How Do You Respond To Someone Who Says They Hate Gregorian Chant

Why do some people hate Gregorian chant?

If one considers church music to be a living tradition, and chant to be a part of that tradition, one cannot help but see the upheavals of the early twentieth century, sparked by the Motu Proprio, as being partially responsible for the abandonment of plainsong in its entirety in the minds and hearts of so many members of the faithful. While living in a modern “EF” environment, it can be alluring to look back to the music of the immediate pre-conciliar period and consider this to be “the” tradition, one that stretches back to St.

According to this point of view, the only significant rupture in that tradition in recent memory would have occurred in the 1960s.

Following the Motu Proprio reforms, there was an unprecedented revolution in Catholic music that was both far-reaching and ambitious, and it was only partially effective.

Parallel to this, much of the popular music of the day, as unpleasant it may be to think of it in that manner, was deemed improper, and “acceptable” pieces, by mediocre composers of the time, who were deemed more decorous, were brought in to replace it.

As a result, the new chant books had already met with some opposition, especially nationalist opposition from non-French Europeans, and were not particularly simple to adopt at the parish level due to their inherent difficulty.

As a result, it is understandable that the implementation of such reforms has been sporadic at best.

Because the living taproot, no matter how corrupted, that was tied in an organic, decentralized way to the broadest sense of the tradition had been uprooted in 2003 and 2008, and because the “new-old” ways of doing things had not had enough time to take root between generations, it was perhaps inevitable that the attachment to plainsong in its current Graduale form would be tenuous at best.

In addition, without that visceral sense of “this is how we did things” (ask my 60-year choir veterans, who serve in a very musically conservative parish) applying to Gregorian plainsong from the Graduale, an attempt to graft it onto a vernacular liturgy without a real powerhouse of an education program to accompany it will appear strange at best, hopelessly out of touch and alien at worst.

As if it came from another planet, this was an idea. (And while we’re on the subject of planets, what exactly is the conservative obsession with the abridgedplaneta? Gothic is fantastic.)

Gregorian chant

Gregorian chant is a type of liturgical music performed in unison or in monophony by the Roman Catholic Church to accompany the readings of the mass and the canonical hours, sometimes known as the divine office. The Gregorian chant is named after St. Gregory I, who was Pope from 590 to 604 and during whose reign it was collected and codified. King Charlemagne of the Franks (768–814) brought Gregorian Chant into his country, which had previously been dominated by another liturgical style, the Gallican chant, which was in general usage.

  1. The passages that are repeated from one mass to the next are included in theOrdinary of the Mass.
  2. The first appearance of the Gloria was in the 7th century.
  3. The Gloria chants that follow are neumatic.
  4. TheSanctus andBenedictus are most likely from the period of the apostles.
  5. Since its introduction into the Latin mass from the Eastern Church in the 7th century, theAgnus Dei has been written mostly in neumatic form.
  6. The Proper of the Mass is a collection of texts that are different for each mass in order to highlight the significance of each feast or season celebrated that day.
  7. During the 9th century, it had taken on its current form: a neumatic refrain followed by a psalm verse in psalm-tone style, followed by the refrain repeated.

As time progressed, it evolved into the following pattern: opening melody (chorus)—psalm verse or verses in a virtuously enriched psalmodic structure (soloist)—opening melody (chorus), which was repeated in whole or in part.

Its structure is similar to that of the Gradual in several ways.

Synagogue music has a strong connection to this cry.

Sacred poems, in their current form, the texts are written in double-line stanzas, with the same accentuation and amount of syllables on both lines for each two lines.

By the 12th century, just the refrain had survived from the original psalm and refrain.

The Offertory is distinguished by the repeating of text.

The song has a neumatic feel to it.

Responses are short texts that precede or follow each psalm and are mostly set in syllabic chant; psalms, with each set to a psalm tone; hymns, which are usually metrical and in strophes or stanzas and set in a neumatic style; and antiphons or refrains, which are short texts that precede or follow each psalm and are mostly set in syllabic The Gradual’s form and style are influenced by the sponsor’s contribution.

Amy Tikkanen has made the most current revisions and updates to this page.

Discussion Question of the Week: In our practice, have Gregorian Chant Propers really ever been the norm?

THE THEORY:Gregorian Chant is the model, the fundamental ideal of singing in the Roman Rite, and it is based on the Gregorian Canon. It has always been this way from the beginning of time. As a result, Gregorian Latin Propers should be given precedence over all other forms of music. Gregorian Introits, Offertory chants, and Communion chants from the Graduale Romanum are being utilized increasingly often in churches and cathedrals, while they still constitute a small minority of all churches and cathedrals.

Gregorian Chant possesses these characteristics in the highest degree, and as a result, it is considered to be the Chant proper to Rome, the only chant she has inherited from the ancient fathers, the only chant she has directly proposed to the faithful as her own, the only chant she prescribes exclusively for certain parts of the liturgy, and the only chant that recent studies have so successfully restored to their integrity and purity.

As a result, Gregorian Chant has long been regarded as the ultimate model for sacred music, and it is entirely legitimate to establish the following rule: the more closely a composition for church approaches the Gregorian form in terms of movement, inspiration, and savor, the more sacred and liturgical it becomes; and the more out of harmony it is with that supreme model, the less worthy it is of the temple.

  • Sacrosanctum Concilium (Sacrosanctum Concilium,1963)116.
  • Musicam Sacram (Musical Sacram) (1967) 50.
  • (b) In sung liturgical services celebrated in Latin: Whenever feasible, the melodies that are present in the “normal” versions of the book should be utilized.
  • GIRM is an abbreviation for Geographic Information Resources Management (1969 and succeeding versions) 41.
  • John Paul II was the second Pope of the Roman Catholic Church.
  • Gregorian chant occupies a unique position among the musical forms that best reflect the traits necessary by the idea of holy music, particularly liturgical music, and which are most closely associated with it.

St Pius X noted that the Church had “inherited it from the Fathers of the Church,” that she had “jealously guarded for centuries in her liturgical codices,” and that she still “proposes it to the faithful” as her own, considering it “the supreme model of sacred music.” He went on to say that the Church had “inherited it from the Fathers of the Church,” that she had “jealously guarded for centuries in her liturgical codices,” and that As a result, Gregorian chant continues to be an important aspect of unity in the Roman Liturgy even today.

  1. Sing a Song of Praise to the Lord (2007)72.
  2. Consequently, all else being equal, it should be given prominence in liturgical services.” Gregorian chant is distinctively Christian music, created by the Church for the Church.
  3. It is a sign of communion with the universal Church, a bond of unity across cultures, a means for diverse communities to join together in song, and a call to contemplative participation in the Liturgy.
  4. It is apparent that pastoral concerns must take precedence over all other reasons.
  5. The holy music heritage must be carefully safeguarded and nurtured in order to be passed on to future generations.
  6. 28 and 30.116.

The promotion of choirs, especially in cathedral churches In contrast, other types of holy music, particularly polyphony, are by no means prohibited from being performed during liturgical celebrations, so long as they are in keeping with the spirit of the liturgical action, as stipulated in Article 30.118.

  1. 119.
  2. Accordingly, adequate consideration should be given to their music, which should be given a fitting position not only in the formation of their attitude toward religion, but also in the adaptation of worship to their local talent, as specified in Articles 39 and 40.
  3. Musicam Sacram (Musical Sacram) 9.
  4. The Church does not forbid any type of holy music from being used in liturgical acts as long as it is in keeping with the spirit of the liturgical celebration itself and the nature of its various components, and as long as it does not interfere with the active participation of the faithful.

in addition to that The pastors of souls should examine whether parts of the heritage of sacred music, written in previous centuries for Latin texts, could be used in a convenient manner in both Latin and vernacular liturgies, after taking into account the pastoral usefulness of their own language and the character of their own language.

  1. GIRM 41.
  2. John Paul II was the second Pope of the Roman Catholic Church.
  3. Additionally, the Second Vatican Council acknowledged that “other genres of sacred music, particularly polyphony, are by no means barred from liturgical celebrations,” as St Pius X had done before it.
  4. 12.
  5. In order to discern and communicate in music the reality of the Mystery that is celebrated in the Liturgy, only an artist who has been deeply immersed in the sensus Ecclesiae may make an attempt to do so.

Other things being equal, the Second Vatican Council changed the “pride of position” accorded to Gregorian chant by including the words “other things being equal.” There are a number of essential liturgical and pastoral difficulties that every bishop, pastor, and liturgical musician must deal with in addition to these “other things.” When contemplating the use of chant treasures, pastors and liturgical musicians should take care to ensure that the congregation is able to engage in the Liturgy through singing as much as possible.

  1. As part of the process of building the Church in unity and peace, they should be sensitive to the cultural and spiritual context of their respective communities.
  2. When asked if Gregorian Chant was “in possession,” would Tra le Sollecitudini have responded as follows?
  3. Special efforts will be made to encourage the widespread adoption of the Gregorian Chant by the general public, in order for the faithful to once again participate more actively in religious services, as was the case in ancient times.
  4. In addition to completing the conventional edition of Gregorian chant books, a more critical edition of books that have already been released after the restoration by St Pius X is being worked on.
  5. The essence of the matter is whether or not the Gregorian Chant Propers have indeed been the standard throughout modern church history.
  6. Ratisbon was not the first place where non-Gregorian chants were used in the liturgy; the practice dates back to the 9th century at Metz.
  7. Various polyphonic and other arrangements were frequently utilized to replace the Chant from the 16th century forward.

When Chant music was replaced by other music in the 18th and 19th centuries, the musical quality had deteriorated to the point that it was on par with the worst of what could be found in secular theaters at the time.

Their efforts, on the other hand, have mostly been in futile, with just a small number of parishes having benefited.

Some composers even created volumes of alternate music (sometimes known as “chanting tones”) for use by choirs who were unable to perform the Chant itself, and these proved to be extremely successful.

The fact that hymn singing became the first accepted standard for accompanying the Church’s rites following the Council is hardly necessary to mention.

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Most of these instances, with the exception of those in vernacular, have retained the wording of the antiphons themselves as they were originally supplied by the liturgical books.

Finally, the reality is that Gregorian Chant has not, at least since the Reformation, if not even earlier, been used as a standard basis for the singing of the Propers, and it is not possible to assert that it has “always been in pride of place,” as proponents of Gregorian Latin Propers are prone to claim.

This is either antiquarianism or just plain artificiality on the part of the author.

Using our wonderful Gregorian Chant legacy in this context, I feel, demands far more delicacy and complexity than just dumping dollops of Chant into the right liturgical places and hoping for the best, as I believe we have done in the past.

plumbic sulfide formulagregorian chant period

WHEN IT COMES TO SINGING IN THE ROMAN RITE, Gregorian Chant serves as a model, a fundamental ideal. From the beginning of time, this has been the case. It follows that Gregorian Latin Propers should be given precedence over all other forms of chant. Gregorian Introits, Offertory chants, and Communion chants from the Graduale Romanum are being routinely employed in more churches and cathedrals, but they are still in the minority. The number of musicians who have been persuaded by this argument appears to be growing.

These characteristics can be found in the highest degree in Gregorian Chant, which is, as a result, the Chant proper to the Roman Church, the only chant she has inherited from the ancient fathers, which she has jealously guarded for centuries in her liturgical codices, which she directly proposes to the faithful as her own, which she prescribes exclusively for certain parts of the liturgy, and which the most recent studies have so happily restored to their integrity and purity In light of these considerations, the Gregorian form has long been regarded as the supreme model for sacred music, and it is entirely legitimate to establish the following rule: the more closely a composition for church approaches the Gregorian form in terms of movement, inspiration, and savor, the more sacred and liturgical it becomes; the more out of harmony it is with that supreme model, the less worthy it is of the temple.

  • Sacrosanctum Concilium (Sacrosanctum Concilium) (1963)116 116 In the eyes of the Church, Gregorian chant is uniquely adapted to the Roman liturgy, and as a result, it should be given prominent placement in liturgical services, barring exceptional circumstances.
  • (a) Gregorian chant, as it is peculiar to the Roman liturgy, shall be given precedence over all other forms of music in sung liturgical services conducted in Latin.
  • In addition, it is preferable that an edition be made that has simpler tunes, which may be used in smaller churches.
  • Gregorian chant, as it pertains to the Roman Liturgy, should be given the highest priority, all else being equal.
  • Chirographon Sacred Music is a type of sacred music composed by Chirographon, a Greek word that means “Sacred Music” in English (2003) 7.
  • Because of its “particular suitability for the Roman Liturgy,” it was acknowledged by the Second Vatican Council as deserving of prominence in liturgical services in Latin, provided that other factors were held equal.
  • Praise the Lord (2007)72.
  • Crypt singing is a living connection with our forefathers in faith, as well as traditional Roman rite music.
  • THEOTHERTHEORY: The Catholic Church expressly recognizes that Gregorian chant is not the only choice available, nor is it always the preferable option in all circumstances.
  • Additionally, the papers provide the following possibilities: The 114th Sacrosanctum Concilium is dedicated to the protection of the sacred.

Choirs must be vigorously promoted, particularly in cathedral churches; however, bishops and other pastors of souls must take special care to ensure that, whenever a sacred action is to be celebrated with song, the entire body of the faithful may be able to contribute that active participation which is rightfully theirs, as stipulated in Art.

  • In contrast, other types of holy music, particularly polyphony, are by no means prohibited from being performed during liturgical celebrations, so long as they are in keeping with the spirit of the liturgical action, as stipulated in Canon 30.118 (a).
  • 1.
  • Music is extremely important to some people in some regions of the world, particularly mission lands, where they have developed their own cultural musical traditions that play an important role in their religious and social lives.
  • The music of Sacram (Sacrilege of Music).

Sacred music of any kind is not prohibited by the Church from being used in liturgical celebrations so long as it is in keeping with the spirit of the liturgical celebration itself and the nature of its individual parts, and so long as it does not interfere with people’s ability to participate actively.

  1. 49.
  2. In a single and the same celebration, there is nothing to prohibit various sections of it from being sung in a variety of languages.
  3. Paul II was the second Pope of the Catholic Church.
  4. Additionally, the Second Vatican Council acknowledged that “other genres of sacred music, particularly polyphony, are by no means excluded from liturgical celebrations,” as St Pius X had done.
  5. 12.
  6. In order to discern and communicate in music the reality of the Mystery that is celebrated in the Liturgy, only an artist who has been deeply immersed in the sensus Ecclesiae may try it.
  7. With the critical phrase “other things being equal,” the Second Vatican Council changed the “pride of position” accorded to Gregorian chant by the Catholic Church.

When contemplating the use of chant treasures, pastors and liturgical musicians should take care to ensure that the congregation is able to engage in the Liturgy through singing during the service.

WHEN IT COMES TO PRACTICE At any point in the previous 600 years, hasn’t Gregorian chant served as a fundamental model of singing in the Roman Rite?

To encourage the faithful to participate more actively in the church services again, special efforts will be made to revive the usage of the Gregorian Chant among them, as was the case in ancient times.

In addition to completing the conventional edition of Gregorian chant books, a more critical edition of those books that have been released following the restoration by St Pius X is being created as part of this project.

Ultimately, the question is whether or not the Gregorian Chant Propers have been the standard in recent church history.

From the 16th century on, the so-called Ratisbon edition of the chants provided a bastardized version of Gregorian chants that was widely used throughout Europe until the Solesmes monks produced their new editions in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which were widely used throughout the world.

  • Different countries, such as the German-speaking countries and the Eastern European countries, have produced a variety of non-standard variants.
  • Fake Bourdon arrangements were first sung in alternating with the Chant, a technique that was continued in the French “Organ Mass,” among other places; but, as time went on, the harmonized settings were the only ones that were performed.
  • In response to this phenomena, a campaign to restore Gregorian Chant to its proper place arose, which resulted in the establishment of Gregorian Societies on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.
  • There are several alternatives to the Chant in hymn books from both the late nineteenth century and the twentieth century, ranging from basic polyphonic works to fauxbourdon arrangements, which can be found in both the United States and the United Kingdom.
  • As an alternative for the Chant, German Singmesses were performed beginning in the 18th century and the Betsingmesses in the 20th century, among other places.
  • Most of these instances, with the exception of those in vernacular, have retained the wording of the antiphons as they were originally published in their respective liturgical books.

Finally, the reality is that Gregorian Chant has not, at least since the Reformation, if not even earlier, been used as a standard basis for the singing of the Propers, and it is not possible to claim that it has “always been in pride of place,” as proponents of Gregorian Latin Propers are wont to claim.

Antiquarianism or simply plain artificiality are the terms used to describe this phenomenon.

Using our wonderful Gregorian Chant legacy in this context, I feel, demands far more delicacy and complexity than just dumping dollops of Chant into the right liturgical places and hoping for the best, as I believe we have in the past.

“I Just Can’t Warm to Gregorian Chant”

Gregorian chant, in particular, is immensely lovely to me. When I hear it, it hits something really personal in me. In my heart and mind, it is inextricably linked to the concept of faith itself. In my opinion, it is the epitome of excellent music, and I listen to it all the time, even whether I am at home or driving. Alternatively, I’m confident that there are people for whom this is not the case, and I’m not alone in this belief. Some people are unable to connect with the music. They are unconcerned about what it means.

Instead of admitting it straight – while being aware of the Vatican’s guidelines on chant – they concoct a slew of fanciful justifications for not giving chant in the first place or for eliminating it altogether, searching for loopholes in the areas of acculturation, language, and other factors.

  • Whether we like it or not, Gregorian chant is the music of the Roman Rite, regardless of our personal preferences.
  • Although I am not attracted to the aesthetics of Gregorian chant, I would like to believe that I could still come to terms with its normative importance as a form of ritual music even if I did not enjoy it.
  • How can I do a personal inventory of my own commitment to the ritual ahead of my own personal preferences, provided that my own personal preferences and the ritual’s commitment coincide in this particular instance?
  • In the mail just arrived a big collection of CDs including recordings of Polish Orthodox liturgical music, including chant from the St.
  • This is a style and a language about which I have little or no prior knowledge.
  • In my listening, I was struck by the thought that perhaps this is what some people perceive when they hear Gregorian chant performed in a foreign language or style.
  • Why should we sing chant in a society where the sound and language are so foreign to those who wish to participate in the Mass?

Why not create a foreign environment in which devoted Catholics feel that the liturgy is more distant and distanced from their hearts than it would otherwise be by using unfamiliar noises and words.

Due to the fact that this is not music that I would listen to in the automobile or at cocktail hour, I pictured myself in a liturgical environment.

As I began to listen to the noises, I realized that I was not listening to them as music in the same sense that we could listen to a symphony or a concerto, but rather as an act of devotion.

Today, I began to experience a sensation of warmth, perhaps even fondness, in this place.

Then I pictured myself in a confrontation with the musicians at the Polish Orthodox Church in my imagination.

Happiness anthems in the people’s language, as well as the music of today’s young people, are what we need.

We must bring the liturgy to the people and meet them “where they are,” with music that is both enjoyable and uplifting.

Let me state unequivocally and unequivocally that I would never do such a thing.

After all, it appears that I am missing the most important point concerning music during the Divine Liturgy: that it is inextricably linked to the rite.

It’s possible that I’m pushing for the abolition of the Polish Orthodox religion itself.

There will never be a day when I will purchase the CDs, put the music on in my car to listen to while driving, study books about the subject, or incorporate it into any other aspect of my life other than Sunday church.

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Perhaps, rather than trying to alter the music, I should let the music to change me.

Not only that, but we must also acknowledge that “it is not all about me.” Whatever we propose in the liturgy has an impact on everyone in the community and has an impact on the future of the religion as a whole.

There are a plethora of possible explanations.

Many people believe that Gregorian chant is nothing more than a particular form of hymn, and that singing chant is simply a manner of commemorating our past and nothing more.

They are oblivious to the fact that chant is the musical accompaniment to the ceremony itself.

The experiences and understandings that we need are being denied to us because of this.

There includes polyphony from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, as well as the Viennese orchestral heritage.

Also possible is the inclusion of songs that are not directly related to or derived from the liturgical text itself.

However, this liberality must be exercised with caution.

I am arguing that these individuals must adopt a different way of thinking and allow the chant to weave its way into our understanding of the faith, just as Catholics have done since the beginning of time.

During the Sacred Music Colloquium in Pittsburgh, I was seated next to two parishioners who were completely unaware that we would be providing music for their parish Mass the next day.

This is exactly what we would anticipate them to feel when they began the experience: a great deal of frustration.

After about 15 minutes, I noticed their shoulders begin to relax and they were more comfortable.

The woman took out her rosary and bowed her head.

They stick around till the very conclusion of the game. Furthermore, when they genuflected on their way out, they had a really cheerful look on their faces. They appeared to have started with irritation and ended with a sense of metamorphosis, based on what I could discern.

Opinion

It was in the summer of 2001 that I traveled to Poughkeepsie, New York, in search of what we referred to as “the traditional Latin Mass,” a form of Roman Catholic worship that dates back centuries and was last authorized in 1962, just before the Second Vatican Council changed everything. I was unsuccessful. Conservative Catholics referred to those who sought it out as “schismatics” and “Rad Trads” during the time of their search. In terms of community, the individuals who attended Mass there were more like a clandestine network of romantics, detractors of Pope John Paul II, people who had been betrayed by the official church, and — believe it or not, some saints.

  • The entire Mass was different from the one that took place after Vatican II.
  • It took me a month to get used to the pace of the place.
  • It was an eerie feeling.
  • Today, it is celebrated in bustling churches, which are teeming with children and young families.
  • Earlier this year, he published a paper called Traditionis Custodes, in which he accused Catholics like us of being subversives.
  • He did this in order to safeguard the “unity” of the church.
  • The elimination of terrorism is a religious priority for the Pope.

Instead of the love of Christ, it will lead people to believe that the new Mass constitutes a new religion, one committed to the unification of man on earth rather than the love of Christ.

In contrast to current Masses, there were no peculiarities such as balloons, guitar music or applause, which can often be found in them.

In his place, a clergyman who conducts himself in a peaceful manner, and a sculptor who is meticulous in his work.

Over time, parishes began to reintroduce the sacred polyphony composed by long-dead composers such as Orlando Lassus and Thomas Tallis, and contemporary composers like as Nicholas Wilton and David Hughes, to the mystical tones of Gregorian chant and the sacred polyphony of the Renaissance.

They don’t even claim to be writing from a group of believing Christians in their letter.

As a result, it is associated with international culture as well as churchmen and formal Christians.

This ferment was accompanied by the emergence of radical new theologies all throughout the world.

Only overconfident Catholic bishops could have imagined anything other to be true.

They referred to Vatican II as ” a new Pentecost ” — a ” Event “— because it had provided the church with a new sense of itself.

However, with the election of Pope John Paul II in 1978, they believed their revolution had been put on hold once and for all.

He consolidates authority in Rome, usurps the prerogatives of provincial bishops, and implements a micromanaging style that is fueled by concern over disloyalty and heresy, among other things.

Pope Francis believes that we shall return to the old Mass in the near future.

To put it bluntly, they do not believe in the new Mass.

The altar was separated from the tabernacle when the priest was facing the congregation.

In a notable change from previous prayers, prayers highlighting the Lord’s actual presence in the sacrament were substituted with prayers emphasizing the Lord’s spiritual presence in the gathering congregation.

Rather than Christ’s offering and sacrifice, the new Mass presented itself as “a narrative and historical remembrance of the events recalled in Scripture,” with the offering and sacrifice being made by the assembled people, as stated in the most commonly used Eucharistic prayer in the new Mass, “from age to age you gather a people to Thyself, in order that from east to west a perfect offering may be made.” For Catholics, the way we pray has an impact on our beliefs.

  1. Our physical journey toward an altar and tabernacle is guided by the ancient rituals.
  2. Because of this, it demonstrates that God generously loves and redeems us despite our transgressions.
  3. Consider Mozart’s magnificent rendering of faith in the Eucharist, “Ave Verum Corpus,” which is available on YouTube (Hail True Body).
  4. According to the new Mass, God owes salvation to man because of the inherent dignity of human beings.
  5. Now, where there used to be love, there is only affirmation, which is virtually indistinguishable from apathy.
  6. It is my belief that the practice of the new Mass helps people to create a new faith: The only way to become authentically Christian is to stop to be a Christian at all.
  7. It was during the early years of the new religion following the council that it manifested itself by knocking down the statues, the ceremonies, and the religious devotions that had previously existed.
  8. My understanding is that they are willing to make our religious life as difficult as they can.
  9. When I think about traditional Latin Mass movements, the ancient motto “We resist you to your face” comes to mind.
  10. Pope Benedict had granted us permission to begin fixing the harm for the time being.
  11. Michael Brendan Dougherty is a senior writer at National Review and a visiting fellow for the social, cultural, and constitutional studies division at the American Enterprise Institute.

He is the author of “My Father Left Me Ireland: An American Son’s Search for Home,” which was published by the American Enterprise Institute.

The Beautiful Mystery, Part 1

It was in the summer of 2001 that I traveled to Poughkeepsie, New York, in search of what we called “the old Latin Mass,” a style of Roman Catholic liturgy that had been in use for centuries but had not been approved since 1962, when the Second Vatican Council changed everything. Conservative Catholics referred to those who sought it out as “schismatics” and “Rad Trads” at the time of its discovery. In terms of community, the individuals who attended Mass there were more like a hidden network of romantics, detractors of Pope John Paul II, people who had been betrayed by the official church, and — believe it or not, saints.

  • In comparison to the post-Vatican II Mass, the entire ceremony was changed.
  • For me, it took a month to get used to the pace of the place.
  • Following years of opposition, Pope Benedict permitted adherents of this Mass to grow in the mainstream of Catholic society, a step that began to drain away the radicalism of the traditional movement and bring us back into harmony with our bishops and clergy.
  • Despite this, Pope Francis considers this Mass, as well as the modestly increasing number of Catholics who attend it, to be a serious issue.
  • Pope Benedict XVI granted us permission to conduct a liturgy in 2007, but he withdrew those permits in order to preserve the “unity” of the church.
  • We who go vast distances to take part in it consider it a religious obligation to continue participating.
  • It is likely that the severity of his campaign will push these young families and communities toward the radicalism that I ingested in Poughkeepsie years ago, before Benedict was elected.
  • On Sundays, the priest and the congregation stand facing the altar.
  • There will be no more priests in the style of the gabby religious talk-show host.
  • The traditional Mass creates room for our personal prayer and thought by diverting the priest’s attention to the drama on the altar.
  • Since the Latin Mass has spawned such cultural offshoots as Agatha Christie and Nancy Mitford, among other British cultural heavyweights, a letter to Pope Paul VI was sent after Vatican II pleading for the continuation of this tradition.

A host of priceless artistic accomplishments have been inspired by the rite in question, which has been preserved in its magnificent Latin text — not only mystical works, but also works by poets and philosophers and musicians and architects as well as paintings and sculptures by artists from all eras and cultures.” As a result, it belongs to both universal culture and churchmen and formal Christians.” As a result, numerous parishes had their altar rails, tabernacles, and baldachins pulled down because the Vatican Council mandated a rethink of every part of the basic act of worship.

  • Throughout the world, radical new theologies were emerging in response to this ferment.
  • Catholic bishops who are overconfident in their abilities might think otherwise.
  • They referred to Vatican II as “a new Pentecost” — a “Event” — because it had provided the church with a new sense of itself.
  • However, with the election of Pope John Paul II in 1978, they believed the revolution had been put on hold once and for all.
  • He consolidates authority in Rome, usurps the prerogatives of provincial bishops, and implements a micromanaging style that is motivated by concern over disloyalty and heresy.
  • Is it possible that he is doing this to safeguard his most fundamental beliefs?
  • I can’t send my children back since it isn’t a place of religious formation.

Numerous revisions to the Mass have been made in order to diminish the conviction that it is a genuine sacrifice and that the bread and wine, once consecrated, are transformed into the body and blood of our Lord.

According to the new Mass’s mandated petitions, the structure was no longer referred to as an altar, but rather as the Lord’s table.

According to the traditional Mass, the priest was re-presenting the same sacrifice that Christ made on the cross, a sacrifice that appeased God’s anger against sin and brought mankind back into right relationship with him.

An altar and tabernacle are the physical targets of the traditional rite.

That God graciously loves us and redeems us despite our sin demonstrates God’s gracious love for us.

For example, “Ave Verum Corpus” by Mozart is a beautiful representation of faith in the Eucharist (Hail True Body).

Humanity’s inherent dignity is recognized in the new Mass, and God is obligated to provide salvation to each person.

Now, where there was once love, there is only affirmation, which is virtually indistinguishable from apathy.

So let’s get together and sing for us!

The new faith is practiced with a fervent spirit in places like Germany, where bishops and priests seek to fit the religion’s teachings to the moral standards of the nonbelieving culture that surrounds them, as is the case in the United States today.

See also:  What Does The Chant In Lord Of The Flies Symbolize

What I don’t know is whether or not the bishops will join Francis in his crusade against the Latin Mass.

It seems likely that if they do, they will further divide the church, either by concealing or revealing its divisions.

For the time being, Pope Benedict had granted us permission to commence repairs.

“My Father Left Me Ireland: An American Son’s Search for Home,” written by Michael Brendan Dougherty, a senior writer at National Review and a visiting fellow for the division of social, cultural, and constitutional studies at the American Enterprise Institute, is out now.

Recap (Prologue and Chapters 1-17)

In the summer of 2001, I travelled up to Poughkeepsie, New York, in search of what we called “the old Latin Mass,” a type of Roman Catholic liturgy that dates back centuries and was last approved in 1962, before the Second Vatican Council changed everything. Conservative Catholics referred to those who sought it out as “schismatics” and “Rad Trads” at the time. Individuals who attended Mass there weren’t precisely a community; we were more like a clandestine network of romantics, detractors of Pope John Paul II, people who had been betrayed by the mainstream church, and — I believe — some saints who gathered for Mass in secret.

  1. The entire rite was changed from the Mass celebrated after Vatican II.
  2. It took me a month to get used to the rhythm of the place.
  3. Following years of opposition, Pope Benedict permitted adherents of this Mass to flourish in the mainstream of Catholic life, a step that began to drain away the radicalism of the traditional movement and bring us back into alignment with our bishops.
  4. Nonetheless, Pope Francis considers this Mass, as well as the modestly increasing number of Catholics who attend it, to be a serious matter.
  5. In order to preserve the “unity” of the church, he revoked the permits granted to us by Pope Benedict XVI in 2007 to sing a liturgy whose heart has remained constant since the seventh century.
  6. Its abolition is a religious goal for the Pope.
  7. Rather than the love of Christ, it will lead people to believe in a new religion, one that is committed to the unity of man on earth rather than the love of Christ.

It never included any of the gimmicks that you may see in a modern Mass, such as balloons, guitar music, or applause.

In his place, a priest who goes about his job quietly, and a sculptor who is meticulous in his work.

Gregorian chant, sacred polyphony composed by long-dead composers such as Orlando Lassus and Thomas Tallis, as well as modern composers such as Nicholas Wilton and David Hughes, was revived in the years after Pope Benedict XVI’s liberalization of the traditional liturgy.

Their letter makes no pretense to be from a group of believing Christians.

This ferment was accompanied by radical new theologies being preached all throughout the world.

Only overconfident Catholic bishops could have imagined anything other to be the case.

They referred to Vatican II as ” a new Pentecost ” — a ” Event “— that had provided the church with a new sense of itself.

However, with the election of Pope John Paul II in 1978, they believed their revolution had been re-ignited.

Perhaps he’s doing this to safeguard his most fundamental convictions.

My children will not be able to return since it is not part of their religious upbringing.

The concept that the Mass was a genuine sacrifice, and that the bread and wine, once consecrated, became the flesh and blood of our Lord, has been reduced or substituted in many modifications.

The mandated prayers of the new Mass tended to never even refer to that structure as an altar, but rather as the Lord’s table, rather than the altar.

The prayers of the traditional Mass stressed that the priest was re-presenting the same sacrifice that Christ made at Calvary, a sacrifice that appeased God’s anger against sin and brought mankind back into right relationship with God.

The traditional ritual directs us bodily toward an altar and a tabernacle.

It demonstrates that God mercifully loves us and redeems us despite our transgressions in this way.

Consider Mozart’s magnificent performance of faith in the Eucharist, “Ave Verum Corpus” (Hail True Body).

God owes man salvation, according to the new Mass, because of the inherent dignity of human beings.

Where there was once love, there is now only affirmation, which is indistinguishable from apathy.

It is my belief that the practice of the new Mass helps people to embrace a new faith: Rather than becoming a true Christian, one must first decide not to be a Christian at all.

It was during the early years of the new religion following the council that it manifested itself by knocking down the statues, the ceremonies, and the religious devotions that had existed previously.

I’m not sure how difficult they’re willing to make our religious lives for us.

The ancient motto of the traditional Latin Mass movement, “We resist you to your face,” comes to mind.

We had been granted permission by Pope Benedict to begin mending the damage for a short period of time.

“My Father Left Me Ireland: An American Son’s Search for Home,” written by Michael Brendan Dougherty, a senior writer at National Review and a visiting fellow for the social, cultural, and constitutional studies section at the American Enterprise Institute, is out now.

Favorite Quote

In the summer of 2001, I traveled to Poughkeepsie, New York, in search of what we referred to as “the old Latin Mass,” a style of Roman Catholic liturgy that dates back centuries and was last approved in 1962, before the Second Vatican Council changed everything. Conservative Catholics labeled those who sought it out as “schismatics” and “Rad Trads” at the time. The individuals who attended Mass there weren’t precisely a community; we were more like a clandestine network of romantics, critics of Pope John Paul II, people who had been jilted by the mainstream church, and — I believe — a few saints.

  • The entire ceremony was different from the post-Vatican II Mass.
  • It took me a month to get used to its beat.
  • Years later, Pope Benedict permitted believers of this Mass to grow in the mainstream of Catholic life, a gesture that began to drain away the radicalism of the traditional movement and bring us closer to our bishops.
  • However, Pope Francis considers this Mass, as well as the modestly increasing number of Catholics who attend it, to be a serious matter.
  • In order to preserve the “unity” of the church, he revoked the permits that Pope Benedict XVI granted us in 2007 to sing a liturgy whose heart has remained constant since the seventh century.
  • Its abolition is a holy imperative for the Pope.
  • It will lead people to believe that the new Mass reflects a new religion, one that is committed to the unification of man on earth rather than the love of Christ.
  • It never included any of the gimmicks that may be found in current Masses, such as balloons, guitar music, or clapping.
  • In his place, a clergyman who goes about his business in the background, a sculptor who is meticulous in his work.

In the years following Pope Benedict’s liberalization of the old rite, parishes began to restore the mystical tones of Gregorian chant, the sacred polyphony composed by long-dead composers such as Orlando Lassus and Thomas Tallis, as well as contemporary composers such as Nicholas Wilton and David Hughes.

  1. Their letter doesn’t even claim to be from a group of believing Christians.
  2. This ferment was accompanied by the emergence of radical new theologies around the world.
  3. Only overconfident Catholic bishops could envisage anything other.
  4. They referred to Vatican II as ” a new Pentecost ” — a ” Event “— that had given the church a new sense of itself.

Pope Francis is utilizing the papacy in just the manner that progressives previously claimed to despise in order to put an end to the ancient Latin Mass: He consolidates control in Rome, usurps the prerogatives of provincial bishops, and implements a micromanaging style inspired by fear over disloyalty and heresy.

  • Pope Francis believes that we shall return to the old Mass in the future.
  • To put it bluntly, the new Mass is not their faith.
  • The altar was separated from the tabernacle with the priest facing the congregation.
  • The prayers that referred to the Lord’s physical presence in the sacrament were visibly replaced with prayers that emphasized the Lord’s spiritual presence in the gathering assembly.

The new Mass presented itself as a narrative and historical retelling of the events recounted in Scripture, with the offering and sacrifice being made not by Christ, but by the assembled people, as stated in the most commonly used Eucharistic prayer in the new Mass: “from age to age you gather a people to Thyself, in order that from east to west a perfect offering may be made.” For Catholics, how we pray has an impact on what we believe.

  • The traditional rite physically directs us toward an altar and a tabernacle.
  • It demonstrates that God mercifully loves and redeems us despite our transgressions in this way.
  • Consider Mozart’s magnificent rendering of trust in the Eucharist, “Ave Verum Corpus” (Hail True Body).
  • According to the new Mass, God owes man salvation because of the inherent dignity of human beings.
  • Where once there was love, there is now only affirmation, which is indistinguishable from apathy.
  • I believe that the practice of the new Mass helps people to develop a new faith: In order to become fully Christian, one must first cease to be a Christian at all.
  • When the new faith was young, following the council, it manifested itself by taking down the statues, rites, and religious devotions that had previously existed.
  • I’m not sure how difficult they are willing to make our religious lives.

The ancient motto of the traditional Latin Mass movement comes to mind: “We defy you to your face.” I believe that one day, even secular historians will look back on the events of Vatican II and recognize them for what they were: the greatest spasm of iconoclasm in the history of the church, dwarfing both the Byzantine iconoclasm of the ninth century and the Protestant Reformation.

What Pope Francis is proposing with his crackdown is a new cover-up.

“My Father Left Me Ireland: An American Son’s Search for Home,” written by Michael Brendan Dougherty, a senior writer at National Review and a visiting fellow for the social, cultural, and constitutional studies section at the American Enterprise Institute, is out now.

Discussion Questions

1. In her Acknowledgements, Louise discusses the neurology of music, including its impact on her creativity and the impacts of music on our brains. What impact does listening to music—and the type of music you listen to—have on your life? Gregorian chant is being played in the background, so would you read—or reread— The Beautiful Mystery while listening to, or after listening to, the music? (There is an unexpectedly large amount of information captured.) Would you anticipate that doing so would have an impact on your reading experience?

The jurisdiction of Chief Inspector Gamache extends across the entire province.

If yes, what is the reason behind this?

In any of the others, do you think?

5.

One of them has to be the assailant.

In other words, are you the type of reader who enjoys solving mysteries, or are you the type who prefers to wait for the revelation?

Do you approach other writers’ mysteries in a different way depending on how you answered that question?

If you’ve read Louise’s novels in the sequence in which she wrote them, you’ve probably seen that she lays seeds for future storylines.

Barbara Peters graduated with a BA from Stanford University, an MA from Northwestern University, and an MSLS from the University of Tennessee School of Law.

It is operated on a non-profit basis.

Rosenwald, a mystery publishing company with over 600 titles in print that continues to thrive today.

She has also received a dozen nominations for Bookseller of the Year, as well as the Arizona Republic’s Lifetime Achievement Award / Million Dollar Club in 2011.

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