Chant To Do When Givig Lei To Someone Hawaiian

Songs about Leis

Over the years, a plethora of songs about leis have been written. The beauty and history that lie behind the ritual of wearing a lei have been immortalized in song several times throughout the years. Here are some of the songs that are dedicated to the Hawaiian lei. Aloha — Albert Nahale’a Hli’ilua The beauty of the lei, as well as the grandeur of Hawaii’s natural scenery, are both celebrated in this song. Alice Ku’uleia’s Hanohano No ‘O Hawai’i (Hanohano No ‘O Hawai’i) Nmakelua Nmakelua Nmakelua Nmakelua Nmakelua The grandeur and majesty of Hawaii’s Mauna Kea are captured in this brief song about the maile lei, which is a traditional Hawaiian flower lei.

Bright is a Hawaiian cowboy who was born in the United States.

Hanohano Hawai’i – Traditional Hawai’ian dress This straightforward song relates the story of the numerous Hawaiian islands and the lei that each is famous for.

This song is about love, beauty, and the significance of the lei in Hawaiian culture.

  1. This wonderful song makes mention of various locations in the Hawaiian islands, as well as the pleasant scent of flowers.
  2. Sam Li’a Kalainaina, Srpoem .’s Heha Waipi’o is a work of fiction.
  3. Hello, my name is Hi’ilawe and I am from Hawaii.
  4. In this charming story, the lei reflects both of these things.
  5. In this song, the rain, lovely leis, and the waves of Hawaii are all the main points of interest.
  6. This song about the town of Hilo features the town’s friendly residents and the lei that they are wearing.
  7. King.

Ao Hilo – Alice Kuuleialohapoina’ole Namakelua is a member of the ‘I’iwi a’o Hilo tribe.

Mr.

Ka Lei E – A traditional Hawaiian greeting This upbeat lei song features a variety of leis produced from various sorts of flowers, all of which are described in detail.

This love ballad is about leis, love, and the pleasant aroma of native flowers, all of which are mentioned.

BugbeeIrmgard ‘Aluli BugbeeIrmgard ‘Aluli BugbeeIrmgard ‘Aluli The thrill of dancing, as well as the leis worn by the dancers, are described in this song about dancing.

Ku’u Lei Lehua is the Hawaiian name for Charles E.

It is the maile lei that is mentioned in this charming love ballad that compares a loving lover to a lei.

Peter Kalani is a musician from Hawaii.

Greetings and salutations, Lei Makamae – Charles E.

Wear A Lei – K.

This straightforward song is a celebration of the numerous sorts of leis that may be found.

Lehua, roses, and other flowers are mentioned in this song, which celebrates the numerous islands of the Hawaiian Islands and the various varieties of leis that are worn on each of them.

This song about being given with a lei is a lighthearted depiction of the camaraderie that might be conveyed by the gift of a lei.

Helen Desha Beamer is the author of Lei O H’ena.

Charles E.

King’s Lei Lehua of Pana’ewa.” This song is about the beauty of a friend, as well as the beauty of the natural environment surrounding her, represented by the lei she wears.

King’s Na Lei O Hawaii (Song of the Islands).

George E.

Na Lei O Hawaii – Na Moku Ewalu (Hawaiian Lei of Hawaii) The emphasis of this song is the Hawaiian islands and the many materials that each island brings to the lei-making process.

(The Four Islands) – J.

Noelani Mähoe (pronounced Noelani Mähoe) is a Hawaiian singer and songwriter.

Poliahu is a work by Frank Kawaikapuokalani Hewett, who was born in Hawaii.

Na Moku O Hawai’i (Lelekowali) is a song written by Charles E.

In this brief song, many places of Hawaii are highlighted, as well as the leis that are most popular in each area.

This brief and charming love song is about a woman who is symbolized by a wreath of flowers in the background.

In this upbeat Hawaiian song, the mountains, cowboys, and the lei of Waimea are all highlighted in various ways.

This brief song is about the flowers, leis, and natural beauty of the Hawaiian island of Waimea.

This ballad tells the story of the plants of Waika and the great band of runners that traveled there to gather them. Pua Ke Aloha – A traditional Hawaiian greeting In this brief song, leis, the flowers that are placed in them, and the love that they signify are all praised.

Hau‘oli Lā Lei

Over the years, many songs have been written about leis and their significance. Numerous songs have been written to celebrate the beauty and history that surround the ritual of wearing a lei. Many of the songs that are dedicated to the lei may be found here…. Aloha, Hli’ilua – Albert Nahale A beautiful lei and a beautiful natural scenery of Hawaii are both celebrated in this song. Alice Ku’uleia is the author of Hanohano No ‘O Hawai’i. In the case of Nmakelua, the name means “Lion of the Sea” or “Lion of the Sea of the Ocean.” Described in this brief song about the maile lei, the beauty and grandeur of Hawaii’s Mauna Kea are captured.

  • Bright is a Hawaiian cowboy who is well-known for his bravery and courage.
  • Hawaii’s traditional way of life (Hanohano Hawai’i).
  • In the Land of the Lei No Kamaile – Keali’i Reichel.
  • Love, beauty, and the significance of the lei are all themes that run through this song.
  • A number of locations in the Hawaiian islands, as well as the fresh scent of flowers, are mentioned in this beautiful song.
  • Sam Li’a Kalainaina, Srpoem .’s Heha Waipi’o was written in response to a request from a reader.
  • Hello, my name is Hi’ilawe and I am from Hawaii.

In this charming story, the lei symbolizes both.

Betty Lou Yuen’s Hilo, Hawaii, is her hometown.

In the Hawaiian language, this is known as Ho’okahi No Pua Lawa (the Law of the Ho’okahi Noesis).

In the heart of Hilo is Alice Ku’uleialohapoina’ole Namakelua, who is known as the “I’iwi of the Valley of the Temples.” Throughout this song, which celebrates the beauty of a balmy Hawaiian evening, the lehua flower and the sounds of birdsong are referenced.

Dennis Kamakahi is known as Huallai in the Hawaiian language.

The traditional Hawaiian greeting, Ka Lei E.

By Solomon Hiram, the song “Ka Moa’e” was written.

Thelma Sproat sings Ka Waimea Swing.

The delight of dancing, as well as the leis worn by the dancers, are described in this dance tune.

Give a lei to a valued family member in this brief, upbeat song about the Hawaiian tradition.

King was known as Ku’u Lei Lehua (King of the Hawaiian Islands).

Elizabeth Peters Tuttle is the author of Ku’u Pua Lehua (King of the Wind).

In this song on making a lei, the usage of maile and flowers is described.

— Charles E.

It is compared to a gorgeous lei in this wedding song, which is about the individual who is getting married.

Holi for the song “Lei E, Wear A Lei.” Wearing many sorts of leis is celebrated in this straightforward song.

Among the flowers mentioned in this song, which celebrates the several Hawaiian islands and the various varieties of leis that are worn on each, are lehua, roses, and other blooming flowers.

Helen Desha Beamer, as Lei O H’ena, is a Hawaiian singer and songwriter who lives in Hawaii.

Charles E.

King’s Lei Lehua of Pana’ewa” in Hawaiian.

Song of the Islands – Charles E.

George E.

This wonderful song describes the many different types of ornamental leis, as well as their smells and colors.

It is an interesting look at the various products that are used to produce leis.

Kealoha, N Moku ‘Ehi (The Four Islands).

It is detailed in this wonderful song, which tells of the different leis that have come from each of the four islands that are named.

A number of legends and religious personalities are addressed in this intriguing song, which also speaks about love and grief, as well as of the use of the lei.

King Na Moku O Hawai’i (Hawaiian National Anthem) It is said in this brief song that several places of Hawaii, together with their respective favorite lei, are discussed.

When a woman is symbolized by a wreath of flowers, this brief and charming love song is about her.

In this upbeat Hawaiian song, the mountains, cowboys, and the lei of Waimea are all addressed.

Flower leis and the beauty of Waimea are featured in this little song.

John Spencer is the leader of Waika. This ballad tells the story of the flora of Waika, as well as the great band of runners that traveled there. Traditional Hawaiian greeting – Pua Ke Aloha This brief song is dedicated to leis, the flowers that adorn them, and the love that they symbolize.

  • Hawai’i island has scarlet lehua
  • Maui has pink roselani
  • O’ahu has yellow ‘ilima
  • Moloka’i has green kukui
  • And the Hawaiian islands have a variety of flowers. Lna’i – orange kauna’oa
  • Lna’i – orange kauna’oa The islands of Kaho’olawe have gray hinahina, Kaua’i has purple mokihana, and Ni’ihau has white pp.

Today, the celebration of lei day is connected with the free Brothers Cazimero concert at Kapi’olani Park, lei-making competitions, and school performances, with courts of kings and queens from each island participating in the festivities. In a speech delivered in 2001, Hawai’i Senator Daniel Kahikina Akaka dubbed May Day “Lei Day” in order to encourage random acts of kindness and the spreading of the Aloha spirit, which is best demonstrated by the hospitality and inclusion displayed by Native Hawaiians.

  1. This melee was held in memory of Hi’iakaikapoliopele, who traveled throughout N Kai ‘Ewalu to participate (the eight channels).
  2. Ka’ula o ke kai ke lei maila o ke kai In the name of Niihau, I offer you my heartfelt greetings.
  3. If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected] or [phone number].
  4. No ka lua na na na na na “I’m going to KlaueaUa,” I say.
  5. The Inuwai wind has dried up the land.
  6. From Naue the pandanus to Puna the lady, the story begins.
  7. Make your feelings known.
  8. The maile lei, which is arguably the most well-known lei, is given out on special events like as weddings and graduations.
  9. Haku lei are frequently presented to expectant mothers since it is considered bad luck to wear a closed lei or necklace.

Other notable tidbits….

Today, the celebration of lei day is connected with the free Brothers Cazimero concert at Kapi’olani Park, lei-making competitions, and school performances, with courts of kings and queens from each island participating in the tournament. In a speech delivered in 2001, Hawai’i Senator Daniel Kahikina Akaka dubbed May Day “Lei Day” in order to encourage random acts of kindness and the spreading of the Aloha spirit, which is best illustrated by the hospitality and inclusion demonstrated by the Native Hawaiian people.

  1. This melee was held in memory of Hi’iakaikapoliopele, who traveled throughout N Kai ‘Ewalu to participate in it (the eight channels).
  2. O Ka’ula o ke kai, Ke lei maila.
  3. It’s a matter of pride for the Inuwai to wear their mlie on their sleeves.
  4. Naue kahala and Punaka wahine are not allowed on the island.
  5. “I’m going to KlaueaUa” In the midst of the stillness, a lei of sea foam is present at Ka’ulaNi’ihau.
  6. Pandanus of Naue is taken from the water and consumed there.
  7. Symbolic of many events, lei – and the plural form of it without a “s” – is also used.
  8. It is common for people to offer a lei composed of fresh flowers to commemorate the loss of a loved one, to celebrate a significant achievement, or to welcome the start of an exciting business.

It is customary to gift haku lei to pregnant women, as wearing a closed lei or necklace is considered bad luck.

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Today, the celebration of lei day is linked with the free Brothers Cazimero concert at Kapi’olani Park, lei-making competitions, and school shows with courts of kings and queens to represent each island. In a speech delivered in 2001, Hawai’i Senator Daniel Kahikina Akaka dubbed May Day “Lei Day” in order to encourage random acts of kindness and the spreading of the Aloha spirit, which is best reflected by the hospitality and inclusion demonstrated by Native Hawaiians. The N Lei o Hawai’i was the first mele to record all of the islands’ symbols, and it was created by Reverend Samuel Kapa of Maui.

  • Other mele and ‘oli that are linked with this fragrant day are as follows: May Day is Lei Day in Hawai’i, and there is a customary lei chant to recite while presenting a lei to someone.
  • It’s a matter of pride for the Inuwai people.
  • There will be no Naue kahala or Punaka wahine.
  • “I’m going to KlaueaUa,” says the volcano.
  • The Inuwai wind has dried out the land.
  • From Naue the pandanus to Puna the lady, the story continues.
  • It should be made public.
  • The maile lei, which is arguably the most well-known lei, is given out on special events like as weddings or graduations.
  • Haku lei are frequently presented to pregnant women since it is considered bad luck to wear a closed lei or necklace when pregnant.
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A Custom of Aloha

With the introduction of tourism to the Hawaiian islands, the lei swiftly rose to prominence as a symbol of the state, attracting millions of tourists from all over the world. A long line of lei merchants lined the pier at Aloha Tower during the “Boat Days” of the early 1900s, preparing to welcome newcomers to the islands and returning natives to their homes on Oahu. Many departing guests were supposed to toss their lei into the water as their ship passed Diamond Head, hoping that, like the lei, they would return to the islands at some point in the future.

Visitors are greeted with a warm “aloha” and adorned with beautiful fresh leis by welcoming greeters. Beginning your Hawaiian trip in this manner is a lovely experience.

Lei Etiquette

When it comes to wearing a Hawaiian lei, there are very few “rules” to follow. Anyone can wear one at any time of day or night; there is no need to wait for a special occasion. If you want to purchase or manufacture a lei for yourself, it is entirely acceptable. It is customary for residents to keep a nut, seed, or shell lei on hand for special events like as weddings or birthdays. In addition, flower, fern, and feather leis are frequently used to embellish headgear. In the event that you are getting a lei for the first time, there are a few “unspoken regulations” that you should be aware of.

As a result, you should always take a lei and never refuse one.

It is considered impolite to take a lei from your neck in the presence of the person who presented it to you, therefore if you must do so, do so discreetly if at all possible.

The wearing of so many leis around one’s neck that one’s vision is impaired is not unusual among graduating seniors.

Lei or Leis?

When it comes to wearing a Hawaiian lei, there are very few “rules.” Nobody has to wait for a special occasion to put on one — everyone may do so at any time of day. If you want to buy or manufacture a lei for yourself, that’s entirely OK. When it comes to special events, it is typical for locals to keep a nut, seed, or shell lei on hand. In addition, flower, fern, and feather leis are frequently used to embellish hats in the Hawaiian tradition. When getting a lei for the first time, there are a handful of “unspoken regulations” that should be kept in mind.

Because of this, never decline a lei; always take it.

Remove a lei from your neck in front of the person who presented it to you; thus, if you must remove it from your neck, do so discreetly.

It is very uncommon for a graduating senior to wear so many leis around their neck that they are unable to see anything!

Lei (garland) – Wikipedia

Alei() is a popular agarlandorwreathcommon in Hawai’i and Polynesia as a greeting. A lei, in a broader sense, is any collection of things that has been strung together with the intention of being worn. Leis of various styles are given as presents to honor people all over the Pacific.

They are offered to visiting dignitaries, graduates, and loved ones who are about to depart, for example. The lei acquired popularity in the United States as a result of the frequent practice of handing out lei to visitors arriving in or departing fromHawaii.

Symbolism

It is usual in Hawai’i and across Polynesia to use the function alei() as a garlandsorwreathcommon. The term “lei” refers to any collection of things that are strung together with the intention of being worn as a headdress. There are many different types of lei that are offered as presents to honor individuals all over the Pacific. They may be given to visiting dignitaries, graduates, or loved ones who are leaving. When visitors arrive or go from Hawai’i, it is customary to present them with a lei, which has acquired popularity in the United States.

Materials

Lei hulu, which is composed of feathers Alei can be made up of a pattern or series of just about anything, but it is most frequently made up of fresh natural greenery such as flowers, leaves, vines, fern fronds, and seeds, among other things. The most usually used flowers are those ofplumerias, tuberoses, carnations, orchids, and pikake, however maileleaves, ferns, and tleaves are also incredibly popular and traditional amonghuladancers, as are ferns and tleaves themselves. Other sorts ofleimay include marine or land shells, fish teeth, bones, feathers, plastic flowers, cloth, paper (including origami and monetary notes), sweets, or anything else that may be strung together in a sequence or pattern and worn as a wreath or necklace, among other things.

Crafting

Made of feathers, the lei hulu. Alei can be made up of a pattern or series of anything, but it is most frequently made up of fresh natural greenery such as flowers, leaves, vines, fern fronds, and seeds, among other things. Flowers such asplumerias, tuberoses, carnations, orchids, and pikake are the most usually utilized, while maileleaves, ferns, and tleaves are also incredibly popular and traditional amonghuladancers. Other sorts ofleimay include marine or land shells, fish teeth, bones, feathers, plastic flowers, cloth, paper (including origami and monetary notes), sweets, or anything that may be strung together in a sequence or pattern and worn as a wreath or a necklace, among others.

Historical context

Leis were initially worn as a sign of respect by ancient Polynesians and certain Asian people as a matter of tradition. Native Hawaiians frequently utilized them to denote their social standing and royal status. They are also worn as a mark of respect for one another and their own gods. It has been shown that the leis that the Native Hawaiians wore were connected to their religion and hula culture. Native Hawaiians, who are of Polynesian descent, brought the practice of lei manufacturing and wearing to the Hawaiian islands with them when they first landed in the islands.

Every year on the first of May, a holiday known as Lei Day is observed to commemorate the act of lei manufacturing as well as the traditions that surround it.

Customs

There are several customs and rituals related with the giving, receiving, wearing, keeping, and disposing of lei, all of which are covered in this article. This practice began during World War II when a hula dancer dared to offer a lei and kiss to a United States soldier, resulting in the establishment of a lei distribution tradition that continues today. Leis have been a significant part of Hawaiian culture up until this day. Hawai’ians traditionally present leis by bowing slightly and elevating the lei over the heart before handing the lei to the receiver, because raising the hands above another’s head and/or touching their face or head are both considered disrespectful.

If a person is unable to wear a lei that has been presented to them owing to allergies or other reasons (for example, a musician who might tangle the lei in their instrument strap), the lei is exhibited in a place of respect, such as the musician’s music stand or microphone stand.

Traditionally, they should be returned to the location where they were gathered, or if that is not feasible, they should be returned to the ground by hanging on a tree, burying, or burning, according on the circumstances.

Many varieties of lei may be dried by hanging them in a window, allowing the natural scent to fill the room as they dry.

Polynesia

It is customary in Hawaii to give and receive lei in a specific way, as well as to wear it, store it, and dispose of it in a specific way. This custom began during World War II when a hula dancer dared to offer a lei and kiss to a United States soldier, resulting in the establishment of a modern-day tradition of lei distribution in Hawaii. Leis have remained a significant part of Hawaiian culture up until this day, according to historians. Because putting the hands over another’s head, or touching the face or head, is considered disrespectful, traditionalists present a lei by bowing slightly and raising it above the heart, enabling the recipient to grasp it.

Those who are unable to wear a lei that has been presented to them (for example, a musician who might tangle the lei in their instrument strap) can have it placed in a place of honor, such as the musician’s music stand or microphone stand, as a token of their appreciation.

In accordance with tradition, they should be returned to the location where they were collected, or if that is not feasible, they should be returned to the ground by hanging in a tree, burying, or burning them.

Most lei may be dried in a window, allowing the space to be filled with the scent of fresh cut flowers and other natural materials. Also common in automobiles is the application of this approach.

Hawaii

President Lyndon Johnson of the United States of America wears a lei while visiting Hawaii. Birthdays, graduations, marriages, funerals, retirement celebrations, and bridal showers are among the most frequent events for which ni lei may be found among Hawai’i locals. When a high school or college graduate is spotted wearing so many n lei that they reach their ears or higher, it is not unusual for them to be a celebrity. Every year on May 1, Hawaiians commemorate ” Lei Day “, which was originally celebrated in 1927 by poet Don Blanding.

In 2008, at the 81st Annual Mayor’s Lei Day Celebration at Kapiolani Park, Honolulu broke the world record for the World’s Longest Lei by displaying the world’s longest lei.

In celebration of Lei Day, all of the major Hawaiian islands put on elaborate pageantry, with each island represented by a distinct type of lei and a specific color.

  • On a visit to Hawaii, President Lyndon Johnson dons a lei to symbolize peace and prosperity. N lei are most commonly seen at birthday celebrations, graduations, weddings, funerals, retirement parties, and bridal showers, among other events in Hawaii that are attended by locals. When a high school or college graduate is spotted wearing so many n lei that they reach their ears or even higher, it is not unusual for them to be questioned. Every year on May 1, Hawaiians commemorate ” Lei Day,” which was established by poet Don Blanding in 1927 and has been celebrated ever since. For a while, Blanding worked as a journalist for the Honolulu Star Bulletin, and he discussed his concept with columnist Grace Tower Warren, who coined the term “May Day is Lei Day.” Ruth and Leonard “Red” Hawk wrote the traditional Hawaiian song “May Day is Lei Day in Hawaii” in 1927. Honolulu broke the world record for the World’s Longest Lei in 2008 at the 81st Annual Mayor’s Lei Day Celebration at Kapiolani Park. Informally, the lei measured 5,336 feet (1,626 meters), which is more than a mile in length. In celebration of Lei Day, all of the major Hawaiian islands put on elaborate pageantry, with each island represented by a particular type of lei and a particular color.

Gallery

  • Vendors of Hawaiian lei in 1901
  • Delegates to the 2017 Pacific Islands Forum
  • The Royal Tongan Wedding in 1976
  • And more.

See also

  • Buddhist prayer beads, Hindu prayer beads, and other similar items. Namaste
  • Phuang malai
  • Mala, which is used in India
  • Malai
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References

  • Featured item in the Los Angeles Times titled “Finding a lei-making class in Hawaii.”

Further reading

  • McDonald, Marie A., et al (1995). The Hawaiian Lei is known as the Ka Lei. Ku Pa’a Publishing, ISBN 978-0-914916-32-1
  • Ku Pa’a Publishing, ISBN 978-0-914916-32-1

External links

  • The History of the Lei
  • Na Lei o Hawai’i
  • The History of the Lei
  • The History of the Lei The Feather Lei, a collection of photographs from Lei Day. This is a narrative written by Cheryl Chee Tsutsumi on the art of manufacturing feather lei in Hawaii. Published in the November/December 2009 issue of Maui No Ka ‘Oi Magazine.

Lei of Aloha

In Hawai’i, the gift of a lei may elevate any occasion to a higher level of significance. Whether it’s for love, a celebration, or to commemorate someone, you may choose the one that best represents the feeling you want to send or the one that most meets your personal style and preferences. All of them depict the illustrious history of the lei. The Hawaiian practice of making and presenting lei is celebrated on Lei Day, which falls on May 1. However, many people are unaware that the practice encompasses much more than just the day that is formally designated.

  1. Celebrations and seasonal events are marked with specific lei, which are part of Hawaiian custom.
  2. It is a present for extending a heartfelt welcome to someone.
  3. This gift’s beauty and significance emanate from the giver’s heart.
  4. It was they who brought many of the plants that they required for everyday living — plants for medicinal purposes, plants for sustenance, and plants that they brought for their lovely aroma to be used as a personal adornment — and they were the ones who brought them.
  5. The lei they wore was related with the geography of the location, the religion of the people who lived there, and the hula tradition that they practiced.
  6. The new Native Hawaiians discovered a plethora of other objects, such as hala and maile, that could be fashioned into ornaments for themselves.
  7. Today, lei are still made using the same materials.

The pupu lei was created out of shells, while the hulu manu lei was constructed out of feathers on the island of Oahu.

Other flowers and materials, such as the carnation, the orchid, and the plumeria, were added later on.

Lei and Hula are two of the most beautiful people in the planet.

He grew up on the Hawaiian island of Oahu, where his childhood pastimes and interests were mostly focused on Waikk Beach and athletics.

As a freshman, he not only learned about hula and chanting, but he also gained an understanding of other facets of Hawaiian culture.

They are the owners and operators of “Na Kani O Hula,” a hula implement manufacturing business located out of their house.

In addition to learning about lei-making, he claims, he also learnt about Hawaiian history and culture via hula.

Many of them were connected to Hawaiian folklore and religious practices, according to Kapono.

However, many kapu were suspended during the Makahiki season (October or November through February or March), which coincided with the traditional Hawaiian New Year ceremony in honor of Lono.

Makahiki was a time of peace, gathering, and hula performances that were not restricted by any rules or regulations.

Tradition dictates that, when competing, hula dancers must wear certain lei that correspond to the dance they are performing.

To put it simply, “kinolau” means the divine may be found everywhere, and everything is the divine.

“Hula dancers would gather ferns, such as palapalai, laua’e ferns, and maile, for use as adornments in ceremonial performances and other practices, after first obtaining permission from Laka,” explains Kapono.

“Whatever is in the music, we try to give it the most accurate portrayal we possibly can.” “For example, the crimson blossoms of the ‘ohi’a lehua, which were brought to the islands by the Polynesians immigrants, depict Pele and her sister Hi’iaka.

A lei woven from the aromatic leaves of maile has been used to communicate love, respect, blessings, unwavering commitment, reverence and friendship for hundreds of years.

Lei has a variety of traditional meanings and applications.

This vine was worn around the neck, allowing it to hang freely down to the hips and thighs.

The ilima was the traditional dress for chiefs and members of royal families.

The ti plant has a long history of being put outside dwellings as a deterrent against bad spirits.

A lei was created by stringing together many ti leaves.

Limu kala is a kind of seaweed that has been harvested and utilized in a variety of ways, including for religious purposes, as medicine, for eating, and as a lei in Hawaii.

After then, the sick individual or a kahuna would pray to Kanaloa for healing.

Once the lei had been worn for some time, it would be swept into the sea as a sacrifice to Kanaloa in the hopes of purifying the wearer of his or her illness.

As a result, lei started to be worn for nearly every occasion by both commoners (maka’ainn) and chiefs (ali’i).

What is commonly referred to as a haku lei is in fact a lei po’o that has been made in the haku fashion.

“One thing that hasn’t changed is that offering a lei represents transferring your mana to another person.” Generally speaking, mana is a supernatural force that can be attributed to individuals, spirits, or inanimate objects.

Lei are the archetypal sign of love and aloha, and when we make them, we want to ensure that we are putting the best of our spiritual energy into them, adds Kapono, “so that when we present them to someone, we are giving them positive energy, connection, and love.” According to Kapono, the type of flower used to make a lei and then given as a gift to a loved one has more to do with personal choice and seasonal availability than with meaning.

  • Although the lei worn now are quite similar to those worn in Old Hawai’i when the first Polynesians arrived on the Hawaiian islands, their significance and presentation have evolved through the years as well.
  • Kapono explains that traditionally, it was considered insulting to drape a lei over someone’s head, particularly if that person was a royal representative.
  • “Because, just as lei are created and given with love, they may also be given with ill intentions,” says the author.
  • When Steamer Days or Boat Days first began at Aloha Tower and Honolulu Harbor in the 1840s, tourists were greeted with armloads of lei, a tradition that has continued to this day.
  • When jet jets first appeared on the scene in the 1950s, that specific custom came to an end.
  • Inouye International Airport’s lei stands are strategically placed in the vicinity to facilitate travelers.
  • Although most islanders think that anybody can wear any type of lei for any occasion, Hawaiian custom demands that certain lei be used for specific occasions.

Wearing a lei created from the yellow, orange, and red keys of the pineapple-like hala fruit intertwined with maile leaves or laua’e fern during the start of Makahiki season, the Hawaiian New Year’s celebration, is one example.

When worn at other seasons of the year, it, on the other hand, might bring ill luck to the wearer.

Despite the fact that the offering of a lei carries important symbolic significance, it is up to interpretation by the maker, seller, giver, and recipient.

“There are still some people who feel that giving a closed lei to a pregnant lady is wrong,” adds Kapono.

Lei are frequently described as being formed in a circle to represent love and the circle of family members.

“Whether it’s an heirloom feather lei, a lei pupu that has been passed down from generation to generation, or a lei made from fragrant flowers and beautiful ferns, the joy of gifting and receiving a lei filled with the aloha spirit can brighten anyone’s day — even during the darkest of times.” “A lei filled with the aloha spirit can brighten anyone’s day — even during the darkest of times.” Ku’ulei Ka’ae creates and sells lei out of Pua Melia, a booth near Daniel K.

  1. Inouye International Airport where she lives with her family.
  2. In addition to these ladies, there are descendants of the original Native Hawaiian airport lei salespeople who work here as well.
  3. “Love is the only thing we have to offer in the face of this epidemic.
  4. Inouye International Airport.
  5. “I don’t believe many people know the positive impact a lei can have on someone’s life.

It doesn’t matter if the flower is a pikake or a plumeria or a ginger or a pakalana or a double tuberose; the donor must adore the flower since it is both a symbol and an extension of their affection for the recipient.” Ku’ulei’s ancestors began selling lei four generations ago, with her great-grandparents as the first customers.

  1. In addition to a 1932 Ford vehicle that her husband customized with hooks to hang the lei on, their daughter, Sophia Ventura, was also Ku’ulei’s maternal grandmother.
  2. She was then offered to open a shop at the entrance road to the former Aeronautics Aviation Airport, which she accepted.
  3. The first people to open their doors in this new facility were my mother and myself, she recalls.
  4. The ladies that sell lei at this place are descended from the first Native Hawaiian airport lei merchants who first set up shop in the area.
  5. I only ever received a lei when my mother brought home a plumeria lei on Mother’s Day when I was growing up.
  6. I inquired as to why I couldn’t have a double carnation lei or a pikake, which my mother explained.
  7. ‘One day you will see what I mean.’ The idea was that when you get a lei, it is given out of the goodness of your heart.

When you are younger, you do not really comprehend the significance and complexity of the situation.” She also sent me a double carnation when I was in ninth school, which I remember fondly.

I wore it to school, which was convenient.

It didn’t come from the bottom of my mother’s heart.

How I wanted I had that plumeria lei, since it would have meant the world to me!

“The most beautiful lei is one that is given from the heart.

“Hawaiian lei have become famous across the world for their exquisite beauty and scent.

“Our goal is to wrap a lei of peace and aloha around the entire world,” he says.

Honoring Hawaii’s Lei on May Day

When travelers arrive at the airport in Hawaii, they are greeted with a lei*, a traditional flower arrangement. However, the practice of exchanging and wearing lei dates back to before Hawaiian Airlines’ first commercial flight in Hawaii, a single-engine, six-seat Bellanca Pacemaker, took off in 1929. In Hawaii, leis are used to commemorate almost every occasion, from birth to death, as a way of greeting and saying goodbye, and to express honor and joy. Birthdays and weddings are two of the most important days of a person’s life.

  1. Graduation.
  2. The first of the year.
  3. Leis are ideal for every setting, including the house, the beach, and the business.
  4. And, of course, on Lei Day, which is celebrated annually.
  5. This is how the inaugural “May Day is Lei Day” was celebrated on May 1, 1928, which happened to be the same year that Hawaiian Airlines’ first plane was being built.
  6. A lei can be worn around any part of the body that can be encircled, including the neck, hands, and ankles, as well as the top of the head and a hat.
  7. From a lei composed of a single type of flower to a lei that incorporates a variety of diverse aspects, there is something for everyone.

Flowers, feathers, and other such things.

Even the bone and teeth of certain animals were used as currency in the past.

Think about it: a lei is like having someone’s arms wrapped around your shoulders in a warm, loving embrace.

In Puni Patrick’s opinion, “I’m not sure how many people actually grasp how crucial lei are to hula.” Puni is a hula instructor at the Kauai Museum on the Hawaiian island of Kauai.

“Whenever we have a performance, we join up with a hula sister and assist each other in tying on our lei,” she explains, adding that there is a specificoli, or chant, that is spoken during the procedure.

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” A large part of preparing for a performance is doing this.” Thus, the underlying meaning of lei is revealed, as illustrated in this lovely metaphor proposed by Puni.

And it is for this reason that it is regarded customary etiquette to never decline a lei or to remove it quickly, as doing so interrupts the flow of the gift itself.

The style and materials of the lei are carefully selected based on a variety of considerations.

For that song, I would wear a lei made ofohi lehua, because the flower is well-known on Hawai’i Island, the island’s characteristic color is red, and the flower is considered feminine.

In a similar vein, wearing a lei made of pikake for a song composed by Robert Cazimero would be perfectly suitable because of his well-known affection for the jasmine flower.

When doing more traditional hula, also known as askahiko, it is vital to pay homage to Laka, also known as the goddess of hula, as well as the surrounding environment.

), the lama tree (Diospyroa sandwicensis), and the maile vine (Vinca minor) (Alyxia oliviformis).

According to Puni, “you take on the identity of Laka, and by donning her lei, you promise to dance her poetry.” Making a lei is much more than just selecting the appropriate materials.

Puni claims that the more traditional procedures arepili, which is wrapping, andhaku, which is braiding, among others.

Askui is the term used to describe this kind of lei-making.

In the case of those who make lei for a variety of reasons, such as greeting a loved one at the airport, performing in a hula competition, or participating in one of the many lei-making competitions that take place on Lei Day, the effort of gathering the necessary materials can take several days of traipsing through the forest.

  • Puni and her hula sisters “volunteer with Hui O Laka to assist in the removal of invasive species and the establishment of native plant communities.” Just as essential as the creation and donning of lei is the way in which one’s lei is treated on a day-to-day basis or after a performance.
  • A lei denotes love, and you wouldn’t want to throw away anything as precious as love.
  • In an ideal situation, lei would be returned to their place of origin.
  • “In this way, the petals fall off and fertilize the ground.” A fragrant lei can be set on a nightstand or hung in a window to dry, enabling its fragrance to permeate the whole room.
  • “It’s amazing to be able to pass a lei on to someone else,” Puni adds.
  • All of this mana is being contributed, whether it’s yours, the maker’s, or someone else’s.
  • “When someone presents you with a lei, people are very open to accepting it.
  • “It is an offer that cannot be denied.” Whether worn for hula or presented as a welcome or departure gift, lei all have one thing in common: they symbolise love.

Its precise translation may be “Love is worn like a wreath through the summers and winters,” but its true message is pretty simple: love is eternal. In Hawaiian, the word lei is pronounced the same way in both the single and plural forms—lei.

Nā Lei: A Unique Hawaiian Custom

Polynesians celebrated their gods all throughout the South Pacific by twining greens into wreaths and decorating their bodies with strings of flowers and vines to symbolize their devotion. Lei making in Hawaii dates back to the advent of the Polynesians voyagers, who embarked on an epic trek from Tahiti, navigating by the stars in sailing canoes, to arrive at the Hawaiian islands. The practice of wearing lei in the Hawaiian Islands began with the arrival of these early immigrants.

History of Nā Lei

The types of lei made in Polynesia and Hawaii were very similar; N lei (plural for lei) were made from a variety of materials including flowers, leaves, shells, seeds, nuts, feathers, and even the bones and teeth of animals. N lei (plural for lei) were made from flowers, leaves, shells, seeds, nuts, feathers, and even the bones and teeth of animals. Ancient Hawaiians wore the lei to beautify themselves and distinguish themselves from other people, according to Hawaiian tradition. Historical accounts suggest the maile lei was the most notable of these symbols.

The Ali’i would symbolically intertwine the green maile vine in a Heiau (temple), and the completion of the intertwining would officially create peace between the two clans.

At Aloha Tower, during the boat days of ancient Hawaii, lei merchants lined the pier as malihini (visitors) arrived for their first visit to the islands, as well as kamaaina (locals) returning home.

“Every flower on the islands has a distinct meaning,” says master lei maker Barbara Meheula.

A Custom of Aloha

When it comes to wearing a lei, there are very few “rules” to follow. Anyone may wear one at any time of day or night; there is no need to wait for a specific occasion to do so. Making one or purchasing one is completely permissible, as is purchasing or making one for oneself. In Hawaii, it’s extremely typical to see folks prepared for big events by keeping a candlenut, lei hulu (feather), or kupua (shell) on hand. Hats are frequently ornamented with flowers, ferns, and feather leis, among other things.

  • A lei should be seen as a warmly received expression of one person’s devotion for another.
  • It is customary to gently drape a lei over one’s shoulders, with the ends falling down in the front and rear.
  • This sweet and delicate flower is used to greet guests, but it should never be presented to someone who is ill.
  • Gifting leis is a common tradition at many types of celebrations including birthdays, funerals, marriages, anniversaries, and graduations in Hawaii.
  • Pikake, the flower of romance, is traditionally used to make the bride’s lei, which is soft white and sweet-smelling.
  • Pikake is frequently woven with maile, a pungent-smelling vine-like plant that grows wild in Hawai’i’s rain forests and gives off a strong scent.
  • The material from which a ni lei is made can be anything, however the majority of the time it is made of fresh natural vegetation such as flowers, leaves, vines, and fern fronds.

Shells from the sea and land, nuts, feathers, animal teeth and bones, sweets, and money are all examples of other forms of lei that can be strung together in a sequence or pattern and worn as a lei poo (head lei) or wrapped around the neck.

Learn the Lei Lingo

  • Haku is a 3-ply braiding technique that incorporates extra materials
  • It is a means of braiding a base material, such as softened tree bark, while inserting ornamental greenery into each wrap of the braid. A hili is a braid or plait produced from a single material
  • It is most typically formed from three or more strands of flexible vine or fern that have been braided together. To hilo is to twist or interweave
  • To make a lei, one twists two strands together to form a rope is known as hilo creating. Similarly to a daisy chain, hipuu or Nipuu is a way of knotting the stems of ornamental plant material. It is sewn on a backdrop and each subsequent row of lei material is overlapped on top of the preceding row, giving a scale effect
  • It is also known as Humu/ Humuhumu. Kui is a Japanese word that means to puncture or string with a needle. A fairly typical way for stringing flowers such as plumeria, carnations, roses, and other similar blooms
  • A corkscrew-type twist such as that found in the pig tail is referred to as a wili (winding, twisting, cranking, or coiling). Made by looping fiber around successively shorter lengths of material, this technique is used to make lei. It is traditional to braid a song, and a song made out of passion for an individual is referred to as a lei (cord).

Haku is a three-ply braiding technique that incorporates extra materials; it is a means of braiding a base material, such as softened tree bark, while inserting ornamental greenery into each wrap of the braid. A hili is a braid or plait produced from a single material; it is most typically formed from three or more elastic vine or fern strands braided together. To hilo is to twist or interweave; to make a lei, one twists two strands together to produce a rope is known as hilo. Similarly to a daisy chain, hipuu or Nipuu is a way of knotting the stems of ornamental plant material.

The Japanese word for pierce or string is Kui.

A corkscrew-type twist such as that found in the pig tail is referred to as a wili (to wound, twist, crank, or coil).

The term haku mele means to braid a song; a lei is a song created out of passion for a certain individual.

The Aloha Tradition – The Hawaiian Lei Company

While a few ancient Hawaiian customs have faded from memory, the tradition of lei-giving has managed to subsist and flourish.In the beautiful islands of Hawaii, everyone wears leis.A lei is a common symbol of love, friendship, celebration, honor, or greeting.In other words, it is a symbol of Aloha.Take a walk around Hawaii; you’ll find leis everywhere—graduations, parties, dances, weddings, and yes, even at the office.In Hawaii, any occasion can be considered special and “lei-worthy.”No one can resist the vibrant colors, the intoxicating fragrances, or the beautiful tradition of Hawaii’s most recognized icon…the flower lei.The History of the Lei The custom of the flower lei was introduced to Hawaii from the various surrounding Polynesian islands and even Asia.In ancient Hawaii, wearing a lei represented wealth, royalty, and rank.

Leis were also heavily associated with hula, religion and geography.Most Hawaiians preferred the Maile lei-a leafy vine that has fragrant spicy-sweet leaves that is draped and worn open-ended to the waist.However, royalty and Hawaiian chieftains favored the fiery, vibrant Ilima—a thin orange blossom that requires hundreds of flowers to make a single lei strand.

  • In Hawaii, the names Lehua and Ilima are used, while Maui’s name is Lokelani, Kauai’s name is Mokihana, Moloka’i’s name is Kukui, and Lana’i’s name is Kaunaoa. Niihau’s names are Pupu and Kaho’olawe’s name is Hinahine.

Before the familiar hum of airline jets were heard in the sky, tourist and travelers arrived in Hawaii by boat.Many old Hawaiians retell their stories of “boat days” with fond memories.When the boat would arrive at the dock, it was a social celebration with lei greeters, hula dancers, music, and photographers.A common custom for departing travelers was to toss their leis into the ocean by Diamond Head Crater.A safe return to Hawaii was ensured if their lei drifted to shore.Since May 1, 1928, Hawaii has celebrated every May first as it’s official “Lei Day.”Hawaiians call it “May Day.”The flower lei is celebrated passionately on May Day with Hula, parades, and music.On May Day, most parents request to take a day off of work so they can watch their children participate in May Day festivities and programs at school.

Everyone in Hawaii is encouraged to wear a lei on May Day.Lei Etiquette Leis can be worn, received, or given for almost any occasion.In Hawaii, a lei is given for an office promotion, a birthday, an anniversary, a graduation, or any special event.Yet more notably, a lei can be worn for no other reason than to enjoy the fragrance, take pleasure in the beautiful flowers, or simply, to celebrate the “Aloha Spirit.”There is one big faux pas that should never be made.Never refuse a lei!Always graciously accept the lei with a toothy smile and a kiss on the cheek.(If you don’t feel comfortable with giving or receiving a kiss on the cheek, a warm hug is acceptable!)If you are allergic or sensitive to flowers, then discreetly and apologetically slip-off the lei.It is acceptable and considered a kind gesture to offer the lei to your spouse if you are unable to wear it.Last, but not least, there is one more taboo…it is considered (in Hawaii) impolite to give a closed (tied) lei to a pregnant woman.Many Hawaiians feel that a closed lei around the neck is bad luck for the unborn child.(Head Hakus and open-ended leis are acceptable to give to pregnant woman.)

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