How Can The Nfl Get Away With Chiefs Chant Redskins Name

‘End racism,’ the NFL implored. So what about the Chiefs’ name?

Despite the fact that the NFL season began in September, it did so during a national debate over racial injustice and under pressure from its top players to do something about it. This season, the NFL stated as part of a broad-based social justice program that its clubs will stencil two messages on their end zones for the whole season: “End Racism” and “It Takes All Of Us,” in order to demonstrate their commitment to effecting positive change. “Taking concrete and meaningful efforts to address current systemic prejudice is vitally critical,” Commissioner Roger Goodell stated at the start of the season.

For 16 years, a group calling itself Not in Our Honor has called on the Chiefs to shed their name and renounce decades-old game-day ceremonies that are based on Native symbolism and customs.

That initiative, which is backed by a number of national advocacy organizations, has received little attention thus far.

It also committed to evaluate the “Arrowhead Chop,” which is performed in conjunction with the thunderous war chant that reverberates across the notoriously noisy venue’s stands.

Many activists believe that those actions are a far cry from the change they are seeking, which is the abolition of the Chiefs name as well as the elimination of all Indian-derived images and ceremonies.

And in order to further the pressure, they are taking a page from the playbook that was key in pushing Snyder’s hand in the first place.

The founder and executive director of IllumiNative, an Oklahoma-based organization dedicated to elevating Native voices and combating traditions and tropes that fuel racism and discrimination, such as team nicknames and imagery, said, “Imagine that it is your culture that is being mimicked and mocked.” “Imagine that it is your culture that is being mimicked and mocked,” she said.

Our children and individuals go through anything similar to this. The absurdity of the NFL and all of its franchises in declaring that they are taking a stand against racism… “It’s time to call it quits.”

Calling a corporate blitz

Despite the fact that the NFL season began in September, it did so during a national crisis over racial injustice and under demand from its top players to take action against it. This season, the NFL stated as part of a broad-based social justice campaign that its clubs will stencil two words on their end zones for the whole season: “End Racism” and “It Takes All Of Us” in order to express their commitment to bringing about change. As Commissioner Roger Goodell stated before the start of the season, “confronting current systemic prejudice with meaningful and constructive initiatives is very necessary.” In our job, we shall not slack off.” Native American activists will be looking for signals that their concerns are being considered as part of the Super Bowl LV campaign on Sunday, when the Kansas City Chiefs take on the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

  1. Not in Our Honor has been campaigning for the Chiefs to shed their name and forsake decades-old game-day ceremonies that are based on Native symbolism and customs for the past sixteen years.
  2. Earlier this year, the Kansas City Chiefs prohibited supporters from attending games at Arrowhead Stadium while wearing headdresses or face paint with American Indian themes.
  3. It was six years of debate with local leaders from a variety of Native backgrounds that culminated in the revisions, according to the Chiefs in a statement.
  4. Although Washington Football Team owner Daniel Snyder said in July that the Redskins moniker will be dropped, campaigners are encouraged by the wider national push to replace Native team names and mascots.
  5. It included legal action, protests, political pressure, and, eventually, a concerted campaign by investors to compel the NFL and the team’s main corporate sponsors, which included Nike, FedEx, Bank of America, and Pepsi Co., to demand reform.

Our children and people go through anything similar to this. ” There’s a lot of hypocrisy in the NFL and all the clubs who claim to be standing up against racism. This is it. “I’ve had it.”

Name Scrutiny Extends From Redskins To Chiefs, But Kansas City’s Mascot Has A Different Origin Story

During an NFL game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Kansas City Chiefs on Sept. 23, 2018, a view of the Kansas City Chiefs end zone can be seen in action at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri. The image is courtesy of Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images. Sportswire icon courtesy of Getty Images Because Washington’s NFL club, the Redskins, has officially changed its moniker to the Washington Chiefs, Kansas City’s franchise name, the Chiefs, has come under fire. That name, on the other hand, was not taken from any Native American tribe.

  • Roe Bartle, who was instrumental in the city’s acquisition of a professional football club in the early 1960s.
  • Fans, some of them are costumed in Native American garb, do the tomahawk chop in Arrowhead Stadium while Warpaint the horse gallops after a touchdown is scored.
  • The origins of the mere nickname, on the other hand, are more benign.
  • As Hunt was approaching the end of his second and last term as mayor at the time of his persuasion, Bartle mentioned that he had attempted to bring pro football to Kansas City at least two prior times during the AFL’s heyday.
  • Following his service in the war during World War I and his graduation from the University of Chattanooga with a law degree, Bartle began working as a scout executive in Wyoming after attending a training session held in Kansas City.
  • Hunt was inspecting the Kansas City area after meeting with Bartle in Dallas, and only Bartle and his chauffeur were aware of the fact that Hunt was doing so because he didn’t want to compete with the Dallas Cowboys for fans.
  • Lamar.” Hunt’s ruse was revealed in his book 100 Things Chiefs Fans Should KnowDo Before They Die.
  • Hunt formally announced his team’s relocation from Dallas to Kansas City in the spring of that year, and the Chiefs moniker was officially formed in May of that year.
  • Over the course of the Chiefs’ history as a club, their Native American traditions have also been called into question.
  • Fans, on the other hand, continued to sing the song and do the arm motion until the series brought it back a short while later.
  • The City of Fountains also has a large fountain, which is located at the south end of Penn Valley Park and has two bronze statues of firemen, which is named after the city.

Bartle Hall is located less than two kilometers away from the fountain. The Kansas City Convention Center, which is located in the heart of downtown, is dedicated in honor of the Chief, who died on May 9, 1974.

The Kansas City Chiefs’ “Arrowhead Chop” chant isn’t a tribute to people like me. It’s racist.

Note from the editor, dated February 5, 2021: This essay was initially published before to the 2020 Super Bowl in February of that year. It has been updated to include information on this year’s game. During a Chiefs game, a self-described lifelong Kansas City Chiefs fan approached me and inquired what the lyrics meant that were chanted by the crowd when they performed the “Arrowhead Chop,” the well-known chant that is composed of a sequence of literal ” oh oh oh “s. With disdain and irritation, I told him that they didn’t signify anything.

“It’s nothing,” I said again and again.

The Kansas City Chiefs, an NFL football club based in my hometown, will face the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the Super Bowl this year.

Over the course of several years, the public discourse about offensive sports mascots that misrepresent Native American culture has been centered on the Washington Redskins and the Cleveland Indians, with the Kansas City Chiefs remaining largely unnoticed.

As an educator at Haskell Indian Nations University, the only four-year university for federally recognized Native tribes in the United States, I have given numerous presentations on common misconceptions about Native Americans, as well as the harmful stereotypes perpetuated by sports mascots such as the Kansas City Chiefs, among other topics.

  1. It’s also becoming physically tiring.
  2. A group of Spanish conquistadors assaulted my own people, the Acoma, Haaku, in vengeance for a previous conflict that resulted in the deaths of 12 conquistadors.
  3. Men above the age of 25 were stripped of their right foot as a form of punishment.
  4. This isn’t the only atrocity that isn’t taught in classrooms very often.
  5. It is no coincidence that the football club from San Francisco, the 49ers, is named after this time period in history.
  6. In recent years, the campaign for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) has gained momentum; nevertheless, until Savanna Grey Wind was killed and her unborn child was taken from her in North Dakota in 2017, the media had mostly ignored the issue.
  7. According to a report by the Urban Indian Health Institute, there were 5,712 reported incidents of missing American Indian and Alaskan Native women in the year 2016.

In addition, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Native Americans are killed in police contacts at a greater rate than any other racial or cultural group in the United States.

The historical traumas that Native Americans have experienced have shown themselves in the loss of our people as well as the loss of our lands and resources.

Nobody has to tell us that the majority of American society is so uninterested in and disdainful of our culture that they chose to do stupid chants while dressed in our attire in order to reduce the entire race to a ridiculous caricature for entertainment purposes.

Native headdresses are rarely seen outside of football games in Kansas City or Washington, Halloween gatherings, and music festivals when the headdresses are prominent.

For example, Native Americans revere the drum, and that drum is never used in the company of alcoholic beverages.

Our cultural traditions of “pumping up” your team are insulting and racist, and we reject them.

He told me about his experience with the tribe.

Roe Bartle, a white man whose Scout title “Chief Lone Bear” was the inspiration for the name of the Kansas City Chiefs football franchise.

The man refused to accept the notion that his dressing up as a Native American constitutes cultural appropriation, claiming instead that the attire and dances “respect” Native Americans by carrying on their traditions.

That is what Native American headdresses represent: Chiefs fought and earned their headdresses, much like military soldiers get medals for their service.

It saddens me that the racist “tomahawk chop” continues to be celebrated in the city where I live and work.

Kansas City, especially its variety, is a favorite of mine.

As part of my mass communication courses, we discuss not just the actual history of Native Americans and the influence of misconceptions, but also how we may correct this situation.

Native people need to be included in wider dialogues as real individuals, rather than only as spectators at sporting events or as a source of entertainment.

It is about learning and appreciating the horrific past our ancestors were exposed to, as well as the practices undertaken by the United States government in order to obliterate our Native identities.

This article is based on remarks published in the Kansas City Star and on the website KansasCity.com. A professor of media communications at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas, Rhonda LeValdo has been teaching for more than 20 years.

Redskins, Indians considering new names. Is it time for the Chiefs to make a change?

The landscape of American sports is shifting, and the Kansas City Chiefs are racing against the clock. The Washington Redskins of the National Football League revealed last week that they will be reconsidering their moniker, a move that will almost probably result in a new name being adopted by the start of the football season. A few days later, the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball announced that they, too, would consider changing their name. A statement from the baseball clubs stated that they “recognize our unique role in the community” and that they “are dedicated to listening, learning, and responding in a manner that may best unify and inspire our city.” Assuming both clubs choose new names, the only major sports franchises that continue to use Native American symbols in their advertisements and game-day activities would be the Kansas City Chiefs, the Atlanta Braves, and the Chicago Blackhawks, all of which are based in the United States (Some would also add the Golden State Warriors to that list).

  1. A comprehensive evaluation of their usage of such images and traditions is required by each of those clubs, including the Kansas City Chiefs.
  2. However, the Chiefs — and other community leaders who are gleefully basking in the club’s success — must at the very least explain publicly why maintaining the team’s name and accompanying traditions is so critical to the team’s continued success in the present time.
  3. It is impossible to dismiss the concerns of the Native American population, as well as those of a much larger audience.
  4. A thorough investigation of everything is required, including the tomahawk chop, the drum beat, Arrowhead Stadium’s Warpaint, and the costumes worn by supporters at the game.
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In the group’s words, “rather than celebrating Native people, these caricatures and stereotypes are damaging, since they propagate negative perceptions of America’s first peoples and lead to a disrespect for Native peoples’ humanity.” Many members of the Native American community are offended by the nicknames and symbols that have been assigned to them.

  • The question isn’t whether or not all Native Americans find these symbols offensive; rather, the question is whether or not all Native Americans find these symbols offensive.
  • That should be sufficient motivation for the team and the city to reassess their adoration for a chant and a costume that have no connection to the game in which they participate.
  • If the Chiefs’ success continues, the difference will be too stark to ignore — and it will be recognized by everyone in the United States.
  • There will be a great deal of opposition to even bringing this subject up.
  • Some in Kansas City will argue that the team is named after former Mayor Roe Bartle, who was known as the “Chief” because of his nickname.
  • On game day, there aren’t many people who dress up as a hunky politician.
  • If Kansas City were to choose a name for a sports team today, would it choose one based on the ethnicity of the people who live there?
  • The world has changed.
  • Others will point to this as an example of “cancel culture” gone awry, or as an example of political correctness gone awry.

Understanding the power of words and pictures, as well as the need of utilizing them to promote unity rather than divide, is essential for true strength. Authentic strength comes from re-examination of past traditions in light of current conditions.

How the Kansas City Chiefs got their name, and why it’s so controversial

There are changes taking place in American sports, and the Kansas City Chiefs are in a hurry. After announcing last week that they would be reconsidering their nickname, the Washington Redskins are almost certain to change their moniker before the start of the football season this fall. Later, the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball announced that they, too, were considering a new moniker. A statement from the baseball clubs stated that they “recognize our unique role in the community” and that they “are dedicated to listening, learning, and responding in a way that will best unify and inspire our city.” Assuming both clubs choose new names, the only major sports franchises that continue to use Native American symbols in their advertisements and game-day activities would be the Kansas City Chiefs, the Atlanta Braves, and the Chicago Blackhawks, all of which are based in the U.S.

  • (Some would also add the Golden State Warriors to that list).
  • An massive and divisive endeavor, renaming the defending Super Bowl champions would be difficult to accomplish.
  • A request for comment from the Chiefs was not returned on Monday.
  • Meanwhile, other teams are taking a serious look at ethnic stereotypes and racial caricatures, and the Chiefs can’t just brush it under the rug or assume that a well-timed meeting would bring everyone back to normal.
  • These kinds of images are deemed intolerant by the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI).
  • An April poll indicated that 65 percent of Native Americans who regularly participate in traditional traditions felt the tomahawk chop and the accompanying chant are disrespectful to their cultures.
  • However, some Native Americans believe this to be the case.

The NFL can’t force the Washington club to alter its name while simultaneously condoning the chop or sounding the war drums in Kansas City.

However, quarterback Patrick Mahomes’ recent 10-year deal agreement provides us reason to believe this will be the case.

Similarly to the cities of Washington, D.C., and Cleveland, supporters will argue that the names are designed to commemorate Native Americans or that they have nothing to do with that group.

Funny.

Feathers and face paint, on the other hand, may be found in plenty.

That isn’t the case.

Everything that made sense back then would be laughed out of the room in the 1960s.

Asked about the name changes in Washington, D.C.

Understanding the power of words and pictures, as well as the significance of utilizing them to promote unity rather than division, is essential to having real strength in this world. Authentic strength comes from re-examination of historical traditions in light of contemporary situations.

How the Kansas City Chiefs got their name

What’s more, the Chiefs’ are named after a white guy who impersonated Native American culture, which adds to the intrigue of the whole situation. Vincent Schilling, a Mohawk writer who has covered sports and written on Native American culture, claims that it all started with the Boy Scouts of America, of all organizations. The Boy Scouts of America program, which was founded by Harold Roe Bartle in 1925, includes the Tribe of Mic-O-Say, which is a component of the Boy Scouts of America program.

In his Mic-O-Say group, Bartle was known as “Lone Bear,” and he also went by the title of Chief Lone Bear.

Bartle, affectionately known as “chief,” was instrumental in persuading Lamar Hunt, the owner of the Dallas Texans football club, to relocate the franchise to Kansas City.

As a result, they went along with it.

Why it’s an issue

It appears to be a simple and innocent first-person narrative. But, according to Schilling, it’s what’s associated with the Chiefs’ name that he and many others are concerned about – things like the tomahawk chop and the headdresses that supporters frequently don at games. The Chiefs begin each game with a cheerleader riding a horse named Warpaint and striking a big native-style drum emblazoned with the team’s insignia, which serves as the team’s mascot. Some have claimed that these actions are being taken in respect of Native Americans, but Schilling does not believe them.

  • “My grandmother couldn’t even reveal her true self with me, but they can create a caricature of her and tell me that I should be respected by her?” Schilling expresses himself.
  • The Atlanta Braves and the Cleveland Indians are two of the best teams in Major League Baseball.
  • The Atlanta Braves, the Florida State Seminoles, and the Kansas City Chiefs all employ the tomahawk chop during games and as an enduring element of their own fan cultures, respectively.
  • Over the years, the Washington Redskins have been the target of litigation and harsh criticism because of their nickname, which certain Native communities, like as the National Congress of American Indians, find so insulting that they will not even pronounce it out loud.

The Seminoles have a logo that is similar to this. The Cleveland Indians are marked by a cartoonish “Chief Wahoo” insignia, which stands for “Chief Wahoo.”

Mascots dehumanize Native people, says one group

According to Schilling, images of Native Americans as mascots first appeared during the golden era of movies. Indigenous people have long been stereotyped as “savages,” and stories of Native Americans killing settlers, among other things, have become popular and profitable. As a result, they continued to be produced. “And television is where we learn the most,” he added. Native American characters are underrepresented in the entertainment that we consume. According to IllumiNative, a non-profit organization devoted to enhancing the visibility of Native people in society, only around 0.4 percent of characters featured on prime-time television and blockbuster movies are Native American.

  1. Crystal Several schools, according to Echo Hawk, executive director of IllumiNative, don’t teach anything about Native Americans prior to 1900.
  2. Echo Hawk, a Native American activist, told CNN that Americans have a tendency to view of Native Americans as individuals who live in a bygone past.
  3. “It contributes to the dehumanization of indigenous people,” she stated.
  4. As Echo Hawk pointed out, imagine if supporters showed out to support their team while dressed in blackface.
  5. Despite this, many people overlook the use of red lipstick or the wearing of headdresses.
  6. Earlier this year, the American Psychological Association adopted a resolution advocating for the discontinuation of the use of Native American mascots.
  7. Levant, past president of the American Psychological Association, in a statement.
  8. In 2013, the National Congress of American Indians issued a 29-page study advocating for the abolition of racism in sports and the elimination of native sports mascots.
  9. Native peoples, Native cultures, and tribal countries are slandered, defamed, and vilified in commercial and educational contexts, according to the research.

What teams are doing about it

It might take a long time to bring about this type of cultural shift. Professional sports teams generate billions of dollars in revenue and have millions of devoted supporters who are adamant on maintaining their team’s symbols and traditions, no matter how troublesome they may be. Change, on the other hand, does occur, although in little, halting stages. After receiving a complaint from a player on an opposing club during the 2019 Major League Baseball postseason, the Atlanta Braves changed the manner they demonstrated the famed Tomahawk Chop.

  1. This is one issue where college sports has been ahead of the curve.
  2. The group singled out certain colleges that used Native American imagery and themes in their branding.
  3. This will be on show this Sunday, when millions of people tune in to watch the Super Bowl and 65,000 people cram into Miami’s Hard Rock Stadium: the tomahawk chops, the regalia and headdresses, the face paint and everything else.
  4. As for the message it will convey on football’s most important platform, he isn’t very optimistic about it.
  5. “I really, truly don’t know what to expect,” he remarked.
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Chiefs under pressure to ditch the tomahawk chop celebration

On November 28, 2010, during an NFL football game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Seattle Seahawks in Seattle, supporters of the Kansas City Chiefs carry a placard that reads “TomaHAWK Chop,” according to a file photo. As part of the national movement for racial justice, the Kansas City Chiefs banned headdresses and war paint from their games. But the team’s efforts to make its popular “war chant” more palatable are drawing new scrutiny from Native American groups as the team prepares to make its second straight appearance in the Super Bowl.

Warren, from the file) On November 28, 2010, during an NFL football game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Seattle Seahawks in Seattle, supporters of the Kansas City Chiefs carry a placard that reads “TomaHAWK Chop,” according to a file photo.

But the team’s efforts to make its popular “war chant” more palatable are drawing new scrutiny from Native American groups as the team prepares to make its second straight appearance in the Super Bowl.

Warren, from the file) The Kansas City Chiefs are under increasing pressure to quit a popular practice in which fans erupt into a “war cry” while using a chopping hand motion supposed to replicate the Native American tomahawk during pregame ceremonies.

The team’s chop tradition and even its name have long been criticized as being derogatory to American Indians, but national attention has been focused on the Washington football team’s use of the name Redskins and the cartoonish Chief Wahoo logo, which has been used as an emblem for the Cleveland Indians baseball team for decades.

  • Several Native American organizations have joined together to put up billboards in the Kansas City region to express their opposition to the tomahawk chop as well as the Chiefs’ name.
  • A few thousand individuals have signed two online petitions, one of which was created by a fourth-grader and the other by an adult.
  • Gaylene Crouser, executive director of the Kansas City Indian Center, on the other hand, thought the change was ridiculous.
  • “However, I’m not sure they believe it made any effect at all,” she remarked.

Face paint and headdresses were prohibited from the stadium, according to Chiefs president Mark Donovan, who called it a “significant step.” As he continued, “you are going to have ideas on both sides about what we ought to and ought not to do.” “We’re going to keep having those talks,” says the president.

Petersburg, says the improvements aren’t nearly enough.

Group co-founder Alicia Norris called the chop “very insulting,” adding it “conjures up notions of Native Americans and indigenous people as savages.” Norris also called the chop “racist.” According to her, the team is now trying to justify their decision by claiming they are being culturally acceptable and respectful to indigenous people by not allowing headdresses on the field.

And you may continue to use this movement that resembles a tomahawk chop, but we’ll refer to it as a drum beat instead for the time being.

“All you have to do is modify it.” Tomahawk shouting and arm movements were adopted by Chiefs fans long ago, following a tradition that originated at Florida State University in the 1980s and has now spread throughout the NFL.

“Just to hear all of the supporters performing the tomahawk chop and hearing it reverberate through the halls, it’s a wonderful noise that we produce here,” said a fan who works in the stadium.

Bien, who had been a Chiefs season ticket member for 15 years before the epidemic curtailed seating space at the stadium this season, described it as “the lifeblood of the organization.” In his words, the chop has “absolutely nothing to do with Native Americans,” and he speculated that the origin of the Chiefs’ moniker may have more to do with the mayor of Dallas who was instrumental in luring the team to Kansas City in 1963.

Mayor H.

The Chiefs, according to reports, were given their moniker by club owner Lamar Hunt in honor of Bartle.

He pointed out that, despite the fact that Bartle was white, he founded a Scouting organization called the “Mic-O-Say Tribe,” which is still operating and continues to dress and speak in Native American garb and language.

Regis Mohawk Tribe, Schilling explains why he was given the title “Chief”: “He dressed up as an Indian and fraudulently instructed Boy Scouts how to dress up like Native Americans.” When people went to the games, they all dressed up like Indians, maintaining a harmful cultural image for decades.” Specifically, he criticized the team’s modifications to the chop, calling them “insulting” and “a ludicrous gesture with a complete lack of cultural responsibility.” Dave Skretta, an Associated Press pro football writer, contributed to this report.

Kansas City Chiefs name controversy – Wikipedia

When the Kansas City Chiefs and the Seattle Seahawks square off in an NFL football game on November 28, 2010, fans of the Chiefs raise a placard that reads “TomaHAWK Chop,” according to a file photo. As part of the national movement for racial justice, the Kansas City Chiefs banned headdresses and war paint from their games. But the team’s efforts to make its popular “war chant” more palatable are drawing new scrutiny from Native American organizations as the team prepares to make its second straight appearance in the Super Bowl.

  • Warren.
  • As part of the national movement for racial justice, the Kansas City Chiefs banned headdresses and war paint from their games.
  • Photograph courtesy of Associated Press photographer Ted S.
  • The Kansas City Chiefs are under increasing pressure to discontinue a popular ritual in which fans erupt into a “war cry” while executing a chopping hand motion meant to resemble the Native American tomahawk.

The team’s chop tradition and even its name have long been criticized as being derogatory to American Indians, but national attention has been focused on the Washington football team’s use of the name Redskins and the cartoonish Chief Wahoo logo, which has been used as an emblem for the Cleveland Indians baseball team since the 1920’s.

  1. Signs protesting the tomahawk chop and the name “Chiefs” have been put up in the Kansas City region by a collaboration of Native American organizations and organizations.
  2. The signatures on two online petitions, one of which was launched by a fourth-grader, totaled a few thousand individuals each.
  3. In contrast to Gaylene Crouser, executive director of the Kansas City Indian Center, who thought the change was ridiculous, she thought the change was hilarious.
  4. ” “However, I’m not sure they believe it made any effect at all,” she stated.
  5. Face paint and headdresses were prohibited from the stadium, according to Chiefs president Mark Donovan, who called it a “major step” forward.

As we move forward, we’ll continue to make adjustments, ideally adjustments that achieve our goal of respecting and honoring Native American history while also enjoying the fan experience.” Although improvements have been made, the Florida Indigenous Rights and Environmental Equality organization, located in St.

  1. The group plans to stage a demonstration near the stadium on Sunday before the game’s start, singing and waving placards.
  2. As a result, the Chiefs are still referred to as the Chiefs, and the fans continue to behave as if they were in an indigenous-type environment since they are still referred to as the Chiefs.
  3. It’s a bit ridiculous.
  4. Former Florida State University football players and fans began yelling and waving tomahawks in the 1980s, and the Chiefs have long since inherited the tradition.
  5. “Just to hear all of the fans performing the tomahawk chop and hearing it reverberate through the halls, it’s a wonderful noise that we produce here,” said a fan who works in the building.

In other words, it’s all about the soul.” Bien, who had been a Chiefs season ticket member for 15 years before the virus reduced seating space at the stadium this season, described it as “the lifeblood.” He stated that the chop had “absolutely nothing to do with Native Americans,” and that the genesis of the Chiefs’ moniker may have more to do with the mayor of Dallas, who was instrumental in luring the franchise to Kansas City in 1963, rather than Native Americans.

  • Known as “The Chief” for his many years of involvement in the Boy Scouts, Mayor H.
  • The Chiefs, according to reports, were given their moniker by club owner Lamar Hunt in honor of Bartle..
  • Even though Bartle was of European descent, the author claimed that he founded a Scouting organization called the “Mic-O-Say Tribe” that is still alive today and still uses Native American clothing and language.
  • As a member of the St.

Author Dave Skretta of the Associated Press contributed to this article.

Mascots and traditions

The Chiefs’ previous mascot, Warpaint, a Pinto horse ridden by a man wearing a feathered headdress, was retired in 1989 and replaced with their current mascot, K. C. Wolf. Warpaint made a comeback in 2009, but this time he was mounted by acheerleader. Warpaint was once again discontinued in July 2021, with the team president claiming that it is the proper thing to do at this point in time. Although Native Americans and national news media outlets have stated that they believe the practices are racist, the Chiefs continue to engage in many of the same behaviors as other teams with Native American names, such as wearing headdresses and warpaint, performing the tomahawk chop, and banging on a drum.

Because of this, any usage of the chop by Arrowhead-based cheerleading must now be done with a closed fist, a change from the long-standing practice of using an open palm tomahawk chop.

Emergence of controversy

Following the publishing in the Kansas City Starof images of fans attending a football game in October 2013 dressed in feathers and warpaint and performing the tomahawk chop, a large number of Native Americans lodged formal complaints with the newspaper. One caller, who was particularly unhappy because the pictures were published on Columbus Day, called the images as “mockery” and “racist.” Another labeled the photographs as “racist.” According to Derek Donovan, writing for the Star’s “Public Editor” column, the concerns were “legitimate,” and the newspaper should include “other colorful, intriguing individuals in the crowds.” According to a story published in The Star in early August 2014, the team’s administration is preparing conversations with several Native American groups in order to find a non-confrontational strategy to eradicate, or at the very least lessen, inappropriate behavior.

Amanda Blackhorse, the principal plaintiff in the trademark dispute against the Washington Redskins, believes that a name change for the Kansas City Chiefs would be the best answer.

The Cardinals’ management has refused to comply.

It’s true that the Kansas City Chiefs have remained under the radar, according to Norma Renville, executive director of the Women of Nations Community Advocacy Program and Shelter.

Following the Chiefs’ appearance in the playoffs in 2016, Native Americans at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas, petitioned the team to refrain from engaging in stereotype-invoking conduct such as wearing headdresses and performing the “tomahawk chop.” There have been efforts to address other concerns, such as supporters donning warpaint and headdresses, but Native Americans in the area have defended the “chop” and the cry that goes along with it.

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However, according to a nationwide poll, half of Native Americans claimed the “tomahawk chop” upset or insulted them, with the number climbing to 65 percent among those who were more involved with Native customs.

In spite of the fact that both teams were referred to in violent terms, the Chiefs were significantly more likely to receive insults related to intelligence (such as being called stupid), and many of these insults were specific references to negative Native American stereotypes, such as drunkenness (“firewater”), and being inbred or extinct.

When Amanda Blackhorse, Diné (Navajo), attended a protest during a football game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Washington Redskins atArrowhead Stadium, she was the target of prejudice on the part of the authorities.

“,” “We won, you lost, get over it!”,” and “Go get drunk!” Also, there are so many different insults.

People tossed beers at each other. That came as a complete surprise to me. I’ve dealt with prejudice throughout my life, but to witness it overtly and in the open while no one did anything was shocking. It was a complete shock.”

References

  1. AbLeah Asmelash’s full name is AbLeah Asmelash (February 1, 2020). How the Kansas City Chiefs earned their name and why it’s so contentious are discussed in this episode. CNN
  2. s^ What the Kansas City Chiefs and the Boy Scout Tribe of Mic-O-Say have in common and how they obtained their names. IndianCountryToday.com. Retrieved2021-02-17
  3. s^ “The Washington Redskins and Cleveland Indians are considering rebranding. Does it appear that it is time for the Chiefs to make a change? “….. The Kansas City Star published an article on July 7, 2020, titled The Editorial Board of the Kansas City Star (July 7, 2020). “The Washington Redskins and Cleveland Indians are discussing rebranding. Is it past time for the Kansas City Chiefs to make a roster change? “.The Kansas City Star Michael Levenson is a writer and director who lives in New York City (August 20, 2020). A ban on headdresses at Arrowhead Stadium has been instituted by the Kansas City Chiefs, according to the New York Times. Leslie abAguilar abAguilar (September 10, 2020). KTV5 reports that “Chiefs fans are reacting to modifications surrounding the tomahawk chop and headdresses.” Warpaint is a trademark of the Kansas City Chiefs. The Kansas City Chiefs are a football team based in Kansas City, Missouri. The original version of this article was published on December 14, 2014. On November 13, 2014, I was able to obtain Eduardo Medina’s full name is Eduardo Medina (July 26, 2021). Still the Chiefs, the Kansas City team will retire their mascot, “Warpaint,” according to The New York Times
  4. If the Kansas City Chiefs want to “eliminate racism,” they should start with their own name, according to an opinion piece. NBC News is a television news network. Retrieved2021-02-17
  5. s^ Liz Clarke is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom “The NFL pleaded with fans to “put an end to racism.” So, what’s the deal with the Chiefs’ moniker? “….. Issn:0190-8286 The Washington Post. Retrieved2021-02-17
  6. s^ According to KTLA, the Kansas City Chiefs will not be wearing headdresses or face paint as the club prepares to begin the NFL season on September 10, 2020. Obtainable on September 13, 2020
  7. DONOVAN and DEREK are two of the most well-known and well-respected people in the world (October 27, 2013). “The ‘Indian’ attire used by Chiefs fans is troubling.” The Kansas City Star
  8. MELLINGER, SAM (Sam Mellinger) (August 6, 2014). According to the article, “In order to avoid a cultural free-for-all, Chiefs create alliances with American Indian tribes.” The Kansas City Star
  9. MELLINGER, SAM (Sam Mellinger) (June 25, 2014). “The woman spearheading the campaign to get Washington’s NFL nickname changed believes the Chiefs should be on the lookout.” The Kansas City Star
  10. Hendley, Matthew
  11. The Kansas City Star (December 10, 2014). “Native Americans are urging the Arizona Cardinals to adopt a policy prohibiting the wearing of headdresses and redface.” The Phoenix New Times (Phoenix, Arizona)
  12. Barry Lytton is the author of this work (October 16, 2015). “Native American organizations will demonstrate against the Kansas City Chiefs’ moniker during the Vikings game.” The Grand Forks Herald (North Dakota)
  13. Ariel Rothfield is the author of this work (January 15, 2016). “A Native American group in Kansas is urging Kansas City Chiefs supporters to refrain from doing the Tomahawk chop.” KSHB is a radio station in Kansas City. The original version of this article was published on December 28, 2016. Obtainable on January 16, 2016
  14. John Eligon is a fictional character created by author John Eligon (January 29, 2020). When it comes to the Kansas City Chiefs, “Celebrating the Chop Divides”, according to the New York Times
  15. “Not Your Mascot: Opinions versus Data,” according to the New York Times. Indigenous Engineering is a term used to describe a type of engineering that is indigenous to a region. Meet the Native American Woman Who Took on the Washington Football Team” was published on February 18, 2020, and was retrieved from the internet. Mother Jones is a fictional character created by American journalist Mother Jones in the 1960s. The 18th of June, 2014

Celebrating the Kansas City Chiefs, the Chop Divides (Published 2020)

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The city of Kansas City is home to the University of Missouri. Two Denver Broncos fans were in town for a game last month and were standing at the bar, engaged in some friendly ribbing with fans of the Chiefs, who were in town for a game at The Rieger same night. It wasn’t long before the Broncos supporters made their way through the dining area. That’s when aChiefsfan reacted with a gesture that has become as iconic with the franchise as the club’s red uniforms: With his hand in the air, he chopped through the air, all the while chanting in time to the beat of the music.

The Chiefs’ beloved football team has left an indelible mark on the culture of this city, whether it’s the tradition of wearing red on Fridays before games or the practice of changing the final line of the national anthem to “and the home of the Chiefs” before kickoff at Arrowhead Stadium, which is the team’s home stadium.

Now that the Chiefs are competing in the Super Bowl for the first time in 50 years on one of the largest platforms in sports, there is renewed interest in the long-standing tradition.

A popular way for many sports fans to show support for their team while also intimidating the opposition is to use the chop and its accompanying chant, which includes a pantomimed tomahawk motion and a made-up war cry that is also used by fans of the Atlanta Braves, the Florida State Seminoles, and the Exeter Chiefs rugby team in England.

Rieger chef and owner Howard Hanna expressed his disappointment as the impromptu chop played out in his restaurant.

“It gives us a bad reputation.” As a result, the Chiefs have managed to stay out of the fiercest flames of the national debate about Native American mascots and images in sports.

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Over the past six years, the group has collaborated with Native Americans to reexamine and alter some of its long-standing practices. Following that discussion, the club issued a statement forbidding spectators from wearing in Indian garb and requesting that broadcasters abstain from panning to any who do not comply with the request. During occasional games, the team makes instructional remarks regarding Native American history and customs, and a group of Natives distributes literature outside the stadium.

The Chiefs, on the other hand, have showed little interest in stopping their fans from being ejected from the stadium.

Several players have expressed gratitude for the tomahawk chop and chant, which they said helped them get pumped up.

When asked about worries that it is offensive, he responded, “I have nothing to do with that and I know nothing about that.” It was Marty Schottenheimer, then the head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs, who encouraged fans to do the chop during a performance by the Northwest Missouri State band, which at the time was led by a Florida State alumnus.

The Arrowhead Chop is a nickname given to the gesture in honor of the Kansas City Chiefs’ stadium.

John Learned, a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho unified tribes, was the leader of a small group that, in 2013, persuaded the Chiefs to abandon customs that featured non-Native persons clothing in the manner of Native people.

According to him, “we aren’t going to go after the chop since it is one of a kind.” “It serves as a rallying call for our group.” Some more established Native groups claim that the Chiefs have disregarded them, despite the fact that the club has referred to its partnership with Learned as evidence of its outreach to indigenous communities.

It is the opinion of the local Indian population on the tomahawk chop that varies, according to Crouser, from those who believe it is OK to others who are outraged by it.

According to the survey, which will be published in the academic journal “Social Psychological and Personality Science,” opposition was even stronger among individuals who often participated in Native rituals, with 65 percent stating that the chop offended them.

As Stephanie Fryberg, a Tulalip professor and researcher at the University of Michigan, put it, “There is no way that the usage of Native Americans as mascots is honoring.” “It’s all a trick of the light.” Some Chiefs fans are conflicted about the tomahawk chop; they understand why Native Americans would find it disrespectful, but they insist that they use it to praise their team, not to denigrate Indians.

The team would have to lead the campaign to do rid of the chant, according to a number of supporters who stated they had no problem with it being replaced with anything else.

This is just that kind of caught-up-in-the-moment collective excitement,” said Parker, a fan from Prairie Village, Kansas, a suburb of Kansas City that is a 10-minute drive southwest of the city.

“I don’t think they should be offended,” Shirley stated emphatically.

‘Anyone who knows Kansas City, and especially anyone who has gone to Arrowhead Stadium, understands that we are a terrific place,’ Lucas remarked. Ken Belson and Ben Shpigel contributed to this story with their reporting.

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