Cops Chant Whose Streets, Out Streets In St Louis

St. Louis officers chant ‘whose streets, our streets’ while arresting protesters

Following a third night of violence and turmoil in St. Louis, around 100 protestors marched in silence through the city’s downtown streets during morning rush hour on Monday. By the time they reached City Hall, the stillness had been broken by cries for justice. Protests have erupted around the city since former police officer Jason Stockley was cleared of charges of killing a black motorist during a police pursuit in 2011. Stockley was acquitted on Friday, sparking widespread outrage. Stockley is a light-skinned Caucasian man.

Officials said that some demonstrators destroyed windows and overturned garbage cans in a concentrated area downtown, while others hurled chemicals and rocks at police, according to officials.

Monday, Mayor Lyda Krewson declared that “after the rally, organizers announced that the daytime protest had come to an end.” ‘However, there was a number of protesters who remained behind, seemingly determined to damage windows and destroy property.’ She refuses to answer any questions from the press.

Adding to the heightened tensions, a St.

  1. In a subsequent tweet, photojournalist David Carson stated that he had contacted with the commander on the scene, who stated that while he had not heard the chant, it was wrong and that he would “deal with it.” The St.
  2. Sunday that “several warnings to disperse” had been issued near the junction of Washington Avenue and North Tucker Boulevard.
  3. However, other demonstrators said that police had surrounded them and that they had no way out.
  4. Louis Post-Dispatch, was caught up in the commotion and tweeted, “Less than 100 of us, including media, are boxed in at wa and Tucker on all four sides.” A short time later, Faulk was one of those that were detained.

During a press conference held overnight Sunday, Interim Police Chief Lawrence O’Toole frequently referred to those detained as “criminals.” According to him, “these offenders who have been apprehended should be held responsible and prosecuted to the greatest extent of the law.” “We have the upper hand.

  • In his speech, he added, “I’m glad to inform you that the city of St.
  • “Those crooks are in jail as of right now.” According to local media, some 1,000 people had assembled outside a downtown police station before dusk and marched peacefully through the city before the sun fell on the day.
  • After some time had passed, the demonstrators were met by police officers equipped in riot gear.
  • In an earlier article published on Sunday, news sources stated that the Department of Justice had decided not to pursue a federal civil rights investigation against former officer Stockley.
  • Stockley, 36, was arrested in May 2016 and charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of 24-year-old Anthony Lamar Smith, who was killed during a police pursuit.
  • Stockley and his partner chased Smith in their car.
  • It was also speculated that Stockley may have placed the firearm inside the car, as it had DNA from both Stockley and the officer, but not Smith’s.

Louis Circuit Court stated in a 30-page order published Friday that he had struggled over his decision. As the trier of fact, he stated that “this Court is just not firmly convinced of the defendant’s guilt.” Protests erupted on the streets of St. Louis nearly immediately after the shooting.

St. Louis Police’s Chants of ‘Whose Streets? Our Streets!’ Once Again Reveal the Warped Mindset Infecting Too Many Departments

On full, alarming display last week in St. Louis was the adversarial “we against them” mindset that plagues many police agencies when it comes to their encounters with people of color. In reaction to protests by members of the community following the acquittal of police officer Jason Stockley in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith, a group of St. Louis police officers screamed, “Whose streets? “These are our streets!” And that’s exactly what happened in one of the nation’s most racially segregated cities, where a zip code separation of only a few miles can mean an 18-year difference in life expectancy.

  1. In order to accomplish this, they appropriated a cry that originated among the very communities of color who have long been disadvantaged and mistreated by our country’s criminal justice, economic, and political institutions.
  2. Please make no mistake about it: the police were delivering a clear and frightening message to communities of color in St.
  3. What matters to us is whether or not members of law enforcement agencies have been implicated in past and present abuses to communities of color.
  4. And this message is being given by not just any police department, but by the most lethal police force in the history of the United States of America.
  5. Louis Metropolitan Police Agency that murders its citizens at a greater rate than any other police department in the country’s top 100 most populous cities, according to a new study.
  6. Louis police department blew an opportunity to create connections with disadvantaged neighborhoods and to consider themselves as extensions of those communities when they chanted a claim of ownership over the city’s streets.
  7. Perhaps even more discouraging is the fact that, in a certain sense, the cops are correct: In many cities, the streets are theirs to use as they like.
  8. Please make no mistake about it: the police were delivering a clear and frightening message to communities of color in St.

Furthermore, rather than demanding progressive reform of harmful police practices, Jeff Sessions’ Department of Justice has exacerbated the national crisis over police-community relations by pulling back on federal oversight of police departments engaged in unconstitutional conduct, including repurposing the Department’s Community Oriented Policing Services program to facilitate more aggressive policing rather than prioritizing community relations, among other things.

  • President Trump, for his part, has deregulated the supply of military weaponry to local police agencies, raising the likelihood that police departments around the country would raise tensions between themselves and the general public, as they did in Ferguson three years ago.
  • However, three years after the shooting of Michael Brown and more than one thousand other Black persons, nothing has changed in terms of seriousness.
  • Louis police officers to assert ownership over public streets from the very community whose blood has been poured on those streets.
  • Even after all we’ve been through in this nation, the police are still corralling activists into a tiny area like livestock and then rounding them up and detaining them all at once without any evidence of their involvement.
  • Unfortunately, we have not yet witnessed the level of leadership required to bring about criminal justice changes that are critical to the protection of our communities and their citizens.
  • Louis denounce the provoking, disgusting chanting of the city’s police force in the harshest words possible and make it plain that the police are there to serve the people, not themselves.
  • However, the situation is even worse than that.
  • And it will need far more radical and significant answers than a few mild reprimands to completely remove it.
  • Lawyers and judges must also work together to modify a present legal norm that is unusually liberal when it comes to when the police can use lethal force, resulting in “lawful but horrifying” shootings that occur.

The police do not have the right to patrol the streets. They are considered members of the community. The moment has come for police reform to be implemented. We can’t afford to lose any more time in this situation.

St. Louis police crossed the line with ‘Whose streets? Our streets’ chant

When St. Louis police officers in riot gear scream “Whose streets? Our streets,” they are threatening and excluding people. As well as celebrating the acquittal of Jason Stockley, the white former officer who shot and killed a black driver, Anthony Lamar Smith, who was 24 years old at the time of the shooting. TNS On behalf of immigrants or in opposition to police brutality, demonstrators cry, “Whose streets? Our streets,” which implies that our cities, and, in an even broader sense, the public space of the square, are collectively ours to use and enjoy.

  • Louis police officers in riot gear scream the same phrase, it is intended to intimidate and exclude.
  • Police officers, rather than the people they serve, have the idea that they control the streets and the criminal justice system as a whole, which is why protestors are out protesting in the first place.
  • Considering that they live just a few miles away from Ferguson, where a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown three years ago, their reaction is particularly disheartening.
  • instead of dispersing peaceful demonstrators, St.
  • After that, some cops appeared to feel the need to reinforce their point by repeating the insult, “Whose streets?
  • “This is our city, and we’re going to make sure it’s protected.” The police, on the other hand, do not own the night or St.
  • He used some of the same words that Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz used in the wake of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings: “It’s time to get back to work.” “It’s all right, Boston,” he remarked after the team’s first game following the tragedy.

It has the word ‘Boston’ on it.

Nobody is going to be able to dictate our freedom.

However, in St.

The court ruled that the dashcam footage of the cop promising to “kill this mother-er” was too unclear to be used as evidence in any case.

As a result of the fact that Smith’s DNA was not found on it, However, nonviolent protestors sang, “We will win together,” as they marched through the streets on Monday.

And, certainly, it is the only way we will ever be able to. The original version of this story was published on September 19, 2017 at 4:33 p.m.

How the iconic ‘Whose streets? Our streets!’ chant has been co-opted

  • Police officers in St. Louis were observed yelling in the streets “Whose streets are they? Our streets, indeed! “on Saturday and Sunday
  • The phrase is generally used as a rallying cry for individuals who are fighting persecution
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Whose streets are they? Our streets, indeed! Whose streets are they? Our streets, indeed! Many people were taken aback by it. The phrase, which was originally intended to serve as a rallying cry for individuals fighting tyranny, has been usurped by those in positions of control. “It’s all about expressing one’s right to use public property. “We’ve assembled here,” protesters have said with this sign. ” We have significance just by virtue of the fact that we are here voicing our opinions. And we, as occupants of this place, are significant “Tamar Carroll, an associate professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology, shared her thoughts on the subject.

  1. Our Streets!” “The cops were using it to assert their control of the city, to assert their ownership over the streets and public areas,” says the author.
  2. While the slogan has been around for decades, it has seen a resurgence in recent years as more and more people have taken to the streets to protest police violence, racial inequity, and other injustices.
  3. Her statement stated that it was utilized in labor demonstrations as well as marches for reproductive rights and advocacy for AIDS victims.
  4. The term is unquestionably connected with the group, and it is a prominent theme in many of their statements.
  5. It reappeared in New York City later that year, following the death of Eric Garner, as well.
  6. Nonetheless, the slogan has recently gained popularity with organizations on the other side of the political spectrum.
  7. AV The cry is featured prominently in the documentary about the Charlottesville protests, which is available online.
  8. “That is why it makes it conceivable for a counter-movement to take it.” Uncertainty exists as to whether the St.
  9. For comment, CNN has reached out to the St.
  10. The acquittal of a former St.
  11. “I believe it is potentially incendiary for them (the police) to usurp something that is about social justice, that is about the right to public space, and that is about the right to demonstrate in public,” Carroll said.

In my opinion, this will not enhance police ties with Black Lives Matter demonstrators in the long run. A previous version of this story mistakenly named Meg Handler. The article has been updated to reflect the correction.

Police chant “whose streets, our streets” after arresting St Louis protesters

Whose streets are we talking about? We have streets here, people! Whose streets are we talking about? We have streets here, people! It was a shock to many people. The phrase, which was originally intended to serve as a rallying cry for those resisting tyranny, has been usurped by those in positions of control. “Declaring one’s right to use public space is at the heart of the matter. ‘We’ve gathered here,’ protesters have said, using the sign. The fact that we’re here, expressing our opinions, gives us significance.

  1. It was recently that she collaborated on an exhibition at the Bronx Documentary Center, titled “Whose Streets?
  2. ” “It was being used by the police to assert their control of the city, to assert their ownership of the streets and the public places,” says one officer.
  3. The slogan has been around for decades, but in recent years it has gained in popularity as more and more people have taken to the streets to protest police brutality, racial injustice, and other injustices.
  4. It is not incorrect to characterize the shout as a “Black Lives Matter” rally.
  5. As a result of the demonstrations that followed the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri, the phrase became so defined that it served as the title for a documentary chronicling the community’s response to Brown’s murder.
  6. On President Trump’s Inauguration Day in Washington, and the following day at women’s marches all across the world, it was heard.
  7. When white nationalists marched down the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, last month with tiki torches in hand and Nazi paraphernalia on show, it was a common cry.
  8. A historian, Dr.
  9. It’s unclear if the St.
  10. According to CNN, the St.
  11. A former St.

According to Carroll, “it’s potentially incendiary for them (the police) to take something that’s about social justice, that’s about the right to public space, and that’s about the right to demonstrate in public, and to usurp it.” In my opinion, this will not help police relations with Black Lives Matter demonstrators in the near future.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this article misidentified Meg Handler as a woman named Meg Smith.

St. Louis police chant ‘Whose streets? Our streets!’ after violence sparks 80 arrests

  • Whose streets are these? It’s our streets! Whose streets are these? It’s our streets! It came as a surprise to many. Authorities had usurped the phrase, which had previously been used as a rallying cry for individuals fighting injustice. “Essentially, it is about expressing one’s right to use public space. ‘We’ve gathered here,’ protesters have said with this sign. We have significance just by virtue of the fact that we are here expressing our ideas. And we, as occupants of this area, have significance “Tamar Carroll, an associate professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology, explained the situation. She recently collaborated on an exhibition at the Bronx Documentary Center titled ” Whose Streets? Our Streets!” “It was being used by the police to assert their control of the city, to assert their ownership of the streets and public areas.” LGBT activists, immigration activists, and, most importantly, African-American civil rights activists have all used the phrase during flashpoints of racial conflict. Despite the fact that the cry has been around for decades, it has seen an increase in popularity in recent years as more and more people have taken to the streets to protest police violence, racial inequity, and other injustices. “That was a chant that was pretty much constant from the time I started shooting rallies in the early ’90s,” said Meg Handler, a photographer who was also a co-curator of the “Whose Streets?” show. It was utilized in labor demonstrations as well as marches for reproductive rights and AIDS victim advocacy, according to her. It is not incorrect to describe the shout as a “Black Lives Matter” chant. The term is unmistakably connected with the group, and it is a prominent theme in many of their statements. Throughout 2014, following the tragic shooting of Michael Brown, it was heard in the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, and became so crystallized during the protests that it became the title of a documentary documenting the community’s response to Brown’s killing. It reappeared in New York City later that year, following the death of Eric Garner. It was heard in Washington on the day of President Trump’s inauguration, and it was heard again the next day at women’s marches all throughout the world. However, in recent years, the slogan has spread to organizations on the other side of the geopolitical spectrum. It was yelled by white nationalists as they marched along the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia, last month, tiki torches in hand and Nazi garb on show. AV The shout is featured prominently in the ice documentary about the Charlottesville events. “It has never, to my knowledge, been associated with a particular social movement,” Carroll, the historian, said. “It is for this reason that it is potential to be hijacked by a counter movement.” It’s unclear if the St. Louis police officers who yelled it were doing it to make fun of demonstrators or whether they were using it to convey their own message to the public. For comment, CNN has sought out to the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department, which has not responded. The acquittal of a former St. Louis police officer who was charged with first-degree murder after shooting and killing Anthony Lamar Smith, a black man, in 2011 sparked the turmoil on Sunday night. “I believe it’s potentially incendiary for them (the police) to take something that’s about social justice, that’s about the right to public space, and that’s about the right to demonstrate in public, and to usurp it,” Carroll said. “I believe that will have little effect on police relations with Black Lives Matter demonstrators.” CORRECTION: An previous version of this story misidentified Meg Handler as the author.

St. Louis mayor decries officers’ chant of “Whose streets? Our streets!” during protests

ST LOUIS -St. Louis is a city in the United States of America. It was not appropriate, according to Mayor Lyda Krewson, for cops to yell “Whose streets are they? Our streets, indeed! “on Sunday, after clearing away demonstrators and observers from the city’s central business district. During a press conference held on Tuesday, the mayor denounced the shout. When an organized demonstration came to an end and destruction erupted, officers in riot gear were heard yelling after making arrests and after making arrests.

  • The city of St. Louis is located in the United States of America. It was not appropriate, according to Mayor Lyda Krewson, for officers to yell “Whose streets are we talking about? We have streets here, people! “the next day, after emptying the city’s downtown of demonstrators and observers During a press conference on Tuesday, the mayor denounced the chanting. When an organized demonstration came to an end and destruction occurred, officers in riot gear were heard yelling after making arrests. A typical protest shout is “Occupy Wall Street.”

Days of protests erupted when a judge found Jason Stockley, a white former police officer, not guilty of the 2011 shooting murder of 24-year-old black drug suspect Anthony Lamar Smith. Stockley was acquitted by a jury on Friday. Police officers, according to Krewson, are under a great deal of stress, but “that is not an excuse.” In addition, Krewson believes it was “inflammatory” for interim police Chief Lawrence O’Toole to claim that “police owned” the incident that occurred Sunday night. According to CBS station KMOV-TV, the St.

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Additionally, according to KMOV-TV, “the department is aware of the video circulating on social media and is currently analyzing the clip.” According to KMOV-TV, the mayor has stated that she intends to meet with demonstrators and has also indicated that she will postpone town hall meetings set for this week.

“We are paying attention.” According to KMOV-TV, past meetings were tense, with angry citizens expressing their dissatisfaction with the mayor’s responses to their complaints about policing and criminal activity.

There were no organized demonstrations scheduled for Tuesday.

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St. Louis Police Chant ‘Whose Streets? Our Streets!’ After Arresting Protesters

A phrase typically chanted by Black Lives Matter protestors was screamed by St. Louis police officers Sunday night when cops detained more than 80 individuals during the city’s third night of turmoil, according to the St. Louis County Sheriff’s Office. “Whose streets are these? According to the Associated Press, after clearing a street of demonstrators and onlookers, police chanted, “Our streets!” According to David Carson, a photojournalist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the slogan was yelled two times in total.

David Carson (@PDPJ) is a Twitter user.

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The slug is black-voices, department Voices, section, and slug Subcategories: politics, religion, and other topics.

False for video advertisements, false for native content, and false for commercial content video:, isHighline:false, vidibleConfigValues:, top media:, anthology:, content:, playerUpdates:, customAmpComponents:, ampAssetsUrl:, video:, isHighline:false, vidibleConfigValues:, video:, isHighline:false, vidibleConfigValues:, video:, isHighline:false, The following traits are present:null, positionInUnitCounts:, buzz body:, buzz bottom:, buzzfeedTracking:, cetUnit: buzz body.” Jackson, the public information manager for the St.

  1. Louis Metropolitan Police Agency, said the department is analyzing footage from “the video that has been circulating on social media,” but she did not identify which video was being investigated.
  2. Louis police officers, such actions are in violation of the pledge officers swear to protect the public.
  3. “We are required to uphold that oath under all circumstances.
  4. Whether we support rallies, protests, or acts of violence, it is our responsibility to carry out our responsibilities without regard to our personal beliefs.” Following peaceful daytime demonstrations against the acquittal of former St.
  5. Stockley was acquitted on all counts in the case.
  6. More than 1,000 people went up to peacefully protest police violence, but by the next morning, some had become violent.
  7. When asked about the skirmishes, interim Police Commissioner Lawrence O’Toole claimed at least five firearms were seized from those detained and that some police had “mild” or “moderate” injuries.

“The police owned the night,” said O’Toole, who did not address the shouting but commended his officers for their “excellent job” on Sunday night and declared that “the cops owned the night.” “I’m glad to tell you that the city of St.

“I’m proud to tell you that the city of St.

“Those crooks are in jail as of right now.” Cops attempted to “mock” demonstrators by shouting the officers’ own refrain back at them, according to Michelle Higgins, co-chair of the St.

Higgins said she was “unsurprised.” As Higgins told HuffPost, “it’s all part of what appears to be a sophisticated effort to portray activists and demonstrators as the enemy.” “has made it very evident that the belongings of municipal officials and the property of the city of St.

Bruce Franks Jr.

In an interview with a reporter from the St.

stated, “We are the system.” “We are the ones who create the system.

We’re going to make you feel uncomfortable.

Mittman, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri, stated in a statement that the police department had continued to “engage in reprehensible, unlawful and unconstitutional activity.” The group is looking at legal possibilities, and it has urged people to consider why the protests were taking place in the first place.

Louis region,” he added. This post has been amended to incorporate comments from Michelle Higgins and the public information manager for the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. Read the original story here.

The problem with St. Louis police chanting “Whose streets? Our streets!”

A phrase typically chanted by Black Lives Matter protestors was screamed by St. Louis police officers Sunday night when cops detained more than 80 individuals during the city’s third night of turmoil, according to the St. Louis County Sheriff’s Department. “Whose streets are we talking about here? ” According to the Associated Press, after clearing a street of demonstrators and onlookers, the police chanted, “Our streets!” David Carson, a photojournalist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, said that the slogan was yelled twice.

The following is a message from David Carson (@PDPJ).

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Louis Police Department, David Carson, @genassign, @bustournewsletter, @ads scary, @health depression, @health models, @health erectile, @health ibs, section, department of black voices (slug: black-voices) voices, sector, slugging subcategories: politics, redirectedUrl:null is Header: false, width: false There is no override for null.

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Jackson, public information manager for the St.

She did not identify which video the department is studying.

Louis officers, are in violation of their oath of office.

“We have a responsibility to uphold that pledge under any and all conditions.” As stated in our Code of Ethics, “I will never act in an official capacity or allow personal sentiments, biases, political opinions, aspirations, animosities, or friendships to have an impact on my actions.” That chant is in direct conflict with the code of ethics that we all pledged to uphold and follow.

  • On Sunday, violence erupted in the city for the third night in a row following peaceful daytime demonstrations protesting the acquittal of Stockley, who was a former St.
  • A large crowd of more than 1,000 people gathered to peacefully oppose police brutality, but by the evening, some members of the mob had began shattering storefront windows and vandalizing private property.
  • When asked about the skirmishes, interim Police Commissioner Lawrence O’Toole claimed at least five firearms were seized from those detained and that some police received “mild” or “moderate” injuries.
  • “The cops owned the night,” O’Toole declared after his officers performed “excellent job” on Sunday night, despite the fact that he did not address the shouting.
  • Louis is secure.
  • Louis is safe,” he said.
  • They’ll be in jail tonight,” says the sheriff.

Louis Action Council, that cops attempted to “mock” demonstrators by screaming their own refrain back at them, but she was “surprised.” As Higgins told HuffPost, “it’s all part of what appears to be a sophisticated plan to portray activists and demonstrators as the enemy.” People have not been given priority over the belongings of municipal officials and public property in St.

  • Bruce Franks Jr.
  • In an interview with a reporter from the St.
  • stated that “we are the system.” The system is made up by us.” Your tranquility will be disturbed by us.
  • Nonviolent resistance is the only choice.” While the protests over the weekend were mainly peaceful and nonviolent, Jeffrey A.
  • An investigation into legal alternatives is being conducted by the group, which has urged individuals to inquire as to why the demonstrations were occurring.

Louis region,” he added. It has been updated to incorporate comments from Michelle Higgins and the public information manager for the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department.

A rallying call of the oppressed

“Whose streets are these?” goes the protest chant. According to Tamar Carroll, a professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology, the phrase “Our streets!” has been used often over the previous several decades to deliver a message about the competition for space throughout the years. Anti-war demonstrators have used it in the immigration debate, during times of heightened racial tension (such as in New York in 1990 and Oakland and Ferguson, Missouri in 2014), and in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when AIDS activists and LGBTQ people responded to violence against their community.

Early this year, Carroll co-curated a show at The Bronx Documentary Center, which was titled after the cry and investigated protests for social change throughout history and into the modern day and was dedicated to the memory of Martin Luther King Jr.

An analysis conducted earlier this year by The New York Times(paywall) revealed that, with the exception of a few cases, cops have escaped conviction in high-profile incidents with the exception of a few cases.

Louis adopt the chant, it sends a terrifying message to protestors and the larger community that the officers serve, according to Carroll: “It’s a way for marchers to say: ‘You have to reckon with us…by virtue of our numbers, you must pay attention.” Using a chant that has been extensively adopted by numerous social-justice movements, particularly Black Lives Matter, is terrible, and it has the potential to be incendiary,” says the author.

To be sure, several St.

The damage of appropriation

“Whose streets?,” protesters chanted. According to Tamar Carroll, professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology, the phrase “Our streets!” has been used often over the previous few decades to communicate a message about the fight for space. Anti-war demonstrators have used it in the immigration debate, during times of heightened racial tension (such as in New York in 1990 and Oakland and Ferguson, Missouri in 2014), and in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when AIDS activists and LGBTQ people responded to violence directed at their community.

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At The Bronx Documentary Center earlier this year, Carroll co-curated an exhibit titled “Stand Up for Social Justice” that studied rallies for social change across history and into the present day.

According to a New York Times(paywall) study published earlier this year, cops have escaped conviction in high-profile cases with the exception of a few instances.

Louis adopt the chant, it sends a terrifying message to protestors and the larger community that the officers serve, according to Carroll: “It’s a way for marchers to say: ‘You have to reckon with us…by virtue of our numbers, you must pay attention.’ “I believe it is terrible, and possibly incendiary, for the police to take a cry that has been extensively adopted by many social-justice movements, including Black Lives Matter,” I believe.

To be sure, several cops in St. Louis, including one who talked with a photojournalist, expressed their displeasure with the phrase’s use.

St. Louis Police Chant “Whose Streets? Our Streets!” as Protests Against Stockley Verdict Continue

Demonstrators marching in St. Louis on Sunday in protest of the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley’s conviction. Photographs courtesy of Getty Images As more demonstrators went to the streets following the acquittal of white police officer Jason Stockley, who shot and killed a black driver, Anthony Lamar Smith, in 2011, more than 80 people were detained in St. Louis on Sunday night. Stockley was acquitted of all charges. After a peaceful gathering of more than 1,000 demonstrators outside police headquarters in the afternoon, and a subsequent march through the streets, an additional march of around 100 protesters through the streets in the evening was held.

  • According to the Associated Press: Planters were pushed over, windows were broken at many stores and hotels, and plastic chairs were thrown at an outdoor function as they made their way through the neighborhood.
  • One of the officers had a leg injury and was brought to a local hospital for treatment.
  • A short time later, buses transported extra cops outfitted in riot gear, and police patrolled downtown into the night, making arrests and confiscating at least five guns, according to O’Toole.
  • Our streets!” was chanted by police as they conducted their arrests, according to many witnesses.
  • Also on Twitter, the St.
  • Missouri is a state that allows for open carry.

St. Louis officers chant “whose streets, our streets” while arresting protesters

After a third night of turmoil in St. Louis, protesters gathered for a march to express their outrage at the acquittal of a former police officer accused of murder. The march came only hours after officials reported they had detained more than 80 individuals during the violence. In St. Louis, where memories of the chaos that erupted in 2014 when a white police officer fatally shot a black teenager in neighboring Ferguson remain vivid, the protests, which officials say have veered toward destruction and violence at night, have rattled the city.

  1. It also marked the beginning of a wave of demonstrations against police use of deadly force that has swept across the country in recent years, with demonstrations taking place in cities across the country.
  2. Louis police officer, was found not guilty in the early morning hours of Friday, April 12.
  3. While in pursuit with police, Stockley was heard shouting, “I’m going to murder this —————————————————————————————————————————- As part of their investigation, prosecutors said that Stockley planted a gun in Smith’s car, noting that the weapon was recovered with only Stockley’s DNA on it.
  4. He also stated that he did not place the pistol, claiming that he was looking for it when he entered Smith’s car.
  5. Stockley was found not guilty of all charges in the case.
  6. In the end, Wilson stated that prosecutors were unable to persuade him that Stockley “did not act in self-defense.” Following the announcement of Wilson’s order, protesters began gathering in the streets of St.
  7. Demonstrators vowed to cause “mass disruption,” and their numbers swelled throughout the day Friday, officials and media reports said.

St.

People were flinging water bottles, rocks, and chairs, breaking windows, and causing extensive damage to multiple shops around the city, according to eyewitness accounts.

O’Toole said more than 80 persons were detained late Sunday night and described them as “a bunch of thugs on a mission to shatter windows and destroy property” during a press conference early Monday morning.

He also stated that police collected five guns from protestors that were not being utilized.

Louis is safe, and the police held their own tonight,” O’Toole said of the demonstrations that took place on Sunday night.

“Do they believe that this will make us feel safe?” we wonder.

Since the demonstrations began on Friday, police have announced more than 100 arrests, and they have also reported injuries to a number of law enforcement officials.

Local and state politicians who responded to the turmoil were not in office at the time, including Missouri Gov.

Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson, a Democrat who was elected earlier this year.

At the weekend, he posted a message on Facebook saying that “our leaders have in the past allowed individuals to destroy windows, plunder, and ignite fires.” “They sat back and watched them do it.

The vandals were apprehended by the police tonight.” According to Krewson, whose home was destroyed late Friday night, the “great majority of protestors are peaceful,” but “for the third day in a row, the days have been tranquil and the evenings damaging,” according to a briefing early Monday.

  1. Louis Post-Dispatch newspaper, was reporter Mike Faulk, who had been working for the newspaper.
  2. Our streets” as they made arrests following the demonstration.
  3. Demonstrators gathered outside St.
  4. The crowd yelled and cheered, and at least one person held a placard that said, “No justice, no peace.” “Whose streets?
  5. “These are our streets.” On Monday morning, the marchers took a brief halt and stepped away from the road to let a firetruck and an ambulance to attend to a call.
  6. These protests, which have now lasted for a fourth day and show no signs of abating, are the latest to erupt following a lethal police shooting, a decision by prosecutors not to pursue charges, or a jury verdict acquitting a police officer involved in the incident.

This incident occurred in 2011, long before Ferguson became the first of a string of places – including Baltimore, San Francisco, Cleveland, Baton Rouge, Seattle, and Charlotte – where killings involving police officers sparked widespread unrest and received widespread attention from the media.

Convictions, on the other hand, are still extremely rare.

The case in St.

Wilson said that Smith’s automobile collided with a police vehicle before speeding away from the scene.

During a discussion about Stockley’s remark about killing Smith, Wilson noted the stress as a contributing factor, saying in his view that “people say all kinds of things when they are stressed or in the heat of the moment.” The judge also stated that Stockley’s behavior during the chase was not “consistent with the behaviour of a person who purposefully kills another person illegally,” according to Wilson.

  • He said that Stockley was informed that Smith was in possession of a firearm and that he did not immediately open fire when he approached Smith’s vehicle.
  • Smith was shot five times, with one bullet passing through his heart, according to Wilson’s account.
  • Neil Bruntrager, an attorney representing Stockley, thanked Wilson for providing a thorough explanation of his judgment, which he said allowed the public to fully grasp the factors that led to the acquittal of Stockley.
  • “That is priceless in my opinion.
  • Because if you read this, if you actually read this, you would not be able to arrive to any other conclusion than what he came to.” Stockley retired from the St.
  • Following his acquittal, he went into depth about his side of the story.
  • Federal officials stated that they had previously reviewed Stockley’s case and had decided not to pursue any action against him.
  • Attorney’s Office refused to do so in 2012.
  • Civil rights prosecutions need a very high legal standard, something that federal authorities have reiterated time and time again when declining to pursue charges in high-profile instances involving civil rights violations.

St. Louis police probe whether officers chanted ‘Whose streets? Our streets’

ST. LOUIS (Reuters) – The city of St. Louis has been hit by a tornado. In response to the acquittal of a white former police officer who shot and killed a black man in 2011, the St. Louis Police Department is examining if some of its officers screamed “Whose streets? Our streets” during protests. Even though several hundred protestors marched through the streets of St. Louis once more on Monday evening, the demonstrations remained calm as intermittent rain appeared to keep some demonstrators at home.

David Carson, a photojournalist for the St.

Our streets,” appropriating a phrase that had been used by the demonstrators themselves.

It depicts a group of policemen.

A court ruled on Friday that police officer Jason Stockley, 36, was not convicted of first-degree murder in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith, 24, in 2011.

The skirmishes brought up memories of riots that erupted in Ferguson, Missouri, after a white police officer fatally shot a black teenager in 2014.

Our officers are held to the highest levels of professionalism, and any officer who fails to achieve those standards will be held responsible.

Louis police civilian oversight board, which is also conducting an investigation, would only serve to exacerbate tensions.

There is “no need 2 chant,” according to the Ethical Society of Police, a group of black St.

While the majority of protests were peaceful, some became violent at night, with individuals taking to the streets armed with firearms, bats, and hammers, among other weapons.

It stated that it delayed publicizing the decision in order to avoid interfering with the trial.

Chris Kenning contributed reporting and writing from Chicago; Dan Whitcomb contributed additional reporting from Los Angeles; and Ben Klayman, Cynthia Osterman, and Michael Perryfor edited the piece. -phone -onlyfor-tablet-portrait-upfor-tablet-landscape-upfor-desktop-upfor-wide-desktop-up

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