How To Clap For The I’d Rather Not Say Jazz Chant You Tube

25 Best Black Gospel Songs You Should Be Listening To

Hezekiah Walker, Anthony Evans, Kirk Franklin, and Israel Houghton are some of my favorite artists to listen to. In the presence of these black gospel performers, I am overwhelmed with a force and energy that I can only dream of emulating while leading worship. However, this does not preclude me from listening to and enjoying these songs. That’s why I compiled this list of 25 black gospel songs that I believe everyone should be listening to, regardless of their background or normal listening choices.

Let’s get this started.

You may subscribe to the Worship Leader 101 Podcast by clicking on this link.

See You Again – Anthony Evans

When I first heard this music, I was really taken aback. I determined that this was the gospel hymn that I would eventually attempt to perform before my congregation. So we gathered the (predominantly white) worship team and trained like crazy for the performance. Yes, it sounded exactly like a long-forgotten U2 song. There’s nothing like the real thing. Despite the fact that we were unable to duplicate the song’s beauty and strength, I continue to enjoy listening to it on a regular basis. To this song, Evans brings an unbelievable amount of energy and vocal prowess to the table.

Way Maker – Sinach.

This is one of those songs that takes the world by surprise and becomes a worldwide phenomenon. It has been covered by nearly every praise band and big Christian musician at this point, and it is expected to continue to climb in popularity in 2021. It makes no difference whether you’re in a little rural town in Iowa or a large city like Los Angeles, or if you’re in London, England, or Lagos, Nigeria. When you hear it, you will be moved to worship like never before.

Every Praise – Hezekiah Walker

As you can see, there are some things I simply cannot pull off while I am leading worship. It’s similar to call and respond. Walker does an excellent job with this. With the spoken word, he naturally calls out to the choir (and the passersby in this video) and leads them in song. If I were to do this, it would sound more like Weird Al Yankovic yelling out the next line of my newest polka, rather than like myself. Hez deserves to be commended. Don’t just sit back and listen to praise and worship music.

Find Out How To Get Started For Free.

You Are Good – Israel Houghton

There’s a good reason why this guy’s given the name “Promised Land.” His high-energy singing and extremely amazing guitar playing will take you precisely where you want to go. This is one of my all-time favorite worship songs, regardless of the style in which it is performed. Now, all I desire is that I could give it justice!

Anything Can Happen – Jonathan Nelson

A good explanation why this boy is called after the Promised Land is that he has a lot of potential.

That’s precisely where he’ll take you with his high-energy singing and tremendously talented guitar work. Regardless of the style, this is one of my all-time favorite praise songs. Now all I desire is that I could do it justice in my writing!

Shackles (Praise You) – Mary Mary

I recall hearing this song for the first time on secular radio when it was originally released. It’s a clean pop tune that also serves as a worship hymn at the same time. I’m not sure how Mary Mary achieved it, but it’s something I’d hope to be able to do eventually.

No Weapon – Fred Hammond

With “No Weapon,” Hammond provides real encouragement to those who are believers. When a worship leader instructs and encourages a congregation, it is a joy to see. God desires that every worship leader lead his or her congregation with the same expertise that Hammond demonstrates here.

You Deserve It – JJ. HairstonYouthful Praise

“No Weapon,” a song by Hammond, provides real encouragement to believers. A worship leader who instructs and encourages the congregation is one of my favorite things to see. Every worship leader should have the same level of competence as Hammond demonstrates in this video.

Your Spirit – Tasha Cobbs Leonard ft. Kierra Sheard

There’s nothing more inspiring than listening to strong women lead the congregation in worship. With this powerful track, Leonard and Sheard will completely demolish you and your dance floor.

O Come to the Altar – Israel HoughtonElevation Worship

Absolutely nothing compares to the experience of listening to powerful women lead the congregation in worship. With this powerful track, Leonard and Sheard completely destroy you.

Your Love – William Murphy

There’s nothing more inspiring than listening to strong women lead the congregation in prayer. With this powerful track, Leonard and Sheard completely demolish you.

You’re Bigger – Jekalyn Carr

“You’re Bigger” is a tour de force on the immensity of God, and it dispels the myth that your issue is greater than God’s. Carr’s enthusiasm is contagious. When you don’t have any faith left, she sings it into reality for you.

You Are Here – William McDowell

Another mind-blowing example of a true worship leader at work may be found in this song. While leading his vast ensemble and congregation, McDowell exudes a fresh sense of authority. For me, and for the vast majority of majority-white churches, the concept of call and response is a foreign concept. It’s something I’d like to become more proficient at. In order for the leader to lead and improvise, the first step is to have a really strong group of backup voices that are capable of carrying the melody and feel of the song.

Victory – Yoland Adams

Ok. I was completely taken aback. This is one of those songs that you consider performing for about 2 seconds before deciding against it because you know you would never be able to give the song justice. There are a plethora of aspects in this. First and foremost, I could never arrange a choir to sound as amazing as this while also dancing as well as they did here. First and foremost, Yolanda Adams’ on-stage demeanor is so genuine and captivating that you can’t help but be drawn in. Third, I’ve never heard a string part sound quite like this before.

I Need You Now – Smokie Norful

Ok. Wow. I’m completely taken aback! There are some songs that you contemplate about performing for about 2 seconds before deciding that you could never give it right. This is one of those tunes. Here, there are several components. First and foremost, I could never arrange a choir to sound as well as this while also dancing as well as they do.

Second, Yolanda Adams’ stage presence is so real and engaging that you can’t help but be drawn in by her story and her performance. I’ve never heard a string part that was this upbeat before. As soon as I began to watch this film, I was unable to stop myself.

Awesome – Pastor Charles JenkinsFellowship Chicago

Ok. My mind has been blown. This is one of those songs that you consider performing for about 2 seconds before deciding against it because you know you would never be able to do justice to it. There are a plethora of components here. First and foremost, I could never arrange a choir to sound this wonderful while yet dancing in such a dynamic manner. Second, Yolanda Adams’ stage presence is so genuine and engaging that you can’t help but be drawn in. Third, I’ve never heard a string part that was quite that upbeat.

To God be the Glory – Andrae Crouch

From a pioneer in the field of praise music comes a classic. There are no boundaries between this music and its listeners’ styles, backgrounds, and cultures. When I was a youngster, I remember singing it at my predominantly white church. This is a one-of-a-kind song in that it is strong no matter how it is performed.

Breathe – Byron Cage

This song, in contrast to the most of the others on this list, is one that I’ve performed hundreds of times, dating back to my days as a youth group worship leader. The uplifting lesson that Byron Cage’s interpretation provides is that you can add your own unique spin to any song and turn it into something fantastic. The melodies of God transcend all boundaries of style and culture.

See also:  What Is A Harmonic Chant

I Need You – Donnie McClurkin

This song, in contrast to the most of the others on this list, is one that I’ve performed hundreds of times, dating back to my days as a youth group worship leader in high school and university. The uplifting lesson that Byron Cage’s interpretation provides is that you can make any song better by adding your own unique spin to it. God’s praises are more important than fashion or culture.

A God Like You – Kirk Franklin

There’s plenty of place in today’s worship performances for upbeat songs to be played. For whatever reason, the majority of worship songs nowadays are either dirges or power ballads, which I’m not sure why. So, here’s a pleasant tune to help fill in the blanks for you. In fact, if I had the same level of talent as Mr. Franklin, I might be able to perform this piece in my church.

GoodBad – J Moss

When the vocalist, in the middle of a praise song, starts joking about how your phone stops ringing and no one wants to hang out with you, you know it’s a good one. This isn’t a song; it’s a message delivered in music. Many worship leaders, I believe, are apprehensive about incorporating teaching and encouraging into their songs. In terms of technique, J Moss is a master.

Alright – Lowell Pye

When the vocalist, in the middle of a praise song, begins joking about how your phone has stopped ringing and no one wants to hang out with you, you know it’s a fantastic worship song! A sermon, not a song, is being delivered here today. Many worship leaders, I believe, are apprehensive about incorporating teaching and encouraging into the songs they perform. In terms of technique, J Moss is a pro.

Boasting – Lecrae + Anthony Evans

Is it true that praise music and rap don’t go together? Why aren’t God’s people able to reach out with spoken word in the same way that they can with song?

In God’s sight, there is no distinction between the two. Rap has a long way to go before it is accepted into mainstream worship services (particularly in white-predominant churches), but it is on its way there. So prepare yourself.

Jesus the Same – IsraelNew Breed

Please accept my invitation! Where was I when God was bestowing this level of ability on people?

Better – Hezekiah Walker

Hezekiah Walker seemed to be having a great time doing whatever it is that he is doing. When I’m leading worship, I’d like to be able to experience greater delight like this.

Father Jesus – Fred Hammond

Regardless of what he is doing, Hezekiah Walker appears to be having tremendous enjoyment. When I lead worship, I wish I could have more joy like this.

Diversity Is The Key To full worship Of God

Hezekiah Walker seemed to be having a great time in whatever he is doing. When I’m leading worship, I’d like to be able to express more joy like this.

Jazz it up: teaching English with jazz chants

Hezekiah Walker appears to be having a great time with whatever he is doing. I’d like to experience more delight like this while I’m leading worship.

Why use them with teenagers?

Jazz chants are extremely effective in introducing youngsters to rhythm, tension, and groupings of all kinds of people. They are not very enthusiastic about drills at this age, but they are nevertheless required to participate. For native speakers, emphasis is the most important factor in conveying meaning. It’s what we’re looking for while trying to figure out what’s significant and where to put our attention. As a result, chanting is a practical technique to assist your kids become more aware of their own intonation patterns and sound more naturally.

  • In order to be performed or practiced in an adolescent class, several jazz chants have been written with the adult audience in mind.
  • Jazz chants do not need any prior musical knowledge.
  • Simply put, get the beat!
  • Here is one of my favorite jazz chants, as well as some ideas for how you may use it to help your kids improve their pronunciation.
  • I’d prefer not say anything.
  • I’d prefer not say anything.
  • What year were you born?

I’d prefer not say anything.

How much money do you earn?

What is it about you that you aren’t married?

What is it about you that you don’t want children?

Where were you last night, by the way?

Did you remain out till the wee hours of the morning?

Did you come home on your own? Were you able to have a wonderful time? Did you catch a nice performance? Did you go to a concert this weekend? I’d prefer not say anything. The following is an excerpt from Jazz Chants Old and Newby Carolyn Graham is a writer and editor who lives in New York City.

  1. Toss out some questions to your adolescents and see if they can recollect any that are deemed personal in their culture. Allow them to come up with ideas on their own. After then, turn on the jazz chant so that they can hear any of the questions that have been asked. Have them listen to the recording again and repeat the written chant. Make certain that all of the jargon is understandable. Mark the chant with your partner to demonstrate key stresses, intonation, decreased sounds, connecting, and blending. You may choose whether you want to concentrate on a specific element of pronunciation or if you want to cover all of the major ones. It is dependent on the ability of the students as well as the overall complexity of the chant. For stress management, I generally ask my adolescents to listen to the chant again after marking it and touch the stressed phrases. This has shown to be effective. First and foremost, it enhances the musical intelligence by including somatic and kinaesthetic intelligence. Second, rhythmic skills are intricately related to motor and cognitive processes such as language and memory
  2. After practicing the chant in a group setting, break your adolescents into two groups and have them practice the chant alone. One group is in charge of asking questions, and the other is in charge of answering them. When they are familiar with the chant, you may ask them to perform it in groups of two people. Exaggeration is another technique for drilling it home. Create the impression of a nosy coworker or a nosy neighbor by assigning duties that sound dramatic. It’ll be a lot of fun! You may go even farther and recommend to your kids that they turn some more of these types of questions into their own jazz chant
  3. This way, they will undoubtedly remember how to avoid answering incorrect questions in a courteous manner.

It is possible to employ chants to help you learn or review new language. Typically, we use the chant below with lower-level teens who are having difficulty coming up with synonyms for the word ‘good.’ He’s a fantastic dentist, and I highly recommend him. He’s a fantastic dentist, and I highly recommend him. Danny is his given name. She’s a wonderful patient to have. Annie is her given name. He’s a fantastic vocalist, by the way. Bill is his given name. She’s a fantastic dancer, too. Jill is her given name.

  • Sherri is her given name.
  • Larry is his given name.
  • Sandy is her given name.
  • Andy is his given name.
  1. Vocabulary learning and revision can be aided by certain chants. Typically, we use the chant below with lower-level teens who are having difficulty coming up with synonyms for the word “good.” Dentists like him are hard to find. Dentists don’t come much better than this guy! Mr. Danny is the person you’re looking for. In terms of patient care, she’s exemplary. “Annie” is her given name. A fantastic vocalist, he’s got a lot of talent. Mr. Bill is the individual in question. The woman can dance like no one’s business! ‘Jill’ is her given name. She possesses exceptional writing abilities. Her name is Sherri, and she lives in the United States of America. He’s a brilliant lawyer with a great deal of experience. Larry’s given name is. She’s a fantastic instructor in every sense. My friend Sandy is the one in the picture above. The young man is a star pupil. Mr. Andy will introduce himself. The following is an excerpt from the book Jazz Chants Old and New by Carolyn Graham.
See also:  Which Class Is Pre Existing To Chant Music

For some time now, I’ve had a kid that travels overseas for around half of the school year. She once told me that her biggest challenge is not even the language, but rather the small chat that is so common in English-speaking nations. I was surprised. What’s more, guess what? I introduced her to jazz chants, which she enjoyed! Your gloves are very nice. Your gloves are really nice! Is it the first time you’ve seen them? No, not at all. I’ve had these for a long time. What store did you acquire these from?

  1. They’re just stunning.
  2. I like the ring you’re wearing.
  3. No, not at all.
  4. What store did you acquire it from?
  5. It’s just stunning.
  6. (Adapted from Carolyn Graham’s Small Talk: More Jazz Chants Chants)
  1. A student of mine has been studying overseas for almost half a year now, and I’ve been teaching him for quite some time. The small chat that is so common in English-speaking nations, she once told me, was her biggest challenge, not even the language itself. What’s more, you’re right. Jazz chants were introduced to her by me! My favorite thing about your gloves is that they’re comfortable and stylish. Your gloves are very nice. Is it the first time you’re seeing them? Oh no, not this time! These are things I’ve held for a very long time. You didn’t say where you got them from. It was in London that I purchased them. Their beauty is undeniably apparent. Greetings and thanks for your assistance. My favorite thing about your ring is the design. It appears to be a new product. Oh no, not this time! Several years have passed since I first saw it. Did you acquire it from a store or something? That’s where I got it from. I think it’s just stunning. Greetings and thanks for your assistance. The following is an excerpt from Carolyn Graham’s book Small Talk: More Jazz Chants, Chants.

Because jazz chants are typically constructed around specific words or patterns, you may use them to revise or even teach grammatical structures. First thing in the morning on Saturday, I called my mum. We had a one-hour conversation. I then went home and showered. After that, I played tennis. I walked to the kitchen, prepared a cup of tea, and pulled out my English book, where I diligently studied. I completed all of my schoolwork without making a single error. Then I made the decision to take a little sabbatical.

(Adapted fromGrammarchantsby Carolyn Graham) (Grammarchants)

  1. Distribute the script without any of the past tense verbs. Instruct your pupils to guess the phrases that will be used to fill in the gaps
  2. Then have them listen to the chant and confirm their predictions. Concentrate on the past tense of the verbs, as well as their structure and sound. Read the passage aloud, line by line. There are many other emotions you may practice there: reading a sad story, telling about a dull Saturday, being proud of a productive morning, and so on. Instruct your teenagers to read with a specific tone and leave the rest of the group to guess
  3. Concentrate on the tonal quality of the original chanting pattern. Make a mark on the stress by clapping, tapping, or stamping it! Chant along with the tape
  4. Then go on to writing and reciting the stories of adolescents from their own history. It can be preceded with brainstorming verbs and collocations, or it can be accompanied by a template, such as the following:

_We chatted about _First, I phoned _Then, I went to the park, and _In this manner, your teenagers will not only receive some additional practice with the Past Simple, but they will also improve their automatic usage of collocations as well. And, hopefully, will have a fantastic time while doing so. Countless other chants may be found in Carolyn Graham’s books; you’ll be amazed at how powerful and fun they are. Have you ever utilized jazz chants to teach your teenagers something important?

So, which one is your personal favorite? Formerly employed seasoned educator who has been eugenics-educated (CELTA A, TKT, TKT CLIL, CAE, DELTA 1 Pass with Merit). The CPD has accepted the PLIDA ad libitum ad libitum ad libitum.

When To Clap At The Symphony: A Guideline

When it comes to orchestra concerts, one of the most heated discussions is about when to clap. A clapping specialist may be divided into two categories: one who tells you that clapping between movements is OK and that there are no regulations, and another who advises that you should only applaud after the piece is totally done. However, both sorts of specialists have historical and/or conventional aspects and data that may be used to support their positions, which is ironic. However, rather than debating whether method is superior and why, I’d like to provide some basic rules that I’ve seen both on stage and as an audience member.

When attending a performance, crowds will typically clap twice before the music even begins to play.

  1. When the concertmaster arrives, applause erupts. The concertmaster bows, on behalf of the orchestra, and then tunes the instruments. Once the tuning process begins, you can stop clapping
  2. When the Music Director appears, stop clapping. Continue to clap
  3. In most cases, the music director will call the entire orchestra to the stage to express his or her gratitude.

The music is the next item on the agenda. The chances are that you’ve already thumbed through the software. Take attention of the order in which things are presented in the program; this will provide you with cues as to when it is appropriate to confidently applaud. For example, here’s a sample program that I’ve developed over the years: Extremely edgy Composer of the Modern Era (4:03) The Violin Concerto is by a well-known contemporary composer (35:50) ——Intermission——- Symphony8:An Easily Recognizable Dude in the Tradition (30:04) The first work on the program is a single movement composed in a minimalist style.

Because you may not know how this task will conclude at this time, determining when to clap is dependent on how the work concludes.

  1. Single-movement compositions make up the first half of the program. As an additional feature, some applications include a minute clock, which allows you to get a sense of how long you will be listening to a composition. You might not know how this work will conclude at this moment, so determining when to applaud is dependent on how the task concludes..

The conductor will be escorted from the stage. If the applause continues, they will be called back on stage for one more salute. The conductor makes a triumphant return to the stage with the soloist. The applause is acknowledged by both the conductor and the soloist, and then the second item on the program is performed. This is the point at which the excitement begins. Some concertos have ferocious initial movements that culminate in a pyrotechnic display that causes the audience to leap from their seats.

  1. You are welcome to participate if the first movement concludes in a whirlwind and there is a quick surge of applause. It’s possible that you’ve even begun it. There is absolutely nothing wrong with letting off some steam in this area. An appropriately kind soloist will bend a little, possibly smile, and then recollect herself. However, if you don’t feel like applauding, you are under no need to do so. If the initial movement has a softer finishing movement, take pleasure in the sensation of being transfixed and wait. There is no need to celebrate at this point. Remember that there are still two more movements to appreciate, and that interrupting a moment such as this might detract from the overall effect of a mood that the orchestra and soloist have just established. If the opening movement of a concerto is neither very showy or quiet, such as a Mozart concerto, some members of the audience will often applaud. You have the option to participate or not. However, it is quite improbable that the entire crowd is clapping at this moment, so you may feel uncomfortable if just 20 people applaud at this point. Similarly, for the second movements of concertos, the guidelines are the same. The way they conclude their performance as well as the energy generated by the crowd should assist determine whether or not you should applaud
  2. The conclusion of the final movement is less difficult. If there is a loud and sudden termination, your instincts will lead you through the situation. If the work comes to a calm conclusion, don’t hurry to applause
  3. Instead, take time to appreciate the sensation and wait for the body language on stage to relax and signal to the audience that the act is over.
See also:  What Is The Saints Chant

Both the soloist and the conductor will be departing. Continue to cheer. The soloist returns to the stage and takes a solo bow. Continue to cheer. It is customary for the soloist and conductor to come back out and acknowledge the orchestra before taking a general bow for everyone onstage if the atmosphere in the auditorium permits it. Continue to clap until the soloist and conductor have completely exited the stage. After the interval, there will most likely be a symphonic piece in multiple movements after the intermission.

Even before the action is completed, there may be some points where every bone in your body wants to leap to its feet and scream with delight.

In most cases, orchestras will advise you that it is acceptable to applaud between sections.

To keep track of whatever movement the orchestra is in, or if you’re afraid to applaud until the very end, look for visual clues to tell you where you are in the performance.

Visual signals will be helpful if the performance comes to a quick and loud conclusion, but most of the time, others around you will be clapping, making it comfortable for you to join in.

A note to conductors

There will be a departure of both the soloist and the conductor. Continue to clap your hands in appreciation. The soloist returns and takes a solo bow at the conclusion of the performance. Continue to clap your hands in appreciation. It is customary for the soloist and conductor to come back out and acknowledge the orchestra before taking a general bow for everyone onstage if the atmosphere in the auditorium permits it. Continue to clap until the soloist and conductor have finished their performance.

  • Some of the movements, much like the previous concerto, may entice you to cheer.
  • Even before the movement is completed, there might be some points where every bone in your body wants to leap to its feet and scream with delight.
  • When it comes to applauding between movements, most orchestras will tell you it’s OK.
  • Observe the visual signals if you’ve lost track of whatever movement the orchestra is in or if you’re afraid to applaud till the finish of the performance.
  • Although visual signals will be helpful if the performance comes to a quick and loud conclusion, individuals in your immediate vicinity will usually be clapping, making it comfortable for you to participate.
  1. Please do not keep your hands in the air at the conclusion of a loud and quick symphonic performance as though there is more music. People are baffled by what you’re doing, and when you eventually put your arms down, the applause comes in in a dismal stream. This should not be done! People desire to release their energy as soon as possible after doing a loud and quick task. Allow the audience to know absolutely that this is the conclusion
  2. It is sometimes beneficial to inform the audience that there may be a trick ending. If your orchestra is performing the Fifth Symphony by Sibelius or the Sixth Symphony by Tchaikovsky, explain to the audience what happens in the piece. A license to applaud after the third movement of Tchaikovsky6, for example, would provide solace to certain listeners while providing guidance for others. After all, applause is a reaction to energy, and a good release may be quite soothing at certain moments. However, restraint may be highly effective as well. In any case, it’s excellent to express your opinions
  3. However, shooting glaring stares or frantically waving an arm to “discipline” an audience member who has plainly clapped at the incorrect time is not a good idea. It is more likely that people will remember your acts than they will recall those of the offender(s).

A note to frequent audience members

Thank you for being a regular participant in the audience! You are the heart of what keeps orchestral music alive, and we are eternally thankful to you for that! While most audiences are welcoming to newcomers, some can be a little prickly, and it would be wonderful if we could change their point of view on the matter:

  1. Despite the fact that it is pleasant to feel educated and refined by refraining from clapping when it is deemed inappropriate, it is rude to scold individuals or complain about those who breached your rule by clapping in between motions. One of the most enjoyable aspects of attending a live orchestral concert is the opportunity to share the experience with others
  2. Nevertheless, if someone’s first time is made to seem foolish or unsophisticated, it may be their last. If someone claps out of place (according to your standards), be grateful and silent since this is a person who has made an effort to attend a live event that you enjoy as well as they do. Thank your lucky stars that there are people who care about the arts.

A note to the new comer

Please accept my gratitude for making time to visit and try something new! The sight of fresh individuals appreciating an art form to which we have devoted and committed ourselves for many years fills us with delight. Prepare yourself for your concert experience by doing the following:

  1. Attending a concert should not be prevented because of your uncertainties or fears. Do not be concerned if you are the only one clapping at this point
  2. After all, you are not the only one who is experiencing something new. In any case, no one will remember this
  3. Instead, it will be the cell phone that will be the focal point of attention. As I previously stated, there are no rules, only a few principles, which I have outlined above. It is more vital to be present at a live orchestral concert than to obey any regulations, but if you are still anxious about applauding in the incorrect spot, simply wait and follow the lead of others.

This is my general guideline for everyone: you should never feel terrible about applauding; but, you should feel horrible about making others feel bad about clapping, which is against the law. Check out this article for more information on audience behavior. Do you require homework assistance at a low cost? For more information, please see our homework assistance service. Place an order and enjoy your high-quality assignment!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *