Scary Mary Chant How To Do The Chant

Bloody Mary (folklore) – Wikipedia

A divination procedure depicted on a Halloween greeting card from the early twentieth century portrays a lady gazing into a mirror in a darkened room in order to obtain a glimpse of the face of her future spouse. On the wall on the left, a witch’s shadow has been projected. Bloody Mary is a witch who chooses whatever ghost, phantom, or spirit to summon in order to reveal the future. When her name is shouted constantly, it is supposed that she will appear in a mirror. Depending on the historical variants of the mythology, the Bloody Mary apparition may be benign or malicious in nature.

Ritual

A traditional divination rite required young ladies to go up a flight of stairs backwards while holding a candle and a hand mirror in a darkened house, according to tradition. The expectation was that they would be able to catch a glimpse of their future husband’s face when they looked into the mirror. There was a possibility, however, that they would instead see askull (or the face of the Grim Reaper), which would indicate that they would die before they would get the opportunity to marry. Catoptromancy is still practiced today, and Bloody Mary is said to manifest herself to people or groups that ritualistically invoke her name in an act of catoptromancy.

It is necessary to say the name thirteen times (or some other specified number of times).

According to the legend surrounding the ritual, participants may be subjected to the ghost yelling at them, cursing them, strangling them, taking their soul, swallowing their blood, or scratching their eyes out as part of the experience.

The current tale of Hanako-san in Japan has a striking resemblance to the Bloody Mary narrative.

Phenomenon explanations

When one looks at a mirror in a poorly lit environment for an extended amount of time, it is possible to experience hallucinations. In addition, additional hallucination components, such as animals or unusual faces, may appear to “melt,” distort, vanish, and rotate in the face of the patient. According to Giovanni Caputo of the University of Urbino, this phenomenon, which he refers to as the “strange-face illusion,” is believed to be a result of a “dissociative identity effect,” which causes the brain’s facial-recognition system to misfire in an as-yet-unidentified manner, leading to the appearance of a strange face.

Other plausible explanations for the occurrence include illusions that can be linked, at least in part, to the perceptual effects of Troxler’s fading, as well as self-hypnosis, orapophenia, and other forms of paranormal activity.

See also

  • Bloody Mary legend in popular culture
  • A list of ghosts
  • And other related topics.

References

An exclusive extract from Lucia Peters’ book, Dangerous Games to Play in the Dark, may be found after the jump. Throughout this collection, Peters brings together the scariest and most dangerous supernatural games from throughout history, from around the world, and from the deepest recesses of the internet, including Stiff as a Board, Light as a Feather, and The Answer Man, among others. However, you need exercise caution when playing because some of the entities you may come into touch with will not always adhere to the rules.

  • Warnings about fire and explosions are also provided.
  • Bloody Mary (also known as “Bloody Mary”) Proof of your bravery will be given as a reward.
  • In a darkened house at night, if you were to walk backwards up a staircase, passing a mirror along the way, it was claimed that you would see one of two things reflected back at you: either your future spouse’s face or a skull.
  • It appears that the Bloody Mary itself came around a bit later, though it is difficult to pinpoint exactly when.
  • And as for who Bloody Mary is, well, that’s a mystery.
  • Known as Mary Worth, she may have been either a Puritan lady who was tried and executed for witchcraft or a woman who died in a car accident more recently.
  • According to others, she is Mary Whales, who might be either the aforementioned automobile crash victim or some sort of ghostly hitchhiker-type spirit.
  • Meanwhile, some assert that she is none other than Mary Tudor, the Queen of England who reigned from 1553 to 1558 and was dubbed “Bloody Mary” for the frenzied murders she carried out against Protestants in a bid to restore Catholicism to England.
  • The genuine monsters, it is possible, are merely mirror images of ourselves.

After the advertisement, the article continues. Whatever your point of view, one thing is certain: if you attempt to call Bloody Mary, you are doing so only for the challenge of surviving your meeting with her. DIRECTIONS ON HOW TO PLAY:

  1. An exclusive extract from Lucia Peters’ book, Dangerous Games to Play in the Dark, may be found in the following section: In this collection, Peters brings together the scariest and most dangerous supernatural games from throughout history, from around the world, and from the deepest recesses of the internet, including Stiff as a Board, Light as a Feather, and The Answer Man, among others. However, you should exercise caution when playing, since some of the entities you may come into touch with will not always adhere to the rules of engagement. Bloody Mary is the name of this game. Additional Warnings: There is a fire hazard. The goal is to call for help. Drink a Bloody Mary if you want to be a little more adventurous. Proof of your gallantry will be given as a commendation. Young people in the nineteenth century participated in a traditional ritual known as Bloody Mary, which had its origins in a mirror game. It was thought that if you walked backward up a staircase in a darkened house at night, passing a mirror along the way, you would see one of two things reflected in the mirror: the face of the person you were destined to marry, or a skull. If you saw the skull, it signified that you were doomed to die before you had the opportunity to marry anybody you loved. While the Bloody Mary itself appears to have been created later, the exact date of its creation is unclear at this point. Although the legend was not widely known until the 1970s, folklorist Janet Langlois’s essay “Mary Whales, I Believe in You,” which appeared in the 1976 anthology Indiana Folklore: A Reader, contains several versions of the legend that Langlois had gathered over a period of several years in the early 1970s. And who is Bloody Mary, you might wonder. So it depends on who you’re talking to about what you want to say. Known as Mary Worth, she may have been either a Puritan lady who was tried and executed for witchcraft or a woman who died in a car accident more recently. She may have been either. According to others, she is Mary Whales, who might be either the aforementioned car crash victim or some sort of ghostly hitchhiker. Those who believe she’s the furious ghost of a woman who lost her kid believe she’s not. Meanwhile, some assert that she is none other than Mary Tudor, the Queen of England who reigned from 1553 to 1558 and was dubbed “Bloody Mary” for the frenzied murders she carried out against Protestants in an attempt to restore Catholicism to England. A scientific explanation for the apparition of the ghost has been proposed, for what it’s worth. It’s been reported that gazing into a mirror in low light settings for an extended period of time causes our perspective of what we’re seeing to distort and become monstrous in appearance. The genuine monsters, it’s possible, are merely mirror images of ourselves. Following the commercial, the article continues. Whatever your point of view, one thing is certain: if you attempt to call Bloody Mary, you are doing so only for the challenge of surviving your meeting with the vampire. PLAYING DIRECTIONS:

Say it loudly, starting gently and then increasing the loudness with each repetition. Repeat it once, twice, three times, and so on until you reach a total of thirteen repetitions. The number thirteen is considered to be a lucky number. Speak the thirteenth repeat with a sense of completion. Then come to a complete halt. Look a little harder. What do you think you’re seeing? Is it just you that has this problem? Are you certain? Take another look, but this time from a distance. Make sure you don’t put yourself within arms reach of the mirror.

But what if she manages to seize control of you?

  1. If you make it through the ordeal, extinguish the candle, turn on the lights, and exit the room
  2. Otherwise, repeat the process.

Do not utilize the mirror in the future. In addition to the candle, a flashlight can be used in place of the candle; however, the effectiveness of the summoning may be less predictable when using a flashlight. If the procedure described here fails to provide the intended outcome, a number of adjustments may be used in successive tries to attain the desired result: After the advertisement, the article continues.

  • Start the game exactly at midnight on the dot
  • Alternately say the word “Bloody Mary” three times instead of the traditional thirteen
  • Instead of chanting the name “Bloody Mary” thirteen times, chant it seven times. While reciting Bloody Mary’s name in the sink, fill the sink with water. As an alternative to staring into the mirror while repeating Bloody Mary’s name, gently rotate in place in place. After the twelfth repetition, stop spinning and face the mirror, chanting the thirteenth repetition while staring into the mirror
  • After the twelfth repetition, stop spinning and face the mirror
  • It is suggested that you replace the chant of “Bloody Mary” with the chant “Bloody Mary, I kidnapped your baby,” and that you replace the song of “Bloody Mary” with the chant “I believe in Mary Worth.” Bloody Mary cannot be dispelled after she has been summoned, despite the fact that many different techniques have been presented to accomplish this goal. Following the conclusion of the ceremony, some accounts propose painting a cross on the mirror with soap for three nights afterward. Others advise burning sage in the center of the playing area or sprinkling vinegar in each of the four corners of the room. You may, of course, experiment with these tactics, but don’t depend on them to be effective. Breaking the mirror would be a mistake
  • You wouldn’t want to let her out, would you?

This excerpt is from Lucia Peters’ book, Dangerous Games to Play in the Dark. The publisher, Chronicle, has granted permission for this use. Lucia Peters has copyright protection until the year 2019.

Is the Bloody Mary Story True?

The investigation into the tale of Bloody Mary dates back to 1978, when folklorist Janet Langlois published an essay on the subject in the journal Folklore. Even at that time, the belief in summoning the mirror-witch was common across the United States. In addition to being summoned anytime a group of screaming females gets together for a sleepover, Mary has been known to receive calls from boys as well. In the early 1970s, the legend of ‘Bloody Mary’ was widely circulated among children. We usually conducted the “ritual” in bathrooms since the bathrooms of our suburban homes had huge mirrors and could easily be darkened even during the day because they did not have windows.

One well-known ‘Bloody Mary’ anecdote included a young lady who allegedly closed her recitation with the bitter “Idon’tbelieve in Mary Worth,” then stumbled over the doorjamb as she exited the restroom and fractured her hip.) For example, if you walk into the bathroom and stare into the mirror with the lights turned out and the room entirely dark, and then speak ‘Bloody Mary’ thirteen times, a lady will emerge and scrape the top or bottom of your face up or down.

  • In a dark room, I was informed that if you spoke the words “Hell Mary” seven times and looked in the mirror, you would see Satan’s visage.
  • This is how I’ve always heard the story told: You walk into a room with a mirror and turn off all of the lights in the room (this works well in a bathroom).
  • While you are chanting, you should be spinning around at a medium speed and taking a quick look in the mirror after every pass or three.
  • “she” should appear and…?
  • She was trembling and looked to be truly afraid when she came out, and she refused to speak about what had happened.

However, people who were in the vicinity of her when she emerged noted that her clinched fingers were covered with blood. Continue reading for more spooky tales and terrifying urban legends. Variations:

  • Avenging spirits go by many names, including Bloody Mary and Bloody Bones. They also go by names such as Hell Mary and Hell Mary Worth, Mary Whales and Mary Johnson. They also go by names such as Kathy, Agnes, Black Agnes, Aggie, Svarte Madame, Sally, Kathy, Agnes and Black Agnes
  • And they go by the name of Agnes and Black Agnes, Svarte Madame and Svarte Madame. It is necessary to use the proper chant while calling on Mary. According to one version, the important statement is “I believe in Mary Worth,” but other versions call for the yelling of “Kathy, come out!” or the chanting of “Bloody Mary” into the mirror as many times as the ritual requires. (On occasion, requests for Bloody Mary are more scripted, and she is called with cries such as “Bloody Mary! I killed your kid!” The specific criteria of the ritual change from time to time. The mirror must be lighted by a single candle according to some rules, while others need a candle on either side of the mirror. According to other interpretations, just one girl repeats the message to Mary
  • This girl is either a volunteer or one who has been chosen by her peers to call the mirror-witch. There is significant variation in the amount of chants required to summon Mary, as well as in what the mirror-witch performs when she arrives. She has the ability to kill her summoner, drive her insane, or viciously scratch her face. If she wants to, she may just gaze threateningly out of the glass, or she can bring one of the girls back through the mirror and into her home with her.
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Some believe Mary is a witch who was hanged a hundred years ago for practicing black magic, while others believe she is more recent, and that she died as a result of a local automobile accident in which her face was horribly disfigured. Some people confuse the mirror witch with Queen Mary I of England, who is referred to in history as “Bloody Mary.” According to an enlarged version of that story, this homicidal British queen murdered young girls in order to bathe in their blood in order to maintain her youthful beauty.

She was a famous beauty who was scared of losing her beauty, and she was also terrified of losing her life.

She earned the nickname “Bloody Mary” because she executed a number of Protestants during her reign, as she attempted to re-establish Catholicism as the official religion of the land following the reigns of her father (Henry VIII, who married six wives over the course of his lifetime and established himself as the head of a new religion rather than tolerate the Pope’s ruling that he couldn’t divorce wife1 in order to marry wife2) and her brother (Henry VIII, who married six (Edward VI, who ruled after Henry died but passed away himself at the age of 16).

This woman, Mary, was a devoutly religious woman who saw what she was doing as the saving of her subjects’ souls from eternal damnation.

The fact that returning the kingdom to Catholicism would also serve to protect her crown was also a crucial factor in her decision.

Despite the fact that both Mary and Elizabeth were children of Henry VIII, Mary’s mother was Katherine of Aragon, while Elizabeth’s mother was Anne Boleyn.

Despite the fact that she restored the country to Protestantism and, in the process, ordered the deaths of at least as many of her subjects as her half-sister did during her time on the throne, Elizabeth was referred to as “The Virgin Queen” rather than any version of “Bloody Elizabeth” because she never married.

Despite the fact that this Mary was a vain and stupid lady, she is not remembered in history as a homicidal one.

However, unlike Mary I of England, she did not pursue her subjects in large numbers.) So, despite the fact that there was a British monarch known as “Bloody Mary,” no evidence of a connection between her and the mirror witch has been discovered, other than the fact that they both had the same name.

  1. Coincidences occur in legend, as they do everywhere else.
  2. Gail de Vos provides the following rationale for her position: So why do youngsters continue to invoke Bloody Mary, putting themselves in risk and maybe causing a tragic outcome?
  3. A safe technique to extract pleasure and relieve anxieties and concerns is something they are continuously on the lookout for.
  4. Various varieties of these divinations exist; one involves reciting a rhyme in the dark of the night before the wedding and then swiftly peering in the mirror to catch a glimpse of the groom-to-be, while another involves chanting a rhyme in the dark of the day before the wedding.
  5. The tradition of covering mirrors in a residence where a death had happened until the body was brought away for burial was popular in those days.
  6. As a result, the dead would remain in the house for several days.) It was thought that if the dearly departed received a sight of himself in a mirror, his ghost would remain in the home because the mirror would imprison his spirit and he would be trapped in the house forever.
  7. In the 1998 filmUrban Legend, two co-eds attempt to call an evil ghost by repeating the words ‘Bloody Mary’ over and over again.

“Bloody Mary”: From the Bathroom to the Laboratory

Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary… My skin crawls when I think of the mirror specter, even in jest. It is said that Bloody Mary, the spirit of a lady who can be called by saying her name thirteen times into a dimly lit mirror, is one of the most popular urban legends around. Whatever the cause, this practice has maintained down through the centuries, with study into the subject commencing in 1978 with a piece written by Jane Langlois about the “game,” as she came to refer to it, and its roots.

The truth of this narrative practically confirms the existence of witches, spirits, and an afterlife; this is certainly an astonishing assertion.

A buddy or older peer may have recounted the story to them at a sleepover or campfire, if any of these folks are anything like I am.

The narrative began with “a friend of a friend” or “my cousin’s friend,” to give the story credibility and personality, and ended with “my cousin’s friend.” A ritual reflecting pre-pubescent anxiety, according to Alan Dundes’s article “Bloody Mary in the Mirror: A Ritual Reflection of Pre-Pubescent Anxiety,” involves young girls at sleepovers who decide to try and summon Bloody Mary, also known as ‘MaryWorth’ because she is widely believed to be a witch who was burned at the stake for practicing magic (Snopes).

Certain recent renditions think she is a young lady who died in a car accident; in some legends, particular sentences must be spoken; and in various parts of the world, a distinct image is believed to manifest itself.

According to a Washington Post article, it is critical to understand how legends spread, which is partly due to word-of-mouth and partly owing to the practicality of a certain notion.

Just as legends of a “murderer in the backseat” or a “phone call from within the home” have persisted in our society, we are drawn to stories that are given to us in an appropriate location, such as a movie theater.

We dismiss alien abductions and the flat earth theory because it intrinsically sounds ludicrous (whether or not we should dismiss them is a topic for another subject completely), but when we hear “a girl had a murderer in her backseat,” it appears just genuine enough for us to accept as factual information.

It is theoretically possible that the entire Bloody Mary summoning procedure will result in nothing of significance occurring.

When looking into a mirror in low light, researchers discovered that they may see apparitions and distorted faces, according to the study “VisualPerception During Mirror-Gazing at One’s Own Face in Patients with Depression.” According to recent results in neuroscience (BBC), people are fascinated by faces, and are capable of recognizing a face in a variety of objects such as food, technology, and domestic appliances.

  • It consequently makes sense that the brain will attempt to locate a face in a dimly illuminated mirror when presented with little to no stimuli.
  • If today’s children are anything like me, they will enter the restroom, whirl around, and yell “BloodyMary” thirteen times before exiting the bathroom.
  • The chances are that most people will never see the suffering lady because of their own timidity, but according to the research, if someone glances into a mirror, a face or distortion will almost certainly appear.
  • The existence of ghosts, witches, and urban legends has yet to be confirmed, but now that you know your brain will seek to terrify itself, why not go ahead and gaze into a mirror!
  • Mikkelson is one of the sources (2001, April 28).
  • Is There a True “Bloody Mary” Story Behind the Legend?
  • B., Bortolomasi, M., Ferrucci, R., Giacopuzzi, M., Priori, A., and Zago, S.

B., Bortolomasi, M., Ferrucci, R., Giacopuzzi, M., Priori, A., and Zago, S.

Patients with depression report changes in their visual perception when they look in the mirror at themselves.

(1998), Bloody Mary in the Mirror: A Ritual Reflection of Pre-Pubescent Anxiety, Western Folklore, vol.

2 (pp.

119.

(2014, June 30), Why some urban legends go viral, he explains why some urban legends go viral.

Dagnall and K.

Robson’s website was used to obtain this information (2014, July 30). David Robson explains how the brain creates illusions, including the appearance of the Virgin Mary in a slice of toast and the appearance of a screaming face in a man’s testicles.,,,,, It was retrieved from

Scary Mary

Scary Mary
Season 1, Episode 2122
Air date May 714, 2011
Written by Billy BrownDan Angel
Directed by Peter DeLuise
Episode Guide
PreviousThe Perfect Brother NextCreature Feature, Part 1

Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary,… To be honest, I get goosebumps even when I’m making light of the mirror specter. It is said that Bloody Mary, the spirit of a lady who can be called by saying her name thirteen times into a dimly lit mirror, is one of the most popular urban legends in existence. Whatever the cause, this practice has lasted down through the centuries, with study into the subject commencing in 1978 with a piece written by Jane Langlois about the “game,” as she came to refer to it, and its beginnings in the United Kingdom.

  • The truth of this narrative effectively confirms the existence of witches, spirits, and an afterlife; this is an amazing assertion.
  • A buddy or older peer may have recounted the story to them at a sleepover or campfire, if any of these folks are anything like I was.
  • The narrative began with “a friend of a friend” or “my cousin’s acquaintance,” in order to provide credibility and personality to the tale.
  • According to some modern interpretations, she is a young lady who died in a car accident; in other traditions, particular sentences must be said; and in various places, a different picture is believed to emerge.
  • According to a Washington Post article, it is critical to understand how legends spread, which is mostly due to word-of-mouth and the practicality of a notion in some cases.
  • Our society has clung to stories like a “murderer hiding in the backseat” or a “phone call from within the home” for the same reason.
  • In addition, the tale must make sense to us, or at the very least appear to be entertaining or fascinating in order for us to continue reading.

According to an article on The Conversation, urban legends prey on people’s societal concerns and vulnerabilities; for example, people are terrified of being abducted, killed, and finally stalked by a witch’s ghost (apparently).

Nevertheless, Giovanni Caputo and his colleagues have discovered that something is taking place that might be the cause of the urban legend….

Thus, when presented with little to no stimulus, it seems logical that the brain may attempt to locate a face in a poorly illuminated mirror.

They will walk into the bathroom, spin around and shout “BloodyMary” thirteen times, and then rush out of the bathroom, if they are anything like me.

Even while nothing spectacular has been discovered as a result of the inquiry into the subject, neuroscience has unearthed a disturbing phenomena.

Mikkelson, D.

What Is the Truth About the Legend of Bloody Mary?

It was retrieved from Caputo et al.

B.

Patients with depression report changes in their visual perception while looking in the mirror at themselves.

(1998), Bloody Mary in the Mirror: A Ritual Reflection of Pre-Pubescent Anxiety, Western Folklore, vol.

2, pp.

119–135 (2014, June 30) Why certain urban legends become viral, by J.

When you go to the Washington Post website, you can find out why some urban legends go viral.

Dagnall and K.

Robson, D., et al., retrieved from (2014, July 30). In this book, David Robson discusses why the brain creates illusions, such as the Virgin Mary appearing in a slice of toast or the sight of a screaming face appearing in a man’s testicles. Obtainable via the website

Summary

Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary, Bloody… Even making light of the reflected specter gives me the creeps. One of the most well-known urban legends is that of Bloody Mary, the spirit of a lady who can be called by saying her name thirteen times into a poorly lit mirror. Whatever the cause, this practice has maintained down through the centuries, with study into the subject commencing in 1978 with a paper written by Jane Langlois about the “game,” as she came to refer to it, and its roots.

If this narrative is genuine, it practically confirms the existence of witches, spirits, and an afterlife; this is an incredible assertion.

A buddy or older peer may have recounted the story to any of these folks if they are anything like me.

“Bloody Mary in the Mirror: A Ritual Reflection of Pre-Pubescent Anxiety,” written by Alan Dundes, describes how most participants are young girls at sleepovers who decide to try and summon Bloody Mary, or her alias ‘MaryWorth’ as she is commonly believed to be a witch who was burned because she was accused of practicing magic (Snopes).

  • In each case, regardless of where you are or when you were born, the method is the same: someone comes into a room with a mirror and says something until an image emerges behind them.
  • The word-of-mouth is exactly what I was referring to when I said gathering around a campfire and telling stories.
  • The other important aspect is that the tale must make sense to us, or at the very least appear to be entertaining or fascinating.
  • According to an article on The Conversation, urban legends prey on people’s social concerns and vulnerabilities; people are terrified of being abducted, killed, and finally pursued by a witch’s ghost, among other things (apparently).
  • Giovanni Caputo and his colleagues, on the other hand, discovered that something is taking place that might be the source of the urban legend.
  • According to recent results in neuroscience (BBC), people have a fascination with faces, and are capable of identifying faces in a variety of objects such as food, equipment, and domestic appliances.
  • Bloody Mary is based on solid science, which is contrary to popular belief, and thus serves to increase the attractiveness of the urban legend even further.
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The chances are that most people will never see the suffering lady because of their own timidity, but according to the research, if someone glances into a mirror, a face or distortion will most likely appear.

Ghosts, witches, and urban legends are still untested, but now that you know your brain will attempt to terrify itself, why not go ahead and gaze into a mirror?

Do you believe there is a true “Bloody Mary” story behind the legend?

B., Bortolomasi, M., Ferrucci, R., Giacopuzzi, M., Priori, A., and Zago, S.

B., Bortolomasi, M., Ferrucci, R., Giacopuzzi, M., Priori, A., and Zago, S.

Patients suffering from depression report changes in their visual perception when looking in the mirror at themselves.

Dundes (1998), Bloody Mary in the Mirror: A Ritual Reflection of Pre-Pubescent Anxiety, Western Folklore, vol.

2, pp.

(2014, June 30) Why certain urban legends go viral, in The New York Times, p.

N.

Drinkwater are co-authors of the paper (2017, May 15) Why urban tales are more strong than ever, and how to combat them Robson, D., ed., retrieved from (2014, July 30).

David Robson discusses how the brain creates illusions, including the image of the Virgin Mary in a slice of bread and the appearance of a screaming face in a man’s testicles. Obtainable from

Plot

Part 1 of 2 Hannah is an out-of-the-ordinary young lady who despises staring in the mirror and dislikes her own reflection. During a sleepover with several of her pals, she learns that they want to play a game called “Scary Mary,” which they have never played before. When she complains that she doesn’t know how to play, they tell her the following story: once upon a time, there was a girl named Mary who was infatuated with her appearance. Her farmhouse caught fire one day, and she perished as a result of the flames.

  1. Wow!
  2. Afterwards, turn on the lights and take a peek in the mirror at the exact same moment.
  3. Hannah discovers a little hairbrush with the letter M written on it a few days later.
  4. When a friend phones her, her mother informs her that she has been grounded.
  5. She is putting on her make-up and combing her hair with the M brush that she recently discovered.
  6. When Hannah’s mother discovers that something is wrong, she finds nothing in Hannah’s room.
  7. Part 2: While Hannah finds herself in Scary Mary’s world, she refuses to conform to the expectations of everyone else, who has surrendered their faces to Mary.
  8. In his search for Hannah, Hannah’s buddy Eric stumbles upon a Mary with her face on it and learns that it is not her.
  9. He discovers the real Hannah in a chest and then returns to the actual world by wading through a flood of Mary’s tears to get back to where he belongs.

Cast

  • The first section is titled Hannah is an out-of-the-ordinary young lady who despises staring in the mirror and does not enjoy it. They inform her that they want to play “Scary Mary” one night during a sleepover with several of her friends, which she agrees to participate in. The tale goes that once upon a time there was a girl named Mary who was preoccupied with her appearance, and when she declares she doesn’t know how to play, the other players give her the narrative: Her farmhouse caught fire one day, and she perished as a result of the flames she had escaped. She is currently waiting for someone to shout her name, so that she can “take their face” and transform into something lovely. Wow! If you want to call Scary Mary, you must do so in a dark room, with a candle in front of the mirror, while saying a poem. Afterwards, turn on the lights and take a peek in the mirror all at once. The assignment is completed by Hannah, but nothing appears to have happened yet. Hannah discovers a little hairbrush with the letter M written on it a few days after the initial discovery. Hannah then slips away to go shopping for cosmetics supplies later in the evenings. A friend phones her and she receives a message from her mother saying she has been grounded. Hannah, on the other hand, is alone in her bedroom. She is putting on her make-up and combing her hair with the M brush that she discovered earlier in the morning. Women in masks are lurking in her bathroom mirror, completely unaware of Hannah’s presence. When Hannah’s mother hears something, she goes into Hannah’s room and finds nothing there. Hannah is discovered to be in Scary Mary’s realm after she has left since the girls in masks smashed through the mirror and took her into it after she had left. Part 2: While Hannah finds herself in Scary Mary’s world, she refuses to conform to the expectations of everyone else, who has surrendered their faces to the witch. Mary uses the girls’ features to disguise herself as one of them in the hopes that a boy would come to save the girl and take Mary out of her world, but no one ever appears to help her. Upon arriving to locate Hannah, Hannah’s buddy Eric discovers Mary with her face and immediately recognizes her as being someone else entirely. This represents what had murdered Mary, as the farmhouse is set ablaze. He discovers the real Hannah in a chest and then returns to the actual world by wading through a flood of Mary’s tears to go back to where he came from. At the conclusion, Mary requests Eric’s assistance..

Music

– It is played at the end credits.

Trivia

  • Fear of the Dark episode “The Tale of Many Faces” serves as inspiration for Scary Mary, who is based on the urban legend Bloody Mary. Director Peter Deluise and actor Jean-Luc Bilodeau previously collaborated on the Disney Channel Original Movie 16 Wishes. Editor Lisa Robinsin received a Leo Award for her work on this episode.

Gallery

Tyler narrates the story of Scary Mary. Hanna examines herself in the mirror. Eric and Hanna successfully return to their realm. Teresa Watson, a production designer, created this concept sketch. Teresa Watson, a production designer, has created another another concept sketch.

Video(s)

Scary Mary, Part 1 (R.L. Stine’s Haunting Hour, Season 1, Episode 21) Scary Mary Part 2 (R.L. Stine’s Haunting Hour, Season 1, Episode 22)

Where did the legend of Bloody Mary come from?

A drink will not emerge if you stand in front of a mirror in a darkened room with a candle and chant “Bloody Mary, Bloody Mary” (despite what some people believe!). Instead, you will be disappointed. According to folklore, the ceremony, however, may result in the appearance of a hideous ghost on the scene. Are you bold enough to give it a shot on your own? Bloody Mary is a game that almost every female who has ever attended a slumber party has played, or at the very least heard about. Bloody Mary has been told for as long as anybody can remember, but historians began attempting to trace the story’s roots back to the 1970s, when they discovered that it originated in the United Kingdom.

  1. The participant walks into a darkened room with a candle in his or her hand.
  2. The participant may see Bloody Mary in the mirror, or she may reach out of the mirror and scratch his or her face.
  3. There are other variations on the story, including the mirror pouring blood, the individual’s hair becoming white, and the participant just leaving without a trace.
  4. Folklorist Alan Dundes proposes that the legend represents a kind of initiation process into femininity, in a way that is both distinctive and somewhat Freudian in nature.

Other interpretations, on the other hand, place the story’s roots in a more historical context. Some believe that Bloody Mary may have been one of the following ladies, all of whom may have had a compelling motive to return from beyond the grave to cause havoc among the living:

  • Mary Tudor (also known as Mary I of England), who executed many Protestants for heresy, earning her the nickname “Bloody Mary.”
  • Elizabeth Bathory, also known as the “Queen of Blood,” who was allegedly convicted of murdering hundreds of young girls so she could bathe in their blood
  • Mary Worth, a witch executed during the Salem witch trials
  • And Elizabeth Bathory, who was allegedly convicted of murdering hundreds of young girls so she could bathe in their blood.

Regardless matter where the story originated, Bloody Mary offered (and continues to deliver) many a night of eerie thrill for anybody who was brave enough to give it a go (and succeeded). With the addition of other typical superstitious features such as mirrors and magic rituals, Bloody Mary is guaranteed to continue to be a popular legend for many years.

Behind The Mirror: The True Story Of Bloody Mary

Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons When you’re standing in a dark bathroom with only a solitary candle for illumination, all you have to do is stare into the mirror and repeat her name three times: Bloody Mary. When this happens, a ghost is reported to emerge, sometimes cradling a dead infant and other times pledging to come after your child. While the mythology may have been made up, the lady behind the mirror and the narrative of Bloody Mary were as real as they could possibly be, and she was a royal figure at that.

The Person Behind The Real Bloody Mary Story

The myth of Bloody Mary has her roots in the reign of Queen Mary I, who was the first queen regnant of England. The mythical queen, now known as Bloody Mary, was born on February 18, 1516, in the Palace of Placentia in Greenwich, England, and became known as such after her death in 1516. Mary Tudor was the only child of King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon. At the age of 17, her father dissolved his marriage to her mother, dissatisfied by the absence of a male successor to the crown. This marked the beginning of Mary’s lifetime of humiliation over her own femininity and her own mother’s.

The king went on to marry Anne Boleyn, the maid of honor of his now ex-wife, who disappointed him by bearing him yet another daughter, Elizabeth, as a result of their marriage.

Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Anne Boleyn is a historical figure who lived during the reign of Henry VIII.

The Origins Of The Bloody Mary Legend

For the most of her adolescence, Mary had suffered from excruciating menstrual cramps and irregular menstrual cycles, which would be related to her subsequent physical and psychological stress later in life. Additionally, she was known to suffer from severe and regular bouts of melancholia, as well as depressed spells, which she would carry with her for the remainder of her relatively brief life. After overcoming all of the difficulties and hardships that were piled against her, Mary was crowned Queen of England in 1553 at the age of 37.

  1. It is at this point that the origins of the Bloody Mary mythology began to be established.
  2. Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Mary I of England, the historical figure who inspired the mythology of Bloody Mary.
  3. After demonstrating typical pregnancy symptoms such as breast enlargement and a developing belly for many weeks, the people was skeptical of the queen’s sudden good fortune, and it didn’t take long for whispers of a fake pregnancy to start circulating across the country.
  4. Until then, the people of England and Spain kept a close check on Mary and her whereabouts in the world.
  5. The typical procedure was for Mary to enter a private room, where she would remain for six weeks before her estimated due date of May 9, as was customary.
  6. False rumors, on the other hand, circulated very instantly throughout the kingdom, with some saying their Queen had delivered a boy, while others said she had died in childbirth or that her bloated belly was the result of a tumor rather than a pregnancy.
  7. She continued to wait, unable to explain or comprehend what was happening to her body, while others around her began to lose faith in her ability to survive.
  8. By August, Mary had finally emerged from the confines of her chamber, childless and completely alone for the first time in her life.
  9. The people of England were split during the time of Mary’s pregnancy, with Protestants and Catholics holding opposing views.

The Bloody Mary Legend Continues On

Commons image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Mary Tudor, the inspiration for the legend of Bloody Mary. Bloody Mary, Queen of England, is still remembered as one of the most notable examples of supposedpseudocyesis, sometimes known as “phantom pregnancy,” in the history of the world. Pseudocyesis is a rare and perplexing syndrome that happens when a person who is desperate to become pregnant actually “tricks” their own body into believing that she is pregnant, resulting in the development of medical symptoms and even the cessation of the menstrual cycle.

  1. This is supported by accounts of Mary’s poor appetite and a lifelong history of monthly irregularity, as well as other evidence.
  2. Despite the fact that she had the telltale indications of pregnancy, she was subsequently found to have reached menopause and, as a result, had yet another unsuccessful pregnancy.
  3. Bloody Mary’s name may still be heard today, repeated by youngsters throughout the world in front of dark bathroom mirrors, all expecting to get a horrific sight of the ghost, with no knowledge of the true tale of Bloody Mary’s appearance.
  4. Continue reading about another infamous royal, Elizabeth Bathory, the alleged Blood Countess, in the following section.
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The Bloody Mary Legend – The True Story of the Bloody Mary Ghost

The Bloody Mary legend is an ancient, old folklore that you probably first heard about in primary school and that your younger siblings and family members have most likely also heard about in their early years. The Bloody Mary narrative is based on numerous urban legends and folklore, and many think it is based on the actual account of the witch Mary Worth. At first glance, the story may appear harmless, but as you hear how horrific and terrible the tale is, you will be horrified. It has everything — witches, kidnappings, a witch being burned at the stake, and magical elements.

The Legend

The Bloody Mary legend is an ancient, old folklore that you probably first heard about in primary school and that your younger siblings and family members have most likely also heard about in their younger lives. It is believed that the Bloody Mary narrative was based on a genuine account of the witch Mary Worth. The Bloody Mary story may appear harmless at first, but after you understand how horrific and terrible the tale is, the story becomes much more frightening. Magic, witches, kidnappings, burning at the stake and other supernatural elements are all present.

Take a journey with us through the eerie world of Mary Worth and discover why and where the tale originated – as well as why you might still be hesitant to speak “Bloody Mary” three times in front of a mirror after all this time!

Mary Worth

Is the Bloody Mary a legitimate drink? Based on the narrative of the witch Mary Worth, some individuals believe this to be the case. It’s fair to say that the history of the Bloody Mary is extensive and, shall we say, pretty bloody (ba-dum-tsh). Many people already suspected Mary of being a witch, based on the fact that she lived in the forest in an incredibly tiny cottage and was well-known in the community for selling tinctures and natural cures. Those who used her treatments were often ostracized by the exceedingly pious because they were practicing “wicca.” She was feared by the locals and they were afraid she would curse them or their animals if they got too close to her.

The residents in the hamlet searched everywhere they could think of for them, but they couldn’t come up with a single idea as to where she might possibly be.

Her normally aged and decrepit appearance had radically transformed, and she was beginning to appear more feminine and youthful.

The people were wary, but there was nothing they could do to stop the invasion.

The Miller’s Daughter

The miller’s daughter is the next character in the Bloody Mary narrative. She was attracted by a mystery noise that only she could hear one night, when her mother was sitting up in bed treating a severe toothache with a herbal medicine that she had purchased from Mary. The miller’s wife was terrified, and she cried out for her husband to come and rescue her and accompany her daughter to the mill. Their kid was running away and they were yelling at her to return, but it seemed as though she was being guided by an unseen and unseeing presence.

  1. When they came closer, they discovered that Mary Worth was standing in a clearing near to a large oak tree, which they had missed the first time.
  2. Although it’s difficult to give a definitive response to the question “What is Bloody Mary?” because witches don’t normally have wands or shine in an unnatural light, it’s safe to say that the majority of people believe she is a witch or some other form of supernatural person.
  3. When Mary Worth realized that everyone in the hamlet knew who she was, she broke the spell and fled to the forest.
  4. She wasn’t able to outrun the farmer, unfortunately.
  5. He fired a shot that struck Mary in the hip, and she fell to the ground.
  6. In the midst of her burning, she cast a curse upon the villagers, telling them that if they ever ventured to speak her name in a mirror, she would come back for them – her soul would return to wherever they had summoned her from to wreak her vengeance upon them.

It seems that she had been injecting herself with the blood of their children in order to appear younger!

The Bloody Mary Curse

The tale of Bloody Mary, on the other hand, does not end there. The most widely accepted version of the tale holds that if you sing her name three times into a mirror, you will call the Bloody Mary ghost, who will, unhappily for you, take your soul for her own and rip yours to shreds in the process. The legend is based on a true story. She will abandon your soul to the flames, just as she was abandoned to the flames by the villagers, and to top it all off, you will be condemned to an eternity locked in a mirror by the townspeople.

The Bloody Mary Experience

Kimberly Trice contributed to this article. On Halloween night, my friends and I were having a sleepover at my place. In the end, my friends and I decided to make it a horror movie night complete with spooky stories and bad food. When the clock struck twelve o’clock, we didn’t know what to do and didn’t want to fall asleep quite yet. Hannah came up with a novel concept. “I think we should give the Bloody Mary thing a go,” Hannah proposed. Danielle, who was seated cross-legged on my bed, inquired as to why we would want to do such a thing.

  1. It’ll be a lot of fun!
  2. Then her spirit arrives, appearing just as she did when she died: horrifying and gory, with scars covering her whole face!” “She comes across as really stunning.
  3. Danielle inquired, her voice full of skepticism.
  4. As I was putting my clothing away, I said something.
  5. It has the potential to be entertaining.” Ooh, it seems like it might be enjoyable!
  6. “What a fantastic way to spend eternity,” Danielle said with a snort.
  7. “The Bloody Mary isn’t genuine,” I said, hoping to persuade Danielle to join me.

“When my friend Katie tried it once, she saw a ghost in the mirror,” she says.

“There’s just one way to find out for sure,” Hannah explained.

Let’s do it!” “Let’s give it a shot.” As soon as I returned to the supply closet, I quickly gathered the rest of us, including Danielle, and raced to the downstairs bathroom, which had no windows and would be ideal because we wanted complete darkness.

After washing my hands in front of the bathroom mirror, I recounted everyone the story of Bloody Mary, primarily to refresh their memory.

The witch utilized her dark abilities to resurrect herself as a child by murdering a group of young girls in her town.

While the five of us waited, we stared at our reflections in the glass, without blinking a single time, with our hearts racing.

After then, Danielle stated: “Nothing is happening.

The door wouldn’t open for any reason.

I dashed to the front door, shoving Danielle aside, and unlocking the door.

Danielle yelled and pointed at herself in the mirror at the same time.

Her features were contorted with hate, and flames appeared to flare all around her as she spoke.

Perhaps we were seeing things, or perhaps our eyes were playing tricks on us.

A series of long scratches developed on Danielle’s cheeks and she staggered backwards, gasping for air, her hands rising up to shield her face from the pain.

My forehead collided with the wall.

The next morning, I awoke in the middle of the night and fumbled furiously to find a light switch.

It was Danielle who was blacked out at the bathroom sink with nasty scratches all over her arms, legs, and face when I turned it on.

When I took her out of the bag, I gasped when I realized she was also covered with scratches.

When I realized that there were just four of us crouching on the bathroom floor, my eyes widened in surprise and confusion.

When I looked down, the words “I AM REAL” were etched into the inside of my arm.

It was up and running in seconds.

Once we cleaned up the blood on Hannah, Danielle, and my arm, we all huddled together in my room for the rest of the night, unable to sleep because we were too terrified. Since that night, my friends and I have had several such sleepovers, but we have never attempted to contact Bloody Mary again.

The Terrifying True Story Behind ‘Bloody Mary’

As humans, there’s one thing that unites us all: we’re terrified shitless when we see ourselves shouting Bloody Mary into a mirror for the first time. One of the most well-known urban legends of all time has emerged as a result of this. There have been several sleepovers where I have chanted her name into a mirror. However, only a small number of individuals are aware of the origins of the narrative.

Who IS Bloody Mary, Anyway?

When you look in the mirror, there are a few distinct possibilities for who you may meet. Queen Mary I of England is the first contestant. Was Queen Mary I the first person to drink a Bloody Mary?| source: Flickr Once you’ve earned a moniker, it’s difficult to get rid of it. The only person who understands this more than Queen Mary I, or as history like to remember her, Bloody Mary, is herself. The choice of a name did not happen by accident. As part of her efforts to convert England to Catholicism, she was responsible for the burning at the stake of approximately 300 Protestants.

  1. She had a frightfully convincingfalse pregnancy that everyone believed.
  2. In the weeks leading up to her planned delivery, she was bedridden, and physicians began preparing for the birth she was expecting.
  3. It turned out that she had never been pregnant in the first place.
  4. This time, she was more subdued in her delivery of the happy news.
  5. Even worse, Queen Mary I passed away in the midst of it all, adding to the tragedy.
  6. Those who believe she is Bloody Mary claim she is on the lookout for her abducted children and is prepared to steal one if necessary.

Contestant № 2: Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary Queen of Scots, in contrast to the other ladies on this list, was not thought to have caused much carnage; rather, it was thought to have happened *around* her. During her pregnancy, her ill-advised marriage to her cousin the Earl of Darnley went horribly wrong, as evidenced by his stabbing a man 56 times in front of her. Darnley died in a strange manner following the heinous crime. Despite the fact that there was never any proof, fingers were pointed in the direction of Mary, who happened to marry one of the prime suspects in Darnley’s murder.

Elizabeth was concerned that there might be an insurrection against her and that Mary Queen of Scots would seize control of the crown, so she imprisoned her.

Mary was sentenced to death by beheading as a result of numerous plots whispered in Elizabeth’s ear and a few ingenious escape schemes devised by her sister, Elizabeth.

A few moments after she had been effectively decapitated, the executioner attempted to lift her head and cry, “Long Live the Queen.” The only thing he’d done was steal her red wig, and Queen Mary of Scots’ genuine hair and head were left strewn across the ground.

This horrible demise, combined with the murder that appeared to surround her whole life, may have contributed to Queen Mary of Scots’s status as a strong candidate for the Bloody Mary award.

Contestant № 3: Elizabeth Bathory

Okay. Although her given name is not Mary, I would not rule outElizabeth Bathory from consideration. Actually, I wouldn’t do anything that would be considered disrespectful to the memory of Elizabeth Bathory. Elizabeth Bathory, often known as the Blood Countess, was a Hungarian princess who rose to power in the 1500s and went on to become the most prolific female serial murderer in history. She is often believed to have been the inspiration for Dracula. She has an impressive bloody resume, and believe me when I say that she has earned it.

source: Getty Images Elizabeth Bathory had an insatiable appetite for murder, and she was able to get away with it because of her enormous financial resources (even the king owed her money).

Canning, strangling, stabbings (with needles), and lacerations from Elizabeth’s own teeth were all reported, as well as beatings and stranglings by Elizabeth.

It should come as no surprise that Elizabeth Bathory’s craving for youthful blood would endure even after her death, making her a powerful competitor on the same level as the others.

I Believe In Bloody Mary

Attempting to link historical personalities to urban tales may appear to be a foolish move. Legends, on the other hand, are frequently based on some element of fact. Whatever your point of view, one thing is certain: the world is changing. These aren’t the kinds of women you want to see in your bathroom mirror at 2 a.m. on a Saturday.

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