People Who Chant Usa

U-S-A! – Wikipedia

In the United States of America, the initials ” U-S-A!” are chanted to demonstrate national pride and to support national sports teams from the country’s capital, Washington, DC. It is also utilized in other community events, such as political rallies, to bring people together.

Origins

The earliest reported instance of the United States of America chant occurred in 1918 at the Bethlehem Steelplant in Lebanon, Pennsylvania.

Use in sports

A scene from the 1936 Summer Olympics documentaryOlympia: Festival of Nations, which depicts the finals of the 1,500 meter run and the long jump, features a rendition of the Olympic cry. At the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany, it was captured on film during the basketball tournament final between the United States and the Soviet Union, which was broadcast live. When the national men’s teams of Hungary and the United States faced off against each other in Budapest in 1979, the chant was heard throughout the stadium.

While cheering for the United States hockey team during their 7–3 victory against Czechoslovakia in the second game, the audience began shouting, “USA!

Throughout the rest of the team’s games, the cry received national notoriety after the United States defeated the Soviet Union in what became known as the ” Miracle on Ice “, and went on to defeat Finland for the gold medal in the process.

Use in professional wrestling

A scene from the 1936 Summer Olympics documentaryOlympia: Festival of Nations, which depicts the finals of the 1,500 meter run and the long jump, contains a rendition of the Olympic anthem. At the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany, it was captured on film during the basketball tournament final between the United States and the Soviet Union, which was won by the United States. When the national men’s teams of Hungary and the United States faced off against each other in Budapest in 1979, the chant was heard throughout the stadium..

While cheering for the United States hockey team during their 7–3 victory against Czechoslovakia in the second game, the audience began shouting, “USA!

Throughout the rest of the team’s games, the cry received national notoriety after the United States defeated the Soviet Union in what became known as the ” Miracle on Ice “, and went on to defeat Finland for the gold medal in the Winter Olympics.

Usage

It was first used in Plze, Czechoslovakia, in May 1969, to celebrate the city’s liberation by American and Polish forces at the close of World War II, according to Wikipedia.

It was used repeatedly during the 1984 United States presidential election campaign rallies for incumbent President Ronald Reagan; it was also heard at occasions during his presidency, including a visit to Port Washington, Wisconsin, during which Reagan was campaigning.

Post 9/11 usage

The original description for this image was as follows: “Standing on the site of the greatest terrorist assault on American soil, on September 14, 2001, President Bush guarantees that the voices of those clamoring for justice from throughout the country will be heard and action will be taken. Rescue workers erupted in applause and chanted, “USA, USA,” in response to the President’s speech.” Following the September 11th attacks in 2001, the chant was heard at patriotic ceremonies at sporting events.

  1. President George W.
  2. During the 2001 World Series, the audience chanted “U-S-A” when the first pitch was thrown, indicating that the pitch was struck by a pitching machine.
  3. troops in Pakistan on May 1, 2011, crowds gathering outside the White House could be heard yelling “U-S-A!” after the announcement was made.
  4. The shout was also heard on Sunday evening during the lone Major League Baseball game taking place at the time, a game between the Philadelphia Phillies and the New York Mets, which took place while the news was breaking.
  5. It was claimed that the cry had “racial connotations” when it was used at an Adolfo Camarillo High School athletic event in 2013, which sparked considerable controversy.

Satirical usage

It has been adopted by English football supporters during matches against Manchester United, whose owners are from the United States and are unhappy with the club’s supporters as a result of the club’s large debt. The “U-S-A” cry is used by opposing fans to remind United followers of this; this was also true of Liverpool supporters before the RBStakeover in the club. British fans, on the other hand, utilize the phrase in a non-sarcastic manner in order to honor the accomplishments of American players like as Tim Howard at Everton.

A celebration of virtually anything may be found on The Simpsons, and it is frequently followed by the blowing of his car’s horn and flashing of its headlights. The slogan is also heard in the television show It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia when the group devises a strategy.

References

  1. It has been adopted by English football supporters during matches against Manchester United, whose owners are from the United States and are unhappy with the club’s supporters as a result of the club’s heavy financial burden. The “U-S-A” cry, used by opposing fans, serves to remind United followers of this
  2. This was also true of Liverpool until the RBStakeover in 2011. British fans, on the other hand, utilize the phrase in a non-sarcastic manner in order to honor the exploits of American players like as Tim Howard at Everton FC. After receiving the news that a French citizen with his sights set on Boyd’s fiancée had overstayed his visa and would be deported, the crew of Cheers chanted the phrase, headed by Woody Boyd, in theCheersepisode “A Fine French Whine” “Jer-ry, J-ry!” has appeared on The Jerry Springer Show, where it may appear spontaneously and without apparent explanation after the show’s traditional cheer of “Jer-ry, J-ry!” It is also frequently given by Homer Simpsonon The Simpsons. A celebration of virtually anything may be found on The Simpsons, and it is frequently followed by the blasting of his car’s horn and the flashing of his headlights. Similarly, when the group comes up with a scheme on It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, the chant is sung.

The People Chanting “U-S-A” Loathe America, and Everything It’s Supposed to Stand For

I’m not here to wax lyrical about what America “means” in the year 2021; that’s not my purpose. Even before Trump entered office, it wasn’t difficult to find evidence of the contradictions, cruelties, and greed that characterized the darker side of what had become a national experiment. But it was only after Trump took office that the situation became truly nasty and awful. Despite this, even in the most difficult of circumstances, there was a glimmer of optimism, based on the promise (if not the actuality) of the revolutionary system of democratic governance that we had established about 250 years before the events of September 11th.

  • Something greater was within our reach, even if we didn’t think we’d be able to grab it in the near future.
  • The protesters who invaded the nation’s capital on January 6 had an unifying goal: they intended to overthrow the country’s democratic system of government.
  • The subversion of public will in favor of their deposed leader was at the heart of the fascist impulse’s core goal.
  • There’s a legitimate argument to be made that decades of right-wing media propaganda portraying liberals and Democrats as their worst enemies, along with the insistence of Republican leaders that Joe Biden’s victory was illegal, has driven them mentally ill.
  • Many of them appear to be really honest.
  • opponents of Donald Trump realized four years ago that he had won a lawful election under the electoral college system, notwithstanding our widespread displeasure.
  • It’s possible that some of the rioters were devout Christians.

and Trump supporters often differ in their views on various issues, they all have a characteristic that has grown ubiquitous among the right side of our country: a proud and intentional ignorance of the facts.

The fact is that it completely eclipses all apprehension about or commitment to the American form of governance.

Nobody uses the name “America” more frequently or displays its symbols more frequently than the people who live in it, but no group is more fundamentally ignorant of the country’s history and democratic purpose than they are.

Civic responsibility is a foreign concept to them, and true democracy is an annoyance when it gets in the way of their fundamental in-group objectives.

The result is an American form of fascism led by one of the most corrupt, self-interested narcissists in our history, and it is a travesty of justice.

The fact that so many people support him is horrifying, and the rot in their souls was on full show as they battled police officers, trashed property, and threatened members of Congress, all in the name of a cause…

What would you give up for the ability to reverse an election based on “proof” that everyone with a brain can see is completely fabricated?

For the opportunity to demonstrate the kind of horror they would unleash if they were ever given complete control of the situation?

Despite the fact that it was relatively simple to restore order, it is important to remember that revolutions are often carried out by just a tiny percentage of a country’s population.

Ted Cruz has maintained his opposition to the election results even after it became evident that they were tainted by blood; he has ambitions to become president, and he wishes to tap into the frightening id of people who have pledged allegiance to Donald Trump.

But this specific form of entitled wrath isn’t going anywhere, and it will be searching furiously for its next messiah.

In order to defeat Trump and his supporters in the future, the next rescuer will have to despise the concept of American democracy just as much as Trump does.

You will not be able to fake this.

People like this can be described as “halfway criminals” since they desire the benefits of this type of assistance without the unpleasantness that goes along with it.

In the unlikely event that someone Trump comes along, he or she will have the same quality, the same reckless energy that shrugs its shoulders at the prospect of human life being lost.

A shot sounds out and she falls backwards in the footage, which can be viewed on Twitter.

One eyewitness informed journalists on the scene that she instantly declared she was alright, however footage from the event show her laying on the ground with blood covering her mouth and a look of astonishment in her eyes.

Look at her Twitter page this morning, and it becomes clear that she has entirely bought into the mythos of Trump, including all of its accompanying anxiety, grievance, and hazy sense of wrath at having been somehow repressed, somehow suppressed.

What is the purpose of this?

No matter whether their actions were motivated by misinformation or malice, the fact remains that the individuals who gathered in the nation’s capital on Wednesday were fighting for the end of fair elections, the end of public will, and the death of democracy.

And while they mention the country’s name, wear its colors, and scream its slogans, there is one message that they are trying to convey in their hearts and minds.

“Death to America,” cries out a message we’ve heard before, from beyond our borders, and one that rings as loudly as the beat of a drum: Death to the United States of America. Death to the United States of America.

r/AskReddit – Why do Americans chant U-S-A, U-S-A?

Not that I’m going to go all rosy-eyed and romantic about what America “means” in twenty-first-century terms. Even before Trump entered office, it wasn’t difficult to find evidence of the contradictions, cruelties, and avarice that characterized the darker side of what had become a national experiment. But it wasn’t until Trump took office that things became truly nasty and awful. Despite this, even under the most difficult of circumstances, there was a glimmer of optimism, based on the promise (if not the actuality) of the revolutionary system of democratic governance that we had established about 250 years before the events of September 11.

  • There was something greater within our grasp, even though it appeared that we would never be able to grab it.
  • They all had an identical aim when they invaded the nation’s capital on January 6: they wished to overthrow the country’s democratic system of government.
  • The subversion of public will in favor of their deposed leader was at the heart of the fascist impulse’s core goal.
  • There’s a legitimate argument to be made that decades of right-wing media brainwashing portraying liberals and Democrats as their mortal enemies, along with the insistence of Republican leaders that Joe Biden’s victory was illegal, has turned them mentally deranged.
  • Many appear to be earnest in their expressions of concern for others.
  • opponents of Donald Trump realized four years ago that he had won a legitimate election under the electoral college system, despite our widespread displeasure.
  • Possibly a few of the rioters were devout followers of Christ.
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and Trump supporters, on the other hand, typically share a characteristic that has grown ubiquitous among the right side of our country: a proud and intentional ignorance of the facts.

What’s more, it trumps any respect for or loyalty to the American form of governance entirely.

Nobody uses the name “America” more frequently or displays its symbols more frequently than the people who live in it, but no group is more fundamentally ignorant of the country’s history and democratic purposes than they are.

For them, civic responsibility is an alien concept and genuine democracy is an annoyance when it gets in the way of their fundamental in-group objectives.

The result is an American version of fascism led by one of the most corrupt, self-interested narcissists in our history, and it is a travesty of democracy.

When so many people rally behind him, it’s frightening, and the rot in their souls was on plain show as they attacked police, trashed property, and threatened members of Congress, all in the name of a cause…

What would you give up for the ability to overturn an election on the basis of “proof” that everyone with a brain can see is completely fabricated?

Because they want the opportunity to demonstrate the level of horror they would unleash if they were given complete control of the situation?

It was very simple to restore order, but it’s important to remember that revolutions are often carried out by a small minority of a country’s population.

Ted Cruz has maintained his opposition to the election results even after it became evident that they were tainted by blood; he has ambitions to become president, and he wishes to tap into the frightening id of those who have pledged their allegiance to Donald Trump in the process.

But this specific form of entitled wrath isn’t going away, and it will be searching furiously for its next messiah.

In order to defeat Trump and his followers in the future, the next rescuer will have to despise the concept of American democracy just as much as they do.

This is something that cannot be faked.

“Halfway crooks” are those who desire the advantages of this type assistance but don’t want to be associated with the unpleasantness that goes along with it.

In the unlikely event that someone Trump comes along, he or she will possess the same character, the same reckless energy that shrugs its shoulders at the prospect of human life being lost.

A shot rings out and she falls backwards in the footage, which can be accessed on Twitter.

However, while one eyewitness informed journalists on the scene that the woman instantly stated that she was alright, footage from the event show her laying on the ground with a look of shock in her eyes and blood covering her mouth.

Look at her Twitter page this morning, and it becomes clear that she has entirely bought into the mythos of Trump, including all of its accompanying paranoia, resentment, and hazy sense of wrath at having been censored or otherwise restrained.

What is the purpose of this device?

While it’s possible that the individuals who demonstrated in the nation’s capital on Wednesday did so out of ignorance or malice, the reality is that they were fighting to put a stop to fair elections, popular will, and democracy.

Moreover, while they mention the nation’s name, wear its colors, and chant its slogans, they have one message in their hearts: they want to see their country succeed.

A message we’ve heard before, both inside and beyond our borders, and it rings as loudly as a hammering drum: “Death to America.” America is doomed. America is doomed.

When U.S.A! U.S.A! chant is not patriotic

  • I’m not here to wax lyrical about what America “means” in the year 2021
  • I’m here to talk about reality. Even before Trump entered office, it wasn’t difficult to find evidence of the contradictions, cruelties, and avarice that characterized the darker side of what had become a national experiment. And yet, even in the darkest hours, there remained a glimmer of optimism, based on the promise (if not the actuality) of the revolutionary system of democratic democracy that we had established some 250 years before. People’s will has been continually subverted in many ways, and in other ways, it has been warped, but through it all, the people have preserved the ability to alter what they want to change with their vote. Something greater was within our grasp, even if we didn’t think we’d be able to get our hands on it. And this is due to the fact that, despite the numerous defects in the system, we continue to live in a representative democracy. The protesters who invaded the nation’s capital on January 6 had a same goal: they intended to overthrow the country’s democratic institutions. They waved American flags, screamed “USA,” and dressed in patriotic garb, but their ultimate goal was to overturn a fair election in favor of an aspiring tyrant and to eliminate the remaining remnants of public representation that are essential to America’s survival, which was their ultimate goal. The overturning of popular will in favor of their deposed leader was the essential goal of the fascist collective impulse. It is possible to script their reaction if any of them happen to see this piece, because the operating premise of the entire movement was “The election was stolen!” As a result, it’s difficult to tell if they’re being gullible or lying. It’s possible to argue that decades of right-wing media indoctrination portraying liberals and Democrats as their mortal enemies, along with Republican officials’ insistence that Joe Biden’s election was illegal, has rendered them brainwashed. If that’s the case, and if they honestly think, despite the lack of any proof to the contrary, that Trump won the election, you may be able to understand or even credit their fury. Many of them appear to be quite earnest in their intentions. However, you must also denounce their credulity, because no one else is taken in by this folly. opponents of Donald Trump realized four years ago that he had won a genuine election under the electoral college system, despite our profound sadness. There is just no proof of voter fraud, and there has never been any evidence of it in the past. It’s possible that some of the rioters were sincere believers. People in D.C. and Trump supporters, on the other hand, typically share a characteristic that has grown widespread among the right side in our country: a proud and intentional ignorance of the facts. They have the remarkable capacity to deny a sequence of well-known facts just because they do not want to accept them, and their desire to have things their way takes precedence over logic, evidence, and reason. And, perhaps more crucially, it trumps any respect for or loyalty to the American form of governance that may exist. Here’s what I’m talking about: There is no understanding of what America means, or what it is meant to represent, or what it may signify among Trump followers. Nobody uses the name “America” more frequently or displays its symbols more frequently than the people who live in it, but no group is more thoroughly ignorant of the country’s history and democratic purpose than those who live there. America, in their eyes, is a word to be used violently against foreigners and heretics, and the flag is nothing more than a tribal tattoo. Civic responsibility is an alien concept, and true democracy is an annoyance when it gets in the way of their fundamental in-group objectives. While they bleat out the term “America” at a near-hysterical tone, they couldn’t be more distant from the notion of America. The result is an American version of fascism led by one of the most vile, self-interested narcissists in our history, Donald Trump. That Trump exists is not shocking
  • There are a lot of individuals in this world, and some of them will be terrible and powerful at the same time, as Trump has demonstrated. When so many people rally behind him, it’s terrible, and the rot in their souls was on plain show as they attacked police, trashed property, and threatened members of Congress, all in the name of…. For what, exactly? What are you willing to sacrifice for the power to reverse an election based on “proof” that everyone with a brain can see is completely fabricated? For the right to vent their rage at the fact that other individuals in this country disagreed with their political ideology, and that those other people were more numerous than they were? For the opportunity to demonstrate the kind of horror they would unleash if they were ever given complete control of the show? Whether Wednesday’s actions were a one-time show of power or if this is merely the tip of the iceberg remains to be seen. It was very simple to restore order, but we must remember that revolutions are often carried out by a small minority of a country’s population. Trump has tapped into this raging rage better than any other politician, which is why sniveling ambition vessels like Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders have flocked to him. Ted Cruz has maintained his opposition to the election results even after it became evident that they were tainted by blood
  • He dreams of becoming president, and he wants to tap into the frightening id of people who have pledged allegiance to Donald Trump. He’ll never succeed because he’s such a repulsive human being, but he’s accurate in recognizing that the fury is larger than Trump and that someone else may come along and harness it in the same manner he did. It won’t be easy—Trump possesses a number of naturally seductive characteristics that will be difficult to replicate, even by those who make a conscious effort—but this specific form of entitled wrath isn’t going away, and it will be searching fiercely for its next messiah. In order to defeat Trump and his supporters in the future, the next rescuer will have to despise the concept of American democracy just as much as Trump does. He will have to be prepared to abandon everything in favor of an authoritarian, American-style fascism that appeals to his people on a visceral level. This is something you cannot fake. Cruz is one of several representatives who had the nerve to criticize the violence after having whipped the populace into a frenzy by asserting electoral fraud. We can refer to them as “halfway criminals” since they desire the benefits of this type of assistance without the unpleasantness that comes with it. Trump isn’t bothered by ugliness, and it’s this attitude that has helped him become so successful. If and when the next Trump comes along, he or she will have that same character, that same reckless energy that shrugs its shoulders at the prospect of human life being lost. When you think about Ashli Babbitt, the 35-year-old Air Force veteran who was shot and died inside the Capitol building, it’s difficult not to think about her. They may be discovered on Twitter and show her attempting to climb through a window somewhere in the structure when a shot rings out and she collapses to the ground. The recordings from the scene show her laying on the ground with a shocked expression on her face and blood covering her mouth, according to one eyewitness who was on the site. It was evident that she was on her deathbed. Taking a look at her Twitter account this morning reveals that she has entirely bought into the Trump mythology, replete with paranoia, grievance, and a hazy sense of wrath at having been banned or otherwise restrained. It’s evident that she was one of the real believers, to the point that when the secret service and the police urged her to halt what she was doing, she refused and ended up losing everything. What is this for, exactly? What is the ultimate goal of this endeavor? While it’s possible that the individuals who demonstrated in the nation’s capital on Wednesday did so out of ignorance or malice, the reality is that they were trying to put a halt to fair elections, a stop to popular will, and a stop to democracy. While some are swindlers, some are sadists, and yet others are fanatics, there is one common thread that connects them all. And while they use the country’s name, wear its colors, and yell its slogans, they are united by a single message in their hearts. It’s a message we’ve heard before, from beyond our borders, and it resounds as loudly as a drumbeat: “Death to America.” America has met its end. America has met its end.
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I’m not here to wax lyrical about what America “means” in the year 2021. It’s been a nasty, terrible stretch since Trump took office, and even before that, it didn’t take much effort to detect the contradictions, the cruelties, and the greed that distinguished the darker side of what had become a national experiment gone wrong. And yet, even amid the most difficult of circumstances, there was a glimmer of optimism, based on the promise (if not the actuality) of the revolutionary system of democratic governance that we had established some 250 years before.

  1. Something greater was within our reach, even if we didn’t think we’d be able to grasp it.
  2. The protesters who invaded the nation’s capital on January 6 had an unifying goal: they intended to overthrow the country’s democratic system.
  3. The overturning of public will in favor of their expelled leader was the essential goal of the fascist collective drive.
  4. There’s a legitimate case to be made that decades of right-wing media propaganda portraying liberals and Democrats as their worst enemies, along with the insistence of Republican leaders that Joe Biden’s victory was illegal, has rendered them brainwashed.
  5. Many of them appear to be really genuine.
  6. Four years ago, despite our profound regret, opponents of Donald Trump recognized that he had won a legitimate election under the electoral college system.
  7. It’s possible that some of the rioters were sincere believers.

and Trump supporters largely share a characteristic that has grown widespread among the right side of our country: a proud and intentional ignorance of the facts.

More crucially, it takes precedence over any respect for or loyalty to the American form of governance.

Nobody uses the name “America” more frequently or displays its symbols more frequently, yet no group is more fundamentally uninformed about the history and democratic purpose of the country in which they reside.

Civic responsibility is a foreign concept to them, and true democracy is an annoyance when it gets in the way of their fundamental in-group objectives.

All of this, of course, is an American version of fascism, led by one of the most corrupt, self-interested narcissists in our nation’s history.

The fact that so many people support him is scary, and the rot in their souls was on full show as they battled police, trashed property, and threatened members of Congress, all in the name of…

For the right to reverse an election on the basis of “proof” that anyone with a brain can see is completely fabricated?

For the opportunity to demonstrate the level of horror they would unleash if they were given complete control of the situation?

It was very simple to restore order, but we must remember that revolutions are often carried out by a small minority of a nation’s population.

Ted Cruz has maintained his opposition to the election results even after it became evident that they were tainted by blood; he dreams of becoming president, and he wants to tap into the frightening id of people who have pledged their allegiance to Donald Trump.

It won’t be easy—Trump possesses a number of naturally seductive characteristics that will be difficult to replicate, especially by those who intentionally want to do so—but this specific form of entitled wrath will not go away, and it will be searching avidly for its next messiah.

He will have to be prepared to abandon everything in favor of an autocratic, American kind of fascism that appeals to his people on a visceral level.

There are scores of congresspeople, including Cruz, who have the nerve to deplore the violence after driving the public into a frenzy by asserting electoral fraud.

Trump isn’t bothered by ugliness, and that’s part of what makes him so successful.

It’s difficult not to think about Ashli Babbitt today, the 35-year-old Air Force veteran who was shot and died inside the Capitol building.

One eyewitness informed journalists on the scene that she instantly declared she was alright, however footage from the event show her laying on the ground with a look of astonishment in her eyes and blood covering her mouth.

A check at her Twitter page this morning reveals that she has entirely bought into the mythos of Trump, replete with anxiety, grievance, and a hazy sense of wrath at being somehow restricted, somehow restrained.

What is it used for?

Whether out of ignorance or malice, the fact is that the individuals who gathered in the nation’s capital on Wednesday were fighting for an end to fair elections, an end to popular will, and an end to democracy.

And while they use the country’s name, wear its colors, and yell its slogans, they are united by a single message in their hearts and minds.

It’s a message we’ve heard before, from beyond our borders, and it vibrates as loudly as a drumbeat: “Death to America.” Death to the United States. Death to the United States.

How the ‘U-S-A’ Chant Became a Political Weapon

When President Donald Trump delivered his State of the Union speech earlier this week, legislators in the audience erupted in cries of “U-S-A! U-S-A!” at various points. This was not a novel occurrence during the Trump administration. It erupted in applause at President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address last year, when the Capitol building was lauded by Trump as “the monument to the American people,” and then again at the conclusion of the event. This time, the cry was more more prominent—and its usage was even more politically charged—than it had been previously.

Then there’s the question of why members of Congress sound like they’re at a national sporting event.

(According to Emily Cochrane of The New York Times, as the “U-S-A” chant began, some people attempted to express their thanks to Speaker Nancy Pelosi with a “Thank you, Nancy” chant, which failed to gain traction.) It’s possible that some members of the group are seeking to recapture a phrase that has become synonymous with MAGA rallies and Trump’s desire for a border wall, according to Lisa Ryan of New York magazine’s The Cut.

The State of the Union address, according to Rahm Emanuel, was political malpractice.

During Trump’s recent condemnation of Venezuela’s Maduro dictatorship and subsequent declaration that “America will never be a socialist country,” when network cameras focused in on Senator Bernie Sanders’ reaction, Republicans restated their position (whose brand of democratic socialism is a far cry from Maduroism).

  • Over time, the “U-S-A” chant has morphed into something new.
  • The first versions are in the form of “rah rah rah, sis boom bah” athletic college screams, which is similar to the current manner.
  • Putz provided an example from the Daily News of Lebanon, Pennsylvania, which was published on the same day.
  • According to the Associated Press, “Americans in the grand stands and amphitheaters made their presence felt by dominating the cheering” throughout the preliminary events.
  • On Sunday, the throng was energised, as it had been at Bethlehem Steel, by a “cheer leader,” in this instance Gustavus T.
  • Read more about how the ladies of the House switched the State of the Union speech”U-S-A” shouts would become a staple at Olympic Games in the following years.
  • However, during the Cold War, international sporting tournaments that placed the United Regimes against the Soviet Union and other Communist states, such as a baseball game versus Cuba at the 1963 Pan American Games, saw a significant increase in the amount of patriotic chanting.

Actually, the Czechoslovak Republic would play a more major part in the chant’s popularization at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, when the United States men’s hockey team made an unlikely run to the gold medal.

This time, though, the roars were much louder as the Americans humiliated the Soviet strong squad in spectacular manner.

In the summer of 1993, the New York Yankees hosted a series against the Toronto Blue Jays, who were both competing for the American League pennant at the time.

U-S-A!” at the players.

In addition to pro wrestling, rabble-rousing performers such as “Hacksaw” Jim Duggan and Hulk Hogan employed patriotic story lines against opponents who wore ludicrous foreign identities to bring the cheer to the forefront of their respective careers.

Read more: Trump officially launched his reelection campaign yesterday night.

It was most memorably during a visit by President George W.

The rest of the world is aware of your presence.

special forces assassinated Osama bin Laden in Pakistan ten years later, the news was met with “U-S-A” cheers in numerous places, including baseball stadiums.

Democrats in attendance appeared to be attempting to strike a balance by refraining from joining in unless when they could appropriate the chant for their own reasons, such as to celebrate the inflow of women into the House of Representatives.

How Did the U-S-A Chant Start? Here’s the History Behind America’s Greatest Sports Anthem

If you attend any international athletic event, you are almost certain to hear the Americans yelling an irritating yet contagious chant: “U-S-A! U-S-A!” at every turn. While the cheer is now a standard feature of sporting tournaments in the United States, its roots are less certain. It is necessary to go back to the 1970s in order to trace the origins of the chant. As this 2011Slate post points out, it’s difficult to pinpoint the original origins of the “U-S-A!” chant and its variations. Reports of the chant date back to the mid-’70s, however it’s likely that media just did not document it prior to that time.

Innsbruck, Austria, hosted the 1976 Winter Olympics and it appears that the cheer had become rather popular by that point: Image courtesy of Google According to this AP report, “a crowd of 4,500 shouting ‘USA, USA'” helped the United States ice hockey team win a game against the Finnish national team.

The 1980 Winter Olympics are most remembered for the “Miracle on Ice” game, in which a motley American team defeated the Soviet Union, who had been the incumbent four-time winner.

The United States went on to win the gold medal in the tournament, while the Soviet Union took the silver medal.

While it may have been used in earlier years, the “U-S-A!” chant became firmly established as a watershed point in American history, and has since been used to convey enthusiasm at sporting events as well as national pride in the United States.

American crowds chanted “U-S-A” when bin Laden was killed. When did we start that tradition?

Daniel Bymana writes about a similar topic in Slate. analyzes the future of al-Qaida in the wake of Osama bin Laden’s death, John Dickerson considers the president’s proactive participation in the killing, and William Saletan identifies several inconsistencies in the raid story. Along with that, David Weigelddescribes the scene outside the White House following Obama’s announcement, Anne Applebaumapplauds the United States’ decision to rely on human intelligence rather than pricey technologies, and Brian Palmer explains Bin Laden’s burial at sea Visit theSlatest for the most up-to-date news coverage available.

Following the announcement of Osama Bin Laden’s death, fans at a Phillies-Mets baseball game burst into shouts of “U-S-A, U-S-A” as the news spread around the stadium on Sunday night.

It was most likely around the mid-1970s.

There is a rumor floating around that the now famous “USA” cry had its start there.

Although the exact origins of the slogan are still a mystery, press reports from as early as 1975 mention sports fans chanting “U-S-A.” For example, at that year’s National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics swimming championships, the audience began chanting in opposition to the entry of a Canadian team, which went on to win the tournament, which was dominated by American athletes at the time.

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When the Americans defeated the Finnish team in the 1976 Olympic ice hockey competition, four years before the Miracle on Ice, the audience erupted in applause and chanted “Miracle on Ice.” There is no indication in any of the 1970s stories that the chant was revolutionary or even original, but it’s likely that the journalists covering the story at the time didn’t understand they were seeing the beginning of a craze.

  • No matter if it was a really new phenomenon or not, there is proof that it was not yet our national anthem.
  • In 1976, U.S.
  • In 1970, a demonstration in Lower Manhattan brought together blue-collar supporters of President Nixon, including those working on the construction of the new World Trade Center buildings.
  • After an occurrence of this magnitude, it’s difficult to envision any chant other than “U-S-A, U-S-A” being popular.
  • A search of the Google News database for the phrase “chant “USA USA”” yields only nine results prior to 1980.
  • Having a good time outside the White House Patriotic claps are not, of course, a phenomena that is exclusive to the United States.

The word “England” appears in just a few of the cheers, although they often have a more intricate rhythm than the chant “United States of America.” In support of their blue-clad soccer team, French fans chant “Allez les Bleus!” (Go Blues!) Canada adheres more closely to the American model, with yells of CA-NA-DA showering down from the rafters during hockey games in the country’s capital.

  1. O’ Canada Go!
  2. Bonus Explanatory Material: The demise of Osama Bin Laden drew large crowds in Boston, who celebrated by lighting cigars.
  3. It’s possible that this happened before the pilgrims arrived.
  4. ” Potlatch ” is a term used to describe a festival conducted on a special occasion by indigenous peoples in the Western United States, particularly in the Pacific Northwest, where a family presents precious gifts to the community.
  5. Even if the practice of smoking tobacco was adopted from Native Americans by early European immigrants, the tobacco would have been inhaled using a pipe.

Cigars did not reach the shores of the United States until 1762. Do you have a question concerning the news of the day? Inquire with the Explainer. Click here to view a slide presentation of individuals who were celebrating the killing of Osama Bin Laden.

8 Films That Remind Us Why We Chant U.S.A.

Daniel Bymana, writing in Slate, expresses his thoughts on the subject. analyzes the future of al-Qaida in the wake of Osama bin Laden’s death, John Dickerson considers the president’s proactive participation in the killing, and William Saletan identifies several inconsistencies in the raid’s story. Along with that, David Weigelddescribes the scene outside the White House following Obama’s announcement, Anne Applebaumapplauds the United States’ use of human intelligence over pricey technologies, and Brian Palmer provides an explanation for Bin Laden’s burial at sea.

  1. The full text of Slate’s story is available online.
  2. In order to display delight or national pride, when did Americans begin to repeatedly scream the name of their country into the air?
  3. There is a rumor floating around that the now famous “USA” cry originated at the game.
  4. The true history of the cry is still unknown, however reports from as early as 1975 mention sports fans chanting “U-S-A” over and over again.
  5. The American ice hockey team defeated the Finnish team in the 1976 Olympic ice hockey event, four years before the Miracle on Ice, and the stadium erupted in applause.
  6. Whether it was a really novel concept or not, there is evidence that it was not yet our national anthem of choice.
  7. “U-S-A, U-S-A., we don’t mess around, hey!” yelled U.S.
  8. In 1970, a demonstration in Lower Manhattan brought together blue-collar supporters of President Nixon, including many who were involved in the construction of the new World Trade Center buildings.
  9. A chant other than “U.S.A., U.S.A.” is difficult to see spreading in the aftermath of today’s tragedy.
  10. There are just nine entries in the Google News database for the phrase “chant “USA, USA” before 1980.” This search yields 713 items when you extend it to include the next decade as well.
  11. It is important to note that patriotic cheers are not exclusive to Americans.

The word “England” appears in just a few of the shouts, but they have a more intricate rhythm than the chant “United States of America!” To show their enthusiasm for their blue-clad soccer team, French fans yell “Allez les Bleus!” With yells of CA-NA-DA showering down from the rafters at hockey games, Canada adheres more closely to the American model.

  • O’ Canada Go!
  • Additional Explanation: To commemorate Bin Laden’s death, crowds gathered in Boston and lit cigars.
  • Before the pilgrims arrived, it’s possible.
  • Throughout the West, and particularly in the Pacific Northwest, Native Americans have practiced ” potlatch,” which is a festival performed on a significant occasion in which a family gives precious presents to the community as a way of showing their gratitude.
  • Even if the practice of smoking tobacco was adopted from Native Americans by early European immigrants, the tobacco would have been smoked in a pipe.

It wasn’t until 1762 that cigars made its way to the shores of the American continent. Is there something you’d want to know about the news today? Inquire with the Educator. To witness a slide exhibition of those who were celebrating Osama Bin Laden’s death, please visit this website.

Don’t chant “U.S.A.!”

I’ve been watching the Olympic Games on television on a regular basis, like so many other Americans. Despite the fact that I am not a major sports fan, I do pay casual attention to what is going on – and when I do, I, like you, immediately look for the American flag emblem among the competitors so that I can figure out which athlete to support. This, without a question, is one of the most enticing aspects of the Olympic Games. In a world filled with “asymmetrical” dangers and shifting geopolitical landscapes, Olympic fandom is a safe refuge for the simpleton in all of us to escape to.

  • But as I’ve gotten older, I’ve noticed that my “USA!”-chanting reflex has become increasingly interrupted by pangs of discomfort.
  • For the most part, singing the initials of our nation appears to be less common in 1984 than it has been since 1992.
  • The former, staged in Los Angeles, was a Cold War display of hyper-patriotism that was purposely planned to offer the giant middle finger to the Soviet Union and its supporters who were boycotting the country.
  • “This was precisely the aim of the ’84 Olympics – it was a one-sided exhibition of American strength,” Weinreb points out, dismissing such (valid and prophetic) worries.
  • I was 9 years old when the Cold War was at its peak, and I remember thinking it was perfectly reasonable and noble to blend overt sports passion with not-so-subtle saber rattling to make a point.
  • America was at the pinnacle of its geopolitical and economic development, and it was able to claim the label of “world’s lone superpower” at the time.
  • We took advantage of a change in Olympic regulations to field what Sports Illustrated described as “probably the most dominating roster ever assembled in any sport” – the 1992 Dream Team – in the games at Barcelona.
  • I was perplexed as to why we had to rub our power into each other.
  • Since those games took place two decades ago, such questions have transcended sports and have become more important than they have ever been.

From “bring it on” presidential taunts to televised “shock and awe” campaigns, to flag-draped statue spectacles, to “Top Gun”-style aircraft carrier celebrations, to the raucous parties and pompous political declarations that accompany our escalation of foreign wars, we present ourselves as Caesars – but without any of Peter Venkman’s self-effacing cheekiness and all of the Dream Team’s arrogance.

Naturally, such a mindset has permeated our political discourse to the point where its bounds are now strictly defined by a reductionist dispute over “American exceptionalism” – that is, by a Colbert-ian throwdown over whether America is great or the greatest country on earth.

To be sure, as Frank Rich points out in his must-read New York magazine article: “We are not in the same league as Greece.

The fact is, if we were to slide even slightly into a tie for first place, it would drive many Americans insane, because if there is anything baked into the national character, it is the belief that we must be the alpha dog, the leader of the pack, and the unquestioned global champion.” When it comes to today’s Olympics, hyper-patriotism is just a reflection of the national character of the country hosting them.

  • Not only do we react with natural sentiments of camaraderie with our countrymen when the list of athletes is displayed on the television screen and we automatically profile the participants by nation, but we also do so because we are watching a sporting event.
  • The reality that we are not so extraordinary outside of the Olympic village is, of course, lost in the midst of all the red, white, and blue fanfare that ensued.
  • For example, when it comes to healthcare, we are neither gold, silver, or even bronze medalists; unfortunately, we rank 39th in newborn mortality, 43rd in female mortality, 42nd in adult male mortality, and 36th in life expectancy.
  • Even when we are not at a sporting event, we are often called upon to address issues such as military spending, carbon emissions, and imprisonment rates from the dais.
  • As a result, declining standards of life continue to be experienced at home, while anti-Americanism is spreading around the world among a community of countries that regards us as more of a trash-talking aggressor than a humble friend.
  • In other words, we are becoming more preoccupied, and they are becoming more emasculated as a result of our actions in the military, the economy, geopolitics, and, every four years, athletics.
  • It is not my intention to make it appear as though I will be supporting for a different country.
  • That means that in every single individual game I watch, I’ll almost surely be rooting for the red, white, and blue (and maybe with the occasional “USA!” shout in support of them).

For one thing, I’ve outgrown it because I realize that while we should support and respect our athletes, we should also recognize that the same respect should be extended to competitors from all over the world participating in the games – and respect is a completely different thing from complete conquest.

While watching the Olympics, and when thinking about the greater world, we should keep this truism in mind.

UFC 148 Silva vs Sonnen II: An Early Defense of the USA! Chant

The United States of America! The United States of America! This chant is perhaps the most well-known and despised feature of mixed martial arts contests. I say “liked and loathed” because, based on replies on Twitter, most MMA fans and members of the media despise this chant, yet I and others who participate in it really adore it. For me, it brings back memories of summer beach parties with pals back in New Jersey, where we drank large amounts of beer and listened to copious amounts of Bruce Springsteen while getting high.

That’s right, we used to break out in those chants when we were just hanging out at bars on the weekends.

Because we all like the United States of America and what it stands for, and we want to see it succeed.

Sure, Australia was awesome and Korea was a crazy ride, but nothing beats the feeling I get when a CustomsImmigration agent says, “Welcome home.” This weekend, Chael Sonnen will defend his UFC middleweight championship against Anderson Silva.

Sonnen’s song begins to play, I fully anticipate to hear a rowdy audience explode into cries of “USA!” To be honest, I’d be a little disappointed if the audience didn’t yell “USA!” during the entire show.

You know, those fervent Brazilian supporters that everyone admires?

There is a name for this, and it does not include the word “passion.” The term for this is “psychotic.” Doesn’t the USA!

There is no imminent danger of death.

It’s the finest form of collective thought, in my opinion.

When going along Fremont Street or even when playing blackjack at the tables, chanting USA!

That’s exactly what I did last night several times.

Everybody have a wonderful Independence Day and remember to say “USA!”, “USA!”, “USA!”, “USA!”

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