Latin Liturgy Association – How To Chant The Exultet – Recording

The Proper of Time – NPM

Chants from the Proper of Time, the first portion of the Roman Missal, may be found in the list below. Please keep in mind that these chants are given solely for educational reasons and are not permitted for use in a liturgical setting in the United States until November 27, 2011. The majority of the chants you’ll find on this page are prefaces to certain Sundays and solemnities that occur throughout the year. It is in the Order of Mass, immediately before the Eucharistic Prayers that the prefaces for the seasons themselves are contained.

A selection of chants from the English translation and chants of The Roman Missal 2010, published by the International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation.

Recordings of chants from the Roman Missal, courtesy of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians (NAPM), 2010.

All intellectual property rights are retained.

The Mass in the Middle of the Night Jesus Christ, the Light of the Lord is proclaimed at Christmas.

Preface to the Baptism of the Lord: The Baptism of the Lord takes place on the First Sunday of Lent.

Introduction: The Transfiguration of Our Lord on the Third Sunday of LentPreface: The Samaritan Woman Introduction: The Samaritan Woman in the Gospel of John The fourth Sunday of Lent is a day of reflection.

Gloria laus et honor Passion of the Lord Preface: Lazarus Sunday of the Passion of the Lord Antiphon: Hosanna Filio David Hosanna to the Son of David Procession, First Form Procession, Second Form Gloria laus et honor Passion of the Lord Before the Chrism Mass on Sunday, I would want to speak on the Priesthood of Christ and the Ministry of Priests of the Lord’s Supper.

The Sacrifice and the Sacrament of the Passion of the Lord are two aspects of Christ’s sacrifice and sacrament.

Secondly, for the Pope and thirdly, for all religious orders and degrees IV.In the case of catechumensV.In the case of Christian unityVI.In the case of the Jewish People IX.For those in public officeX.For those in tribulation VII.For those who do not trust in Christ VIII.For those who do not believe in God IX.For those in tribulation Showing of the Holy Cross is a Catholic tradition.

The Easter Vigil takes place throughout the Holy Night.

Proclamation of the Feast of the Holy Sepulchre (Longer Form) Liturgy Baptismal Water Blessing of Water Litany of Baptismal Water I Saw Water I Saw Water I Saw Water I Saw Water (high key) Sunday is a very important day.

Preface: The Mysteries of the Most Holy Trinity, the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ, and the Most Holy Spirit Preface: The Fruits of the Most Holy Eucharist (The Fruits of the Most Holy Eucharist) The Heart of Jesus, the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus Preface: The Infinite Mercy of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, King of the Universe Christ the King of the Universe is introduced in the preface.

Easter Liturgy Q&A: Holy Oils and Singing the Exsultet

The receipt of the Holy Oils should take place at the right moment, according to the question. In one of the churches in this parish, the Oils are usually received on Holy Thursday, just before the start of the Liturgy of the Eucharist. The other church prefers to receive the oils prior to the start of the Entrance Procession, which they do at their discretion. The Missal does not appear to provide any helpful hints. 1. The only reference to a Rite of Reception of the Holy Oils is a rubric at the conclusion of the Chrism Mass, which states: “The reception of the Holy Oils may take place in individual parishes either before the celebration of the Evening Mass for The Lord’s Supper or at another time that appears more appropriate.” 2.

  1. The washing of the feet and the transfer of the Most Blessed Sacrament, which are the distinctive elements of this Mass, must not be overshadowed, therefore a straightforward rite during the Introductory Rites is probably the best option.
  2. Q.
  3. A number of phone calls and emails have been received in response to this.
  4. Longer and shorter versions are still available, with the latter, which is the more commonly utilized, including eighty percent of the material from the longer version.
  5. There isn’t a single hymn that gives this stunning text justice!
  6. In any event, it appears that there are no viable options accessible at this time.
  7. It is critical that parishes locate someone who is willing to devote significant time to learning and perfecting the chant.
  8. An audio clip taken at the Chant Café in San Francisco The National Association of Pastoral Musicians has supplied PDF music and an MP3 audio of “The Paschal Proclamation,” which may be found at (go to Chants of the Roman Missal, The Proper of Time, “The Paschal Proclamation”).

For further detail on the nature and organization of the Exsultet, check the Music Column in the December 2012 edition of the Liturgy Brisbane quarterly magazine “Liturgy News,” which was published in December 2012 in Brisbane, Australia.

One Man’s Offering – Liturgical Chant

Blessings
Blessings (LongerShorter Forms)(Gregorian notation)
4-Part Advent Blessing(Gregorian 6 in wide x 8.25 in tall)
4-Part Christmas Blessing(Gregorian 6 in wide x 8.5 in tall)
Short Epiphany Blessing(Gregorian 6 in wide x 8.5 in tall)
4-Part Epiphany Blessing(Gregorian 6 in wide x 8.25 in tall)
Short Easter Blessing(Gregorian notation 5.5 x 8.5 in)
Short Easter BlessingDismissals(Gregorian notation)
4-Part Easter Blessing(Modern notation)
4-Part Pentecost Blessing(Gregorian 6 in wide x 8.25 in tall)
Short Pentecost Blessing(Modern notation 5.5 x 8.5 in)
Short Trinity Blessing(Modern notation 5.5 x 8.5 in)
English Blessings Booklet (only words,no music; requires one8 � x 11 sheet of paper)-pages 41
English Blessings Booklet(only words, no music; requires one8 � x 11 sheet of paper)-pages 23
Seasonal Blessings Booklet (only words, nomusic; requires two 8 � x 11 sheets of paper)-Outer Sheet
Seasonal Blessings Booklet (only words,no music; requires two 8 � x 11 sheets of paper)-Inner Sheet
Nuptial Blessings
The Blessing of the Marriage(BCP 1979 Nuptial Blessing) (three 8 �x 11-inch pages, Gregorian notation)
Prayer of Blessing over the Couple(from the Consultation on CommonTexts Wedding service) (2 pages)
Holy Baptism: The Thanksgiving over the Water (Solemn Tone)(2pages)
Lessons from Lamentations for Tenebrae(according to the AmericanBook of Occasional Services)
Lesson 1 (Lam 1:1-5)(Gregorian notation) (2 pages)
Lesson 2 (Lam. 1:6-9)(Gregorian notation) (2 pages)
Lesson 3 (Lam. 1:10:14)(Gregorian notation) (2 pages)
I am not a musicologist and wasnot even a music major in college, so I’m sure someone who has a better musical background than me will find much that iswrong about the above Gregorian settings. I wouldappreciate help improving the sheet music notation, if anyone more musical would contactme and teachme how to do it better. -Bill Gartig
These settings all use the Tone of Silos, used onTrack 2 of the CDGregorian Chant: Liturgy for Good Fridayby theGregorian Choir of Paris, Francois Polgar, Choirmaster (Musical HeritageSociety 11206H). I am making that recording (an mp3that is 4 minutes, 8 seconds in length and was recorded at 128 kps) availablehere. The language is Latin, not English, but you can hear the tune.You can, of course, sing in any key, but to play along with the therecording, make the first notes A, C, and D.
mp3 of me singing Lesson 1(4m26s @ 64 kbps)(Again, the singing is poor, but try to look beyond that.)
The Exultet—The Exultet(Gregorian notation, large print) (6 pages)
The Exultet (mp3 audio file)(5m41s, 2,669 KB @ 64 kbps)(recorded Spring, 2010.)
The Exultet(mp3 file in the Key of F)(5m39s, 3,979 KB @ 96 kbps) (recorded Mar. 28, 2011)(This recording is pitched lower, in the Key of F. Itbegins C, D-F, F, E, F, G, F, E, D, E-F, D.)
Dismissals
Dismissals(Gregorian notation)
Eucharistic Prayers for Through-Singing
Eucharistic Prayer I (Rite One)
Eucharistic Prayer II(Rite One)(Beta version, suggestions welcomed-posted Feb. 23, 2011)
Eucharistic Prayer A(chanted throughout, Simple Tone) (Gregoriannotation) (REPOSTED 23-Aug-2009)
Eucharistic Prayer B(chanted throughout, Simple Tone) (Gregoriannotation)
Eucharistic Prayer D (chantedthroughout, Mozarabic Chant, Gregorian notation, large print)
MozarabicSursum corda and Preface(2 pages, that is, front and back of one8.5 x 11-inch sheet)(exactly what is theThe Altar Book,only in Gregorian notation)
After Sanctusto the End(10 pages, that is, five 8.5- x11-inch pages printed on front and back)
Mp3 Audio of the After Sanctus(8 minutes, 33 seconds at 64 kbs)
Bilingual (Spanish-English)Eucharistic Prayer 3(fromEnriching Our Worship 1)(does not include Sursumcorda) (Spanish Preface set to Simple Tone) (4 pages)
Prefaces for Eucharistic Prayers
EnrichingOur Worship 1 – Eucharistic Prayer 1 Preface(Solemn Tone)(2 pages)
Enriching Our Worship 1 -Eucharistic Prayer 2 Preface(“male andfemale” version) (Solemn Tone)(2 pages)
Enriching Our Worship 1 -Eucharistic Prayer 2 Preface(WITHOUT “male andfemale”) (Solemn Tone)
Eucharistic Prayer 3Preface (Solemn Tone)(fromEnriching Our Worship 1) -corrected Sept. 25, 2010
Eucharistic Prayer 3 Preface (Simple Tone)(fromEnriching OurWorship 1) (more successful, I think)
Eucharistic Prayer 3 Preface (Simple Tone)(fromEnriching OurWorship 1) (VERY large print)
Enriching Our Worship 1 – Concluding Doxologies for Eucharistic Prayers 1-3(large print)
Celtic Eucharistic Prayer Preface (Solemn Tone) (large print)
Celtic Eucharistic Prayer (post-Sanctus) (large print)
Eucharistic Prayer Inspired by an Original Text – Preface (Simple Tone,INCLUDING sursum corda)
Eucharistic Prayer Inspired by an Original Text – Preface (Simple Tone,WITHOUT sursum corda)
Eucharistic Prayer Inspired by an Original Text (post-Sanctus)
Wisdom Eucharistic PrayerPreface (Solemn)
Wisdom Eucharistic Prayer (post-Sanctus)
Kenyan Eucharistic Prayer(fromOur ModernServicesof the Anglican Church of Kenya) – Preface (SolemnTone) (2 pages) (used during Lent at the Church of Our Saviour,Cincinnati, Ohio)
Anglican Church of CanadaBook ofAlternative Services
Proper Prefaces for the Lord’s Day (Solemn Tone)(2 pages)
Anglican Church of AustraliaLiturgical Materials
Eucharistic Prayer 2 – Preface (Solemn Tone)
Eucharistic Prayer 2 – Preface (Simple Tone)
Eucharistic Prayer 2 – Preface (Common WorshipStyle)
Bruce Ford on Setting Texts to the Solemn PrefaceTone
In 1995 I composed a solemn setting of the AmericanEucharistic Prayer B and sent it to Bruce Ford, one of the leadingAnglican composers of church music. He very kindly sang through my work,noting places where there were problems, and then wrote me a detailedletter explaining both his remarks and the structure of the Solemn Tone.He also sent a one-page analysis of the Solemn Preface Tone. I am hereposting Bruce Ford’s letter, his analysis, and my attempt at a solemnsetting of Eucharistic Prayer B with his notations. I think these areexcellent and clear enough for a non-musician like me to understandthem. (I am amazed that Mr. Ford took the time to look at my materialsand to give me such a well-considered response.) Others consideringsetting text using the Solemn Preface Tone should find these things ofinterest.
BruceFord’s Nov. 1, 1995 letter about setting Texts to the Solemn PrefaceTone
Bruce Ford’s analysis of the Solemn Preface Tone
My attempt at a Solemn setting of Eucharistic Prayer B with Bruce Ford’snotations
The Great Litany
The Great Litany(Gregorian notation, 6 pages, large print-My firstattempt.)
The Great Litany(6 pages, large print, Gregorian notation,revised 12-Mar-2011)
The Great Litany(8-page version, large print, Gregorian notation12-Mar-2011)
Prayers of the People
Prayers of the People Form V (Tone B)(revised July 24, 2009)
Collects of the Day (Contemporary)[These aremeant to be printed and then trimmed to fit into a BCP.]
Advent 1Advent 2Advent 3Advent 4
Christmas Day1ChristmasDay2Christmas Day3
The Epiphany (Jan. 6)Epiphany 1Epiphany Last
Palm/Passion Sunday
Easter Day1Easter Day2Easter Day3
Ascension Day1Ascension Day2
Pentecost Day1Pentecost Day2
Trinity Sunday
Proper 29 (Christ the King)
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Helping Your Deacon or Priest Learn the Exsultet

EGENDHASIT Mozart would have willingly surrendered all of his compositions if he could have claimed credit for writing the opening line of the Exsultet, according to legend. According to Wikipedia, “the language of the liturgy soars to heights that it is difficult to find a comparable example in Christian literature.” However, singing this might be a daunting task! Six pages of notes and phrases that go on and on? Because singing the Exsultet is the proper job of the Deacon, it may also be sung by a priest or a cantor if the Deacon is not available.

  1. This is an excellent chance to collaborate directly with them.
  2. ORSTARTERS, please see the following videos for some vital practice.
  3. Fr.
  4. Download the MP3 of Fr.
  5. Jonathan Gaspar.
  6. There are recordings and practice videos in both upper and lower keys available on this page.
  7. Proclamation of the Feast of the Holy Sepulchre EXULT,LETTHEMEXULT It will be beneficial to refer to some informal remarks I made (in non-technical words) in the margins of theExsultethere, which will be useful.
  8. The first page, which elicits a great deal of joy, is composed of three “verses” or “psalm tones” (as they are classified in my notes) that are structurally similar to one another.

Aside from that, the distinctive fifth-note jump, which is unique to this piece, conjures the joyous fanfare of the trumpet— “…let the trumpet of deliverance scream out our glorious King’s victory!” INVOCATION OF THE BLESSING OF GOD Following that (in parenthesis, which is skipped if the song is sung by a cantor—note the rubrics on page 1), the deacon or priest asks the compassion of God in order to be worthy of proclaiming “this candle’s flawless praises,” which he or she does with authority.

  • Similarly, theOrate, Fratres prays that our efforts would be worthy and appealing to God, which is a similar prayer.
  • Have you ever heard it being sung?
  • The following piece has been extracted directly from the Preface Dialogue.
  • In fact, it opens with the words “It is genuinely just and just…” In this case, too, there are clear similarities to the Liturgy of the Eucharist, and they speak to an increased sense of solemnity.
  • That same Preface tone may be heard throughout the remainder of the chorus.
  • As a result, the Preface tone’s unique cadence is established.
  • (See my comments on page 2 for further information.) I’ve circled what appear to be three “verses” or sentences that I think are important.
  • “These are the feasts of Passover.” THISISTHENIGHTH I’ve highlighted what I like to refer to as the “Litany of This is the Night” about halfway down page three.
  • As a result, it is necessary to emphasize this portion since it contains some of the most astounding implications of the Exsultet.

After this, the Exsultet goes on to say something that is perhaps the most remarkable: “Our birth would have been for naught, had we not been redeemed.” In the wake of this, God’s kindness via Christ’s redemptive work receives a dramatic affirmation in the form of the following astonishing assertion: O absolutely essential sin of Adam, utterly and entirely abolished by the Death of the Lord Jesus Christ!

  1. O fortunate mistake that resulted in such a magnificent and wonderful Redeemer!
  2. However, while you are attempting to concentrate on the notes, be certain that the unlimited blessings of this scripture take precedence over whatever you express to the faithful.
  3. Take pleasure in the book and do not be concerned about faults.
  4. Even the most accomplished singers will make a number of mistakes on this most holy of evenings.
  5. It will be far more vital to have good diction than it will be to sing each note flawlessly.
  6. Take a long-term perspective: It is customary for the Easter Vigil to take place every year.
  7. Each time you do it, it will become better and more comfortable.
  8. It is a privilege to perform this song.

Anyone who follows through on this will be forever transformed in spirit. Allow its breathtaking beauty to capture the hearts of those who are willing to listen! Unless otherwise stated, the opinions expressed by blog contributors do not necessarily reflect the views of Corpus Christi Watershed.

The Easter Vigil: Exsultet

This song, commonly known as the “Easter Proclamation,” is performed at the beginning of the Easter Vigil, immediately following the procession with the Paschal Candle and the triple singing of “The Light of Christ,” verse and answer. In the Episcopal Church, it’s a very long chant (that in most cases is assigned to a deacon, though anybody – even laypeople – may sing it) that expresses the pleasure of Easter. Presented here is the most recent translation (from 2011, I think, in the United States) from the Roman Missal; the video covers the complete text: From NPM.org (the National Association of Pastoral Musicians), you may download the revised translation, as well as the chant music (as shown above, in contemporary notation), in PDF format.

  • (This is a huge file!
  • Choirs of angels, join your voices together!
  • Jesus Christ, our King, has risen from the dead!
  • Rejoice, O Earth, in all your dazzling brilliance, brilliant in the light of your heavenly King!
  • You are filled with awe!
  • Cry out in joy, O Mother Church!
  • The light of the rising Christ beams upon you!
  • From the same website, you may download a PDF chant score of the Exsultet, which is in the ancient translation.
  • A PDF of an Ambrosian Chant arrangement; I’d never heard of this particular melody before.
  • It is unfortunate that most candles today are not made of beeswax, which is quite expensive; so, singing as if they were may not be entirely effective.

You may read more about the Exsultet on TPL’s website, where you can also access all of the words, including translations from multiple English and Latin versions, as well: This ancient chant, also known as the Praeconium Paschale and occasionally spelled “Exultet,” is chanted at the Easter Vigil, and it is also referred to as “Exultet.” This hymn is generally performed by the deacon, after the Paschal candle has been lighted and after the clergy have made their way to the altar.

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The symbolism contained inside the lighting Paschal candle is dual.

For the second time, it depicts Christ, who is known as the “light of the world.” The procession, like the sermon, has a dual significance.

We are reminded in song of this symbolism and the history of our salvation, beginning with Adam’s fall and progressing through Moses and the Israelites’ first Passover, and finally culminating in the events of Jesus’ last Passover, during which he suffered, died, and rose from the dead, thus bringing mankind to the point of redemption.

The following are all of the chants for the Easter Vigil, taken from ChristusRex.org and chanted by the Benedictines of Sao Paulo: Dominica Pasch in the Resurrection of the Lord Ad Vigiliam Paschalem in Nocte SantaLumen Christi (On the Vigil of the Lord’s Supper) (9.9s – 158 kb) score Prconium Paschale (Prconium Paschale) (provisory mono files) I am pleased with the outcome (2m16.2s – 400 kb) In the interest of everyone (33.5s – 101 kb) Vere dignum is a Latin phrase that means “really dignified” (4m43.9s – 835 kb) In the huius (1m42.2s – 303 kb) As a result, oramus ergo (3m00.2s – 531 kb) Cantica after lectiones ad liturgiam verbi – ad liturgiam verbi ad liturgiam verbi Canticum: Iubilate Domino (Canticum: Iubilate Domino) (1m23.0s – 1298 kb) score Canticum: Cantemus Domino, qui confiduntCanticum: Cantemus Domino, qui confidunt (2m12.9kb – 2078 kb) score Canticum: Laudate Dominum (Laudate Dominum) Wine is real, according to the canticum: Vina facta est (1m40.0s – 1564 kb) score Incantations: Attende clum Canticum: Sicut cervus (Cruciform cervus) (2m01.6s – 1902 kb) score Glory to God, Confitemini Domino!

(3m15.1s – 3052 kb) score Antiphona:Vidi aquam (Water of Life) (1m29.4s – 1400 kb) score Dextera Domini is the offertorium (1m36.7s – 1512 kb) score Alleluia is the response to the prayer (1m11.9s – 1124 kb) score It is necessary to do so (28.7s – 451 kb) score And here are some recent posts on some of these topics from Chantblog:

  • Exsultet(orExsultet!)
  • The Easter Vigil: Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia Easter Vigil: Sicut Cervus
  • Vidi Aquam, a song for the Easter Vigil. ‘Dextera Domini’ is the offertory at the Easter Vigil.

Exsultet(orExsultet!); “Alleluia” is sung at the Easter Vigil. Easter Vigil: Sicut Cervus; Vidi Aquam, a hymn for the Easter Vigil. ‘Dextera Domini’ is the Easter Vigil Offertory.

Practice Videos for the Roman Missal Chants

The chants printed in the Third Edition of the Roman Missal are shown in the films that follow. The Corpus Christi Watershed, a Catholic new-media initiative, created these movies for you. You might like to print off a 51-page PDF booklet of the chant settings from the Missal to use as practice material. The ICEL website has a comprehensive collection of the music printed in the new Missal, as well as a number of other resources. OnVimeo, you may see a greeting from the Church Music Association of America (1 of 22).

  1. OnVimeo, you can watch Kyrie (3 of 22) by the Church Music Association of America.
  2. YouTube video of Gloria B (4th of 22) from the Church Music Association of America.
  3. Credo I (6 of 22) by the Church Music Association of America is available on YouTube.
  4. Orate Fratres (number 8 of 22) by the Church Music Association of America is available on Vimeo.
  5. Church Music Association of America’s Sanctus (English) is the tenth of 22 videos available on Vimeo.
  6. Proclamation of Remembrance VIDEO: 12 of 22from the Church Music Association of America on Vimeo Doxology (number 13 of 22) by the Church Music Association of America is available on Vimeo.
  7. Sign of Peace (15 of 22) by the Church Music Association of America is available on YouTube.
  8. VIDEO: 16 of 22from the Church Music Association of America on Vimeo Church Music Association of America’s invitation to communion (17 of 22) is available on Vimeo.
  9. Dismissal from the Church Music Association of America (number 19 of 22) onVimeo.
  10. First Prayer at the Altar of the Lord (Part 2) Twenty-second video from the Church Music Association of America on Vimeo.

Eucharistic Prayer III (number 22 of 22) by the Church Music Association of America is available on YouTube. These options are offered in accordance with the ICEL’s policy regarding the usage of its approved texts, which may be found here.

Easter Proclamation

The Exultet is believed to have been written between the fifth and seventh centuries AD. It is largely utilized in Western Christian traditions.

New Translation of the Mass (2011)

Exultet is believed to have been written between the fifth and seventh centuries AD. Western Christianity is the primary context in which it is employed

  • PDF version of the ICEL score
  • Online Quicktime recording by the National Association of Pastoral Musicians: Chants of the Roman Missal, The Proper of Time, and “The Paschal Proclamation.”

It’s “amateur hour.” In order to assist a bass player, I have been persuaded to give him with a study version that has been transposed into the key of A. If you find my version of NoteWorthy Composer unacceptable, you may purchase a copy of NoteWorthy Composer and edit the.nwc score to your hearts desire.

  • The show’s in its infancy. When a bass player approached me about providing him with a study version in the key of A, I refused. But he persuaded me otherwise. If you find my version of NoteWorthy Composer unacceptable, you may purchase a copy of NoteWorthy Composer and alter the.nwc score to your liking.

1973 MP3 Recordings in English

I had the pleasure of spending the spring of 2006 at the Emory Catholic Center, where I was welcomed with open arms by Tim Hepburn. I was able to persuade him to record the Exultet on my very final night. The file is more than 9 megabytes in size, therefore it may take some time to download. If you don’t receive an error notice immediately away, you should usually take a break from your computer for a short period of time and allow it to complete the download on its own schedule. I believe that the work is definitely worth it.

  1. In 2009, I went to The Station of the Cross and recorded my own version of the song.
  2. I’ll most likely try again the following year.
  3. I was a little too eager at the beginning and didn’t take deep breaths.:o ( To download an MP3 file, right-click on one of the MP3 links in the left-hand navigation menu and select “Save Link As.” from the drop-down menu that appears on the screen.
  4. I’ve double-checked, and the files are indeed on these two websites (as of March 3, 2008); I’ve been able to download them, and you should be able to as well.
  5. Exultet.mp3 is a song by Tim Hepburn (moleski.net- this web site) Exultet.mp3 is a song by Tim Hepburn (canisius.edu- my academic web site) The Exultet by JBro Cantor for Christ is an mp3 file.
  6. According to Tim, the most crucial element is to get so comfortable with the music that one has no fear of the mechanics of the performance.
  7. It is said that the Exultet, like God’s victory over sin, “humbles earthly pride.”

OCP: “Easter Praises”

31st of March, 2011 I’m not sure how long it’s been since any information has been posted or updated on the site, but when I Googled Exsultet recordings, your site came up, along with a request for albums that contain Exsultet recordings. I’m not sure how long it’s been since any information has been posted or updated on the site, but when I Googled Exsultet recordings, your site came up, along with a request for albums that contain Exsulte A wonderful album, “Easter Praises,” is available from Oregon Catholic Press, and it includes everything from a Spanish language version to a First Nations (Native American) version to the Sacramentary version, as well as other variations, one of which is by Christopher Walker and which I particularly like.

For the first time this year, I came across your website when researching the sacramentary form of the Exsultet that I will be signing.

The arrangements I’ve always sang were those that used the same text but developed fresh chant melodies to go along with it. Best wishes for your Lenten journey. Gesu Roman Catholic Parish is served by Fr. Shaun Lowery, OSFS, as its parochial vicar.

Lilypond and Gregorian notation

The 31st of March, 2011. I’m not sure how long it’s been since any new information has been posted or updated on the site, but when I Googled Exsultet recordings, your site came up, along with a request for albums that contained Exsultet recordings. I’m not sure how long it’s been since any new information has been posted or updated on the site, but when I Googled Exsultet recordings, your site came up, along with a request for albums that contained Exsult A wonderful album, “Easter Praises,” is available from Oregon Catholic Press, and it includes everything from a Spanish language version to a First Nations (Native American) version to the Sacramentary version, as well as other variations, one of which is by Christopher Walker and which I particularly enjoy.

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For the first time this year, I came upon your website when researching the sacramental form of the Exsultet.

Enjoy your Lent with blessings!

Shaun Lowery, OSFS

Background

In 2005, I was requested to sing the Exultet with only a week’s notice, and I agreed. I looked high and low for a recording to use as a practice aid, but came up empty-handed. Exultet is something I’ve only ever attempted to sing once in my life, and I believe I made a horrible mess of it. “Earthly pride is humbled” by this tremendous chorus, just as Easter night itself is. For your convenience, I have made three files available for download: an instrumental version of the melody (exultet.mid, approximately 12 MB in size), a Noteworthy file that you can edit with that program (exultet.nwc), and a printable version of that Noteworthy document that corresponds to the midi file (exultet.nwc, approximately 12 MB in size) (exultet.pdf).

The text is drawn from the Roman Missal, which is owned by ICEL and protected by copyright.

  • I had completely forgotten that the Exultet is the first service of the day, immediately following the procession of the Easter candle into the Church. For some reason, I was under the impression that it was in the middle. I’m guessing I was thinking about the Gloria in this instance. I should have arrived a bit earlier and done at least one warm-up run-through
  • Monsignor had instructed me to bring my candle with me to the pulpit, which I did. For example, using my left hand, I had to pry the score out of its folder and position it dangerously on top of a lectionary, all while holding the lectionary in place with the other. In addition, I had to use my left hand to flip the pages of the book. After stumbling through three or four sections this year, I’m going to attempt to get myself to purchase a tiny 3-ring binder and clip it in place before the liturgy begins. I’ve never been able to do the Exultet flawlessly. Unless I express my faults to the crowd by waving my arms and moving about in search of the tune, 99.9 percent of the congregation is unlikely to notice the difference. I can sing certain portions without glancing at the music, but I can’t sing others without looking at the music. The difficult thing is keeping track of which is which.

That the Exultet occurs first – just after the procession of the Easter candle into the Church – had slipped my mind for a moment. Because of some misunderstanding, I assumed it was in the middle of the sentence. I’m guessing I was thinking about the Gloria in this situation. Monsignor instructed me to bring my candle to the pulpit, so I should have arrived a bit earlier and done at least one warm-up run-through. For example, using my left hand, I had to pry the score out of its folder and position it precariously on top of a lectionary, all while holding the score and a paper clip in place.

After stumbling through three or four sections this year, I’m going to attempt to get myself to buy a tiny 3-ring binder and clip it in place before the liturgy starts next year.

Unless I express my faults to the crowd by waving my arms and moving about in pursuit of the tune, 99.9 percent of the congregation is unlikely to notice a change.

There are certain portions that I can sing without looking at the music, and others that I can’t sing without glancing at the music. Making a distinction between one and the other is difficult.

  • I used a three-ring binder with a diameter of 1/2″. It served its purpose admirably in terms of retaining the pages in sequential order and flipping them without too much effort. I’m thinking of putting tabs on each page for next year. There will be no doubt that I will only flip one and only one page at a time
  • In this manner, there will be no doubt about my commitment. Consult with the first lector about the possibility of removing the lectionary from the lectern. If he or she wants to handle the book, he or she may do so by picking it up from the book holder
  • While the candle holder functioned, it made me nervous that I might accidentally knock the candle off the podium. It would have been better if I had set up the binder for one-handed turning and held the candle while singing
  • I muffed the last measure once more. I believe I’ve identified where I’m going wrong. “Jerusalem the following year!”

Other Versions

Any information you can provide on a commercially accessible recording of the Exultate can be very helpful to me. I would be delighted to get a copy for myself and promote it on this website. Father Martin, I thought you would be interested in something I came on online. I had the opportunity to express my frustration to our diocesan choir director about the difficulties I was having in obtaining an English recording of the Exultet, which is found in the Roman Missal. This recording was the result of his tinkering about with the recording equipment.

  • In the meantime, I’ve been putting the materials you gave to good use and am loving the experience.
  • Greetings – I was also seeking for a recorded version of the Exultet, and I recently discovered one at the following link: The Exultet, as well as many other exquisite Easter songs, may be found on the CD.
  • However, it appears that the Exultet is written in Latin rather than English.
  • Martin X.

Association for Latin Liturgy » Orate Fratres

With care and consideration, this CD has been put together to meet the growing need for an authentic reference to the pronunciation of Church Latin and singing of the Gregorian Mass texts. A major source of inspiration for this project has been published in 2002, with the third official version of the Missale Romanum, which is obviously designed to be used on the altar. Moreover, as Pope John Paul II has repeatedly emphasized, singing the Mass should be favored wherever feasible so that “the beauty of music and song will return progressively to the liturgy,” as he put it.

  1. Primarily, it is designed to aid in the formation of prospective priests in the seminaries by offering proper instruction on how to intonate and sing their sections of the Mass in Latin in their respective languages.
  2. The structure is based on the Order of the Mass as found in the Missale Romanum, with the Greeting being the first section and the Dismissal being the last.
  3. The Roman Canon includes just those passages for which music is provided by the Missal, but Eucharistic Prayer III is supplied in its entirety in the Missal.
  4. In addition to the chants of the Sung Mass, a strongly pronounced reading of the spoken Mass is included.
  5. ¹ Audience with Pope John Paul II, held on February 26, 20032.
  6. If he can take a firm lead in the singing of the Gregorian chants from the Missal, the faithful will almost certainly respond enthusiastically in their own way as a result.

The Missale Romanum, editio typica tertia, promulgated in 2002, is a handsome volume for use at the altar, in which music has been prominently included at every stage of the Mass, with the apparent intention that whenever possible, the celebrant will wish to chant rather than simply recite his or her part, has provided a new impetus.

In order to meet the growing need for an authentic reference to both Church Latin pronunciation and chant singing, this CD has been painstakingly put together with great care and attention to detail.

They may choose to listen to the CD over and over again until certain chants get firmly embedded in their memories.

Additionally, in addition to the normal Gregorian texts of the Mass and a valuable selection of essential Prefaces, the ancient chants of Holy Week are included, which will definitely be appreciated by the faithful.

As they lead the faithful ahead to even more joyous sung celebrations of the Holy Mass, the celebrants of this album pray that they may be assisted in finding more fulfillment in their priesthood as a result of this recording.”

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