How To Write Protesting Sign And Chant About Stress

An emergency guide to writing protest signs

The slogan ‘Make Love Not War’ first appeared on posters and badges in the 1960s and was named one of Creative Review’s top 20 slogans of all time in 2007. The phrase “I am a man” has roots that date back to 1787. Neither of these slogans was created as a consequence of someone reading a guide on how to write slogans. However, in recent years, protest has taken on a performance component, with the demonstration becoming as much about the tweeted photo as it is about the protest itself. And the placard serves as the focal point of every demonstration, since it is undoubtedly the most well recognized part of any demonstration.

Alternatively, you may see it as an extension of a folk tradition, with the throngs on the streets meeting the throngs on the internet and both deriving strength from one another.

One part of slogan composition that has remained constant is the untidy folk character of it.

That pool, on the other hand, need frequent re-filling.

1. Don’t use ‘Love Trumps Hate’

Officially sanctioned slogans are rarely the best course of action. When you read this, your head will throb from the way the target’s name (Trump) was placed onto the positive verb in the sentence (conquers).

2. Parody the form

Take a current tagline and give it a new lease on life. ‘We will overcome’ is transformed into ‘We will overcomb’. ‘Your nation requires your assistance’ becomes ‘Your country requires the assistance of the EU’. ‘Hope’ is transformed into ‘Grope.’ Alternatively, the age-old protest slogan is transformed into ‘What do we want?’ Evidence-based science is the way to go. When do you think we’ll get it? ‘After peer review,’ says the author.

3. Make it rhyme

A clever approach to link an allegation to a specific person is through rhyme. Margaret Thatcher was rumored to despise the term “milk snatcher,” and Theresa May will be bemoaning the fact that her name rhymes with the word “appeaser” when she becomes office.

4. Unleash puns

Puns should be used with caution, but the Women’s March generated a number of memorable ones, like ‘Electile dysfunction’ and ‘My favorite position is CEO,’ among others. With a nod back to the miners’ strike, it’s impossible to argue with the slogan ‘If Maggie gets up your nose, picket.”

5. Appropriate the enemy’s lines

You may mock the opponent by using their own words against them — ‘Sad!’, ‘Bigly feminist!’, and so on.

Alternately, you might accept an allegation and repurpose it: ‘Damn sure we’re snowflakes,’ you say. ‘Winter is on its way.’

6. Go meta

An epidemic of sarcasm and meta-ness has erupted as a result of the performative nature of protest. ‘I’m not typically a sign person, but gosh,’ was one of the phrases used last year. “Not typically my thing marching but honestly,” says one British citizen, “I’m so upset I made a sign,” says another, and “So horrible even introverts are here,” says another. But be careful not to become too meta; else, you may come out as disconnected. There are other variations, such as ‘I’m too worried to be humorous,’ which manages to be both meta and a critique of other meta individuals at the same time.

7. Swear

Irony and meta-ness have erupted as a result of the performative nature of protest. This was an example from last year: ‘Not typically a sign guy, but wow.’ “Not typically my thing marching but honestly,” says one British citizen, “I’m so upset I made a sign,” says another, and “So horrible even introverts are here,” says yet another. But be careful not to get too meta; else, you may come off as cold and uninteresting. “I’m too scared to be humorous,” says one of the many variations, which manages to be both meta and a critique of the other meta individuals at the same time.

8. Reference pop culture

In 50 years, these are less likely to be cited, but they still represent a common collection of cultural reference points. See, for example, ‘Orange is not the new black’ and ‘He’s got 65,844,944 issues, and this bitch is one of them’. Referencing memes is often effective — for example, “This is my resistant bitch face.”

9. Do the Mary Poppins one

In fact, there’s a whole sub-genre dedicated to them, such as ‘Super Callous Fascist Racist Extra Braggadocious’ /’Super Callous Fragile Racist Sexist Nazi Potus’, and so on. Keep in mind that this has most likely reached a tipping point. ‘Trumpty Dumpty’ is a better choice.

10. Break the protest fourth wall

The ‘Hello mom’ technique, for example, can be effective in breaking out of the mass audience dynamic and speaking directly to a single person. “Melania, blink twice if you need help,” read one of the signs at the Women’s March on Washington.

11. Be a child

Depending on the slogan, the individual carrying the placard can have a lot of influence. Even if there is a toddler in the image, they can say something that is deceptively easy, such as “I like everyone” or “Be nice.” For those who choose not to protest, they might draw an image that has no message at all — an accidentally subtle statement on the semiotics of protest as pure self-expression, perhaps.

12. Be an old person

Depending on the phrase, the person carrying the placard might have a lot of influence on the message. Even if there is a toddler in the image, they can say something disarmingly basic such as, “I like everyone,” or “Please be kind.” For those who prefer not to protest, they can draw a painting that has no message at all — an accidentally profound commentary on the semiotics of protest as pure self-expression.

13. Be a dog

Depending on the phrase, the individual carrying the sign may have more or less influence.

If there’s a youngster in the image, they can say something deceptively easy like ‘I like everyone’ or ‘Be nice.’ For those who prefer not to demonstrate, they can draw a painting that has no message — an inadvertently nuanced commentary on the semiotics of protest as pure self-expression.

14. Push the form – infographic

When it comes to placard writing, there is a new avant-garde trend that goes beyond simple slogans. A flowchart depicting the events of the Tahrir Square protests in 2011 read: “Civil disobedience – Mubarak quits -No (loop back) / Yes -Parliament dissolved -Constitutional change.” There will be more of this in the future.

15. Push the form – pure visual

Additionally, there’s the purely visual technique, which has the benefit of being able to bridge language boundaries. The image of Ian McKellen holding up Patrick Stewart in meme mode was a great touch.

16. Push the form – physical props

A placard does not have to be what it appears to be. On a balloon, the slogan “When they go low, we go high” (which is an excellent, officially recognized motto) works wonderfully. A daring man used a large straw to make a ‘This is the final straw’ joke, which was received positively. You may even utilize the people in your immediate vicinity as props, as seen by the numerous ‘I’m with her’ placards.

17. Push the form – long copy

This has the potential to become the next big thing. In 2013, an anti-Murdoch protestor carried a banner that included around 400 words. It may sound strange, but now since signs are constantly photographed and shared on social media, everyone has the opportunity to read lengthy text. It’s the social media counterpart of Twitter — a short-form medium that’s now being utilized for longer-form discussions.

18. Push the form – technology

You can also play the role of the visionary who investigates new technology. Alternatively, you might bring a wipeboard instead of a sign, which would serve as a statement on protest as a daily practice. A drone-only protest, on the other hand, may be on the horizon in the near future. If Uber can pull off a (legally questionable) promotional stunt with drones hovering above stationary traffic, it’s possible that drones carrying placards will be marching down Whitehall in the near future. And they’ll almost certainly come up with their own catchphrases.

19. Play it straight

There is absolutely nothing wrong with the phrase “Refugees welcome,” and there is a great deal to be said for it.

20. Use someone else’s

In a slogan, originality is not required – individuals may and should collaborate to achieve their goals. For the sake of not being perceived just as a distant, sardonic remark in these times of direct action, I’d want to finish this piece by participating in it myself. If you’re reading this, you should probably fuck yourself. Hitler is a jerk. Nick Asbury is a branding and design writer who is also half of the creative duo AsburyAsbury. He lives in London. He tweets using the handle @asburyandasbury.

Cities on Edge as Fires Burn Near White House (Published 2020)

Transcript

Londoners Join in Protests Against Police Brutality

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A disaster is declared in Texas, while in Florida, reopenings are delayed.

Image courtesy of Cristobal Herrera/EPA, courtesy of Shutterstock As towns and states prepare for larger demonstrations in the coming days, authorities have responded by mobilizing additional resources and readjusting already established plans, among other measures. On Sunday, Gov. Greg Abbott proclaimed a state of disaster in Texas, granting him the authority to appoint federal officials to serve as peace officers in the state. The disaster declaration was announced by the state’s Republican governor, who had already called the Texas National Guard a day earlier.

The governor stated in declaring the disaster designation that “since protests have turned violent in numerous regions around the state,” “it is critical that we maintain order, safeguard public safety, and defend against property damage or loss.” The governor stated, “Every Texan and every American has the right to protest, and I urge all Texans to utilize their First Amendment rights.” The use of force against people or the damage of property, on the other hand, is undesirable and unproductive.

In South Florida, Mayor Carlos Gimenez of Miami-Dade County has postponed the planned reopening of beaches following the shutdown due to the epidemic, which had been scheduled for this weekend.

As Mr.

The reopening of the beaches would have necessitated a strong police presence.

Contributors to this report included Mike Baker and Peter Baker, Julian Barnes, Johanna Barr, Ellen Barry, Katie Benner, Alan Blinder, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Chris Cameron and Shaila Dewan, Johnny Diaz and Caitlin Dickerson; Nicholas Fandos and Tess Felder; Ben Fenwick and Manny Fernandez; Russell Goldman and Rebecca Halleck; Steve Lohr and Patricia Mazzei; David Montgomery and Derek M.

A linguist explains how to write protest signs that everyone will remember

Daniel Midgley, host of the radio show Talk the Talk, has written a linguistic guide on making good protest placards, which can be seen on Quartz. Excerpt: Convincing, amusing, insulting, and mobilizing language are all possible outcomes. Few forms are capable of accomplishing these objectives as effectively or simply as the protest sign. When you create a protest sign, you must contend with a number of language limitations, which include: Sign-writing becomes difficult since you (and your friends) are restricted by the amount of luggage you (and your friends) can carry.

  1. Fortunately, this is an area where linguistics may be of assistance.
  2. The most powerful and successful protest placards follow these principles.
  3. Rhyming Rhymes are memorable and may be used to transform a sign into a chant if done correctly.
  4. Moreover, the meter of these words (which linguists refer to as their “prosodic pattern”) makes rhyming slogans simple to recall.
  5. HATE’S HANDS ARE TOO SMALL / PLEASE LEAVE MY STATE Please take the time to read the entire document.
  6. Subscribe to my monthly newsletter and receive it in your email.

Notes

  1. Quartz has a linguistic guide on making good protest placards by Daniel Midgley, host of the radio program Talk the Talk. Excerpt: Convincing, amusing, insulting, and mobilizing action may all be accomplished through language use. Protest signs are one of the most effective ways for achieving these objectives. In order to create a protest sign, you must adhere to a certain set of linguistic guidelines. Sign-writing becomes difficult since you (and your friends) are restricted by the amount of luggage you (and your friends) can carry. If you’re marching, your reader will have to process information rapidly, making it difficult to write effective messages on signs. However, linguistics can be of use in this situation. There are specific grammatical and rhetorical criteria that must be followed in order for protest signs to be forceful and successful, whether they are directed towards US President Donald Trump, Brexit, or college tuition rises. Making use of anti-Trump protests as an example, the following list provides some useful language pointers for organizing effective and persuasive pickets. Rhyming When used correctly, rhymes make a sign memorable and even help it become a chant. Since the time of Beowulf, epic sagas have always rhymed because the framework provided a means for the bard to recall what was coming up next in the story. Moreover, the meter of these words (which linguists refer to as their “prosodic pattern”) makes rhyming slogans simple to recall. HATE MY STATE/ CAN’T BUILD WALL/ MR. HATE’S HANDS ARE TOO SMALL Please take the time to read the entire article. Take advantage of any fascinating linguistics opportunities that may arise. Subscribe to my monthly newsletter and receive it in your email inbox every month.
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A linguist explains how to write protest signs that everyone will remember

Convincing, amusing, insulting, and mobilizing language are all possible outcomes. Few forms are capable of accomplishing these objectives as effectively or simply as the protest sign. When you create a protest sign, you must contend with a number of language limitations, which include: Sign-writing becomes difficult since you (and your friends) are restricted by the amount of luggage you (and your friends) can carry. If you’re marching, your reader will have to process information rapidly, making it a difficult assignment.

There are certain syntactic and rhetorical rules that can be used to every demonstration, whether it is against US President Donald Trump, Brexit, or college tuition rises.

Making use of anti-Trump protests as an example, the following list provides some useful language pointers for organizing effective and powerful pickets.

Parallelism

Parallelism is a literary device that is used to group together objects that are structurally similar.

It makes a phrase more accessible and memorable since the similarity of the sections drives the point home even more effectively. NONE RACISM / NONE TRUMP MY BODY / MY SELECTION

Rhyming

Rhymes are memorable and may be used to transform a sign into a chant if done correctly. This is why epic sagas have rhymed since the time of Beowulf: the rhymed framework provided a method for the bard to recall what happened next. Moreover, the meter of these words (which linguists refer to as their “prosodic pattern”) makes rhyming slogans simple to recall. CAN’T BUILD WALL / MR. HATE’S HANDS ARE TOO SMALL / PLEASE LEAVE MY STATE

Personal attributes

Trump’s trademark hairdo, as well as physical characteristics such as his hands, have come to reflect both his persona and his political beliefs and positions. The use of these human characteristics in a slogan is an example of a linguistic phenomenon known as “metonymy,” in which a part represents the whole. Metonymy works because it is simpler to concentrate on an important element than it is to concentrate on the full individual. THEY WILL BE OVERCOME KEEP YOUR TEENY-TINY HANDS OFF MY RIGHTS

Incredulity

Many people have described the 2016 political atmosphere as “surreal,” and Merriam-Webster has even designated “surreal” as the 2016 Word of the Year. Some of the most successful posters express skepticism about certain political goals, prompting people who agree to shake their heads, lament, or chuckle in response. These signs frequently have a conversational tone, are amusing, and are used to draw people together via the use of humor. OMG, what the hell is going on with the GOP? The fact that we are still protesting this sh*t is beyond belief.

Mirroring

Turning the tables on someone or something by using their own words against them is an unwillingness to believe that someone or anything possesses a vocabulary. Many new terms have entered the popular language as a result of Trump’s election. His disjointed, free-flowing manner of conversation, along with adjectives like bigly, pussy, wall, ugly, and unpresidented, makes phrases like these fair game for signs, as does his dialogue. AMERICA HATES ME AGAIN, AND MY PUSHY GRABS IT BACK

Positivity

Linguistics is concerned with more than simply the words that people use; it also includes pragmatics, which is the acts that people attempt to achieve via the use of language. There are a variety of acts that may be taken, such as protesting and complaining, but there are also actions that can be used to encourage and urge. Efficacious slogans are those that appeal to positive ideals; they serve as a tool to enforce social standards in the community in which we live. This is something our children are witnessing, and we are better than this.

Repetition

In addition to the words that people use, linguistics includes pragmatics, which is the acts that people attempt to achieve via the use of language. Actions such as protesting or expressing dissatisfaction are also possible; yet, encouragement and exhortation are equally encouraged and exhorted.

Efficacious slogans are those that appeal to positive ideals; they serve to reinforce the social standards that are shared by the people in the society. Our children are watching, and we are better than this.

5 Ways to Take Care of Your Body After a Day of Protesting

Participating in a demonstration against police violence and anti-Blackness may elicit a wide range of feelings among those who are involved. And if you’re out there for an extended period of time, it may be much more physically and mentally exhausting. Protestors are well aware that standing up for their cause entails dangers, whether in the form of police brutality or the chance of exposure to COVID-19, which is a virus that may cause cancer. You may be exhausted by the time you reach home if you combine the mental strain of long hours of standing, walking, or chanting with the physical stress of extended periods of standing, walking, or chanting.

Obviously, it’s critical to make sure you’re doing everything you can to remain safe during the demonstration (as well as addressing any injuries that may occur), but what you do afterward is just as vital, especially if you want to keep healthy in the long run.

Here’s what we came away with.

Ground yourself in the shower.

After being teargassed at a demonstration, having a lengthy, cool shower is essential for eliminating the toxic compounds that have accumulated on your skin, according to a previous SELF article. For the rest of us, taking a hot shower can help our bodies relax and wind down—and it can also set the stage for a beneficial grounding exercise, according to licensed therapistKaleigh Mancha, M.S, LMFT, a certified yoga instructor who specializes in trauma-informed yoga and the executive director of the nonprofitYoga Havenin Las Vegas.

To begin, take a few deep breaths before getting into the shower, and allow yourself to accept that you’re about to embark on a period of healing activity, advises Mancha.

As Mancha suggests, “If you are still feeling worried after you’ve done the visualization with the water, I recommend folks to go in asquator, sit on the shower floor, and take a couple more deep breaths.” “Those are quite useful indications for maintaining safety.” Make sure the water is warm enough so that you are comfortable, but not so hot that it interferes with your movement, she recommends.

The warm water has a dual purpose as well; it causes an increase in body temperature, which is followed by a reduction once you exit the water and dry off afterward.

This drop acts as a natural sleep aid by assisting you in falling asleep. A neurologist and sleep specialist at Charlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine, as well as author of The Sleep Solution, Dr. W. Chris Winter, explains to SELF how to sleep better.

Show your feet some love.

As previously reported by SELF, if you were teargassed at a demonstration, having a lengthy, chilly shower is essential for eliminating the chemical compounds from your skin. For the rest of us, taking a hot shower can help our bodies relax and wind down—and it can also set the stage for a beneficial grounding exercise, according to licensed therapistKaleigh Mancha, M.S, LMFT, a certified yoga instructor who specializes in trauma-informed yoga and the executive director of the nonprofitYoga Haven in Las Vegas.

  • Take a few calm breaths before getting into the shower, and allow yourself to accept that you are about to embark on a period of therapeutic activity, advises Mancha.
  • As Mancha suggests, “If you are still feeling worried after you’ve done the visualization with the water, I recommend folks to go in an asquator and sit on the shower floor and take a couple more deep breaths,” he adds.
  • She recommends that you keep the water warm enough to be comfortable, but not so hot that it interferes with your workout.
  • When taken before bed, this drop acts as a natural sleep aid.
  • W.

SEIU: Patient Caravan of Cars with Signs and Chants to Join Stanford Healthcare Workers in Protest Over Pay Cuts During Pandemic

The proposal to reduce salaries has been criticized by Stanford caregivers as a “betrayal” that “places an even greater pressure on staff who are already stretched to the limit.” The proposal to reduce salaries has been criticized by Stanford caregivers as a “betrayal” that “places an even greater pressure on staff who are already stretched to the limit.” PALO ALTO, California — From 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow, May 7, near the crossroads of El Camino Real and Sand Hill Road in Palo Alto, a caravan of automobiles transporting patients with placards and chants will join Stanford Health staff in a protest with social distancing.

An OB Tech named Amanda Arrambide expressed her displeasure with Stanford Health Care’s actions, saying, “What they are doing to us and our families is a betrayal that places an additional strain on employees who are already stretched to the brink.” The Stanford administration has responded by reducing our salary as a way of saying thank you for putting our health and the health of our loved ones at risk to care for COVID-19 patients.

  1. “It’s completely unacceptable.” Stanford Health Care abruptly announced last week that it will require employees to take 12 furlough days over a 10-week period, resulting in a 24 percent pay cut during that time.
  2. Approximately half of the workers impacted by the cut earn between $55,000 and $65,000 per year, and the wage decrease will make it difficult for them to pay their rent, purchase groceries, and provide for their families as a result of the cut.
  3. WHEN: Tuesday, February 2nd, from 2 p.m.
  4. The date is Thursday, May 7, 2020.

A union representing hospital workers in the western United States, the SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West (SEIU-UHW) has 97,000 members, making it one of the largest unions in the country. More information may be found at www.seiu-uhw.org.

‘I have faith in what I cannot imagine’: Philadelphia Cubans on the hope, stress of island protests

On July 11, a protest in San Antonio de Los Baos, just outside Havana, sparked a series of island-wide demonstrations that spread like wildfire on social media as Cubans challenged the Communist regime that has been in power for the past six decades. The world was watching Cuba for several days after the protest. There were more than 3,500 Cubans in Philadelphia and others in the surrounding area who were also watching as the demonstrators slammed the government, the economy, lack of civil rights, and the country’s tardy reaction to the epidemic that would hit the country in 2021.

  1. They, on the other hand, cried ‘Freedom.’ Cries of “Cuba Libre” and “SOS Cuba” resounded across the streets of the whole country.
  2. cities where Cubans have established a presence, and the City of Brotherly Love was no exception.
  3. The Movimiento San Isidro is a group of artists and intellectuals in Havana who are opposed to Decree-Law349, which limits freedom of artistic expression by granting the government the authority to fine, seize work materials from, and imprison artists for the content of their works.
  4. According to the most recent U.S.
  5. However, when compared to the other Latino communities in the city, the Cuban community in Philadelphia is in the minority.
  6. There are currently more than 230 members in the Facebook group ” Cubanos en Philadelphia,” which had roughly 50 members before the terrorist attacks on July 11.
  7. The first was held on July 11 in front of City Hall; the second was held on July 14 and included a march from the Art Museum to City Hall; and the third was held on July 18 at the Art Museum.
  8. The administrators of the Facebook group are now urging their followers to contact their representatives in Congress in order to request assistance from the United States government in Washington, D.C.
  9. Afro-Cubans have been protesting against Decree-Law 349 since it was passed in 2018.
  10. New laws were implemented by the Ministry of Communications a month after the July protests, according to the Resolution 105, which was released on Aug.
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Those who use social media to challenge the government or “subvert the constitutional order” risk being prosecuted as “cyberterrorists.” In addition, the Cuban government issued Decree-Law 35, which states that Cubans are prohibited from using the internet or any other telecommunication service to “undermine” the country’s security and internal order, or to transmit false news, offensive information, or content that has an adverse effect on “collective security, general welfare, public morality, and respect for public order.” Internet service providers must monitor content and, if necessary, suspend or terminate a user’s access to their services.

As an Afro-Cuban American scholar and associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Amalia Daché, 44, expressed her surprise at how the United States media and Twitter were blaming the demonstrations on the United States and its intelligence agency, the Central Intelligence Agency, for the demonstrations.

Daché and the majority of others questioned for this piece were critical of those who have blamed the Cuban problem on the United States embargo rather than on the Cuban regime.

“It is the Cuban government that imposes restrictions on food and pharmaceutical imports.

“The rest will be subjected to significant fines.” According to Daché, the new limits are “a government effort to make social media opposition illegal, which has been the most effective weapon Cubans have against the regime’s falsehoods, falsifications, and disinformation that they spread to the Cuban people and the rest of the world.” “Any media containing, for example, videos or photos of Cuban hospitals and the collapse of the health-care system is now punishable under this decree,” said Daché, who has been working with members of Congress to support President Joe Biden’s ongoing efforts to provide uncensored internet access to Cubans.

  1. “Any media containing, for example, videos or photos of Cuban hospitals and the collapse of the health-care system” Daché was born in Cuba, but her family fled to the United States when she was three years old as part of the Mariel Boatlift.
  2. She has been researching how the “Cuban experience” differs in both nations depending on the race of the people, where they reside, and how they were able to move to the United States and Canada.
  3. Daché and her husband, a Cuban who immigrated to the United States three years ago, became active members and are working to put the Cuban struggle in the forefront of public debate in their hometown of Philadelphia.
  4. The event on the steps of the Art Museum in Philadelphia on July 18 drew more than 200 participants, making it one of the largest demonstrations in the city by Cubans calling for democracy in their home country.

“It was so amazing to see individuals from all walks of life, from all ages, and from all parts of Philadelphia,” said Daché, who is collaborating with a graphic designer to raise awareness of the condition of Cubans on the island of Cuba.

Anxiety, hope, and banging pots and pans

During the first few weeks of the demonstrations, Jorge Cárdenas, 35, had difficulty sleeping and eating. He said that he had been thinking about Cuba all day. By joining the “Cubanos en Philadelphia” Facebook group and other social media sites, he realized that many other people were experiencing the same feelings of worry. In the same breath, he described himself as “glad and desperate.” Cárdenas also had trouble sleeping when he initially came in the United States, in the city of Tampa, Florida, in 2009.

The lack of opportunity and fundamental freedoms in Cuba drove him and his family to seek asylum in the United States, according to Cárdenas, who relocated to Philadelphia a year after coming in the United States.

After participating in these rallies and demonstrating for the first time in his life, Cárdenas expressed optimism about the future of his nation and expressed his gratitude to those who helped him.

Looney, 62, who was born in Havana eight months after the revolution began and who left the country in 1966, believes that it is the island’s internet access that has enabled Cubans to communicate so extensively about the demonstrations.

In the beginning, when I returned to my hometown to reunite with my family, it was as if the island was telling me, ‘You left before, but not this time.'” I promise you, you’ll never leave again, and you’ll always come back’,” said Looney, who has traveled there every year since 2009 with the exception of this year due to the epidemic.

  • The caravan proceeded through Lancaster, banging pots and pans, and demanding for the Cuban people to be heard on July 17.
  • The next day, a group of around 75 people demonstrated in Lancaster’s Penn Square.
  • Her voice cracked as she battled back tears as she remarked, “I have a tremendous deal of admiration for all of the people that went out on July 11 and I am humbled by their courage.” My glass is overflowing; I don’t regard it as half-full, but as overflowing.
  • She stated that nothing appeared to be fixed and that the economy was in a state of crisis.
  • Morales and her family moved to the United States from Cuba in 2009, and she has been studying there since.
  • The subject of her undergraduate thesis at Penn was how some of her fellow journalism students in Cuba had graduated and gone on to start alternative journalistic publications and blogs such as El Estornudo and Periodismo de Barrio, among other things.

According to Morales, “I don’t have a lot of optimism for the immediate future or for the regime, but I have a lot of hope for the Cuban people since we now know that they wish to be free.” Because I couldn’t have envisioned what happened on July 11, I put my confidence in what I couldn’t fathom.

Benefits of Singing: 10 Ways Singing Boosts Your Health

Singing, both alone and in groups, has been demonstrated to be beneficial on a variety of levels by decades of studies. According to study, singing with your voice up might have a number of positive consequences.

1. Relieves stress

Singing has been shown to be a stress-relieving activity. After singing, the level of cortisol in participants’ saliva was tested before and after they sang, according to a study conducted in 2017. In that study, the quantity of cortisol in the blood was discovered to be decreased following singing. This indicated to the researchers that participants felt more relaxed after they had shouted out a melody. They also discovered that singing can help to lower stress levels, regardless of whether the individuals sang in a group or by themselves.

A similar study conducted in 2015 examined salivary cortisol levels following a singing performance and discovered that cortisol levels increased in this situation.

2. Stimulates the immune response

There is some evidence that singing can assist to strengthen your immune system and aid in the prevention of sickness. A 2004 study compared the effects of singing to the effects of merely listening to music. Singing was shown to be more effective. Subjects participated in two distinct sessions, during which they either sang or listened to music. Those who sang had greater amounts of immunoglobulin A in their blood, which is an antibody your body produces to help you fight illnesses.. Music listening (without singing along) lowered stress hormones but did not increase the body’s immune system, according to the findings.

3. Increases pain threshold

It doesn’t matter if you’re in a huge choir or a small group; when you sing in a group, the act of communal singing stimulates your body to release endorphins. This hormone can assist in the promotion of happy moods and even the alteration of your perception of pain. A 2012 research discovered that participating in group activities such as singing, drumming, and dancing causes the release of hormones that increase your pain tolerance in ways that simply listening to music does not. Researchers point out that, rather than the music itself, it is the sensations of social connection that appear to be responsible for the increase in pain tolerance.

4. May improve snoring

Even when you’re not singing, regular singing may have an effect on your breathing pattern. According to the findings of a 2008 study, researchers questioned the wives of choir members as well as the spouses of those who did not sing in the choir. The researchers discovered that there were substantially fewer snorers among the choir members. As a result, they recommended that people sing often as a potential cure for snoring. Those that snore less than the general population are found to be those who play wind instruments, according to several studies.

As a result of these findings, some specialists believe that singing and playing wind instruments may be beneficial for those who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

5. Improves lung function

Given that singing requires deep breathing and the regulated use of muscles in the respiratory system, it may be good for people who suffer from certain lung and breathing disorders. The breathing methods employed in singing have been demonstrated to be beneficial for persons who suffer from the following ailments, according to research:

  • Conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Asthma
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Cancer
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Quadriplegia
  • And others.

While singing will not heal or cure any of these ailments, you may benefit from increasing the power of your respiratory muscles as a result of your efforts to sing. According to study, singing can also boost the quantity of oxygen in your blood. In addition to the pulmonary advantages, singers report enhanced mood and a stronger sense of social connection as a result of their practice.

6. Develops a sense of belonging and connection

While singing will not heal or cure any of these ailments, you may benefit from increasing the strength of your respiratory muscles as a result of your efforts to improve your singing. According to study, singing also helps to improve the quantity of oxygen in your blood. Singing has been shown to boost mood and provide a sense of social connection, in addition to the health advantages of exercise.

7. Enhances memory in people with dementia

People suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia suffer from a progressive loss of memory. People with these illnesses were shown to be better able to recall song lyrics than other words, according to studies conducted on them. Participants in an Alzheimer’s Foundation singing research said it was “wonderful to be able to recall anything,” according to the study’s findings. The vocalists, on the other hand, discovered that they recalled far more than simply the words. Some people found that singing familiar songs brought back memories from their past that they had forgotten.

8. Helps with grief

Singing in a group not only helps you cope with physical pain, but it may also help you cope with the emotional pain you experience after losing someone you care about. Researchers discovered in a 2019 study of persons struggling with sorrow that those who participated in a choir did not have worsening depressive symptoms over time, and their feeling of well-being remained consistent. In fact, the choir singers reported a gradual improvement in their self-esteem throughout and after the 12-week study, which was conducted by a psychologist.

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People who require additional support during a time of grief may find that group singing is a good option, according to the findings of the study.

9. Improves mental health and mood

A 2018 research conducted in the United Kingdom analyzed 20 persons who participated in a singing program called as The Sing Your Heart Out initiative, according to the findings. Individuals suffering from mental illnesses, as well as members of the general public, took part in the study.

As a consequence of participating in these singing workshops, the researchers discovered that the participants reported increases in their mental health, mood, sense of well-being, and sense of belonging as a result of their participation.

10. Helps improve speaking abilities

Twenty participants in a singing program known as The Sing Your Heart Out initiative were analyzed by researchers in the United Kingdom during a 2018 study. People suffering from mental illnesses, as well as members of the general public, took part in the study. As a result of participating in these singing workshops, the researchers discovered that the participants’ mental health, mood, sense of well-being, and sense of belonging improved.

  • A 2018 research conducted in the United Kingdom analyzed 20 persons who participated in a singing program called as The Sing Your Heart Out initiative, according to the results. Participants comprised persons suffering from mental illnesses as well as members of the general population. The participants in these singing workshops reported increases in their mental health, happiness, sense of well-being, and sense of belonging, according to the researchers.

A 2018 research conducted in the United Kingdom examined 20 participants in a singing program known as The Sing Your Heart Out initiative. People suffering from mental illnesses, as well as members of the general public, were among those who took part. As a result of participating in these singing workshops, the researchers discovered that the participants reported increases in their mental health, mood, sense of well-being, and sense of belonging.

  • Performing an instrument, dancing to music, or simply listening to music are all examples of musical activities.

Playing an instrument, dancing to music, or simply listening to music are all examples of musical activities.

  • Playing an instrument, dancing to music, or simply listening to music are all examples of musical expression.

Are you unsure about where to begin? Here are some suggestions for getting warmed up:

  • Take a leisurely drive with nothing but the road and the radio for company
  • In the shower, where the acoustics are excellent, you can sing along to all of your favorite songs. Sing along with your children. You’ll create memories that you and your family will treasure for a lifetime. Consider attending a music festival. Some events include group sing-alongs as a part of the agenda
  • Others do not. Look for a local chorus, choir, or song circle and inquire as to when you would be able to participate
  • Taking a few singing lessons with a professional before joining a group might help you become more confidence in your abilities. Check out the numerous coaching sessions available on YouTube for free singing lessons. If you’re interested in music therapy to help you manage with a medical condition or recover from a traumatic event, look for a trained music therapist in your area.

Singing has been proved to be beneficial on a variety of levels, according to research. It may be beneficial in reducing stress, improving immune and lung function, improving memory, improving mental health, and assisting you in coping with physical and emotional discomfort. One of the most appealing aspects of singing is that you don’t have to be particularly talented in order to get the benefits. You may sing to yourself in the shower or to the radio while listening to your favorite songs. Alternatively, you may join a choir or singing group to gain even additional advantages such as a sense of belonging and a sense of connectivity.

As Kavanaugh Vote Approaches, Students Protest Nominee in Harvard Yard With Signs and Chants

Protesters from the Harvard International Socialists gathered in Harvard Yard on Thursday afternoon to voice their opposition to Brett M. Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court, following a run of rallies against the judge at Harvard over the course of the previous week. The anti-Kavanaugh “voice out” was part of a statewide day of action organized to protest the candidate, who is now under investigation. The gathering was the Harvard Socialists’ second event in opposition to Kavanaugh’s nomination; the organization had a rally in the same area the previous week, attended by around 35 people.

  • Scott, was in charge of organizing Thursday’s march.
  • “We wanted to offer people the chance to demonstrate here at Harvard as well, in solidarity with all of the people who are protesting around the country,” Scott said.
  • Women began coming forward with charges that the judge had sexually assaulted them decades ago around three weeks ago, and the judge’s confirmation appeared to be all but guaranteed.
  • The New Yorker reported just a few days later that a second woman, Deborah Ramirez, had told them that Kavanaugh had exposed himself and shoved his penis into her face at a party they had both attended while students at Yale.
  • region in 1982.
  • The Federal Bureau of Probe wrapped up its investigation into the claims this week, and senators expect to vote on Kavanaugh’s confirmation on Friday or Saturday, depending on the weather.
  • Kavanaugh’s nomination to the United States Supreme Court.

DiMartini is the author of this piece.

Some observers shook noisemakers and pounded a tambourine in response to the incident.

Bacow’s imminent inauguration frequently interfered with the voices of the speakers.

The song was broadcast during the demonstration by speakers strategically placed throughout the Yard.

Student protests about his ongoing employment led to the announcement on Monday that he will not be returning to teach his customary course at the Law School, a three-week course offered in January called “The Supreme Court Since 2005.” Earlier this week, University President Lawrence S.

Samantha E.

“It was the overwhelming quantity of emails and phone calls he was receiving — not only from people who attended the school, but from people all across the country,” Rodriguez explained.

McCafferty, a staff writer for The Crimson, may be reached at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter, where she goes by the handle @mollmccaff.

Perspective

Following weeks of remaining at home due to the Coronavirus outbreak, people reacted violently to the death of George Floyd, flooding out onto the streets to protest his death. During the time that they have drawn attention to police violence, their aspirations and concerns have found expression in various chants and protest songs. From protest songs such as “No justice, no peace” and “Say his name” to full-length versions of songs such as “Lean on Me” and “We Shall Overcome,” musical expression continues to play an essential supporting role in political and social movements.

  • But I refer to them as “music” because they employ auditory components such as rhythm, pitch contour, and timbre to communicate meaning that goes beyond what can be expressed in a written language.
  • It does this through the physical bond that forms between the participants in the activity.
  • One of the reasons for this link has to do with two characteristics that work together to distinguish music from other modes of human communication.
  • The same music might mean various things to different people, or even the same person on different occasions, depending on their perspective on it.
  • As an example, take “Lean on Me,” a 1972 song by Bill Withers, which on June 3 became a rallying cry for thousands of demonstrators led by Kenny Sway in the nation’s capital.
  • Consonant looping harmonies, warmth of the strings that accompany the vocal, and a simple swaying melody that dips and rises in a smooth arc all mix in a way that allows for a great deal of creative freedom.
  • This is due to the fact that the shimmering quality of Withers’s voice has characteristics with things that command attention by virtue of standing out against a more uniform background, such as jewelry.

In this scenario, there is a parallel between the notion of physical space being created for a possible new member of the ensemble and the idea of the solo voice eventually gaining reinforcement from others.

The cognitive and socio-cultural factors that contribute to this are discussed below.

From a young age, we are able to seamlessly connect items that come from multiple domains: in this case, sounds and feelings, but also sounds and physical objects or human personalities in other realms.

Because of music’s referential ambiguity, it is not necessary to have a specific language to explain the specific aspects one hears: A vague sense of well-being is sufficient to give meaning to the song.

Because the sounds do not define which of these is accurate, our interpretations of the song, as well as our understanding of its significance in our own lives, will be different from one another.

This ability has been demonstrated in several studies.

Because the vast majority of music — particularly rhythmically driven music such as collective chant — takes use of our ability to entrain by emphasizing the beat, it can readily coordinate the actions of a large number of participants, which is particularly useful in a group setting.

I specifically requested listeners to dance to music that didn’t always have a beat, which they did admirably.

However, when the rhythm was present, virtually without exception, the participants locked onto it and expressed it with their body, despite the fact that I had not specifically asked them to.

There are several films of demonstrators shouting simultaneously, ranging from the rhythmically basic ” Take your knees off our necks!” to the significantly more complicated syncopations in ” If you stood there and watched.” The human propensity to entrain is demonstrated in a variety of ways, including People with no professional musical experience coordinate their voices and entire bodies with one another, resulting in an united ensemble that sounds like a finely tuned system to the listener.

“Muscular bonding,” as the historian William McNeill puts it, is the process through which kinetic precision fosters a sense of social belonging that aids cohesiveness and increases efficiency in common work.

Perhaps this is one of the reasons that practically every culture includes possibilities for synchronized activities, such as performing music, singing, or dancing, in order to promote harmony.

In actuality, it would be incredibly impossible to utilize music to transmit precise thoughts; but, by playing the same song to a group of strangers, one may readily trigger the same feelings and movements in all of them.

Despite the fact that I cannot comprehend the words screamed by demonstrators in Berlin from my New York apartment, my body reacts to their noises in a manner that makes me feel like I am a part of a much greater global gathering.

It is possible that even coordinated movement cannot produce an emotional connection between listeners if the meaning of music is too exact, and this accuracy results in conflict between different interpretations.

One of the most noteworthy examples of this was the usage of Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the U.S.A.” by the Donald Trump presidential campaign during the 2016 election campaign.

As a result, there are more chances for possible abuse.

As we move and feel together in unison, this connection across time and distance often feels more genuine and basic than anything that can be produced only via word or written communication.

Not only does this help us to communicate our message more effectively, but it also helps us to bond together in the common sense of humanity, to care for and support one another in a way that can only be achieved via music.

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