How To Chant The Psalms Orthodox

Chanting the Psalms

The following day, David began by delivering this psalm of thanksgiving to the Lord… Don’t forget to praise the Lord and invoke his name, and to make his acts known to the rest of humanity. Tell him about all of his beautiful achievements while you sing psalms to him and tell him about yourself. Ever since the little lad David first plucked the harp and penned a song in praise of the Lord, these lyrical words have served as a permanent mode of contact with the Almighty. Throughout history, people have sung these words of praise and exaltation, hope and lament, grief and repentance, and joy and have done it in a variety of musical styles and in a variety of languages.

Throughout history, Christians have shared these songs with the Hebrew people, and all Christians, East and West, Orthodox, Catholic, or Protestant – have offered these songs in devotion to the God of Israel.

Psalm tones are used in these ceremonies, which are melodic formulae defined by incipitorintonation (the many starting notes sung exclusively by a cantor), reciting note (on which most of the words are “recited”), and a several note conclusion, which is different for each half of the verse (mediationandtermination).

It is recommended that a two-note formula for each half verse, rising at the conclusion of the first half and descending at the end of the second half, be used if a more straightforward approach to singing the Psalms is desired.

  1. Gregory’s; however, there are other methods, such as antiphonally – two groups singing the same verses simultaneously – a method introduced in the West by St.
  2. Psalm-singing, regardless of the music or the manner of alternating, should be a collaborative effort.
  3. Individuality and leadership (with the exception of a cantor) should be put aside for the duration of the service.
  4. The tempo should be one of relaxed declamation — neither hasty nor slow in the least bit.
  5. To achieve this “symphony,” characterized by St.
  6. When we sing a Psalm, let us remember King David, who was singing in front of the Ark of the Covenant at the time.
  7. Anthony, who sat in the desert of Egypt, singing psalms in the loneliness of the desert.

Athos, by little mission churches in America, and by many other people throughout history. We should remember this and lift our hearts and voices in praise of the Lord, “singing unto the Lord and praising his Name; proclaiming the news of his rescue from one day to another.”

The Psalter: (A Model and Means of Prayer)

Fr. John Ealy of St. Stephen Orthodox Church in Orlando, Florida, contributed this article. Traditionally, the Psalter, from which sections are recited at all services of the Church, is regarded as the Church’s hymn book. Christian tradition has always emphasized the significance of the sacrament, dating back centuries. The majority of Vespers, Matins, Compline, and the Hours are devoted to Psalms. Opening at the beginning of the Divine Liturgy, the Typical Psalms are sung. The antiphons for feast days, which take the place of the Typical Psalms, as well as the Prokeimenon and Alleluia lines, are all derived from the Psalter.

  1. It is the Word of God, as well as a guide to prayer.
  2. This is something that the early saints attest to.
  3. The value of the Psalms, according to the saints, is in the fact that God Himself gives us with the words that we require in order to pray via them.
  4. What is the purpose of reciting the Psalms?
  5. Psalm chanting allows us to hear the Word of God more clearly and in a more distinctive way than we could otherwise accomplish.
  6. A good illustration of what we are talking about may be heard during the singing of the Kathisma at the Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts, which takes place on the first Sunday of Advent (“In my distress I cry to the Lord, thatHe may answer me.”).
  7. They all appear to be familiar with this piece by heart (atleast in part because of the special Lenten melody used).

Psalms should be recited at least once a day in our homes.

As a result, we will become more proficient in our prayer life since we will have gotten accustomed to using prayers that God Himself has supplied.

Benedict, when we recite the Psalms, we must place our minds where our words are in order to be effective.

For what reason should we pray using the words that God has provided?

Matthew and asked Him to teach them how to pray, He did not respond, “Make up your own words,” or “Meditate on the wonders of nature,” or “Just let the Spirit move you.” Instead, He said, “Make up your own phrases.” “Pray in this manner: Our Father, Who art in heaven,” he instructed.

Luke, Jesus instructs His disciples on how to pray in a firm and unequivocal manner.

The Lord’s Prayer, which was given to us by Jesus, should guide all of our prayers as a result.

It is for this reason that we also study the Psalms and read from other Scriptures in addition to the Bible.

When we do use our own words, we will be basing them on what we have learned from the Psalms, the Lord’s Prayer, and the Bible in general.

In a church setting.

Psalmody makes up the majority of this group.

Come to vigils on Saturday nights and on feast days to honor the dead.

The Psalms should be chanted antiphonally, which is an useful liturgical recommendation for groups to consider.

Then we must practice listening and possibly even joining in with the singing of Psalms once we have arrived (when appropriate and possible).

It is impossible to truly pray correctly.

It takes a lot of effort to do the tasks listed above.

This is especially true of our Churchservices, in part because of the numerous distractions that might occur there throughout the service.

We should pay heed to God’s Word and experience His presence in our midst since it is the final thing on his agenda for us.

However, with the strength and assistance of God, it is possible. According to the Dawn, a publication of the Diocese of the South Orthodox Church in America that was published in September 1998.

Learn to Chant – Chant Resources – Hymns & Music – Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America

Chant Stand with a Digital Display By continuing the work of Fr. Seraphim Dedes, the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese is able to keep the Digital Chant Stand up and running as an official Archdiocesan resource, compiling service texts and musical scores for the entire liturgical year in both Greek and English and distributing them electronically via the Digital Chant Stand website and the new GOA Digital Chant Stand mobile app. Diploma in Byzantine Music (Certificate of Completion). Students who complete the Certificate in Byzantine Music program will have a thorough understanding of the abilities necessary for reciting the sacred songs of the Orthodox faith.

  • They will also have a thorough understanding of the contents, use, and interpretation of liturgical books and the rubrics of the Orthodox Church.
  • The Archdiocesan School of Byzantine Music is a musical institution in the Archdiocese of New York.
  • The book also includes a brief introduction to the history of Byzantine music, 107 exercises with analysis of the various characters, and an accompanying CD containing approximately 120 mp3’s covering all of the material found in the book.
  • It is very simple to read and adheres to the conventional technique that is found in the majority of Byzantine music books that have been recognized by the Athens Conservatory.
  • Anthony’s Monastery It features more than 6000 pages of Byzantine music in Western and Byzantine notation, in the style of chanting used on the Holy Mountain, and it is hosted by St.
  • The National Forum of Greek Orthodox Church Musicians is a national organization of Greek Orthodox church musicians.
  • Frank Desby is a songwriter and musician from the United Kingdom.
  • The Byzantine Music Workshop of the Pittsburgh Metropolis is a group of musicians that perform Byzantine music.

Through the training of solo and choral performance, a systematic education of Byzantine music, typikology, and the heritage of chant will be delivered. dr. Nick Giannoukakis, Coordinator and Protopsaltis for the Metropolitan Government of Pittsburgh

Byzantine Chanting: The Psalms

CopticDeacon, I’m going to share my own chanting experience with you in the hopes that it may put some light on your questions. If this is the case, please accept my apologies in advance. Every psalm in Byzantine Chant is assigned a certain chant, or does each psalm have its own chant? No. It can be beneficial to explain which psalms are recited during regular services. My first two sections will cover the primary offices of Vespers and Orthros followed by the Divine Liturgy. Vespers: (See also Psalm 103.) This psalm is recited in the Greek and Arabic traditions, respectively.

  • I’ve only ever heard the Anoixandaria recited in the fourth mode of the plagal.
  • 2) The Psalter’s First Kathisma, or Kathisma I.
  • Since these are also used at the Vigil on feast days and important saint days (with certain absences), I have generally only seen psalms 1-3 performed to music, with psalms 4-8 being read.
  • 3)Psalms 140, 141, 129, and 116 are put to music in all eight modes, depending on the Resurrection Service in the tone of the week, or for the day of a saint or feast, as well as the day of the week and the day of the feast.
  • (Psalms constitute the source material for all four Prokeimenon.) During the second half of Saturday evening, they will be performing passages from Psalm 93 “The Lord is King” in plagal mode two.
  • Orthros: The imperial psalms have only been intoned, never chanted, but only during Lent and in a very serious manner, so there is no set music, at least none that I’ve seen.
  • I believe this is a Russian tradition.
See also:  How To Read Znamenny Chant Sheet Music

It’s possible that I’m mistaken.

4)I’ve never chanted any of the kathismata from the Psalter, simply read them.

I’ve incorporated Mitri el Murr’s rendition, as well as an adaptation of a song I heard on Mt.

In any case, I’ve heard some longer renditions of Psalm 135 that start with plagal mode one, then go to plagal tone 2, then to the varis, and finally to plagal tone 4.

6)For the next two pre-Lenten Sundays, we will recite Psalm 136, “by the Rivers of Babylon,” in mode three, mostly utilizing the Hartophylax version of the text.

7)On non-festival Sundays, we shall chant the first twelve verses of Psalm 118, the Amomoi, in plagal mode one, followed by the Evlogetaria, which will be chanted in the second mode.

George in Wichita, Kansas, by Dr.

(By the way, he is a fantastic chanter; he has recorded a CD of chants for DOrmition in both Arabic and English.) 8If we have time, we will recite Psalm 50 following the Eothinon Gospel, which will be in mode two and based on an Athonite tune (unless otherwise noted).

They’re in good shape.

2)Psalm 145 has been heard in plagal mode 5 as well as in a variety of other tones.

So, to answer your concerns, I don’t believe there are any defined melodies for the psalms that are chanted, with the exception of By the Waters of Babylon and the Anoixandaria, which are both sung in the Anoixandaria.

Again, this is based only on my own personal experience as a chanter in a parish, so I’m sure I’m leaving out some important points. I hope this has been of some assistance.

Sacred Music Library

A
A Good Word Selected verses from Psalm 44, sung as the Polyeleos for Marian feasts.Click on the MIDI file (Listen) to hear how it sounds.
  • Bishop Basil Essey
  • Byzantine Tone 1
  • Chant
  • Major Feasts
  • Orthros
  • Psalms
  • Byzantine Tone 2
  • Byzantine Tone 3
  • Byzantine Tone 4
  • Byzantine Tone 5
  • Byzantine Tone 6
  • Byzantine Tone 7
  • Byzantine Tone 8
  • Byzantine Tone 9
  • Byzantine Tone 10
  • Byzantine Tone 11
  • Byzantine Tone 12
  • Byzantine Ton
P
Psalm 100 Psalm paraphrase by Richard Toensing
  • Psalms
  • Richard Toensing
  • General season
  • Choral
  • Paraliturgical
  • Psalms
  • Psalms
  • Richard Toensing
  • General season
  • Choral
  • Paraliturgical
  • Psalms
  • Choir
  • Paraliturgical
  • Psalms
  • Psalmody by Richard Toensing
  • Season of the year
Psalm 96 (95 LXX) Psalm paraphrase by Christopher L. Webber
  • Choral
  • Paraliturgical
  • Psalms
  • Richard Toensing
  • General season
Polyeleos, Psalm 134 (Brief version) This is the Polyeleos, Psalm 134, sung on major feasts during Matins.”O ye servants of the Lord. Alleluia.Praise ye the Name of the Lord. O ye servants, praise the Lord….”
  • Psalms
  • Richard Toensing
  • General season
  • Choral
  • Paraliturgical
  • Psalms
Polyeleos-Psalm 134 This is the 1st Polyeleos, Psalm 134, sung in Orthros (Matins) on Major Feasts.
  • Bishop Basil Essey
  • Byzantine Tone 1
  • Chant
  • Major Feasts
  • Orthros
  • Psalms
  • Byzantine Tone 2
  • Byzantine Tone 3
  • Byzantine Tone 4
  • Byzantine Tone 5
  • Byzantine Tone 6
  • Byzantine Tone 7
  • Byzantine Tone 8
  • Byzantine Tone 9
  • Byzantine Tone 10
  • Byzantine Tone 11
  • Byzantine Tone 12
  • Byzantine Ton
Polyeleos-Psalm 135 This is the 2nd Polyeleos, Psalm 135, sung in Orthros (Matins) on Major Feasts.
  • In the Byzantine tradition, the first tone is chanted, the monastery of the Holy Transfiguration is visited, and major festivals are celebrated with orthros and Psalms are sung.
Presanctified Liturgy, 26a I Will Bless The Lord (Psalm 33) This is the first 10 verses of Psalm 33, to be sung at the end of the Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts, after “Blessed be the name of the Lord.””I will bless the Lord at all times….”It is sung here by the choir of St. George Cathedral, Wichita, KS.
  • The Presanctified
  • Psalms
  • Lenten Triodion
  • Holy Week
  • Porfiry Petrovich Mironositsky
  • Choral
  • Presanctified
Amomos – Psalm 118This is the beginning of Psalm 118:1-12 that may be sung before chanting the Evlogetaria in Orthros.
  • The Byzantine Tone 5
  • Chant
  • Dr. Sam Cohlmia
  • Orthros
  • And Psalms are among the works performed.
Pre-Communion PsalmsThese 3 Psalms (22, 23,115 LXX) may be sung before or during Communion.
  • Preceding Communion: Bishop Basil Essey, Byzantine Tone 1, Chant, Divine Liturgy, Psalms, General Season
  • Alexander Toorenkov, Archpriest Igor Soroka, choruses, general psalms, and a general season are all featured.
  • Alexander Toorenkov, Archpriest Igor Soroka, choruses, general psalms, and a general season are all included.
  • Vespers
  • Vespers of the Holy Spirit
  • Archpriest James C. Meena
  • Byzantine Tone 1 (Choral)
  • Vespers of the Holy Spirit (General Season)
Psalm 146 (145) Kievan melody, Praise ye the Lord
  • Pastor Vladimir Soroka, Psalms, Russian Tone 2, and the general season
  • Choral
  • General
  • General season
Psalm 23 (22) Kievan melody, The Lord is my shepherd
  • Pastor Vladimir Soroka, Psalms, Russian Tone 2, and the general season are all included.
Psalm 33 Psalm 33 is sung/read at the end of the Presanctified Liturgy, but has been used during communion of the Divine Liturgy as well.It is written here in both WesternByzantine notation.”I will bless the Lord at all times….”MusicFile name updated 3/14/19.
  • Choral music in Byzantine notation
  • Byzantine Tone 1
  • Byzantine Tone 3
  • Byzantine Tone 5
  • Chadi Karam (Chadi Karam)
  • Chant
  • Psalms
Psalm 34 (33) Refrain: O taste and see (can be used for Presanctified Liturgy)
  • Choir
  • Dmitri Bortniansky
  • Presanctified
  • Psalms
  • Season of the year
  • Choral
Psalm 34 (33) Full psalm: I will bless the Lord at all times
  • Choral
  • General
  • Priest Vladimir Soroka, Psalms
  • General Season
  • A.F. Shishkin, Choral
  • The Psalms, Russian Tone 7, the general season, and the priest Vladimir Soroka are all included in the general season.
Psalm 67 (66) Kievan melody, God be merciful unto us
  • The Psalms, Russian Tone 7, the general season, and the priest Vladimir Soroka are all included.
Psalm 82 (81) Kievan melody, God standeth in the congregation of the mighty
  • The Psalms, Russian Tone 7, the general season, and the Priest Vladimir Soroka are all included.
  • The Archpriest Igor Soroka, the Chorale, the General, the Psalms, and the General Season
Psalm of Thanksgiving This compilation of psalm verses may be sung either during communion or after the Divine Liturgy.
  • The Archpriest Igor Soroka, the Chorale, the General, the Psalms, and the Season of the Year

Guest Blog: The Marvelous Enigmas of Igor Stravinsky’s “Symphony of Psalms”

At 12:42 a.m. on Tuesday, January 30th, 2018, The Indy Choir is a group of people who want to make a difference in their community. From time to time, we welcome guest writers to contribute their comments on the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir’s activities. Welcome to Janet, a member of the Symphonic Choir’s alto section, who is featured in this post. It was the middle of October. After sight-singing through Stravinsky’s “Psalm Symphony,” the choir prepared to dive into the Christmas performance season full-force.

As we move out of church at the conclusion of Evensong, this was not the joyful, lyrical chorus of praise sung by my church choir earlier in the service.

What had he been thinking all this time?

I was stumped.

Theodore Stravinsky’s son, Theodore, and Theodore’s wife, Denise, wrote “Catherine and Igor Stravinsky: A Family Chronicle 1906-1940,” which included the time period surrounding the composition of the “Symphony of Psalms,” which I discovered after stumbling through a voluminous and often contradictory body of literature.

  1. The money would be much appreciated.
  2. Since their departure from Russia in 1917, he and his family have been continually on the move, whether from a winter property in France to a summer residence in Switzerland or southern France, or to different properties altogether.
  3. Stravinsky considered himself to be an inventor, and he believed that music was a process through which musical issues might be handled in innovative ways.
  4. At the piano, Stravinsky composed, and he was captivated by the sounds that came from strange chords and intervals.
  5. “When I deal with words in music, my musical saliva is set in action by the sounds and rhythms of the syllables,” he is quoted as saying.
  6. He would eliminate the usage of violins and violas and increase the use of wind instruments.
  7. Words are important at times, but more often than not, it is the aggregated sound world created by human voices and instruments that assaults the listener’s senses.
  8. Following his work for the day, the family and their visitors would gather for a late lunch (a picnic in the summer) and go on rambles about the lake, swim or boat in the nearby lakes and rivers, or walk up the nearby highlands and mountains.
  9. A multi-lingual, family-oriented, and welcoming household, with the welcome firmly established by Stravinsky’s wife, Yekaterina, was the setting for this performance.
  10. His wife had been a talented singer and pianist in her own right.

On Friday and Saturday evenings, Stravinsky, his family, and their guests would engage in heated debates about books the family was reading, the interpretation of a story someone was reading aloud, or the translation of an essay or book they were attempting, with the meaning of words and phrases being fought over.

With all of this intense focus on books and their interpretation, it is easy to be skeptical of Stravinsky’s insistence on music as a language of pure sounds that can be interpreted however one wishes, and to wonder why he chose Psalms 38, 39, and 150 from the Latin Vulgate if he did not value the words of the Psalms.

  • During his travels, he created the “Symphony of Psalms,” which he performed across the world.
  • It was against the wishes of the Russian Orthodox Church, which forbade marriages between first cousins, that Stravinsky tied the knot with his cousin in the Russian capital.
  • When the Russian monarchy was abolished and the Communists gained control of the country in 1917, he was in Europe, and he witnessed the revolution.
  • He relocated to Switzerland, then to France, where he died.
  • It was a moment of instability for the Orthodox Church in Russia, torn between the desire to maintain autonomy and adhere to stringent Catholic traditions and the desire to be brought under the supervision of the newly established Russian communist state.
  • He would have been well aware of the rift within the church, as well as the fact that he had made a conscious decision to follow a certain religious belief system.
  • Psalm 150 is a chant of praise and was the first poem to be chosen.

the last song of praise must be conceived of as emanating from the heavens; turbulence is followed by the quiet of praise.” When I set the lyrics of this final hymn to music, I was simply concerned with the sounds of the syllables, and I enjoyed to the fullest extent my besetting delight of controlling prosody in my own manner.” It’s difficult to believe that merely the “sounds of words” could elicit the deep feelings I had while singing his third movement, or that the passionate responses of audiences could be explained by such a simple mechanism.

  1. The composer, Igor Stravinsky, was confronted with a personal issue during this period of writing.
  2. He had met Vera three years previously, in 1926, when on one of his numerous business trips to France at the time.
  3. His ill wife cooperated with his wishes and continued to maintain the family house and host visitors, but she was dissatisfied with the arrangement.
  4. Even though Stravinsky was an exceedingly private person who kept his personal life under wraps, his involvement with a woman named Anna was generally known among his colleagues and acquaintances.
  5. It is possible that the combination of Stravinsky’s complicated personal background, his struggle to reconcile with the strictures of his faith, and his artistic ambition to establish new musical forms explains why Psalm 150 appears to be so emotionally charged.

Nobody knows whether Stravinsky used Psalm 150 to express the frustrations, longing, and loves of his family life, or the conflicts of his religious beliefs, or if his composition was simply an intellectual exercise in sounds and phrases that stretched beyond what was considered conventional music at the time.

Our Indianapolis Symphonic Choir concert on February 3 at the Schrott Center will feature this piece, which we are looking forward to singing.

In order to find out more about and purchase tickets for the Saturday, February 3 performance of Stravinsky’s “Psalm Symphony” and Vaughan Williams’ “Dona Nobis Pacem,” please visit this page.

Psalmody in the Byzantine Rite

Psalmody is the singing or chanting of thePsalms in public or private prayer, and it is defined as follows: There are several ways in which the Psalms are incorporated into the worship of the Church through its liturgy. It should be noted that most of the language used in this article refers to the way in which hymns other than the psalms are sung.

Direct psalmody

Direct psalmody is the term used to describe when a psalm is simply sung from beginning to end. The singer may be a single individual, in which case the others present will normally listen, frequently remaining sitting; or the vocalist may be a choir, or the entire audience may join in with one voice. When it comes to direct psalmody, the melodies that are employed are often relatively basic psalm tones. Examples of direct psalmody are the Six Psalms of Matins, which are chanted by a single reader in the most straightforward manner imaginable, and Psalm 103, which is recited or sung by the entire congregation at the commencement of Vespers.

It is customary in practically all Christian settings to sing the following phrase at the conclusion of every whole Psalm, or segment of a Psalm: Glory to the Father, honor to the Son, and praise be to the Holy Spirit, now and forever and ever.

If those in attendance had been seated to listen to the psalm, they should rise for the doxology.

Responsorial psalmody

A simple refrain such as “Alleluia!” (Hebrew for “Praise God!”) may be found in certain of the Psalms, particularly those meant for use in public liturgy or on pilgrimages, which are popular among Israelites. This technique was taken up and developed by the Christian Church. A procession, for example, would commonly precede each day’s liturgy in the imperial capital of Constantinople, moving from one assembly site to another until arriving at the church where the actual service would be performed, according to historical records.

  1. This troparion was frequently used to convey the significance of the day’s feast of commemoration.
  2. The reader would then intone each verse of the chosen psalm in turn, and the audience would join in by repeating the troparion (triumphant).
  3. It was finally decided that the psalms and refrains would be used as the antiphons to commence the Divine Liturgy.
  4. During the course of monastic life, a new type of responsorial psalmody arose.
  5. Each psalm verse was intoned individually by a single monk, and the entire congregation sang a hymn following each verse; most typically, a single monk would intone each psalm verse individually and the entire congregation sang the hymn, with a new hymn following each psalm verse.
  6. Both types of responsorial psalmody were still in use at the time.
  7. There are two types of “stations” that are sung at a funeral service: those that are based on Psalm 118 and those that are based on hymns in memory of the deceased.

(Another example of psalmody with a set refrain is the whole form of the Communion Hymn during the Divine Liturgy, which is sung in its entirety. The Communion Hymn is composed of the successive verses of a single psalm, with each verse being followed by the chant, “Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia!”)

Antiphonal psalmody

The expansion of bigger churches and monasteries, as well as the increased extension of divine services throughout time, resulted in a shift in the development of psalmody over the centuries. These scenarios frequently resulted in the singers being separated into two choirs – generally one on the left side of the church and one on the right side of the church. As the two choirs sang alternately, it allowed each singer to pause and reflect on what they were singing, as well as giving exhausted voices a chance to rest between verses or hymns.

Later, in the Carpathian Mountains, this kind of singing became popular in churches where the entire congregation sang in alternating between the two sides of the church, a practice that continues to this day.

Antiphonal and responsorial singing can be combined in a variety of ways: for example, when singing psalms with stichera, the cantor on the right side can sing the first verse, and the faithful on the right side can sing the corresponding sticheron; then the cantor on the left side can sing the next verse, and the faithful on the left side of the church can sing the next sticheron; and so on.

Keep in mind that the word “antiphon” can signify two quite different things in Byzantine liturgy, depending on the context.

(Consider, for example, the antiphons used throughout the Divine Liturgy).

Continuous and thematic psalmody

Because the liturgy of the Byzantine Rite (as well as most Christian liturgy) employs two separate techniques of selecting psalms, a different feature of liturgical psalmody is how the psalms are chosen. In cases where the whole psalter will be sung, the psalms are frequently performed one after another in chronological sequence – possibly picking up where the psalm-singing from the previous service left off at a subsequent service – This continuous psalmodyis distinctive of monastic prayer, and (in the Byzantine Rite) it is organized around the divisions of the Psalter known as kathismata (divided sections).

Psalmody is chanted continuously at Vespers and Matins, as well as at the Hours (during the Great Fast) and other services.

Individual psalms are chosen from the Psalter for use in the fixed sections of the services and on feast days depending on their suitability for the service or the day.

Because the faithful could only attend services once or twice a day, these services were specially embellished with psalms and hymns that best suited the theme of the service or the theme of the day, as well as processions, incense, and pageantry, all of which served to lift the hearts and minds of the faithful to God and to the church.

While theme psalmody has been reinstated in most cases, it has not been restored in all cases. Continuous psalmody (such as the kathismata at Matins) has been eliminated, but the sessional hymns that accompany it have occasionally been retained.

Recommended Reading

  • Johann von Gardner is a German author who lives in the United States. (Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 1980). Russian Church Singing: Volume 1 (Crestwood, NY: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 1980). See Chapter 1, “The System of Orthodox Liturgical Singing.”
  • Casimir Kucharek’s “Orthodox Liturgical Singing.” The Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, which is Byzantine-Slavic in style (Alleluia Press, xxxx). Provides an overview of the history of antiphonal and responsorial singing in the Christian Eastern world

Research and Course Guides: Eastern Orthodox Church: Getting Started

Explanation of the Three-Bar Cross The Orthodox Church asserts that it is the Church founded by Jesus Christ and his disciples, and that it was established on the day of Pentecost in the year 33 A.D., with the descending of the Holy Spirit. It is often referred to as the Eastern Orthodox Church or the Greek Orthodox Church (particularly in the current Western world), among other names. There are several more names for this organization, including the Orthodox Catholic Church, Orthodox Christian Church, the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church, the Body of Christ, the Bride of Christ, and simply the Church.

Regardless of their titles, all of the bishops of the Catholic Church are equal in their sacramental office.

Each bishop, whether he is the Ecumenical Patriarch or only an auxiliary bishop without a diocese, has only one vote in an ecumenical council, and he cannot abstain from voting.

Just as it is with its Apostolic succession, the Church believes in and upholds the faith that was passed down by Christ to his apostles.

Different heresies have plagued the Church throughout history, and when this happens, the Church issues dogmatic pronouncements (especially at ecumenical councils) delineating in new language what has always been believed by the Church, thereby preventing the spread of heresy and calling those who tear the Body of Christ apart to repent.

Orthodox churches in the modern era are divided into fourteen or fifteen autocephalous churches and five autonomous churches, which are together referred to as jurisdictions.

In complete communion with one another, the Orthodox churches continue to practice the same faith and adhere to the same rules of conduct.

While also serving as Ecumenical Patriarchate, the Patriarchate of Constantinople enjoys the distinction of being “first among equals” among the Orthodox Christian churches.

The most widely accepted estimates of the number of Orthodox Christians in the world range from around 225 to 300 million people.

St. Barbara Greek Orthodox Church

Explained in Detail: The Three-Bar Cross Founded by Jesus Christ and his apostles on the day of Pentecost in the year 33 A.D., the Orthodox Church asserts that it is the Church that Jesus Christ and his apostles started on that day. Additionally, the Eastern Orthodox Church or the Greek Orthodox Church are terms commonly used to refer to it (particularly in the contemporary West). The Orthodox Catholic Church, the Orthodox Christian Church, the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church, the Body of Christ, the Bride of Christ, or simply the Church are all names for the same organization.

There is no distinction between bishops from different dioceses in terms of their sacramental authority.

Each bishop, whether he is the Ecumenical Patriarch or only an auxiliary bishop without a diocese, has only one vote in an ecumenical council, and that vote is binding.

Just as it is with its Apostolic succession, the Church believes in and practices the doctrines that were passed down by Christ to the apostles.

Different heresies have plagued the Church throughout history, and when this happens, the Church issues dogmatic pronouncements (especially at ecumenical councils) delineating in new language what has always been believed by the Church, thereby preventing the spread of heresy and calling to repentance those who tear the Body of Christ asunder.

There are fourteen or fifteen autocephalous churches and five autonomous churches, which are together referred to as jurisdictions, that make up the Orthodox Church today.

In complete communion with one another, the Orthodox churches continue to practice the same faith and follow the same rules of conduct.

While also serving as Ecumenical Patriarchate, the Patriarchate of Constantinople has the position of “first among equals” among the Orthodox Churches.

Tutorial for Learning the Tones

a self-study tool designed to expose the singer to the eight tones of the Common Chant (L’vov-Bakhmetev Obikhod) and the Kievan Chant (L’vov-Bakhmetev Obikhod). The tone patterns for singing stichera are illustrated. The next parts will discuss psalm verses, troparia, and canons. To do this, the guide will breakdown each tone and identify each of the melodic phrases included inside it. A thorough explanation is provided regarding the right usage of the melodicphrases, as well as the “formula” (intonation pattern, reciting pitch of the phrase body, and cadence) for each of the melodic lines.

All of the sentences are accompanied by musical and textual illustrations. For each tone represented, there are recorded choral demonstrations of the textual examples, including a full (SATB) choir and individual lines for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass.

Stichera

Common (Obikhod) Kievan
Explanation Explanation
Unison Unison
Full Full
Soprano Soprano
Alto Alto
Tenor Tenor
Bass Bass

Tone 2

Common (Obikhod) Kievan
Explanation Explanation
Unison Unison
Full Full
Soprano Soprano
Alto Alto
Tenor Tenor
Bass Bass

Tone 3

Common (Obikhod) Kievan
Explanation Explanation
Unison Unison
Full Full
Soprano Soprano
Alto Alto
Tenor Tenor
Bass Bass

Tone 4

Common (Obikhod) Kievan
Explanation Explanation
Unison Unison
Full Full
Soprano Soprano
Alto Alto
Tenor Tenor
Bass Bass

Tone 5

Common (Obikhod) Kievan
Explanation Explanation
Unison Unison
Full Full
Soprano Soprano
Alto Alto
Tenor Tenor
Bass Bass

Tone 6

Common (Obikhod) Kievan
Explanation Explanation
Unison Unison
Full Full
Soprano Soprano
Alto Alto
Tenor Tenor
Bass Bass

Tone 7

Common (Obikhod) Kievan
Explanation Explanation
Unison Unison
Full Full
Soprano Soprano
Alto Alto
Tenor Tenor
Bass Bass

Tone 8

Common (Obikhod) Kievan
Explanation Explanation
Unison Unison
Full Full
Soprano Soprano
Alto Alto
Tenor Tenor
Bass Bass

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *