How To Turn Into A Woman Chant

Can women chant Vedic mantras? Know the truth – Times of India

Female chanting of the Vedas is not permitted, according to common opinion. Given that women are seen as a symbol of prakruthi (nature) in Hinduism, it is difficult to understand why this religion forbids women from singing Vedas. Actually, there is nothing in the Vedas that suggests that women should not read Vedas or that they should not be allowed to do so. People hold the idea that repeating Vedic mantras will have an adverse effect on a woman’s ability to produce children. In addition, neither the Vedas nor Hinduism are discriminatory toward women.

In the Sanatana dharma, women are held in the utmost regard.

Also incorrect is the belief that women are not permitted to recite Sundara Kanda due to the fact that it contains the Gayatri Mantra.

In reality, according to the Vedas, the Atharva Veda is a Hindu literature that is exclusively devoted to home rites and practices.

  1. Girls who graduated from Gurukul had two options when it came to their future: either they could become Brahmavadinis or they could marry a prince.
  2. These ladies have been known to remain single for the most of their lives.
  3. In modern India, there are several instances of women reciting and studying the Vedas.
  4. 121 women recited the Vedas for two hours straight, for the first time in history, and without stopping.
  5. This was an attempt to demonstrate that ladies singing Vedas is not against the law.

Gender and Class in the Song of Songs

The exquisite lines in the Song of Songs about heterosexual sexuality, desire, and love demand to be associated with and embraced by those who read them. However, as we read and reread the Song, we become more aware of little but persistent details that highlight questions of gender and class, and that cast a shadow over the overall, seemingly idyllic picture that pervades most of the Song (Song 3:1-4andSong 5:2-8are the exceptions). In both theater and fiction, the characters that have the most lines are typically the ones who have the greatest power.

The song begins with a woman’s voice at 1:2 and ends with a woman’s voice at 8:14.

It is supported by one of the most profound and complete love “credos” ever said by a woman: “Let me be a seal upon your heart, like the seal upon your hand.” Because love is as violent as death, and passion is as powerful as Sheol; its arrows are darts of fire, and its blaze is a blazing flame.

  1. It is also noteworthy because of the intensity and depth of feeling that it elicits.
  2. As a result, you may argue that this is consistent with the remainder of the love lyric.
  3. Keep your eyes peeled for the second portion of Song 8:7, which alters this woman-friendly finish slightly: If a guy handed up all of his fortune in exchange for love, he would be laughed to ridicule by his peers.
  4. It’s important to note that he just gives up his riches, not his life or his body, as the lady would do by making this proclamation.
  5. Sisters’ sexual activity is attempted to be regulated by their brothers (Song 1:6; Song 8:8-10), and lovers refer to one another as “brother” and “sister” as expressions of endearment.
  6. Female lovers—if we accept the premise that the poems contain more than a single heterosexual couple—are primarily represented as rural maidens, with the exception of the chorus of the “Daughters of Jerusalem,” who are depicted as urban.
  7. Women speak more than men in the Song, although men are more frequently heard speaking about women than men speaking about men.
  8. As a result, although males are less prominent in the Song, they are still strongly associated with culture, while females are associated with nature.

Men are not expected to give up their fortunes for love, and they are certainly not expected to give up their souls or their bodies. Even in the world of the Song of Songs, this is not the case.

Songs of Women’s Suffrage

At the Long Branch Casino in New Jersey, women set up banners advertising a suffrage event with Dr. Anna Howard Shaw, which took place around August 1915. For more information and a larger photo, click on the link. A parallel movement for the rights of African Americans and women developed in the years preceding up to the American Civil War, and many of the same leaders were involved in both movements. While creating anthems for their campaign, the suffragists used tunes from popular songs, modified soldier’s songs for marches, and even composed songs based on hymns.

  • 1872-1877).
  • One of the songs included in this presentation is ” Daughters of Freedom,” a song written by Edward Christie with lyrics by George Cooper in favour of women’s suffrage that was first published in 1871 and has since become a classic.
  • There is also a sheet music copy available.
  • ” by Frank Boylen, published in 1881, is an example of sheet music from the movement that was published later.
  • Their outfit, which consisted of a short skirt over loose pants, was nicknamed the “Bloomer costume” by the press.
  • ” The Bloomer’s Complaint,” a song written in 1851 that depicts the public’s reaction to the planned women’s attire, is a good example of this.
  • “I’ll tell you what I think of bicycles,” Susan B.

I believe it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the history of the globe.

Her sense of self-reliance and freedom is immediately heightened the instant she takes her seat; and off she goes, the picture of untrammeled women.” Women riding bicycles were the subject of amusing songs, some of which were risqué, in which males were amused by the sight of a lady in pants.

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, several states, notably in the West, began allowing women the right to vote, either in its whole or with certain restrictions.

In 1911, Yiddish sheet music for ” Damen Rechte ” (“Women’s Rights,” which was translated as “Suffragettes” on the sheet music) by Joseph Rumshinsky and Anshel Shor was published.

The song not only fights for women’s right to vote, but also for equal opportunity in a wide range of professions and positions.

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A comic complaint song about a man whose wife is busy campaigning for the vote, ” Since My Margaret Became a Suffragette,” sung by Maurice Burkhardt, was published in 1912; ” Your Mother’s Gone Away to Join the Army,” sung by Billy Murray in 1913, is a song about the family left behind when a mother goes to fight for the cause.

Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton originally prepared the language of what would become the Nineteenth Amendment, which was offered to Congress in 1878 and ultimately rejected in 1887.

Thus, the women’s suffrage campaign extended over seventy years and incorporated a variety of musical styles to support the cause during that period, until the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment by the states, which needed the ratification of thirty-six states, occurred in 1920.

The songs performed by the suffragists were rarely recorded until long after their goal had been successfully achieved.

Notes

  1. Nelly Bly’s interview with Susan B. Anthony appeared on page 10 of the New York newspaper The World on February 2, 1896. Further reading may be found in the 1911 book ” Fraue Rechte,” written by Arnold Perlmutter with Hermann Wohl and Hyman Altman.

Resources

  • The Suffrage Song Book is written by Henry W. Roby. Crane and Company was founded in 1909. Kansas Memory has a digital copy of the song Songs of the Suffragettes, which was sung by Elizabeth Knight. Folkways Records, 1958 (still available in print through a variety of sellers)
  • Women’s suffrage is a triumph! Songs of the Woman Suffrage Movement, 1848-1920, Miriam Reed Productions, 1995
  • ” Songs of Social Change ” (Songs of America)
  • ” Songs of the Woman Suffrage Movement, 1848-1920, Miriam Reed Productions, 1995

WOMEN IN SACRED CHANT: PAST AND PRESENT

This panel, held in conjunction with the release of the CD “Hymns of Kassian,” explored two aspects of women’s contributions to Christian sacred music: those who create and those who perform the music (singers). Despite the fact that this history has been – and continues to be – significant to the continued vitality of sacred music as an art form and as a crucial method of religious expression, it has been and continues to be overlooked or even ignored in broader histories of Christianity. We heard from a variety of experts on the topic of Kassa as a female composer in Constantinople, her prominent counterparts in the medieval West, particularly Hildegard of Bingen, the presence of women’s choirs in medieval Byzantine liturgical tradition and contemporary Greece, as well as the practice of performing professionally and performing in a liturgical capacity as a female chanter in an American Greek Orthodox parish.

The panel includes audio snippets from the Cappella Romana, In Mulieribus, and Ai Adousai chamber choirs, which serve to illustrate the many traditions under consideration.

Details

This panel, held in conjunction with the release of the CD “Hymns of Kassian,” explored two aspects of women’s contributions to Christian sacred music: those who write and those who sing (singers). Despite the fact that this history has been – and continues to be – significant to the continued vitality of sacred music as an art form and as a critical method of religious expression, it has been and continues to be overlooked or even ignored in broader histories of Christianity. We heard from a variety of experts on the topic of Kassa as a female composer in Constantinople, her prominent counterparts in the medieval West, particularly Hildegard of Bingen, the presence of women’s choirs in medieval Byzantine liturgical tradition and contemporary Greece, as well as the practice of performing professionally and performing in a liturgical setting as a female chanter in an American Greek Orthodox parish.

It includes audio samples from the Cappella Romana, In Mulieribus, and Ai Adousai chamber choirs, which serve to illustrate the many traditions under discussion.

Panelists

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Dr. Susan Ashbrook Harvey

Moderator Susan Ashbrook is a woman who lives in the United Kingdom. Harvey is the Willard Prescott and Annie McClelland Smith Professor of Religion and History at Brown University, where she also serves as the Director of the Program in Early Cultures. She received her bachelor’s degree from Harvard University. She specializes in Byzantine and Syriac traditions of Christianity, with a particular emphasis on the treatment of women, as well as on religion and the senses. Her research has included an emphasis on women’s religious singing in the ancient world, as well as other topics.

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Dr. Sevi Mazera-Mamali

In addition to being the founder and director (Domestikaina) of the Ai Adousai women’s Byzantine chorus in Volos, Greece, Dr. Sevi Mazera-Mamali is also a music instructor of Byzantine music. As a Byzantine musicologist, Dr. Mazera-Mamali had his training at the Kapodistrian University of Athens, and he has also taught at the Higher Ecclesiastical Academy of Vellas in Ioannina. The Ai Adousai women’s Byzantine choir in Volos, Greece, was founded by her in 2012, and she has served as its Domestikaina (Artistic Director and Conductor).

She also plays as a solo pianist on the piano.

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Photini Downie Robinson

Photini Downie Robinson is a singer in Cappella Romana and Lambadaria (leader of the “Left Choir”) at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Portland, Oregon. She is also the founder and director of the YPHOS Voice Studio in Portland, Oregon, where she teaches voice lessons to students. Ms. Downie Robinson has been singing professionally for more than twenty years, and she has performed with a variety of professional ensembles, mostly in the Pacific Northwest. Because of her interest in early music, she embarked on a path that took her through Renaissance polyphony, Baroque chamber music and oratorio, and finally into the very specialized niche of Byzantine Chant.

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She received her Bachelor of Music degree from the Juilliard School of Music.

Anna Song is a medical doctor.

Dr. Anna Song

Photini Downie Robinson is a singer with Cappella Romana and Lambadaria (leader of the “Left Choir”) at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Portland, Oregon. She is also the founder and director of the YPHOS Voice Studio in Portland, Oregon, where she teaches voice lessons to children. Miss Downie Robinson has been singing professionally for almost twenty years, and has performed with a variety of professional ensembles, particularly in the Pacific Northwest region. With a passion for early music, she embarked on a path that took her through Renaissance polyphony, Baroque chamber music and oratorio, and ultimately into the very specialized niche of Byzantine Chant.

She is in high demand as a soloist, chamber musician, cantor, instructor, and clinician, and has emerged as a major champion for the integration of women into the Psaltic Art. The Honorable Dr. Anna Song, MD, FACP

Dr. Alexander Lingas

He is a Professor of Music at City, University of London, as well as the founder and Musical Director of the vocal ensemble Cappella Romana, and a Fellow of the European Humanities Research Centre at the University of Oxford. His current work incorporates historical research, ethnographic, and performance elements. He was given the title of Archon Mousikodidaskalos by His All-Holiness, Bartholomew I, Archbishop of Constantinople-New Rome and Ecumenical Patriarch, who conferred it on him in 2018.

How Did “Barracuda” Become the Go-To Song for Scenes of Female Power?

Harley Quinn and her newfound group of girls find themselves encircled by mercenaries (all of whom are guys), besieged, but determined not to go down without a fight, as Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) approaches its climactic confrontation. While Harley distributes a slew of weaponry, the familiar guitar riff from Heart’s “Barracuda” begins to reverberate throughout the funhouse of mirrors in which they’ve been trapped. The outcome is obvious within a chord: a kickass fight in which this bunch of women—who were previously all individual actors with varying ambitions and who had previously been at odds with one another—will band together and, more than likely, come out on top of the competition.

  • When it was released 20 years ago, it was responsible for the swagger of a leather-clad Lucy Liu, joined the princesses of Duloc during a knight combat, and reignited the rivalry between Sigourney Weaver and Jamie Lee Curtis.
  • For what it’s worth, the song itself has an impressively long and illustrious history.
  • Mushroom’s dissatisfaction with the lack of tour support and financial resources also played a role in their overall rage.
  • A poem Ann wrote later that night about her sentiments over the whole scenario formed the lyrics of “Barracuda,” which was released the following day.
  • ‘Barracuda’ has me completely unraveled…
  • With the barracuda as the central character, the song’s lyrics allude to and describe a predatory fish that appears to represent the slimy record executives responsible for the commercial, as well as other people who objectified the Wilson sisters.

Heart’s fury has been represented in a variety of ways over the years, making “Barracuda” an appealing song for music directors: In addition to appearances in Charlie’s Angels and Marvel’s Jessica Jones (a well-known badass and avenging superhero/detective); Shrek the Third, when the princesses, led by Fiona, fight some knights (this version is a Fergie cover); Chuck, when Anna battles Michael Strahan; and even during the 2008 Republican National Convention, in reference to Sarah Palin, vice presidential candidate; One of these things is not quite like the others, but the 2008 Republican National Convention was a watershed moment in American culture, and the use of the term “Barracuda” in that context is consistent with the others in intent, even if you disagree with the linkage (as the Wilson sisters reportedlydid not).

  • In all of these situations, the song serves as the soundtrack to a scene intended to show the toughness of a woman or a group of women, scenes that are consistent with the song’s genesis tale.
  • “Barracuda” has become the soundtrack to the ferocity and strength of women everywhere.
  • “Barracuda,” the song itself, will never lose its significance as a protest against the sexist and exploitative record industry, and Heart should be allowed to continue receiving their royalties in perpetuity, of course.
  • In addition, when “Barracuda” becomes a cliche in and of itself, its use may mistakenly reduce female characters to a monolithic entity that does not necessarily represent the individual character(s) in question.
  • Is this connection built into our brains in a negative way?
  • The soundtrack of a female-empowering moment in a film, television program, or political campaign might include a variety of songs, some of which may be less anticipated and more surprising, and so have a greater impact on the audience.
  • Girls!
  • What do you think of Nicki Minaj’s “Here I Am”?
  • Is SZA’s “Normal Girl” a real person?
  • The songs “Breakin’ Dishes” or “What’s My Name?” or “Man Down,” or “Cockiness (Love It,” or “Consideration,” or…
  • Heart’s “Barracuda” has justifiably gone to the top of the charts as the music that plays when a lady kicks her behind, but this type of behavior must be curtailed.

Whatever happens after that, I’ll be listening intently. A pop culture journalist and freelancing book editor located in Brooklyn (who also occasionally tweets at @jessmacleish), Jessica MacLeish is most known for her work in the entertainment industry.

Wisconsin singer Madilyn Bailey turns hate comments into a winning song on ‘America’s Got Talent’

  • Singer-songwriter As a child growing up in Boyceville, Wisconsin (population 1,086, 38 miles northwest of Eau Claire), Madilyn Bailey developed a following on YouTube, Facebook, TikTok, and Instagram for her clever original tunes and covers. She now has 13.5 million subscribers on YouTube, Facebook, TikTok, and Instagram for her clever original tunes and covers. Because of “America’s Got Talent,” she is certain to get a significant number of new admirers. However, NBC broadcasted video from Bailey’s audition in advance of her appearance on Tuesday’s edition of the popular competition series, The Voice. On YouTube, it has already been seen more than 2.5 million times. In an interview with judges Simon Cowell, Heidi Klum, Sofia Vergara, and Howie Mandel before her audition, Bailey stated, “The dream for me is to perform music that I’ve written that I love and get it out to as many people as possible.” Bailey’s audition consisted of a performance of an original song with the assistance of many online trolls, which seemed improbable at the time. After receiving thousands of harsh and sexist comments on her YouTube profile — remarks such as “Just stop, quit YouTube,” “They took the song away in a bodybag,” and “Eat a burger” — Bailey used the insults as inspiration for the lyrics of a catchy original folk pop tune she wrote. The end outcome is surprising, but ultimately powerful for everyone involved. In addition, Mandel complimented her on her singing, saying, “You’re a fantastic singer, you’re very excellent.” “It was wonderful that it came as a complete surprise,” Vergara added. “I’m looking forward to seeing what the future holds for you.” As Cowell put it, “I really enjoy hearing someone with a wonderful skill, and Madilyn, you certainly have a terrific talent.” Klum, on the other hand, was ambivalent, describing the performance as “so-so.” However, after some encouragement from Mandel, she chose to join the other judges in voting for Bailey to move on to the next stage of the competition. Bailey really has a number of original songs on her YouTube website that she created just from social media comments — some of which were hostile and frightening — and posted to her channel. The music videos for all of the songs have received at least one million views on YouTube, with one video receiving more than 23 million views. In the 11 years since she began uploading covers to YouTube, she has racked up 1.1 billion views for her videos, including one acoustic rendition of EDM singer David Guetta’s “Titanium” that has been viewed nearly 115 million times. She’s fast to cover popular new singles — she just uploaded a cover of Ed Sheeran’s new single “Bad Habits” — as well as songs by superstars such as Ariana Grande, Billie Eilish, and Panic! At the Disco, among many others. During Tuesday’s program, Bailey said that he “grew up with music all around me throughout my youth.” “My father was a guitarist. When I was eight years old, my father really sat me down and instructed me on how to create a song for the first time.” Bailey has published numerous original songs, the most recent of which being “Wisconsin,” which was inspired by her home state and released last summer. When Bailey penned the song’s lyrics on its YouTube website, she said, “When I was 16, I saved up enough money to buy my very first airline ticket out to L.A., and I literally never looked back.” “I literally never looked back until I wrote this song,” Bailey said about the song on its YouTube page. “I consider myself fortunate to have grown up in a state like Wisconsin, where there is so much natural beauty and life to enjoy. I was raised by two wonderful parents who always pushed me to pursue my interests in the arts. Now I can look back and be proud of my accomplishments in this country, as well as of the many ways growing up in Wisconsin molded me.” Piet Levy may be reached at (414) 223-5162 or [email protected] for more information. Follow him on Twitter at @pietlevy or on Facebook at facebook.com/PietLevyMJS. He can also be found on Instagram. On “TAP’d In,” with Evan Rytlewski, Piet also discusses concerts, local music, and other topics. You may listen to it every Thursday at 8 a.m. on WYMS-FM (88.9) or wherever you receive your podcasts. THANK YOU SO MUCH: This work is made possible thanks to the generosity of our subscribers. By purchasing a gift subscription, you can assist us in spreading the information.
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What is this ‘I am woman’ trend on TikTok and is it a real song?

Right now, there’s a new TikTok craze going around, and to be absolutely honest, I’m completely obsessed with it. Everything about this ‘I am woman’ TikTok song is spot on — the soulful singing, the ladies pumping themselves up, and the sheer amount of self-love expressed in it. So, let’s break it down: where did the song originate from, how did the trend begin, and why is it the best thing to come out of TikTok this year, to name a few questions. The @emmymelimusicabsolutely singing her heart out sound originally gained popularity when it was shared by @emmymelimusicabsolutely.

Since then, the video has received more than 17.5 million views and 3.7 million likes.

What actually is the ‘I am woman’ TikTok trend?

Immediately upon the release of this song, people became infatuated with it and its ultimate feminist message. As a follow-up, they used TikTok to simply exaggerate their own achievements, utilizing the song as the soundtrack to a photo slideshow of themselves that helps them “feel it.” Each photograph corresponds to a line from the song’s lyrics, which are divided into the following sections: I am a female. I have no fear. I have a lovely body. I’m a goddess. I’m invincible in any situation.

Honey, you’re welcome to join us in line.

Furthermore, there are the extremely gorgeous dogs stealing the show:@tuckerbudzyn But, for the most part…

Emma Meli’s song “I Am Woman” is available on iTunes.

So, is the sound actually a real song?

Yes! It was released on Spotify just a few days ago, and you may listen to it there. It has already received three million streams, which is an incredible number. Described as “a silky, mysterious blend of skill and hot R B passion,” the 21-year-old musician believes that her music will “help others express their deepest thoughts and feelings” through her music.

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11 of the most amusing bestie FaceTime mishaps that have been making the rounds on TikTok. So, who is the person who sings the ‘Whether you’re wondering if I hate you, I do’ TikTok audio clip in question? I followed this TikTok hangover regimen, and I’ve never been more self-conscious about my life choices.

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