Good Where We’ve Been; Good Where We’re Going To, Chumash Tribal Chant

Stories & Songs

Chumash tales and music are included in this collection. You may download the full collection in a single file by clicking on the following link (75 megs).

Introduction

Chumash tales and music are included in this collection. You may get the full collection in one file by clicking here (75 megs).

Chumash Welcome Song

We owe our gratitude to the individual who brought us this first song, which we call the Welcome song… ‘Samu’ is the name of my grandfather. It was in a dream that this song came to him, and when he awoke, he went outside and instructed everyone to come around and learn the song, since it is the song that would bring the spirits into the house. This will be the first song you sing anytime a group of people comes together. Pay attention to the:story|song

The Deer Dance song

This first song, titled “Welcome Song,” is dedicated to the individual who brought it to our attention…. “Samu” is the name given to grandfather. It was in a dream that this song came to him, and when he awoke, he went outside and instructed everyone to come together and learn this song, for it is the song that would bring the spirits into the house. The first song you’ll sing anytime you get together will be this one! Take a listen to the:story|musical composition

The Red-tailed Hawk song

It was given to Chumash males on the San Inez Indian Reservation and portrays a hawk flying over a mountainside on a thermal that is hovering over the verge of a precipice. You can hear it fluttering in the background of the song, like if it’s bringing its blessings down on the listeners. Pay attention to the:story|song

The Willow song

When it arrived in the San Inez Indian Reservation, it was given to Chumash men who painted a hawk flying over a hillside on a thermal hovering over the edge. You can hear it fluttering in the background of the song as it bestows its benediction on the listeners. Take a listen to the:story|musical composition

The Tomol Launching song

It was given to Chumash males on the San Inez Indian Reservation and portrays a bird flying over a mountainside on a thermal that is lingering over the edge. You can hear it fluttering in the background of the song as it bestows its benediction on the people. Take a listen to the story|song.

A Seaweed Dance song

However, nothing is known about the origins of this seaweed dance song; however, it is performed in order to petition the kelp forests, which are very crucial to the overall health of the ecosystem. It was discovered through the use of recordings from some years ago. Pay attention to the:story|song

Another Seaweed Dance song

This seaweed dance song pays homage to the seaweed habitats; the vast kelp beds out in the channel are a cradle of life, similar to the rain forest of the ocean, and are celebrated in this song. This is a catchy dance tune that speaks about the wonderful abundance that can be found in the vast kelp beds across the world. Pay attention to the:story|song

The Ocean Waves song

It has been ages since the tides and waves have been rising and falling, breaking and retreating. This song is a mantra that prays for an infinite consciousness of kindness, which is the goal of the song. This has been in action since long before human beings were born, and it will continue to exist long after we are no longer here. While we human beings are only here for a little period of time in the grand scheme of things, we should ask ourselves: what good am I for the brief period of time that I am here?

What contribution do I make today? What good are you for the little period of time you have left? What kind of service do you provide today? Pay attention to the:story|song

The Tupacutu song

This is a highly meaningful song to the Chumash people, and it is performed here. This song is intended to be performed during a feast or at the yearly harvest, and it is intended to bring people together via music. This song serves as a reminder of our familial bonds as well as the power of our community. Pay attention to the:story|song

The Whale song

For the Chumash people, this is a very meaningful song. People get together when they sing this song, which is designed to be sung during a feast and at the yearly harvest festival, among other occasions. This song serves as a reminder of our familial bonds as well as the power of our local communities, which we can all appreciate. Take a listen to the:story|musical composition

The Dolphin Calling song

Our forefathers crossed the big rainbow bridge to the mainland, according to the creation account of the dolphin and the rainbow, which is told in the Bible. While crossing the rainbow bridge, some ancestors lost their footing and fell into the river, where they began to drown. The spirit of the mother earth cried out to the creator to help the people, and the drowning humans were transformed into dolphins as a result of the creator’s intervention. If you are struggling under the weight of your own anguish and suffering, this prayer hymn is dedicated to you.

Pay attention to the:story|song

The Sour Dock song

In spite of the fact that it is not itself a medical plant, it is beneficial in the preparation of teas that aid in the release of therapeutic compounds from other medicinal plants. A highly useful plant, yet it is also a very modest plant in appearance. This prayer aids in the release of each other’s medication. Pay attention to the:story|song

The Momeno song

While not itself a medical plant, the sour dock is beneficial in the preparation of teas that release the therapeutic properties found in other medicinal herbs. Pretty useful plant, although it’s a very modest plant in appearance. It is via this prayer that we may help each other unleash their medication. Take a listen to the:story|musical composition

The Ancestor song

While not itself a medicinal plant, the sour dock is used in the preparation of teas that release the medication from other medicinal herbs. A highly useful plant, but it is also a very modest one. This prayer aids in the discharge of one another’s medication. Take a listen to the story|song.

The Sunset song

This song is dedicated to the sunset and everything that it represents. Twilight time is when the sun is finishing up its day and starts its journey into the evening. Pay attention to the:story|song

The Wolf Chase song

This song is traditionally sung around a campfire at night, with the women dancing around the fire and the males entering dressed as wolves. In this mating dance, the wolves hunt the deer, and as time passes, the females decide which wolf they want to catch and keep. Pay attention to the:story|song

The Night Bird song

There are many distinct names for the night bird, which is referred to as “owls” of various sorts.

At night, a fire is built to do prayer work, and this song is sung to invite the owls into the village. Pay attention to the:story|song

Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians

Our reserve in the Santa Ynez Valley is home to tribal families, our tribal administration, and the Chumash Casino Resort, all of which are located on the reservation. However, our reserve is also the site of a dream that began many years ago with our forefathers and foremothers. Because of the acts we are taking in the present, their spirit will go on for a long time in the future as well. You may learn about us and our history and culture by looking at the content on this page. You can also observe the progress we’ve achieved in terms of our governance and economic growth by visiting this website.

A Living History

Tribal families, our tribal government, and the Chumash Casino Resort all call the Santa Ynez Valley home, and our reservation is no exception. We too have a dream, which began many years ago with our forefathers and continues now on our reserve. Because of the acts we are performing in the present, their spirit will go on for a long time to come. You may learn about us and our history and culture by looking at the material on this website. You can also see how far we’ve come in terms of our governance and economic growth by looking at the information on this page.

Health Clinic

In addition to providing comprehensive medical, dental, and mental health services to all tribe members, the Santa Ynez Tribal Health Clinic also serves the greater community. Go to the website to learn more.

Foundation

We pay tribute to our ancestors by reaching out to our neighbors and providing care for our community. To date, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indian Foundation has raised more than $25 million in donations to support these efforts. More information or to submit a grant request: An Oxnard guy walked away with a large sum of money on Wednesday morning after scoring the jackpot while playing Ultimate Texas Hold’em and placing a side wager at the Chumash Casino Resort’s table games. The 15th annual Chumash Culture Day will be broadcast live on Facebook from 1 p.m.

  • on Saturday, October 23, and will feature California-style Native American music and dance, among other things.
  • During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the Chumash Casino Resort launched its annual Project Pink promotion on Friday, which will showcase pink-hued goodies available for purchase at its restaurants during the month of October.
  • The list goes on and on.
  • The reopening is expected to take place in the spring of 2022.
  • During a time when rising water prices endangered the viability of two child sports teams that shared a local field, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians and prominent county companies banded together to make an ambitious solution a reality.
  • Additionally, a job fair will be held on Wednesday, June 9 from 10 a.m.
  • at the Chumash Employee Resource Center in Buellton.

More than a dozen years ago, the Phoebe A.

All of those relics and artifacts have a connection to the Chumash people.

Chairman Kenneth Kahn, of the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians, is our guest today on the show.

It is supported by the company.

Ken Kahn has been voted to serve another term as the tribal chairman of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians, following a recent poll to elect the tribe’s governing body.

All four members of the tribe’s Business Committee, Mike Lopez, Maxine Littlejohn, Gary Pace, and Raul Armenta, were also re-elected to their positions.

Department of State has issued a statement saying that Representative Deb Haaland became the first Native American approved to serve in the president’s Cabinet on Monday, marking a watershed milestone in the history of American Indians across the country.

Grant applications for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Foundation’s popular Technology in Schools Program are now being accepted.

The Chumash Casino Resort’s sales of pink-colored sweets, snacks, treats, and beverages contributed $6,483 to the annual Project Pink campaign, which raises donations throughout Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October.

The total amount donated this year was $12,966, with the matching grant bringing the total amount donated to $12,966.

Because of the COVID-19 epidemic, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Foundation has donated $100,000 in gifts to Santa Ynez Valley schools to assist them in meeting high-tech demands for distant learning once classes restart.

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It has been a long time since the Santa Ynez Valley Botanic Garden in Buellton finished the repair of its residence, which was built in the style of a typical dome-shaped Chumash structure and constructed entirely of natural plant materials.

In preparation for the reopening of local schools with distance learning in place, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Foundation has announced a $100,000 donation to the Santa Ynez Valley School District to assist with the unexpected expenditures incurred as a result of COVID-19 limitations.

  • The resort reopened its doors on Wednesday, June 10, with increased safety limitations in place.
  • “As the original custodians of the Santa Ynez Valley, our tribe recognizes the necessity of limiting our influence on the environment by all means possible,” says Tribal Chairman Kenneth Kahn.
  • It was in May that the tribe received accreditation from Green Business Certification Inc.
  • Tribal Chairman Kenneth Kahn said the tribe has looked into ways to recycle garbage on-site or with off-site non-profit and business partners to reduce the amount of waste produced.
  • According to Kenneth Kahn, tribal chairman of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians, tribe members will continue to monitor the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and take appropriate safeguards in accordance with government guidelines.

According to Carlos Cortez, scout executive and CEO of the Los Padres Council of the Boy Scouts of America, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians has donated $100,000 to the Rancho Alegre Boy Scout Camp reconstruction project, bringing the total amount donated to the $18 million rebuild campaign to $13.5 million.

Project Pink efforts raised more than $6,000 this year, according to Paul Hohe, director of food and beverage at the resort, who announced the results at the Thrive Fashion Show.

In order to raise awareness of the Central Coast Marine Corps Reserves Toys for Tots campaign, which assists families in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties via collaborations with local agencies, the Chumash Casino Resort has scheduled a December performance each year since 2004.

6, only hours before the pop and R&B group 98 Degrees was scheduled to play at the Chumash Casino Resort Samala Room.

According to the National Defense Authorization Act, which is now awaiting President Donald Trump’s signature before becoming law, the wording was included in the bill.

Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History

To remember our ancestors, we reach out to our neighbors and care for our community. To date, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Foundation has received more than $25 million in contributions. Visit our website for more information or to submit an online grant application In the early hours of Wednesday morning, an Oxnard man struck it rich after winning a jackpot in an Ultimate Texas Hold’em game at the Chumash Casino Resort table games and placing a side wager at the same time. Saturday, October 23, from 1 p.m.

  • PT, the 15th annual Chumash Culture Day will be broadcast live on Facebook, including Native American singing and dance in the California manner.
  • During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the Chumash Casino Resort launched its annual Project Pink promotion on Friday, which will showcase pink-hued goodies available for purchase at its restaurants throughout the month.
  • Infinite number of possibilities According to the proprietors, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians, the Hadsten House hotel in Solvang will lock its doors on September 1 for repairs.
  • The Chumash Tribe has been working diligently behind the scenes for more than a decade to realize our goal of providing a venue where tourists may congregate and learn directly about the Chumash people of this region.
  • This summer, Chumash Enterprises is offering special $250 monthly bonuses to employees in specific positions and hosting a job fair on Wednesday, June 9 from 10 a.m.
  • at the Chumash Employee Resource Center in Buellton in an effort to fill more than 200 full-time and part-time staffing vacancies.
  • More than a dozen years ago, the Phoebe A.

All of those relics and artifacts have a connection to the Chumash culture.

Kenneth Kahn, the chairman of the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians, is our guest this week.

As a thank you for their efforts, the program recognizes team members by granting them $500 All-Star awards from the foundation, which are then donated to a charitable organization of their choosing.

Members of the tribe’s Business Committee, including Mike Lopez, Maxine Littlejohn, Gary Pace, and Raul Armenta, were also re-elected to their positions.

Constructing the $32 million museum and cultural complex for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians is still underway, with completion anticipated later this year.

Project Pink, which raises donations throughout Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, received a total of $6,483 in revenue from sales of pink-colored desserts, snacks, sweets, and beverages at the Chumash Casino Resort this year.

The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians’ gift brought the total amount donated to $12,966.

Because of the COVID-19 epidemic, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Foundation has made a $100,000 grant to Santa Ynez Valley schools to assist them in meeting high-tech demands for distant learning once classes restart.

It has been a long time since the Santa Ynez Valley Botanic Garden in Buellton finished the restoration of its residence, which was built in the style of a typical dome-shaped Chumash home out of natural plant materials and is now open to the public.

Following a three-month hiatus due to COVID-19, the Chumash Casino Resort reopened its doors on Wednesday, June 10, with stricter safety measures in place.

‘As the original custodians of the Santa Ynez Valley, our tribe recognizes the critical need of limiting our influence on the environment through whatever measures are required,’ said Tribal Chairman Kenneth Kahn.

It was in May that the tribe received accreditation from Green Business Certification Inc.

Chairman Kenneth Kahn of the Cherokee Nation said the tribe has looked at ways to recycle garbage on site or with off-site non-profit and commercial sector partners.

Kenneth Kahn, tribal chairman of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians, stated that the tribe’s members would continue to monitor development of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic and take appropriate safeguards in accordance with government guidelines.

According to Carlos Cortez, scout executive and CEO of the Los Padres Council of the Boy Scouts of America, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians has made a $100,000 donation to the Rancho Alegre Boy Scout Camp reconstruction project, bringing the total amount raised so far in the $18 million rebuild campaign to $13.5 million.

He also announced that the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Foundation had provided a matching grant, allowing him to present a donation of $12,234 to the Breast Cancer Resource Center of Santa Barbara.

The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians made a gift of $25,000 to the local Toys for Tots program on Dec.

Among the provisions of the measure passed by the Senate on Tuesday was language ordering the Department of Interior to place 1,427 acres of Santa Ynez property, known as Camp 4, in federal trust for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians.

The wording was included in the National Defense Authorization Act, which is now awaiting President Donald Trump’s signature before it can be signed into effect.

Chumash Life

Chumash culture and daily life revolved around their town and hamlet. There were hundreds of different Chumash villages in and around Santa Barbara at one point in time. Some villages were the size of small cities, while others were much smaller in scale. The communities were built on high land near lagoons, creek mouths, lakes, or springs, and they were surrounded by water. The most populous communities were established along the mainland shore, near the Santa Barbara Channel, in the early twentieth century.

  1. The Chumash Indians are distinguished by their development and usage of the plank canoe, as well as their amazing baskets, tools, and bead making, as well as their customs and beliefs, as well as their craftsmanship.
  2. There would be a large number of such buildings in a community.
  3. Every hamlet had a playground: a level, smooth space large enough for outdoor activities like as shinny, kick ball, and the hoop-and-pole game to be enjoyed by the entire community.
  4. Thesiliykor holy enclosure, a semicircular space that was enclosed for seclusion and where priests and shamans performed religious ceremonies, was located within the complex.
  5. Visit the Museum and get a feel for the Chumash people, who are known as “the ones who produce shell bead currency.” Cave Painting and Everyday Life Health and Medicine are two important topics.

We’re Still Here – Pulse of the Planet

Music ambience: drums/chants, percussion instruments Patrick Orosco, Deer Song, and Ohlone Rumsen are examples of indigenous people. We’re in the Ventana Wilderness in California, with a group of Native Americans who are singing and dancing to the traditional music of their culture. I’m Jim Metzner, and this is the Pulse of the Planet. Thank you for listening. “Keep these tunes in mind. These tunes are hundreds of years old. They seemed to have vanished – as a result of what had happened to our people.

  1. We’re still here, believe it or not!
  2. We shall continue to sing these songs as long as we are present.” Patrick Orozco is an Ohlone Rumsen faith keeper based in Monterey, California, and is a member of the Ohlone people.
  3. In addition, I’ve accompanied them to the lodges, which are ohohome lodges where we worship and reflect, as well as perform holy songs, which are to be retained in the lodge.
  4. “The songs that we are about to share with you are not lodge tunes.” “Why is it, why is it so crucial that there are songs that are not released?” says the narrator.
  5. “They gave us that instruction from the beginning.” It has been going on for several generations now.
  6. We’re bringing back all that was almost lost, you understand.
  7. “A place where all people come together in prayer, in prayer and understanding,” says the author.

Pulse of the Planet is made possible by the National Science Foundation, which has given funding for the project. Hello, my name is Jim Metzner. The Ohaloni Rumsin people take great pride in carrying on traditions passed down from generation to generation. Date of broadcast: 04/25/2012Scientist:

Transcript:

The following music is playing: drum/chanting, persons from the Ohlone Rumsen tribe, including Patrick Orosco; Deer Song; and others This is the Ventana Wilderness in California, and we’re in the company of a group of Native Americans who are singing and dancing to the traditional melodies of their people. The Pulse of the Planet is brought to you by Jim Metzner, and I’m your host. Keep these tunes in mind.” Songs from a long time ago can be found on this page. It was because of what had happened to our people that we believed they were no longer there.

  1. No, we haven’t left yet!
  2. We shall continue to sing these songs for as long as we are present.
  3. In fact, I’ve been all throughout California, to several reservations, and visited with all of the Chumash and Juareo tribe chiefs, to name a few.
  4. No matter where we travel, we receive the same set of instructions: This is not a collection of lodge tunes, which we will share with you.” So, what’s the deal with this?
  5. We consider them to be sacred since they are songs performed exclusively to the creator.
  6. Generations of people have been involved in this activity.
  7. All that was almost lost is being brought back now, you understand.
  8. All people gather in prayer, in prayer and understanding,” says the leader.
  9. Hello, my name is Jim Metzner and I’d like to introduce myself.
  10. Date of broadcast: 04/25/2012Author:
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Chumash Indians Have a Long and Proud History… One of the first humans to set foot on California’s soil. The Chumash Indian tribe has played an important role in California history, as well as in the history of my family. From 1542-1800, I will speak about the history of my family’s tribe, and specifically about two separate periods of time between 1542-1800, during which my family lived and endured some really terrible times, during which many of them were slain or perished from various diseases.

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  2. They were individuals of strong moral character who lived in harmony with the environment.
  3. People’s everyday lives were guided by astrologers who interpreted their birth charts and consulted them.
  4. Santa Barbara served as the geographic center of their territories; Mt.
  5. Pinos, Cuddy Valley (Valley of the Shaman), and Frazier Mountain served as the geographic center of their universe.
  6. (As hunters, gatherers, and fishers, they were acutely aware of their reliance on the natural environment around them.
  7. (Gamble, L., p.

It was customary for them to have rituals to commemorate crucial seasons, and their lives were considered valuable because of their capacity to harvest food and store it for the winter, allowing them to survive the hard winters.

It was reinforced with whalebone and the roofs were made of tulle mats, which were employed as a decorative element.

A single residence may accommodate as many as 50 people.

During the period of European conquest, there were 20,000 Chumash living in a region that stretched from Malibu in the south to San Luis Obispo in the north along California’s coast, according to anthropologists.

Food, clothes, medicine, baskets, boats, and tools were all created by our forefathers and foremothers from practically every form of plant and animal available to them.

The Chumash people’s rich history and way of life are maintained through their art forms, which have been passed down from generation to generation and are still being practiced now.

Our boats – canoes known as tomols – made it possible for us to fish and trade in plenty, moving up and down the coast to different settlements.

The Chumash were met by sailing ships under the leadership of Juan Cabrillo, who led them to safety.

42) With the arrival of the Europeans, the Chumash tribe was confronted with a number of difficulties.

The Spanish began bringing missionaries into the country in order to attempt to convert the Indians to Christianity.

They began to disperse their communities away from the Spanish, and in 1772, they saw missions being erected on the coast of California, and they decided to establish a settlement there.

Unfortunately, most missions exploited Indians as slave labor, which was unethical.

Smith-Llera (Smith-Llera, p.

There is little information available regarding the Chumash’s religion, however they did revere a divinity known as chupu.

The Chumash administration was structured by village rather than by tribe, as was the case in other indigenous cultures.

The chief’s power was based on either his family’s lineage or his financial resources.

This relationship between men and women is historically noteworthy since the Chumash were one of the few Native American tribes who permitted women to hold positions of authority.

(Gamble, L., p.

The Chumash, on the other hand, were rarely involved in actual fighting since they were a peaceful tribe who did not believe in taking another’s life.

Unfortunately, many of these legends were lost to time when the Chumash were all but exterminated by the Spanish mission system in the 1700s and 1800s, resulting in their extinction.

The Chumash civilization is often regarded as one of the most distinctive and technologically advanced in the United States.

The Chumash revered the Earth, referring to it as their “teacher,” since they understood that their own life depended on it.

The novels “When the Animals Were People, Stories Told by the Chumash Indians of California” and “Chumash A Picture of Their World” are just a few of examples of what you may find.

When the Animals Were People is available on Amazon.

One day, I wish to share the fabled narrative that was told to me with my children, and I look forward to doing it.

The Chumash tribe spoke a Salinan-Seri dialect of the Hokan language family, which is related to the Salinan language family.

By the Spanish, they were described as “of pleasant temperament, sociable, generous, and kind.” The six languages that make up the Chumash language family were named after the missions with which they were associated: San Luis Obispo, Mission La Purisima, Mission Santa Ynez, Mission Santa Barbara, and Mission San Buenaventura.

  1. The Chumash had their own form of coinage, which was derived from the ocean.
  2. The greater the number of beads in your collection, the wealthier you were.
  3. It was important to the Chumash that anything they utilized, whether it came from nature or the ocean, was always returned to the Earth since they revered “Mother Earth” and were grateful for everything she had given them.
  4. Coombs (Coombs, G., p.
  5. If they did wear clothing, the ladies would do so in the form of skirts made of pelts or woven plant material.
  6. The Chumash also wore some really unique jewelry made of shells and stones, which you can see here.
  7. They would also bet and compete in foot races from one hamlet to the next, among other things.

This would be attended by individuals from all across the Chumash country who would travel to a host community.

Prayers, rites, political conversations, and games would all be held with the Chumash taking part.

The Chumash utilized the Obispeno language at the San Luis Obispo mission, and it was spoken by the Chumash in the mission.

The Ventura County mission was the source of the Ventureno language and dialect.

Fur robes, moccasins, a headpiece, kilts, aprons, and leggings are some of the many aspects of the clothing to look at.

=In the final image below, this is a relative of a member of the Chumash tribal group.

Unfortunately, the Spanish were forced to return in the 1780s.

The Chumash population in 1800 was just 2,788 people lower than the initial population of 22,000 Chumash Indians before the Spanish arrived.

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Last but not least, one of the most important things I learned from my study is that my family has a rich history that ought to be shared.

In life, I’ve learnt that I should never take anything for granted and that I should be grateful for all I’ve been given.

I wish to pay tribute to my family and ancestors by taking part in activities that were significant to them in their lives.

It was also revealed to me that the Chumash would have been an even wealthier and more prominent tribe today if the Spanish had not barged their way into my family’s property and devastated their numbers during the Spanish occupation.

It was a big eye-opener for me to see that my family placed a high value on respecting and protecting the environment.

I hope to hear from you.

McCall et al (1998).

Nature books published by Ez Nature Books.

Smith-Llera et al (2016).

Capstone Press, a capstone imprint, is based in North Mankato, Minnesota.

A Study of the Chumash World at the Time of Contact with Europeans: Power, Trade, and Feast Among Complex Hunter-Gatherers The University of California Press is based in Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London.

(2008).

In the Chumash World at the Time of European Contact: Power, Trade, and Feasting Among Complex Hunter-Gatherers In the Chumash World at the Time of European Contact (pp.

The University of California Press is based in Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London.

(1977).

5, no. 4, pp. 309-328. “California Native American Chumash Songs Star Knowledge,” a collection of Chumash songs from California. Anwa Weelanchee’s performance on EarthStar TV’s YouTube channel on March 25, 2012, may be seen at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehqPnOPH 5I.

LOCAL NOTES: Local Chumash keep their language and culture alive with music

The following article was posted on October 31st, 2017, in the Santa Maria Sun – Volume 18, Issue 35The following articles were printed from Santa Maria Sun- Volume 18, Issue 35

By JOE PAYNE

Native Americans of the Chumash tribe have a long and rich history. One of the first persons to set foot on the Californian continent. In California history, as well as in my family’s history, the Chumash Indian tribe has played a significant role. From 1542-1800, I will speak about the history of my family’s tribe, and specifically about two separate periods of time between 1542-1800, during which my family lived and endured some extremely terrible times, during which many of them were slain or perished from various diseases.

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  2. People of high integrity, they lived in harmony with the environment and were devoted to it.
  3. In order to guide people’s daily lives, astrologers interpreted their natal charts.
  4. Santa Barbara served as the geographic center of their territories; Mt.
  5. Pinos, Cuddy Valley (Valley of the Shaman), and Frazier Mountain served as the geographic center of the universe.
  6. (As hunters, gatherers, and fishers, they were acutely aware of their reliance on the natural environment.) They had ceremonies to mark the seasons that were critical to their way of life, with particular emphasis placed on the completion of a crop and storing food for the winter months.
  7. Gamble (page 30) describes the process of creating a new product.

They had ceremonies to commemorate the passing of crucial seasons, and they recognized that their lives were important because of their capacity to harvest food and store it for the winter, allowing them to survive the severe winters in which they lived.

It was reinforced with whalebone and the roofs were made of tulle mats, which were employed as a finishing touch.

One residence may accommodate as many as 50 people.

During the period of European conquest, there were 20,000 Chumash living in a region that stretched from Malibu in the south to San Luis Obispo in the north along California’s coast, according to some anthropologists’ estimates.

Food, clothes, medicine, baskets, boats, and tools were all created by our forefathers from practically every form of plant and animal available to them.

The natural environment was a source of inspiration for artists.

Known as hunters and gatherers, the Chumash are a seafaring society that originated in California.

The Chumash tribe was first seen by Europeans in 1542, when they arrived in California from Mexico.

On page 42 of Smith-book, Llera’s she writes, ” When the Europeans came, they brought with them a slew of issues for the Chumash people.

As the Spanish began to arrive, missionaries were dispatched to the Indians with the goal of converting them to Christianity.

They began to disperse their communities away from the Spanish, and in 1772, they saw missions being erected on the coast of California, and they chose to establish their settlement there.

Unluckily, the majority of missionaries utilized the Indians as slaves to complete their missions.

On page 50 of Smith-book, Llera’s she writes, ” The horrible treatment of the Chumash led to a large number of rebellions against the missions in the 1800s.

The shamans of the tribe would heal ailments with chants or medicines, or even a tube that was used to suck out negative spirits from those who were afflicted with the disease.

In ancient times, chiefs ruled over their respective villages.

Women may be able to succeed to the role of chief executive officer in the future.

Those who held the position of head chief were granted the ability to lead their tribes into combat, preside over ceremonies, and provide permission for tribal members to go hunting.

Despite this, the Chumash were a peaceful tribe who did not believe in taking another’s life.

Chumash tribal history was passed down from generation to generation through stories, dances, and legends, as was the case with most Native American tribes.

The Chumash tribe was almost wiped out as a result of being infected with European illnesses, which I shall go into more detail about later on.

We may learn a great deal from the Chumash, who recognized the interconnectedness of humans and the natural riches that the Earth freely provides for them.

In addition, various works authored by tribal members have documented the Chumash way of life.

This novel, When the Animals Were People, tells the story of nine legends about a character named Coyote and his associates, which the Chumash thought were true stories about actual people.

Among the various tales that the Chumash passed down from generation to generation, one that I heard from my great grandmother and found to be rather intriguing was the Coyote legend narrative.

In continuing to share history and tales, I wish to make my forefathers and foremothers proud of me.

Chumash is a Native American term that translates to “beadmaker” or “seashell people.” By the Spanish, they were described as “of pleasant temperament, sociable, generous, and kind.” San Luis Obispo, Mission La Purisima, Mission Santa Ynez, Mission Santa Barbara, and Mission San Buenaventura are the names of the six languages that make up the Chumash language family.

  • In addition to using their own cash, the Chumash also utilized currency that came from the water.
  • Your wealth increased in direct proportion to the number of beads in your possession.
  • It was important to the Chumash that anything they utilized, whether it came from nature or the ocean, was always returned to the Earth since they revered “Mother Earth” and were grateful for everything she had given them.
  • Coombs, describes the process in detail on p.
  • Also, the Chumash were known to dress in a bare minimum.
  • Men and children, on the other hand, typically wore nothing, with the exception of animal pelts when it became chilly.
  • When the Chumash had any spare time, they would engage in a sport that was similar to soccer.

Chumash believed there was a most important period of the year that was very significant, and this time was known as “Day of the New Sun.” A large number of people from all over the Chumash country would travel to a host hamlet to participate in this event.

Prayers, rites, political talks, and games were all part of the Chumash experience.

From the Santa Barbara mission emerged the Barbareno language.

For example, as shown in this image, the Chumash would dress in their traditional clothing at ceremonial occasions.

In order to offer homage to “Mother Earth,” their family members, and sometimes even their deceased ancestors, the Chumash would dance and sing to their honor.

During this performance, she is singing a chanting song that is intended to bless the Earth and express gratitude for all that it provides.

Within a short period of time, the Spanish destroyed the Chumash in a variety of ways, including seizing their property, forcing them to become part of the mission system, ruining their natural way of life, and introducing illnesses.

There was little doubt that the Chumash were not treated properly; tragically, they were slaughtered and humiliated as a result.

If you want assistance with a writing project, our academic specialists are available and willing to assist you.

Look at what we have to offer Last but not least, one of the most significant revelations I had from my study was that my family has a rich history that ought to be shared.

In life, I’ve learnt that I should never take anything for granted and that I should be grateful for all I’m given.

Through my participation in activities that were significant to my ancestors and my family, I hope to pay tribute to them.

It was also revealed to me that the Chumash would have been an even wealthier and more prominent tribe today if the Spanish had not barged their way onto my family’s property and devastated their numbers as they did.

Because of this, I was able to see that my family placed a high value on respecting and caring for the environment.

References L.

The Chumash people of California.

D.

In this book, you will learn about the Chumash people, their history, and present.

L.

A Study of the Chumash World at the Time of Contact with Europeans: Power, Trade, and Feasts Among Complex Hunter-Gatherers Publisher: University of California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London GAMBL, L.

It is important to understand the environment and how it is managed.

17-36).

(n.d.).

Ecological Interpretation of the Chumash Indians’ Conversion to Christianity Human Ecology, vol.

5, no. 4, pp. 309-328. Abstract: “California Native American Chumash Songs Star Knowledge,” a collection of Chumash songs from California’s Native Americans. On EarthStar TV on March 25, 2012, you may view a performance by Anwa Weelanchee, which can be found at www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehqPnOPH 5I.

SINGING TOGETHER
Members of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians performed music at the tribe’s annual Chumash Culture Day on Oct. 14 (last year’s event pictured), singing songs written in Samala and keeping time with traditional clapper sticks.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SANTA YNEZ BAND OF CHUMASH INDIANS
“It feels really good, as you’re singing those old songs and playing the traditional instruments,” Zavalla said. “You definitely feel a connection to your people and your culture, knowing this is what they played so long ago. It helps connect you.”Music has been more than a valuable tool for connecting the Chumash as a community, it also in keeps the Samala language alive, Zavalla said. As culture director the tribe, she teaches Samala to tribal members and youth.A direct connection to both the traditional music and language comes from wax cylinder recordings of Maria Solares, one of the last speakers of fluent Samala. Solares died in 1923, Zavalla said, but before that she spent time with ethnographer John P. Harrington, who interviewed and recorded several Chumash.Solares sang only a few traditional songs for the recordings, Zavalla said, and others were written down. Zavalla and her students use everything they can that came directly from Solares or other Chumash, she said.“We have some that are written down, and we come up with the cadence,” she said. “And so the best-case scenario is we actually find a song she wrote down and she recorded on the wax cylinder recording. We only have three of those right now.”The Chumash of today who work to preserve both their culture and Samala language find a marriage of the two in music, Zavalla explained. They’ve penned new songs, with original tunes inspired by the melodies of their ancestors, she said.“We listen to that to hear how the old songs sounded, and we try to use the same cadence in these other songs,” she said. “We try our hardest because, you know, we don’t know. Sometimes we say, ‘You know what, this just feels good.’”And incorporating re-creations of ancient instruments helps too, she said. The clapper sticks and deer hoof rattles are rhythmic and simple to learn.The Lompoc Museumhas a sizable collection of Chumash artifacts, including musical instruments, available for public viewing. There are authentic items including bone flutes and whistles alongside some re-creations of clapper sticks and rattles. Some were made with muscle shells, and one flute with the tibia bone of deer.“It’s just another example of how the people lived off the land and the natural resources,” Zavalla said, “and how, you know, they were very resourceful and found a way to make instruments out of these different items.”Zavalla explained that most Chumash songs that were passed down were sung for ceremonial purposes, but there were also social songs. The social songs speak to the modern tradition of pow-wows, where tribal groups meet to share music and dance, like at the Chumash’s Intertribal Pow-Wow, which happened Sept. 30 and Oct. 1.Events like the pow-wow and culture day are great opportunities for the Chumash to share their culture, Zavalla said, but the music does a little more for the people who sing it.“In the work that I do,” she said, “I think what I feel most proud of, whether we are creating new songs or bringing back old ones, is when you hear the kids and adults singing our traditional songs again. I mean, it really does reconnect the people to our ancestors, and to each other.”Managing Editor Joe Payne is carving up his own clapper stick. Contact him at [email protected]

Chumash Culture Day Streams Live Oct. 23 on Facebook

On October 18, 2021, at 5:54 p.m., a post was made. Chumash Culture Day includes a lot of traditional singing and dancing, which is a lot of fun. Picture courtesy of the author. The 15th annual Chumash Culture Day will be broadcast live on Facebook from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 23, and will feature California-style Native American music and dancing. SY Chumash Culture Day 2021 will be aired live on the SY Chumash Culture Day 2021 Facebook page, which can be accessed at. The show will feature the tribe’s Samala Singers, dancers, and participation from numerous other tribes around California.

23 or they will be able to watch it at their convenience afterwards.” It is our goal that this would encourage more individuals who are interested in Native American culture to learn more about it on our special Culture Day.” Beginning with a summoning of the ancestors, the performance will include words from Zavalla, songs and dances by the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians’ Samala Singers, and a display of singers and storytellers from a range of California tribes.

The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians is a Native American tribe based in Santa Barbara County, California.

The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians is the only federally recognized Chumash tribe in the United States, and they have been for generations.

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