First “what” Chant

Christian recalls a funny voicemail from Steve Austin that helped create the ‘What?’ chant

The ‘What?’ cry is one of the most well-known in wrestling history, and Stone Cold Steve Austin is the wrestler who is most closely connected with it than anybody else. Stone Cold was able to control the reaction of the audience so well during the peak of the Attitude Era in the WWE that he was able to get them to chant a simple four-letter phrase. Christian explained how he played a role in Steve Austin’s notorious cry and the history behind it in a recent interview with Wrestling Travel from the For The Love of Wrestling conference in Liverpool, which was published by Wrestling Inc.

He left a rambling voicemail on my answering machine, which I received.

I mentioned that I was passing a tree.

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“When I arrived, I inquired as to the nature of the voicemail you had left for me. And he says, “I don’t know, I was just bored and started babbling.” “I really wish I had saved it.” In the next week or so, I was watching Raw from the back row and I could hear the audio of him promoting himself in the ring, and I heard him say, “What?!?” And I thought to myself, “How is he going to accomplish this, and how is he going to get this over with?” Sure enough, he was able to complete the chorus.

  • That was far back in the early 2000s, to be precise.
  • There have been several memorable incidents associated with the phrase throughout WWE history.
  • “When I arrived, I inquired as to the nature of the voicemail you had left for me.” And he’s like, “I don’t know, I was just bored and rambling around.” “I wish I had kept it,” I confess.
  • “I couldn’t believe it.” As it turned out, he was successful in getting the chant to stop.
  • However, it is still utilized by WWE fans to make fun of particular superstars when they are doing a promo in the center of the ring, and this practice has continued to this day.

One simple voicemail Austin left for Christian on one particular day is likely to remain in perpetuity, and it’s all because of it.

WWE News: Stone Cold Steve Austin Details Inventing The ‘What?’ Chant

It’s ice cold. ‘What?’ shouts, popularized by Steve Austin in 2001, have been explained in depth for the first time. Since his appearance as the Alliance’s shining light in the summer of 2001, Austin’s persona has morphed into an increasingly paranoid leader. Stone Cold would use the one-word slogan ad naseum throughout interviews in an attempt to encourage his warriors in their struggle against the then-World Wrestling Federation. Austin recounted where the inspiration for ‘What?’ came from during a talk with Randy Orton on the WWE Network’s The Broken Skull Sessions.

Stone Cold recounted:

Cold as ice. Steve Austin has revealed the origins of the infamous ‘What?’ chants that swept the wrestling world by storm in 2001. Austin’s persona had changed from being the brightest light in the Alliance during the summer of 2001 to being a paranoid leader. Stone Cold would repeat the one-word mantra ad nauseam during interviews in an attempt to encourage his followers in their fight against the then-WWF. Austin recounted the inspiration for ‘What?’ during a talk with Randy Orton on the WWE Network’s The Broken Skull Sessions show.

WWE Twitter Account Asks Fans To Stop Doing The “WHAT” Chant

“Stone Cold”Steve Austin, future WWE Hall of Famer and future wrestling icon, found upon the world’s most convenient way to be irritating back in 2001. “What?” is a single, monosyllabic word that may be given in the middle of an adversary’s statement, and it can be used to be douchey, dismissive, and rude by everyone’s favorite heel in the game. It is that final one, some twenty years later, that is attracting the most attention. Fans, on the other hand, seized on the straightforward reaction and have been employing it ever since to express their dissatisfaction or discontent with a character or their current plot line.

  1. Of course, when Austin pulled the stunt, he had every intention of making a fool of himself.
  2. WWE executives, on the other hand, believe it is disrespectful to their talent since fans continue to use it to reject what they don’t like.
  3. (They have since been removed, so feel free to interpret that anyway you wish.) This was the first message, which was posted during a RAW segment in which Jerry Lawler was interviewing Rusev, and it read: “Can we put an end to the shouts of ‘WHAT?'” It is no longer the year 2001.
  4. The chant was directed towards @AngeloDawkins as he bid farewell to @WWENXT, then it was directed at a “Hall Of Famer” on RAW.
  5. “And now we’re back to RAW.” Despite the fact that the brass made their opinions known, it is unlikely that it will have much of an impact on the audience.
  6. When it comes to live crowds, it’s like a sea of marks and smarks, and they take pleasure in their collective trolling.
  7. Recently, he told Busted Open Radio, “I did it as a running heel at the time, you know, I was wearing heels at the time, and I left that message on Christian’s voicemail.” It seemed like every time I said something, I’d pause and think, ‘what?
  8. You’re right, aren’t you?
  9. Isn’t it true that I’m jabbing you?
  10. So that was my first attempt at putting it to good use.
  11. A huge part of being in WWE or in the wrestling business is that the audience wants to be involved, whether they are rooting for you or against you, applauding for you or booing you, or whatever.

As a part of the show, it provided an opportunity for them to become involved and contribute.” In the meantime, they’re still taking part and saying things like ‘Austin, why in the heck did you invent that, I wish you hadn’t done that’.” I would have never imagined it in a million years that…

“I wouldn’t have predicted…” Do you believe that the chanting are insulting to the wrestlers and their efforts? Or is it merely a harmless show of support from the crowd? Please share your opinions in the comments section!

This Day in Wrestling History (8/13) – Birth of “What?” Chant

Subscribe today to receive real-time updates straight to your device’s screen. As wrestling fans, we’re accustomed to a slew of catchphrases and chants that are frequently associated with a specific match or wrestler, and this day in wrestling history marks the birth of one that has stood the test of time. Following his betrayal of the WWE to join them, Steve Austin delivered a speech to the Alliance on August 13, 2001, in which he debuted what would become his new cry. In the history of professional wrestling, Hugh Morrus was the first person to be the recipient of the most famous chant, which was later followed by Raven and Taz.

  • You have a body weight of 275 pounds.
  • What?
  • What?
  • Is that meant to be humorous?
  • What?
  • Take a look at me!
  • Y2J gave you a good thrashing.
  • “Take a step back.”

Curious origins and legacy

Subscribe today to receive real-time information straight to your smartphone. This Day in Wrestling History marks the beginning of one of the most famous sayings and chants in the history of the sport, and it also marks the beginning of another that has stood the test of time. Following his betrayal of the WWE to join them, Steve Austin delivered a speech to the Alliance on August 13, 2001, during which he debuted what would become his new cry. In the history of professional wrestling, Hugh Morrus was the first person to be the recipient of the most famous chant, which he shared with Raven and Taz.

  1. Mr.
  2. What?
  3. Hugh Morrus, please introduce yourself.
  4. Is it anything to laugh about?
  5. Is it amusing.
  6. Are you trying to make me laugh?
  7. You’re a complete and utter disappointment!
  8. You’re a complete and utter disappointment!
  9. Y’all have made me feel embarrassed.

Steve Austin On The Problem With The ‘What' Chant Being Used Today

Subscribe today to receive real-time information directly to your smartphone. As wrestling fans, we’re accustomed to a slew of catchphrases and chants that are frequently associated with a specific match, and this day in wrestling history marks the birth of one that has stood the test of time. On August 13, 2001, after betraying the WWE to join them, Steve Austin delivered a speech to the Alliance in which he debuted what would become his new cry. Hugh Morrus was the first individual to be the subject of the most famous chant in professional wrestling history, followed by Raven and Taz.

You weigh 275 pounds.

What?

What? Is that amusing? Is that meant to be amusing? What are you here for? To make me laugh, of course. What? You’re a sad person! Take a look at me! You’re a sad person! Y2J whipped the crap out of you. I’m embarrassed by your behavior. “Take a deep breath.”

How did the Kurt Angle ”You Suck!” chant start?

When Kurt Angle enters the ring, the WWE Universe erupts in applause and screams “You Suck!” in unison with his theme song. Kurt Angle is the most popular wrestler in the world. Angle and the rousing ovation from the crowd during his entrance are inextricably linked, regardless of whether he is portraying a heel or a face. However, despite the fact that the trend began in the early 2000s, it continues to be followed today. The Olympic gold medalist was not even spared at the prestigious Hall of Fame event, when he was inducted into the ranks of the world’s finest athletes and entertainers of all time.

  • Angle was projected to be a fan favorite when he joined the WWE since he had previously represented the United States of America at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Even the residents of Pittsburgh, which happens to be his hometown, were unkind to him, and he received no sympathy from them.
  • When Angle first joined the WWE, he was changed into a terrible villain, a role that he performed for five out of the seven years of his original tenure with the company.
  • Angle benefited from these engagements, as he went on to become one of the promotion’s most successful heels of the time.
  • In fact, many fans are still divided on which episode they feel the chants were initially chanted by the supporters, and many consider it to be a different episode altogether.
  • Kurt Angle is seen in the video attempting to show off his abilities to a group of indifferent fans.
  • However, it took a considerable amount of time for the cries to permeate throughout venues around the country.

For a significant portion of that time, Angle was involved in a protracted rivalry with Edge.

When Kurt Angle appeared on the show during the aforementioned time frame, Edge inspired the audience to shout “You Suck” at him during one of the segments.

However, with the acceptance of the Rated-R Superstar, the level of involvement among the fans skyrocketed.

The administration attempted everything they could to keep the chants of “You Suck” to a minimum, but their efforts were in vain.

It was cut from Kurt Angle’s last days in the WWE during his first tenure that the section of the entrance song that the crowd yelled was removed.

When asked about the assertions in a recent Q&A session, Kurt Angle responded affirmatively, admitting to being an early fan of the chants and having liked them “from the beginning.” He saw the comments as a critique of his performance as a heel, and he chose to take them as praises.

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The “You Suck!” shouts have returned as well, and they are much louder now than they were before Angle’s return to the show.

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What Chanting & A Mantra Meditation Practice Can Do To Your Brain – According To fMRI Scans

When Kurt Angle enters the ring, the WWE Universe erupts in applause and screams “You Suck!” in unison with his theme song. Kurt Angle’s entrance song is “You Suck!” It doesn’t matter if Angle is portraying the heel or the face; the fans’ unanimity during his arrival is inextricably linked to him. However, despite the fact that the trend began in the early 2000s, it has continued to this day. The Olympic gold medalist was not even spared at the prestigious Hall of Fame event, when he was inducted into the ranks of the world’s finest athletes and entertainers of all-time.

  • After representing the United States of America at the 1996 Summer Olympics, Angle was anticipated to become a fan favorite when he joined the WWE roster.
  • Even the residents of Pittsburgh, which happens to be his hometown, were unkind to him, and he received no sympathy.
  • When Angle first joined the WWE, he was changed into a terrible villain, a role that he portrayed for five of his seven-year tenure with the company.
  • Angle was a member of the WWE developmental program.
  • While there’s no denying that the “You Suck!” chants are one of the most well-known in WWE history, only a select handful are aware of when the chants first began.
  • From the 22nd February 2001 episode of WWF Smackdown, the following segment has been excerpted.
  • Angle’s entrance song used during this performance was the first reported instance in which supporters sang “You Suck.” But it took a considerable amount of time for the chanting to permeate throughout venues throughout the country.

Angle was involved in a protracted dispute with Edge at that time period.

Edge pushed the audience to yell “You Suck” at Kurt Angle during one of the segments within the aforementioned time frame.

After the acceptance of the Rated-R Superstar, however, the level of involvement among the fans skyrocketed..

Even while the administration attempted everything they could to keep the screams of “You Suck” to a minimum, all of their efforts were fruitless.

It was cut from Kurt Angle’s last days in the WWE during his first tenure that the section of the entrance music that the crowd yelled was eliminated.

When asked about the assertions in a recent Q&A session, Kurt Angle responded affirmatively, admitting to being an early fan of the chants and having liked them “from day one.” Rather than considering them criticism, he views them as accolades on his overall performance as a heel.

With Angle’s return, even the “You Suck!” shouts have made a comeback, and they are now much louder than they were before.

If you have information on breaking news, please send it to [email protected] Was it ever brought to your attention that a male WWE Superstar requested that Bianca Belair use her braid in the ring?

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The Real Meaning of ‘Om (Aum)’ In Yoga:

When Kurt Angle enters the ring, the WWE Universe erupts in applause and screams “You Suck!” viciously in time with his theme song. Angle and the unanimity of the fans’ ovation during his entrance are inextricably linked, regardless of whether he is portraying a heel or a face. Despite the fact that the trend began in the early 2000s, it has continued to this day. The Olympic gold medalist was not even spared at the prestigious Hall of Fame event, when he was inducted into the ranks of the world’s finest athletes and entertainers.

  1. Because he had previously represented the United States of America at the 1996 Summer Olympics, Angle was expected to be a fan favorite when he joined the WWE.
  2. Even the people of Pittsburgh, the place where he was born and raised, were unkind to him.
  3. When Angle first joined the WWE, he was changed into a terrible villain, a role that he performed for five out of the seven years of his first tenure with the company.
  4. Angle benefited from these engagements, as he rose to become one of the promotion’s most prominent tails at the time.
  5. In fact, many fans are still divided on which episode they feel was the first time the chants were chanted by the audience.
  6. Kurt Angle is seen in the video attempting to show off his ability to a group of indifferent fans.
  7. The chanting, on the other hand, took a long time to spread throughout venues around the country.

Angle was involved in a protracted dispute with Edge at the time.

When Kurt Angle appeared on the show during the aforementioned time frame, Edge inspired the audience to shout “You Suck” at him during one of the segments.

However, with the endorsement of the Rated-R Superstar, the level of fan participation skyrocketed.

The administration attempted all they could to keep the chants of “You Suck” to a minimum, but all of their efforts were in vain.

During Kurt Angle’s final days in the WWE, the section of the entrance music that the crowd yelled was deleted from the show.

Kurt Angle, on the other hand, stated in a Q&A session a couple of months ago that he was, in fact, a big fan of the chants from the beginning.

Angle is back in the WWE as the General Manager of the Raw brand, where he previously served.

Instead of appearing to be irritated, Angle now recognizes the chants and gestures as if he is directing the recitation because he understands deep down that it is the WWE Universe’s way of expressing him respect.

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1- Mantra Meditation of Om can help us reach the highest states of Yogic practice.

Chanting meditation, according to the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, an authoritative text on how to walk and live the 8-Limbed Yogic Path that has been around for 1,700 years, can help one attain the ultimate goal of Yoga, Samadhi (deep inner knowing, self-realization, transcendence, and profound bliss). “The cessation of thinking and the attainment of Samadhi are achieved by devotion and complete attention to Ishvara.” 1.23 of the Yoga Sutra We may learn more about ourselves by watching and practicing the yogic concept of Ishvara Pranidhana (surrender, commitment, and devotion to a higher force), which is as follows: “From this practice, all obstructions dissipate, and understanding of one’s own inner self begins to dawn at the same time.

” 1.29 of the Yoga Sutra Ishvara is known as:

  • Chanting meditation, according to the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, an authoritative text on how to walk and live the 8-Limbed Yogic Path that has been around for 1,700 years, can help one attain the ultimate goal of Yoga, Samadhi (deep inner knowing, self-realization, transcendence, and profound bliss) through chanting. “The cessation of thinking and the attainment of Samadhi are achieved by devotion and complete dedication to Ishvara,” says the Buddha. 1:23 of the Yoga Sutra Our deeper understanding of ourselves can only come about through the observation and practice of the yogic concept ofIshvara Pranidhana (surrender, commitment, and devotion to a higher force) : “Through this practice, all barriers are removed, and awareness of the Inner Self is revealed at the same time.” 128th chapter of the Yoga Sutra There are several ways to describe Ishvara.

According to the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, a 1,700-year-old canonical manual on how to walk and follow the 8-Limbed Yogic Path, one can achieve the ultimate objective of Yoga, Samadhi (deep inner understanding, self-realization, transcendence, and profound happiness), by chanting meditation. “Cessation of thinking and Samadhi are accomplished by devotion and complete dedication to Ishvara,” says the Buddha. 1st Chapter of the Yoga Sutras, verse 23 We may learn more about ourselves by watching and practicing the yogic concept of Ishvara Pranidhana (surrender, commitment, and devotion to a higher force).

2- We can unite with our true essence and high self through the repetition of Om.

According to the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, a 1,700-year-old canonical manual on how to walk and follow the 8-Limbed Yogic Path, one can achieve the ultimate objective of Yoga, Samadhi (deep inner understanding, self-realization, transcendence, and profound happiness), via chanting meditation. “Cessation of mind and Samadhi are achieved via devotion and complete attention to Ishvara.” — Yoga Sutra 1.23 It is through the observation and practice of the yogic concept of Ishvara Pranidhana (surrender, commitment, and devotion to a higher force) that we may learn to know ourselves more deeply: “Through this practice, all obstructions are removed, and at the same time, understanding of one’s inner self emerges.” — Yoga Sutra 1.29 Ishvara is represented by:

3- Repetition of Om can help to increase our vital energy levels (prana)

(Image courtesy of giphy) “Prana is the fundamental vibration that exists at all times. It’s a never-ending cycle. … The fundamental sound (Om) is always vibrating inside you. Because it is the germ from which all other sounds emerge… “(Om) possesses the ability to make anything.” — Swami Satchidananda, a spiritual teacher The Japa practice of a mantra, as described in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, produces a vibratory hum between repeats. “Aum…. Aum… Aum…” The gap between the aums (oms) vibrates with prana (life force) (vital energy).

In this approach, we’re purifying our energy field and removing energetic barriers that are preventing us from moving forward.

You can use chanting to establish an energetic doorway that will assist you in crossing the thresholds of your own consciousness. It has the potential to create a holy place in which development and resilience can flourish.

The Effects of Mantra Chanting on BrainOverall Health:

When a brain region is stimulated, the amount of blood flowing to that location rises as well. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which tracks changes in blood flow, the brain’s activity may be measured. According to an fMRI scan research published in the International Journal of Yoga, chanting Om appears to deactivate the brain’s emotional and fear-based centers. 2 – (amygdala). It is related to the stress response through the amygdala, which is your body’s first-alert response system, which works as a link between your emotional center and your brain’s stress reaction.

  1. The stress response begins when the body’s defensive mechanisms are activated, which indicates the activation of other biological systems.
  2. 2 –According to the findings of another fMRI study showing the calming benefits of Om chanting, it may be desirable to further investigate chanting as a potential treatment option for Major Depressive Disorder since a calm amygdala promotes improved emotional processing (MDD).
  3. An 8-week meditation program (which included mantra chanting) lasting 12 minutes each day for eight weeks was reported to provide patients with memory loss with improvements in mood, anxiety, tension, and tiredness levels.
  4. The findings of a research investigation on chanting revealed that experienced meditators had an increase in delta brain waves.
  • Increasing one’s ability to detach from one’s surroundings (7)
  • Preventing distraction sources from interfering with the yogic practices of pratyahara (inward-turning of the senses) anddharana (one-pointed focus) (8)
  • Enabling the body to activate to self-healing and regenerative mechanisms that maintain a balanced equilibrium in the brain and major body systems (9)
  • And Improved sleep quality (nine points)
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Chanting Out Loud Activates Your Body’s Chillax Mechanism (Parasympathetic Nervous System):

It turns out that our voice and our breath are all that we truly need to assist ourselves in finding a calmer, more secure core inside ourselves. According to Dr. Stephen Porges, a researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, we may activate the parasympathetic branch of our nervous system by stimulating the Vagus Nerve. This will cause the body’s intrinsic relaxation response to be triggered. When we stimulate this extremely essential nerve, we are able to simultaneously lessen the stress response while also promoting health, development, and healing.

  1. It is the greatest nerve in your parasympathetic system.
  2. During his presentationVagal Pathways: Portals to Compassion, delivered at Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism ResearchEducation, Dr.
  3. We haven’t referred to it as manipulations of vagal circuits; rather, we have referred to it as religious rites.
  4. Each of these interventions has the effect of activating a distinct vagal circuit that has been associated to the downregulation of protectiveness.
  5. Healing, well-being, and inner tranquility are all made possible through these channels.
  6. Located in the head and neck, these face muscles are linked to nerves that feed the parasympathetic nervous system with oxygen and nutrients (relaxation response).

Lynch, a medical illustrator licensed under CC BY 2.5) Source: In fact, the neurological regulation of the face – the lips, the oral area, the eyes, and even the muscles that govern the center of the ear – is tied to the vagal regulation of our heart.” In other words, when we engage in these behaviors — when we sing or chant, for example – we’re strengthening heart-rate control through the vagal pathway.” – Dr.

Stephen Porges is a physician who practices in the United States.

Considering that these nerve endings are a branch of the Vagus nerve and as such, they both trigger the relaxation response and the “brake,” which serves to reduce the stress reaction.

Combine it with pranayama (yoga breathing) activities that entail taking deep, deliberate belly breaths to get the most benefit.

Another method of activating the Vagus nerve is by belly breathing, which involves contracting the diaphragm, a dome-shaped muscle that lies above your digestive organs and below your lungs.

3 Famous Meditators Who Used The Power of Chanting To Realize Their Potential:

(Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons) The Buddhist mantras Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and Om Mani Padme Hum brought comfort and significance to the artist’s life and work. In her darkest times, she credits her Buddhist religion and chanting practice with saving her life, particularly when she attempted suicide while in a violently abusive marriage with her then-husband, Ike Turner. When questioned about chanting during a Larry King Live interview, she stated, “The practice, in the early phases of it, when it was taught to me, was that it might alter your life if that’s what you were searching for.” And at the moment, that was unquestionably what I want…

So I remember putting in a lot of effort, and I remember doing it that way because it was on my own that I had to work so hard for it in the first place.

2- Russell Simmons

Wikimedia Commons has a collection of images. When the artist sang the Buddhist mantras Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and Om Mani Padme Hum, he found consolation and purpose in his work. Following a failed attempt at suicide while in a very violent marriage with then-husband Ike Turner, she attributes her Buddhist beliefs and chanting practice with saving her life during her darkest hours. When questioned about chanting during a Larry King Live interview, she stated, “The practice, in the early phases of it, when it was taught to me, was that it might alter your life if that’s what you were searching for.

In addition, I had to learn by myself because I didn’t have the freedom to really attend meetings or wait for other people to come to me for help.

The experience “completely transformed my life”.

3- Steve Jobs

(Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons) It is commonly known that Steve Jobs, the famed Apple creator, was a real “seeker” who had a copy of Paramahansa Yogananda’s “Autobiography of a Yogi” on his desk at all times. In the course of his Zen Buddhist studies, he developed into a serious practitioner who chose to participate in extended, severe meditation retreats at what was then the first Zen monastery in the United States, where he also engaged in a meditative chanting practice. (15)References: (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8)(9)(10)(11)(12)(13)(14) Russell Simmons and Chris Morrow are co-authors of this book.

Gregorian Chant Notation

This is a description of the traditional Gregorian Chant notation, with the goal of making it easy for anybody to read and sing the music. Chant is written in neumes, which are notes spoken on a single word that are separated by a space. Gregorian Chant does not have a meter at all, yet it does have a rhythm consisting of groups of two or three notes that is repeated. Vertical lines divide musical phrases and may occasionally provide a break for taking a breath, like in Chant, which is not in a major or minor key, but inmodesto, which means inmodesto (though there are some modes which can sound like a modern scale).

Dois is indicated on the staff by a dot.

Do would occupy the bottom available place in this case. The notation for the chant is on the left. On the right is a modern-day version of this.

Liquescent Neumes

There are several different ways to demonstrate that a note is in your possession: One way to achieve this is to add a dot (punctum-mora) after the note. In modern music, it’s a little like a dotted note in the middle of a phrase. In order to demonstrate that a note is held, more than one of the same note in a row on the same syllable should be included in the composition. A repurcussive neume is what is referred to as this. In contemporary music, a horizontal line (episema) over a neume indicates that the note should be held or that it should be slowed down a bit likerit.

  1. A single accidental that may be employed in Chant notation is the B-flat, which appears to be quite similar to the current B-flat on the piano keyboard.
  2. In every other case, it just lasts for a single syllable.
  3. If you love this website and would want to contribute a few of dollars to help keep it running, you may do so by sending a check to the following address: The payment is made to That is how to read Gregorian Chant notation, in its entirety!
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Reliving the Evolution of Daniel Bryan’s Iconic ‘Yes!’ Chant 8 Years After Debut

  1. Image courtesy of WWE.com The fact that one simple statement drove Daniel Bryan to the top of the professional wrestling world more than eight years after it initially aired on WWE TV is astonishing to contemplate. “Yes!” A chant that acquired popularity as a result of WWE’s bad scheduling has turned out to be one of the company’s most fortunate accidents in recent history. Since its inception, the chant (as well as the person who delivers it) has developed greatly, to the point where it is still as memorable on-screen as it has always been. This is how the “Yes!” cry has evolved over the past decade, leading up to the Royal Rumble on January 26th, which will mark the culmination of Bryan’s professional wrestling career.
  1. Yes! as a chant has a long and illustrious history that can be traced back more than a decade to a life outside of professional wrestling. Bryan has previously stated that the origins of the chant in his own career can be traced back to mixed martial arts, especially to Diego Sanchez. Sanchez used to walk to the Octagon yelling the catchphrase Yes! long before Daniel Bryan popularized the phrase in the WWE, as the video above reveals. Furthermore, Sanchez was significantly more scary in his usage of the slogan, and while it wasn’t precisely duplicated by the audience, the manner in which Sanchez yelled it had a significant influence on the atmosphere. It was here that the Yes! chant got its start, and as Bryan’s career in the WWE’s main event scene grew in prominence, it wasn’t long before he found the right chance to incorporate it into his own persona on screen
  2. This was in the form of his character, Daniel Bryan.
  1. When looking into the history of Yes!, it is necessary to travel back more than a decade to life outside of professional wrestling in order to find out where the cry originated. MMA, notably Diego Sanchez, has been credited with providing the inspiration for the cry in Bryan’s own professional career. Sanchez used to come into the Octagon yelling the catchphrase Yes! long before Daniel Bryan popularized the phrase in the WWE, as the video above reveals. Even more significantly, Sanchez was considerably more scary in his usage of the catchphrase, and while it was not exactly echoed by the audience, Sanchez’s manner in which he said it surely had an effect. It was here that the Yes! chant had its start, and as Bryan’s career in the WWE’s main event scene grew in prominence, it wasn’t long before he found the right chance to incorporate it into his own persona on screen
  2. This was in the form of his role on the WWE’s Raw.
  1. Yes! as a chant has a long and illustrious history that can be traced back more than a decade to life outside of professional wrestling. In the past, Bryan has stated that the origins of the chant in his own career can be traced back to mixed martial arts, notably to Diego Sanchez. As shown in the video above, Sanchez would go into the Octagon yelling the slogan Yes! long before Daniel Bryan did the same in WWE. Furthermore, Sanchez was significantly more scary in his usage of the slogan, and while it wasn’t precisely echoed by the audience, the manner in which Sanchez yelled it clearly had an impact. It was here that the Yes! chant got its start, and as Bryan’s career in the WWE’s main event scene grew in prominence, it wasn’t long before he found the right chance to incorporate it into his own persona on screen
  2. This was in the form of his role on WWE’s Raw.
  1. When Triple H stripped Bryan of the WWE Championship at SummerSlam 2013, it was a prelude to Randy Orton cashing in his Money in the Bank briefcase at WrestleMania 30. The storyline that culminated with Bryan winning the WWE Championship at WrestleMania 30 began in essence at SummerSlam 2013, when Triple H screwed Bryan out of the title to allow Randy Orton to cash in his Money in the Bank briefcase. That was a watershed event in D-professional Bry’s life as well as the history of the Yes! chant itself. However, later that year, another watershed moment in the formation of the Yes! chant occurred. While The Authority was holding court in the center of the ring to discuss the company’s future goals and the debut of a new title, the audience decided to take control of the proceedings. They had a clear vision of who they intended to meet at the summit of the mountain. They were clamoring for Daniel Bryan, chanting his name non-stop. The choice of Mark Henry to raise his hand elicited even greater applause and prompted the entire audience to join in with the cry “Yes!” You can image how excited WWE was when they realized they had a celebrity on their hands backstage. It was occasions like these that demonstrated the importance of a large audience and the momentum that they can provide for a wrestler. It aided in elevating him and the chorus to a higher level of performance
  1. Image courtesy of WWE.com Despite the fact that the Yes! shout is plainly created and intended for audience engagement, there have been various points during the chant’s history where it has naturally expanded to an extent that is beyond comprehension. One of these defining moments occurred during the 2014 Royal Rumble. By this point, Bryan was embroiled in a conflict with The Authority, who was systematically undermining him at every opportunity. Despite the fact that Bryan actually began the event that night, battling against Bray Wyatt, many fans were expecting him to do double duty and win the Royal Rumble battle itself. Not only did this not occur, but Bryan did not even make an appearance throughout the match. That particular act drove fans to grow even more hostile toward the organization, pelting Bryan with shouts and repeated screams of “Yes!” throughout the match’s waning seconds. When it became evident that Batista would be victorious in the Rumble match, and therefore set up a big event with Randy Orton at WrestleMania, the boos got even louder. And as everyone knows, Bryan managed to bully his way into that bout and end up taking the entire show with him. He received a barrage of boos as he arrived at the arena last, which was arguably unwarranted given his position in the contest. As a result of this, the Yes! cry reached new heights in terms of popularity as practically everyone rallied around the sport’s improbable hero.
  1. WWE.com provided the image. However, despite the fact that the Yes! shout is plainly created and intended for audience engagement, there have been multiple points during the chant’s path where it has naturally expanded to an extent that is beyond comprehension. This included the 2014 Royal Rumble, which was one of those defining events. After a year and a half, Bryan was embroiled in a fight with The Authority, who was systematically sabotaging his efforts. While Bryan did begin the program that night, battling against Bray Wyatt, many fans were anticipating him to perform double duty and win the Royal Rumble event itself as a result of his widespread popularity. Furthermore, Bryan didn’t even make an appearance throughout the bout, which was a major letdown. That particular act drove fans to grow even more hostile toward the organization, pelting Bryan with shouts and repeated screams of “Yes!” throughout the match’s waning seconds…. When it became evident that Batista would be victorious in the Rumble match, and therefore set up a major event with Randy Orton at WrestleMania, the chants got even more intense. And as everyone knows, Bryan managed to bully his way into the match and end up taking home the victory. He received a barrage of boos as he arrived at the arena last, which was probably unwarranted. However, this was intended to be Bryan’s night in the eyes of the fans, and as it became evident that he would not be ending the event, the Yes! chant soared to new heights in terms of popularity as practically everyone rallied around the sport’s improbable hero
  1. As the Yes! shout spread across the realm of professional wrestling, it was likely inevitable that it would ultimately spread to other types of sports outside of the squared circle as well. As WrestleMania 30 approached, and Bryan’s popularity was at an all-time high, the Yes! chant made its way to another location. Despite the fact that Mania is just a few weeks away, Michigan State football fans have embraced the song, which was started by Travis Jackson, a junior center for the Spartans. In that moment, Bryan and the Yes! cry cemented their position in sporting culture, and he demonstrated how he had helped bring WWE into the mainstream, and into the homes of millions of people who would otherwise have been ignorant of pro wrestling’s existence. It didn’t end there, either. When the Seattle Seahawks won Super Bowl XLVIII in 2014, they celebrated by tweeting an image with the words Yes! Yes! Yes! Though Mania 30 may have been the apex of Bryan’s narrative, it continued to be successful for some years afterward.
  1. It was surely inevitable that, as the Yes! cry spread across the world of professional wrestling, it would ultimately find its way into other sports outside of the squared circle. And so it has. As WrestleMania 30 approached, and Bryan’s popularity was at an all-time high, the Yes! chant made its way to a different location.. With Mania just a few weeks away, Michigan State football fans embraced the slogan, which was introduced by athlete Travis Jackson, a junior center for the Spartans. In that moment, Bryan and the Yes! chorus cemented their position in sporting culture, and he demonstrated how he had helped bring WWE into the mainstream, and into the homes of millions of people who would otherwise have been oblivious of pro wrestling’s presence. It didn’t end there, though. Following their victory in Super Bowl XLVIII in 2014, the Seattle Seahawks tweeted an image with the caption “Yes, yes, yes!” Even if the completion of Bryan’s narrative at Mania 30 was likely the pinnacle of the mountain, it remained popular for many years after that.
See also:  What Does The Chant In Lord Of The Flies Symbolize

Why is chant called Gregorian?

The fact that the “Gregorian” chant is called after and attributed to Pope Gregory I (r. 590-604) is the result of political expediency and spin doctoring. Conflict between the Pope (the Bishop of Rome) and other Bishops over the Pope’s power as “first among equals” was mirrored by conflict between the Pope, as spiritual ruler of Rome, and the secular leaders of the city of Rome, which lasted for decades. This conflict persisted intermittently until the 15th century, when the “Conciliar Conflict” (c.

In addition to writing, collecting, and organizing the body of plainchant in use during his time period, Gregory I is credited with founding the first singing school (Schola Cantorum) in Rome to train singers for the church, organizing the church’s annual cycle of liturgical readings, and establishing the church’s authority over the Roman secular rulers, among other accomplishments.

  • The artist painted scenes in which a bird sang mantras into his ear while he was writing them down.
  • Any of these claims are up to debate as to whether or not he actually accomplished them.
  • Those who ascribed Gregory’s extraordinary achievements were performing the same function as spin doctors today, who work for politicians and entertainment both.
  • The Emperor Charlemagne addressed a request to Rome for legitimate liturgical books and chants in around the year 800, some two centuries after Gregory’s death.
  • The cry of the Franks is the form that gradually gained popularity….

As a result, what we often refer to as Gregorian chant should probably be referred to as Carolingian chant, but the simple way out is to simply refer to it as plainchant and leave it as that. John HowellToEarly Music Frequently Asked Questions

WWE Twitter Account Pushes for Fans to Stop Doing the What Chant

Back in 2001, when “Stone Cold” Steve Austin first introduced the “What?” chant to the WWE audience, he unintentionally established an 18-year-old trend that is still going strong. While wrestling, if the audience is either bored or doesn’t like the wrestler, they will be given the “What?” treatment every time they take a pause between each remark. Occasionally, wrestlers are able to turn the tables on the audience (Alexa Bliss and The Miz are two recent standouts), but more often than not, they fall under the pressure of having the crowd interrupt them on a regular basis.

It was unsuccessful.

While watching Monday Night Raw, the user posted, “Can we please put an end to the chants of “What?” When the chorus began during a segment between Jerry “The King” Lawler and Rusev, it was asked if they could.

xoxo” On Twitter, a second user said, “We watched people shouting it to @AngeloDawkins when he bid farewell to @WWENXT, and now to a ‘Hall Of Famer’ on RAW.” That is not a show of revolt; rather, it is a display of disdain for authority.

On an episode ofBusted Open Radio earlier this year, Austin revealed why she did it: “I did it as a, you know, running heel at the time and I left that message on Christian’s phone.” In my head, every time I spoke something, the thought would go something like this: “What?” I received a lengthy voicemail and thought to myself, “Man, there’s something here.” I simply thought it was a funny way to poke fun at someone by saying, ‘Oh, you’re meant to be like the World’s Strongest Man,’ or anything along those lines.

  • what?’ You’re right, aren’t you?
  • Isn’t it true that I’m jabbing you?
  • So that was my first attempt at putting it to good use.
  • A huge part of being in WWE or in the wrestling business is that the audience wants to be involved, whether they are rooting for you or against you, applauding for you or booing you, or whatever.
  • It was an opportunity for them to be a part of the performance and to be active in the production.

That’s something I wouldn’t have guessed. back in the day, that anything like this would have the staying power or legs that it does now,” he continued.

WWE: How & When Did the Kurt Angle ‘You Suck’ Chant Get Started?

It was by chance that former WWE champion “Stone Cold” Steve Austin established an 18-year-old tradition amongst WWE fans with the “What?” chant in 2001, which is still going strong. If a wrestler is delivering a promo and the audience is either bored or disinterested in them, they will receive the “What?” treatment every time they take a break between phrases. A number of current wrestlers have demonstrated their ability to turn the tables on the audience (Alexa Bliss and The Miz are two current standouts), while others have crumbled under the burden of having the audience interrupt them on a regular basis.

It was eventually determined that both tweets were removed.

If anything, it is an indication of disdain for the authority figure.

A number of interviews with Austin have focused on the fact that the chant has survived.

I simply thought it was a funny way to poke fun at someone by saying something like, ‘Oh, you’re meant to be like the World’s Strongest Man,’ or anything along those lines…

The tone is quite condescending.

That’s when I realized that no one had done that as a heel before.

So that was my first attempt at putting it to use in this manner.

When you’re in WWE or in the wrestling business, it’s important to remember that the audience wants to be involved, whether they’re rooting for you or rooting against you.

As a part of the show, they had the opportunity to get active and contribute.

I wish you hadn’t done it!’ Never in a million years would I have imagined it. That’s something I wouldn’t have guessed before. “I never imagined that it would have the staying power or legs that it has today,” he continued.

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