Related To What Chant

Related To What Chant, by The Last Poets

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Chant – Wikipedia

Achant (from the French chanter, which comes from the Latin cantare, “to sing”) is the repeated speaking or singing of words or sounds, usually based on one or two basic pitches known as recitation tones. For example, the Significant Responsories and OffertoriesofGregorian chant have a considerable degree of repetitionof musical subphrases, whereas a basic melody with a restricted set of notes contains a complicated musical structure that contains a great deal of repetition of musical subphrases.

Some liturgical chants were transformed into songs in the later Middle Ages (forming one of the roots of later Western music).

Chant as a spiritual practice

Chanting (e.g., the recitation of a mantra, a holy text, the name of God/Spirit, etc.) is a widely practiced spiritual activity. Chanting, like prayer, can be a part of one’s personal or collective practice, depending on the context. Chanting is considered a path to spiritual development by a wide range of spiritual traditions. In 2013, monks sang at Drepung monastery in Tibet. African, Hawaiian, and Native American chants; Assyrian and Australian Aboriginal chants; Gregorian chant; Hindu chant; Qur’an reading; Bahá’ chants; various Buddhist chants; various mantras; Jewish cantillation; and the chanting ofpsalms and prayers in particular in Roman Catholic (seeGregorian chantorTaizé Community), Eastern Orthodox (seeByzantine chantorZnamenny (seeAnglican Chant).

Tibetan Buddhist chant is performed through the throat, with each performer producing a variety of different pitches.

India’s bhakti devotional tradition is based on kirtan, which has a large following in various nations and traditions, including the Ananda Marga school of meditation.

ChineseShijing(), often known as ‘chanted poetry,’ reflects Zen Buddhist concepts and is sung from theDan tien (or lower belly), which is considered the locus of power in many Eastern cultures.

See also

  • A prayer to the almighty
  • A fight song
  • A sea shanty–a rhyming work song performed on sailing vessels
  • A skipping-rope rhyme
  • A football chant, etc.

References

  • A site dedicated to Vedic chants
  • Traditional Buddhist Chants (Texts and Audio), such as those found in the Buddhist Encyclopedia
  • And other related topics.

Thesaurus results for CHANT

musical or drawn-out tones 1 to pronounce in a musical or drawn-out tone

  • The dissatisfied audience at the rock event began chanting, “We want the show to start!”

the ability to generate musical sounds using one’s voice

  • Belt it out
  • Coo
  • Harmonize
  • Humming
  • Lilt
  • Quaver
  • Sharp
  • Scat
  • Trill
  • Troll
  • Yodel

Lullaby, as in the chorus

  • Chorus croon descant
  • (alsodiscant)
  • Folk song glee lullaby madrigal motet part-song pop rocker round roundelay serenade serenade serenade serenade serenade serenade serenade serenade serenade serenade serenade serenade standard standard standard standard
  • Ballad
  • Ditty
  • Jingle
  • Lay
  • Lyric
  • Solo
  • Song
  • Vocal
  • Chant
  • The terms hymn, noel, psalm, and spiritual are interchangeable. Anthem, cantata, canticle, carol, chorale
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See the Definition in the Dictionary.

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Medieval Liturgical Chant and Patristic Exegesis

Medieval chant is examined in depth and with great sensitivity, as is the link between text and music. What is the relationship between text and music in Western liturgical chant? Alternatively, does the music just serve as an abstract vehicle for the text, or does it express the literary structure and meaning? A case study of the second-mode tracts, which are lengthy and complicated solo chants for Lent that were composed in the papal choir of Rome before the mid-eighth century, is used to answer these problems.

He compares the four second-mode tracts that make up the core repertoire to related ninth-century Frankish chants, concluding that their structural and aesthetic principles are neither Frankish nor a function of their notation in the earliest extant manuscripts, but rather a well-remembered written reflection of a long oral tradition that dates back to Rome.

EMMA HORNBY is a music professor at the Department of Music.

The Second-Mode Tracts’ Musical Grammar is a study in contrasts.

When it comes to the first notated witnesses, they have a clear understanding of the genre: The Evidence of the Second-Mode Tracts, which were composed about the year 900 AD Conclusion Appendix 1: Second-Mode Tract Texts, Translations, Parts of Speech, and Melodic Phrases Appendix 2: Mass Proper Manuscripts Referred to in this Study, as well as the Repertory of Second-Mode Tracts Found in the Sample of Early Manuscripts Appendix 3: Mass Proper Manuscripts Referred to in this Study, as well as the Repertory of Second-Mode Tracts Found in the Sample of Early audi filia and diffusa est gratiainLei, as well as facsimiles of the Second-Mode Tracts inFle1 andKor, and of the Second-Mode Tracts inFle1 andKorAppendix 4: Analytical Tables of the Formulaic Phrases inFle1 andOrcAppendix 5: The Textual Tradition of the Core Repertory Second-Mode Tracts andEripe me A transcription of the Chants discussed in this study is included in the Appendix 6: Chants Discussed in this Study Bibliography.

chant royal

Chant royal is a fixed form of verse devised by French poets from the 13th to the 15th centuries that is still in use today. As early as the 14th century, its traditional form consisted of five stanzas of from 8 to 16 lines of equal measure, without a refrain, but with a same rhymepattern in each stanza and an envoi utilizing rhymes from the stanzas, all of which were repeated at the end. The chant royal gained a refrain in the 15th century, and the envoi was typically about half the length of the stanza, which had between 10 and 12 lines, the number being dictated by the number of syllables in the refrain.

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The chant royal, like the ballade, allowed for a variety of interpretations.

During the 16th century, Clément Marotin was a master of this style, and hisChant royal chrétien, with its refrain “Santé au corps et Paradis a la l’âme” (“Health to the body and Paradise to the soul”), was widely performed.

It was resurrected in the nineteenth century and, in essence, belonged to a time when its subject matter might be anything from the deeds of a royal hero to the processional splendours of religious ceremonies.

However, the sad or holy tone of the original poem has been replaced by a number of English-language writers in recent years. It is currently mostly employed in corporate forewords (urbane,ironicpoetry).

Best 36 synonyms for chant

It was devised by French poets from the 13th through the 15th centuries and is a fixed form of verse. As early as the 14th century, its typical form consisted of five stanzas of from 8 to 16 lines of equal measure, without a refrain, but with a same rhyme pattern in each stanza and an envoi that used rhymes from the previous stanzas. As early as the 15th century, chant royals began to include a refrain. The envoi, which was usually about half the length of the stanza (which had anywhere from 10 to 12 lines), was dictated by the number of syllables in the refrain.

The chant royal, like the ballade, was open to interpretation.

During the 16th century, Clément Marotin was a master of this style, and hisChant royal chrétien, with its refrain “Santé au corps et Paradis a la l’âme” (“Health to the body and Paradise to the soul”), became famous.

chant royal In its most basic form, it belongs to a time when its subject matter might be anything from the deeds of a royal hero to the processional splendors of religious ceremonies.

The poem has since been modified by a number of English-language poets, although its serious or religious tone is no longer in use today.

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