Chant Nam Myoho What Greater Joy

Happiness in This World

68186T There is no actual happiness for human beings other than chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, and this is the only way to find it. According to the sutra, “… where living creatures are at peace and enjoy themselves.” 1How could this verse be anything other than a celebration of the unbounded joy of the Law? Surely, you are one of the “living creatures” that have been mentioned. “Where” refers toJambudvpa, and Japan is located withinJambudvpa’s borders. Is it possible that “enjoy themselves at rest” could indicate anything other than that our bodies and brains, as well as our lives and surrounds, are entities of three thousand worlds in a single moment of existence, as well as Buddhas of unending joy?

The phrase “peace and security in their present life and favorable conditions in their future existences” refers to this type of situation.

No one, not even the wisest or most deserving, can avoid difficulties.

Suffer what has to be suffered, and relish what needs to be cherished.

This couldn’t possibly be anything else than the unlimited delight of the Law.

With the greatest of regard, Nichiren A cyclical signhinoe-ne was born on this day, the twenty-seventh day of the sixth month in the second year of Kenji (1276).

Background

NichirenDaishoninforewarned Shij Kingo, a dedicated samurai disciple who was an early convert, in the third month of 1275, almost one year before this letter was written, that as a practitioner of the Lotus Sutra, he should be prepared to face further obstacles and sufferings. The Daishonin provides an explanation of the nature of real happiness in the current work. He believes it is found in the chanting of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. “Regard both pain and joy as truths of life,” he continues, advising Shij Kingo to “continue chanting682Nam-myo-renge-kyo, no matter what occurs,” despite the fact that he is suffering.

Notes

He cautioned Shij Kingo, a dedicated samurai disciple who was an early convert to the Lotus Sutra, in the third month of 1275, almost one year before this letter was sent, that as a practitioner of theLotus Sutra, he would face more obstacles and trials. The Daishonin provides an explanation of the nature of real happiness in the current piece. He claims that chantingNam-myoho-renge-kyo is the key to achieving this state of consciousness. “Regard both pain and joy as truths of life,” he continues, advising Shij Kingo to “continue chanting682Nam-myo-renge-kyo, no matter what occurs,” despite the fact that he has suffered.

There is an emphasis on this in theDaishoninstruction, as it is the only way to experience “the infinite delight of theLaw,” which is also known as Buddhahood.

“Chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo Even Once Contains Limitless Benefit”

The following is an excerpt from SGI President Ikeda’s debate with young leaders, titled Discussions on Youth (pp. 221–23), published in the journal SGI Journal.

Some people feel guilty when they skip reciting the sutra.

Because we have confidence in the Gohonzon, we will not be punished or experience any bad effects as a result of our actions in this regard. Please allow me to set your mind at ease. According to Nichiren Daishonin, chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo even once has innumerable benefits, and repeating it many times has much more.

Then chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo 10 times must contain incredible benefit!

Because we have confidence in the Gohonzon, we will not be punished or experience any bad repercussions as a result of our actions or inactions. Please allow me to set your mind at ease by saying this: According to Nichiren Daishonin, reciting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo even once has many benefits, even if done only once.

Yes, it’s important to keep making efforts, however small, each day. A young women’s high school division leader… said that many of the members in her area find themselves unable to recite the sutra regularly. But all seem to know that when they have problems, they should take them to the Gohonzon and chant about them.

The desire to take one’s place before the Gohonzon is extremely essential in and of itself. Those who have the courage to continue to challenge themselves in this manner deserve the highest level of admiration. You could decide, for example, that “I’m going to recite Nam-myoho-renge-kyo every day, even if it’s only for a few minutes” or “I’m going to chant to the Gohonzon every day” is something you want to do. “Earthly wants are enlightenment,” according to the Buddhist teaching, according to the concept of Karma.

It is normal to believe that one’s earthly goals and one’s enlightenment are distinct and separate—especially given the fact that pain appears to be the polar opposite of bliss.

Because of this, we are surrounded by the light and energy of happiness throughout our lives.

I guess you could say that earthly desires are transformed into enlightenment by Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.

When we chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, all of our worries and sorrows are transformed into energy for our enjoyment, and our progress is fueled by this energy.

So the greater our problems, the happier we stand to become.

Yes, you are correct. People’s lives can be transformed from the most dire suffering to the greatest possible happiness when they have faith in Nichiren Buddhism. Even the most daunting problems can be transformed into opportunities for growth and the building blocks for human greatness when they have faith in this religion. Problems may come in a variety of forms and sizes. A personal problem may be bothering you; you may be wondering how to assist your parents live long and full lives; or you could have concerns for a friend who is unwell, or sad, and desire for that person’s well-being.

These are really worthy causes to be concerned about.

You can change them into life power, greater depth of character, and good fortune by singing this mantra.

Faith entails having objectives and putting up the effort necessary to achieve them. If we think of each objective or problem as a mountain to be climbed, faith becomes a process in which we develop with each mountain we conquer. (page 3)

Nam-myoho-renge-kyo –

Yes, you are correct. Faith in Nichiren Buddhism has the amazing ability to convert people’s lives from the most dreadful suffering to the greatest conceivable happiness, as well as to transform the most intimidating issues into a source of progress and a foundation for humanity’s greatest achievements. It is possible to have problems of varying degrees of severity and complexity. A personal situation may be troubling you; you may be wondering how to assist your parents live long and full lives; or you could have concerns for a friend who is unwell, or sad, and desire for that person’s well-being.

  • Concerns of this caliber are quite admirable.
  • You can change them into life energy, greater depth of character, and good fortune through the practice of chanting.
  • Establishing objectives and working hard to achieve them are essential components of faith.
  • (Second Edition) (p.

Wisdom for Creating Happiness and Peace, Part 1: Happiness; Chapter 3.10

In this extract from The New Human Revolution, the novel’s protagonist Shin’ichi Yamamoto (whose character portrays President Ikeda) is speaking in 1966 to members of the Nichiren Buddhist community in Peru who had just recently begun following the religion of Nichiren. In challenging oneself in a serious way and living according to the Mystic Law, kosen-rufu, and the SGI’s guidelines, those who do so establish the groundwork for eternal pleasure and ultimate triumph in life. I would desire for each and every one of you to achieve such amazing victories.

  1. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the first of these chants.
  2. The chanting of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo enables us to summon an infinite amount of life power.
  3. No matter what occurs, the most essential thing to remember is to keep chanting every day no matter what.
  4. Please recite the booming daimoku in the morning and evening with the dynamic and powerful rhythm of majestic horses racing over the skies as a reminder to yourself and others.
  5. Apart from that, however, we should feel free to express ourselves honestly and immediately to the Gohonzon, no matter what is on our minds.
  6. As a result, we should chant about our wishes, our issues, and our goals in their natural state.
  7. Anything and everything will be heard by the Gohonzon.
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Even the most horrendous sorrows will fade away like the dew of morning and appear to be nothing more than a dream in the end.

Alternatively, we might decide never to make the same mistake again and start over from the beginning.

Furthermore, in the evening, we might cheerfully chant to the Gohonzon, expressing our heartfelt gratitude for the day that has passed.

This indicates that individuals who continue to chant with sincerity are constantly in the company of the Daishonin, the Buddha of the Latter Day of the Law, no matter where they are.

As a result, we may have a deep sense of security from the depths of our being, and we can be free of any and all fear.

Suffering is transformed into joy, and joy is transformed into even greater bliss when you chant.

This is the quickest and most direct route to happiness. From the chapter “Pioneering New Frontiers” in volume 11 of The New Human Revolution.

Wait… Buddhists chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo twice a day?

President Ikeda’s character, Shinichi Yamamoto, speaks in 1966 to members of the Nichiren Buddhist community in Peru who had just recently begun studying Nichiren Buddhism, according to this passage from the novel The New Human Revolution. Whoever challenges himself or herself in a serious manner, aligning their lives with the Mystic Law, kosen-rufu, and the SGI, lays the groundwork for eternal enjoyment and ultimate triumph in life. That is what I want for everyone of you to become great victorious individuals.

  1. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the first chant to be performed.
  2. We may call forth an unlimited amount of life power by chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.
  3. No matter what occurs, the most essential thing to remember is to keep repeating every day of your life.
  4. If you can, please say the thunderous daimoku in the morning and evening to the vivid and powerful rhythm of beautiful horses racing across the skies every morning and evening.
  5. We should, on the other hand, be able to communicate ourselves honestly and immediately to the Gohonzon if we do not want to be judged.
  6. So we should express our wants, our worries, and our aspirations in their natural form via chanting.
  7. In all situations, the Gohonzon will “listen.” Let us chant as if we were having a discussion with each other, confiding our deepest thoughts to one another.

If, for example, we know that we have done something wrong, we should offer sincere prayers of remorse and humbly reflect on our actions and attitudes.

We can also vow to win when faced with a difficult situation and chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo with the might of a lion’s roar or the ferocity of an anasurademon, as if we were about to shake the entire cosmos with our resolve.

Nichiren Daishonin quotes the lines “Dawn after morning we rise up with the Buddha, evening after evening we lie down with the Buddha” from The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, which may be found here (OTT, 83).

Not only does this hold true for this lifetime, but it also holds true throughout the afterlife, with the Daishonin and all celestial deities across the cosmos offering their protection to humanity.

The rest of our lives may be spent enjoying and living them to the fullest.

Because of this, it is critical that we continue to recite Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, no matter how joyful or sad we are feeling or whether we are experiencing good or bad events.

This is the quickest and most direct route to joy. Taken from the chapter “Pioneering New Frontiers” in the book The New Human Revolution (vol. 11).

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Gongyo Practice — Myosetsuji Temple —- Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism

Please take a minute to acquaint yourself with the material provided below before you begin practicing the recitation of Gongyo. Thank you. This is a welcome letter to new members from Reverend Shinga Takikawa, Chief Priest of the Nichiren Shoshu Myosetsuji Temple in Tokyo, Japan. Greetings, New Member: When you begin your daily practice of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism and incorporate it into your everyday life, we extend our warmest greetings to you. You have made a significant step forward on your journey towards a lovely new life.

  • Furthermore, a life equipped with the wisdom and capacity to transform any poison into medicine.
  • Please keep in touch with your sponsor and make an effort to grow in your faith on a daily basis.
  • Apart from that, we have meetings and events all across the Northeastern United States, Trinidad & Tobago, and Eastern Canada.
  • Morning and evening performances are scheduled.
  • It is also required in order for us to receive the Gohonzon, which was delivered to us by High Priest Nichinyo Shonin for our daily practice.
  • Chanting to the Gohonzon allows us to unite our lives with the life of the Buddha via the power of chanting.
  • Gongyo practice is explained in detail in the next section, which also includes slow audio recordings of Gongyo performed by a Nichiren Shoshu priest.

By engaging in daily practice of reciting the Liturgy of Nichiren Shoshu (part of the 2nd and entire 16th chapters of the Lotus Sutra) and chanting Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo to the Gohonzon, attending the monthly Oko Ceremony where we repay our debt of gratitude to the Three Treasures of True Buddhism, and by sharing this Buddhism with your friends and family, you will unquestionably be able to create an indestructible life condition A practice like this, however, is difficult to keep up throughout our lives.

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In his “Reply to Lord Ueno,” our founder, Nichiren Daishonin, writes: “Those with faith like flowing water always persevere in their practice of the Lotus Sutra, never abandoning their faith.” Because you continue to come to see me, regardless of your circumstances, it might be stated that your faith resembles flowing water in its simplicity and strength.

  1. Allow me to express my heartfelt welcome and congratulations on your decision to become a member of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism once more.
  2. Gongyo’s Importance in Japanese Culture The most essential importance of Gongyo in Nichiren Shoshu may be found in the names and meanings of the actual phrases of the Silent Prayers, which are the most important part of the Silent Prayers.
  3. The Second Prayer is an offering to the Shoten Zenjin.
  4. In order to make an offering to the Treasure of the Buddha, Nichiren Daishonin, and the Treasure of the Priest Nikko Shonin, Nichimoku Shonin, and all of the other consecutive High Priests of Nichiren Shoshu, we perform the Third Prayer.
  5. When we pray the Fifth Prayer, we begin with prayers for our departed ancestors, working our way down the line to include our dads, mothers, brothers, and sisters, and ending with petitions for the salvation of all existence.
  6. We give the Second and Third Prayers in order to express our thanks to the Three Treasures for all that they have done for us.
  7. It is believed that the Fifth Prayer corresponds to our paying back our debt of gratitude to our parents, ancestors, and, again, to all of existence.

It serves as the foundation of faith for the one and only genuinely meaningful practice in the era of Mappo, according to the Buddha’s teachings.

Gongyo is the source and generating power that enables us to achieve Buddhahood via our efforts.

Gongyo is extremely significant in this regard.

During Gongyo, one’s attitude and posture are important.

Depending on your preference, you can sit in the traditional Japanese “seiza” manner, cross-legged in the western way, or in a chair.

As a result, one should maintain a straight posture when praying, placing the right and left hands together in the center of the chest and both elbows equally on the sides of the body.

It is not acceptable to sit in such unprofessional ways as sitting awry, with legs crossed, or the likes.

One should chant loudly and clearly, pronouncing each word syllable and letter with clarity and precision.

There are moments when one experiences strange or disturbed thoughts when doing Gongyo (meditation).

Instead, we should be filled with strong conviction that if we follow this Buddhist training to this magnificent Gohonzon with perfect trust, we will all be able to manifest the greatest of blessings in our lives.

The Gongyo ritual is performed twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening, as a common practice.

Guide to Proper Pronunciation Here is a guide on pronouncing Japanese words correctly.

as is indicated by the Spanish word Ricardo “h” is always pronounced—take notice of the distinction between yaku and hyaku.

The elision of two words or syllables is indicated by the symbol, e.g., on page 1, “butsu chi-e” is an elision of “butsu chi-e,” and so on.

In the rhythm of Gongyo, there will normally be one Chinese character each beat, with the following exceptions: shari – hotsu – shari (two beats) hara – mitsu is a Japanese expression that means “the hare and the mitsu” (two beats) shaka – muni – butsu (shaka – muni – butsu) (three beats) p.22 of shigi (one beat) Because each syllable or combination of syllables represents a word or phrase that has profound significance, mispronunciation of a word will cause the meaning of the sutra to be altered significantly.

  1. As a result, each syllable should be uttered independently and clearly throughout the sentence.
  2. These instructions are meant to serve as general suggestions.
  3. How to perform Gongyo Gongyo is a set of prayers that are said in succession.
  4. Only the second, third, and fifth prayers should be recited in the evening.
  5. p.
  6. 22-31, p.
  7. Silent Prayers, pp.
  8. The following is the sequence of recitation.
  9. Face east, chant three times the Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo mantra, bow, and recite Part A.
  10. After the third recitation, take a bow.

Repeat three times the extended Daimoku (Hiki-Daimoku, which is pronounced Namu-Myoho-Renge-Kyo, which means chant Namu, breath, chant Myoho-Renge-Kyo, Namu, breath, chant Myoho-Renge-Kyo, Namu, breath, chant Myoho-Renge-Kyo, Namu, breath, chant Myoho- Bow, recite three times the Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo mantra, and then give the first Silent Prayer while still bowed.

  • Second Psalm (Prayer No.
  • Part A is spoken, and the bell is rung three times.
  • After ringing the bell five times and chanting three times Nam-Myoho-Renge-­Kyo, bow and give the second Silent Prayer.
  • (The locations mentioned for bowing in the first prayer are the identical for the next four prayers as well.
  • To begin, ring the bell and repeat the first two lines of part B, omitting the remainder of part B and beginning with part C.
  • The Fourteenth Prayer Part A is spoken after the bell is rung.
  • Chant three lengthy Daimoku and then the bell three times.
  • The Fifth Invocation Part A is spoken after the bell is rung.
  • While commencing the recitation of the Daimoku, ring the bell seven times in succession (Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo).

Then, with your head down, say the fifth Silent Prayer, which is the mantra Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo three times. To complete Gongyo, ring the bell three times and bow three times before singing Nam Myoho-Renge-Kyo three times.

Brim with the Great Joy of the Bodhisattvas of the Earth

Please take a time to acquaint yourself with the material provided below before beginning to practice the recitation of Gongyo. This is a welcome letter to new members from Reverend Shinga Takikawa, Chief Priest of the Nichiren Shoshu Myosetsuji Temple in Tokyo. Greetings, newcomer! When you begin your daily practice of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism and incorporate it into your daily life, we extend our warmest greetings to you. Taking this step forward will pave the way for a fantastic new life. In whatever situation you find yourself in, you should live a life full with joy.

  1. In the process of sharing our joy with others, we will work together to bring genuine peace and pleasure to this difficult planet.
  2. It is always possible to speak with the priests of Myosetsuji Temple about any issues you may have, and your fellow believers would be delighted to assist you in your Buddhist practice and to share their spiritual experiences with you as well.
  3. On this page (), you may see a monthly calendar summarizing our events for each month.
  4. Furthermore, it is a need for obtaining the Gohonzon, which was given to us by High Priest Nichinyo Shonin for daily practice.
  5. Our lives become more integrated with the Buddha’s by chanting to his Gohonzon (goddess of wisdom).
  6. Gongyo practice is explained in detail in the next section, which also includes slow audio recordings of Gongyo recorded by a Nichiren Shoshu priest as well as a how-to instruction.

Through your daily practice of reciting the Liturgy of Nichiren Shoshu (part of the 2nd and entire 16th chapters of the Lotus Sutra) and chanting Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo to the Gohonzon, attending the monthly Oko Ceremony where we repay our debt of gratitude to the Three Treasures of True Buddhism, and by sharing this Buddhism with your friends and family, you will undoubtedly be able to create an indestructible life condition of happiness and A practice of this nature, however, is difficult to continue throughout our lives.

  • It is said in the “Reply to Lord Ueno” by our founder, Nichiren Daishonin, that those who have faith like flowing water continually continue in their practice of the Lotus Sutra, never abandoning their trust.
  • This is deserving of my sincere admiration and gratitude.
  • Sincerely, Deputy Chief Priest of Myosetsuji Temple, Reverend Shinga Takikawa.
  • The First Prayer is a gift to the Shoten Zenjin, who are fed by the taste of the Law of Myoho-Renge-Kyo, which is expressed in the Law of Myoho-Renge-Kyo.
  • In order to make an offering to the Treasure of the Buddha, Nichiren Daishonin, and the Treasure of the Priest Nikko Shonin, Nichimoku Shonin, and all of the other consecutive High Priests of Nichiren Shoshu, we perform the Third Prayer every year.
  • When we pray the Fifth Prayer, we begin with petitions for our departed ancestors, working our way down the line to include our dads, mothers, brothers, and sisters, and concluding with prayers for the salvation of all creation.
  • Second and Third Prayers are offered in order to reward the Three Treasures for their kindness and generosity.
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With the Fifth Prayer, we are repaid for our debt of gratitude to our parents, ancestors and, once again, to all of creation.

It serves as the foundation of faith for the one and only genuinely meaningful practice in the era of Mappo, according to the Buddha’s teachings on the subject.

Gongyo is the source and generating power that enables us to achieve Buddhahood via practice.

The significance of Gongyo may be seen in this statement.

Gongyo is characterized by a positive attitude and posture.

Depending on the occasion, one may choose to sit in the traditional Japanese “seiza” manner, cross-legged in the western way, or in a chair, among other positions.

One should then sit up straight, with both hands joined centrally on the chest in prayer, and both elbows equally on the sides of the body, as if one were to read a book.

Sitting in such unprofessional ways as sitting askew, with legs crossed, or the like is not acceptable in formal settings.

Ideally, one should chant loudly and clearly, pronouncing each word and letter with clarity.

Gongyo is a period of time during which one may experience erratic or distracted thoughts.

Instead, we should be filled with strong conviction that if we follow this Buddhist training to this beautiful Gohonzon with perfect trust, we will all be able to produce the greatest of advantages in our lives.

Gongyo is performed twice daily, once in the morning and once in the evening, as a common practice.

Instructions on Proper Pronunciation For those of you who are unfamiliar with Japanese pronunciation, here is a guide.

When two words or syllables are omitted, the symbol,, is used to denote this; for example, on page 1, “butsu chi-e” is omitted in place of “butsu.” “bud” rai is pronounced similarly to the first syllable of the term “Buddha,” except that “d” is cut short on page 22, at the start of section “Jigage.” The first syllable of the elided word is pronounced like the first syllable of “Buddha,” except that the “d” is clipped short.

  1. Using hyphens, you may separate words into syllables that are one beat apart in the beat cycle.
  2. In order to do this, each syllable must be uttered individually and clearly.
  3. Guidelines are provided in the following instructions.
  4. Gongyo Techniques Explained An entire series of prayers is included in Gongyo.
  5. Only the second, third, and fifth prayers should be recited in the evenings.
  6. Page 1 to 4 of the Hoben chapter, including an explanation of the term “adventure.” On pages 5-22 of the Juryo chapter, there is a part called Chogyo (prose).
  7. 22-31, Jigage or poem part of the Juryo chapter.
  8. There are three times when the section of part A from ” Sho-i sho-ho” to ” nyo ze hon-maku-kyo to ” is repeated.
  9. The title of the Juryo chapter (first two lines of part B) should be read aloud, but the rest of part B should be skipped.

Repeat three times the extended Daimoku (Hiki-Daimoku, which is pronounced Namu-Myoho-Renge-Kyo, which means chant Namu, breathe, sing Myoho-Renge-Kyo, Namu, breath, chant Myoho-Renge-Kyo, Namu, breath, chant Myoho-Renge-Kyo, Namu, breath, chant Myoho- Then, while still bent, say the first Silent Prayer, chanting the mantra Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo three times.

  1. ) Praying for the Second Time Face the Gohonzon, then ring the bell seven times to signal your intent to attack.
  2. Parts B and C should be spoken, followed by three lengthy Daimoku chants and a bowing motion to finish.
  3. In the first prayer, the bowing points are the same as they are in the next four prayers.) Unless otherwise specified in the fifth prayer, the number of times the bell shall be rung is always the same as specified above.
  4. Recite section A once the bell rings.
  5. Sound the bell, then repeat the first two lines of part C.
  6. Prayer number four.
  7. Then ring the bell three times, repeat the first two lines of part B, omit the remainder of B, and recite part C.
  8. Then ring the bell three times more and give the fourth Silent Prayer.
  9. Recite section A once the bell rings.
  10. While starting the chanting of Daimoku, ring the bell seven times (Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo).

Three more times, say Nam-Myoho­Renge-Kyo aloud, and then lower your head to give the fifth Silent Prayer. To complete Gongyo, ring the bell three times and bow three times before singing Nam Myoho-Renge-Kyo.

Chant for a Better Life

My name is Anukriti Verma, and I am a proud member of the Soka Youth. Today, I’m standing here to discuss my personal human revolution that has occurred over the course of the past ten years of my practice. My father, a mechanical engineer, made the decision to go to the Middle East in 2003 in order to find employment. My mother resigned from her permanent teaching position at the end of the year… When we change, the world around us changes as well. We must first and foremost reform ourselves on an internal level, which includes changing our hearts and thoughts.

Hello, my name is Nalini Prakash.

I can’t even fathom what my life would be like without this exercise.

More “Please allow me to personally feel the power of this prayer – not just for my own benefit, but also so that I might encourage others.” My name is David, and I’d want to relate some of the experiences I had throughout the formative years of my life.

He worked as a carpenter in the city.

Since then, I have reaped several benefits from this practice in my personal and professional life.

My name is Mamta Mehta, and ever since I became a member of this faith, I have built my life around the passage above, which is taken from the chapter Winter Always Turns to Spring, which is found in a Nichiren Daishonin’s Gosho.

Because of my husband’s…More According to the Lotus Sutra, those who believe in it are as if they are in the winter, yet winter always transforms into spring.

Today, I’d want to tell my own journey to becoming a disciple of Nichiren Daishonin’s Buddhism and the magnificent life philosophy that he embodies.

Do not give up hope.

My sister, Rounak Damani, introduced me to this magnificent concept four months ago, and I’ve been following it ever since.

When I was in that situation, I was dealing with financial, professional, and interpersonal difficulties.

I divide my life into two sections: the first covers the period up to August 2006, and the second covers the period following December 2006.

Life was a mathematical calculation that I could never figure out.

In me, there was a huge amount of desire for progress and for reaching achievement.

My life appeared to be ideal at the time.

I was just preoccupied with my daily routine, which included putting in long hours at the workplace, acquiring new skills, and taking on new challenges.

Greetings, Sensei.

I hope you will accept my report. My name is Winnie Tay, and I am from Singapore. I began chanting on the 21st of January, 2013. When one considers the year 2011,…More Accepting responsibility for my actions

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