St. Louis Officers Chant ‘whose Streets, Our Streets’ While Arresting Protesters

St. Louis officers chant ‘whose streets, our streets’ while arresting protesters

Following a third night of violence and turmoil in St. Louis, around 100 protestors marched in silence through the city’s downtown streets during morning rush hour on Monday. By the time they reached City Hall, the stillness had been broken by cries for justice. Protests have erupted around the city since former police officer Jason Stockley was cleared of charges of killing a black motorist during a police pursuit in 2011. Stockley was acquitted on Friday, sparking widespread outrage. Stockley is a light-skinned Caucasian man.

Officials said that some demonstrators destroyed windows and overturned garbage cans in a concentrated area downtown, while others hurled chemicals and rocks at police, according to officials.

Monday, Mayor Lyda Krewson declared that “after the rally, organizers announced that the daytime protest had come to an end.” ‘However, there was a number of protesters who remained behind, seemingly determined to damage windows and destroy property.’ She refuses to answer any questions from the press.

Adding to the heightened tensions, a St.

  1. In a subsequent tweet, photojournalist David Carson stated that he had contacted with the commander on the scene, who stated that while he had not heard the chant, it was wrong and that he would “deal with it.” The St.
  2. Sunday that “several warnings to disperse” had been issued near the junction of Washington Avenue and North Tucker Boulevard.
  3. However, other demonstrators said that police had surrounded them and that they had no way out.
  4. Louis Post-Dispatch, was caught up in the commotion and tweeted, “Less than 100 of us, including media, are boxed in at wa and Tucker on all four sides.” A short time later, Faulk was one of those that were detained.

During a press conference held overnight Sunday, Interim Police Chief Lawrence O’Toole frequently referred to those detained as “criminals.” According to him, “these offenders who have been apprehended should be held responsible and prosecuted to the greatest extent of the law.” “We have the upper hand.

  • In his speech, he added, “I’m glad to inform you that the city of St.
  • “Those crooks are in jail as of right now.” According to local media, some 1,000 people had assembled outside a downtown police station before dusk and marched peacefully through the city before the sun fell on the day.
  • After some time had passed, the demonstrators were met by police officers equipped in riot gear.
  • In an earlier article published on Sunday, news sources stated that the Department of Justice had decided not to pursue a federal civil rights investigation against former officer Stockley.
  • Stockley, 36, was arrested in May 2016 and charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of 24-year-old Anthony Lamar Smith, who was killed during a police pursuit.
  • Stockley and his partner chased Smith in their car.
  • It was also speculated that Stockley may have placed the firearm inside the car, as it had DNA from both Stockley and the officer, but not Smith’s.

Louis Circuit Court stated in a 30-page order published Friday that he had struggled over his decision. As the trier of fact, he stated that “this Court is just not firmly convinced of the defendant’s guilt.” Protests erupted on the streets of St. Louis nearly immediately after the shooting.

St. Louis officers chant “whose streets, our streets” while arresting protesters

Around 100 protestors marched silently along downtown streets during morning rush hour on Monday, following a third night of violence and disturbance in St. Louis. At City Hall, the stillness was broken by the cries of the people demanding justice. Since Friday, when former police officer Jason Stockley was acquitted of charges related to the death of a black man during a police chase in 2011, the city has been engulfed in demonstrations. Mr. Stockley is of European descent. Police detained more than 80 individuals over the course of the night on Sunday after a peaceful rally became violent as the sun set.

  1. In a press conference held about 1 a.m.
  2. Some demonstrators felt that the cops were being overly violent and demanded that they be released.
  3. Louis photojournalist reported hearing police yell “whose streets, our streets” after making several arrests, which he and other witnesses heard for themselves.
  4. Louis Metropolitan Police Department’s Twitter account, which went live about 11:20 p,m, Sunday.
  5. However, other demonstrators said that they had been surrounded by police and that they had no way to get out from the situation.
  6. Louis Post-Dispatch writer Mike Faulk on Twitter after becoming caught up in the chaos.
  7. A photograph of him at the time of his arrest showed him with what seemed to be a media badge around his neck.

As he stated, “I’m glad to inform you that the city of St.

They’ll be in jail tonight,” says the sheriff.

When a small number of people broke away and began shattering the windows of multiple establishments about 8 p.m., the violence looked to flare up.

When the mass arrests took place just before midnight, police stated they gave protestors one hour’s warning.

However, despite the fact that the decision was reached a year ago, the government did not make it public until after the criminal case was concluded on Friday.

Stockley and his partner had attempted to arrest Smith for a suspected narcotics deal at a Church’s Chicken restaurant but had been unsuccessful.

The prosecution claims that during the chase, Stockley was heard screaming, “Going to murder this motherf—er don’t you know it,” before ordering his companion to crash into Smith’s slowing car, which was captured on film.

Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson of the St.

Louis Circuit Court said he struggled over his decision before issuing a 30-page order on Friday. “This Court, in its capacity as trier of fact, is simply not convinced of the defendant’s guilt,” he explained. ” Protests broke out on the streets of St. Louis almost immediately.

St. Louis Police’s Chants of ‘Whose Streets? Our Streets!’ Once Again Reveal the Warped Mindset Infecting Too Many Departments

On full, alarming display last week in St. Louis was the adversarial “we against them” mindset that plagues many police agencies when it comes to their encounters with people of color. In reaction to protests by members of the community following the acquittal of police officer Jason Stockley in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith, a group of St. Louis police officers screamed, “Whose streets? “These are our streets!” And that’s exactly what happened in one of the nation’s most racially segregated cities, where a zip code separation of only a few miles can mean an 18-year difference in life expectancy.

  • In order to accomplish this, they appropriated a cry that originated among the very communities of color who have long been disadvantaged and mistreated by our country’s criminal justice, economic, and political institutions.
  • Please make no mistake about it: the police were delivering a clear and frightening message to communities of color in St.
  • What matters to us is whether or not members of law enforcement agencies have been implicated in past and present abuses to communities of color.
  • And this message is being given by not just any police department, but by the most lethal police force in the history of the United States of America.
  • Louis Metropolitan Police Agency that murders its citizens at a greater rate than any other police department in the country’s top 100 most populous cities, according to a new study.
  • Louis police department blew an opportunity to create connections with disadvantaged neighborhoods and to consider themselves as extensions of those communities when they chanted a claim of ownership over the city’s streets.
  • Perhaps even more discouraging is the fact that, in a certain sense, the cops are correct: In many cities, the streets are theirs to use as they like.
  • Please make no mistake about it: the police were delivering a clear and frightening message to communities of color in St.

Furthermore, rather than demanding progressive reform of harmful police practices, Jeff Sessions’ Department of Justice has exacerbated the national crisis over police-community relations by pulling back on federal oversight of police departments engaged in unconstitutional conduct, including repurposing the Department’s Community Oriented Policing Services program to facilitate more aggressive policing rather than prioritizing community relations, among other things.

  • President Trump, for his part, has deregulated the supply of military weaponry to local police agencies, raising the likelihood that police departments around the country would raise tensions between themselves and the general public, as they did in Ferguson three years ago.
  • However, three years after the shooting of Michael Brown and more than one thousand other Black persons, nothing has changed in terms of seriousness.
  • Louis police officers to assert ownership over public streets from the very community whose blood has been poured on those streets.
  • Even after all we’ve been through in this nation, the police are still corralling activists into a tiny area like livestock and then rounding them up and detaining them all at once without any evidence of their involvement.
  • Unfortunately, we have not yet witnessed the level of leadership required to bring about criminal justice changes that are critical to the protection of our communities and their citizens.
  • Louis denounce the provoking, disgusting chanting of the city’s police force in the harshest words possible and make it plain that the police are there to serve the people, not themselves.
  • However, the situation is even worse than that.
  • And it will need far more radical and significant answers than a few mild reprimands to completely remove it.
  • Lawyers and judges must also work together to modify a present legal norm that is unusually liberal when it comes to when the police can use lethal force, resulting in “lawful but horrifying” shootings that occur.

The police do not have the right to patrol the streets. They are considered members of the community. The moment has come for police reform to be implemented. We can’t afford to lose any more time in this situation.

How the iconic ‘Whose streets? Our streets!’ chant has been co-opted

  • This week in St. Louis, the confrontational “we against them” mindset that plagues many police agencies when it comes to their encounters with people of color was on full, terrifying display. As a response to demonstrations by members of the community after the acquittal of police officer Jason Stockley in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith, a group of St. Louis police officers yelled, “Whose streets? Whose streets?” We’re talking about our roads!” To be clear, in one of the nation’s most racially segregated cities, where zip codes separated by only a few miles can mean an 18-year difference in life expectancy, a police department entrusted with serving the community asserted aggressive ownership over public streets while mocking protestors expressing the community’s pain and frustration, according to reports. By co-opting a cry that originated from communities of color that have long been disenfranchised and oppressed by this country’s criminal, economic, and political institutions. They were successful. They did so less than a ten-minute drive from the site of Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, which was a further insult to injury. Please make no mistake about it: the police were delivering a clear and frightening message to communities of color in St. Louis: we do not care about your suffering or displeasure. What matters to us is whether or not members of law enforcement agencies have been implicated in past and present abuses to members of minority groups. No, we are not interested in your indignation at a white police officer who declared he was “going to murder this motherfucker” before fatally shooting Anthony Smith five times and placing a pistol in Smith’s car. And this message is being given by not just any police department, but by the most lethal police force in the history of the United States of America! Residents of St. Louis are killed at a greater rate than those of any other police department in the country’s top 100 most populous cities, according to data from the FBI. Once again, the St. Louis police department blew an opportunity to create connections with disadvantaged neighborhoods and to consider themselves as extensions of those communities when they chanted a claim of ownership over the city’s roads. Instead, they dug an even deeper trench between themselves and the people who had gathered to express their collective frustration, anger, and sadness — people of color, peace activists, and parishioners alike — and dug a trench even deeper between themselves and the people who had gathered to express their collective frustration, anger, and sadness Perhaps even more discouraging is the fact that the cops are correct in a certain sense: A large number of cities consider the roadways to be their private property. Police saturate Black and brown neighborhoods with aggressive patrols
  • They carry high-powered weapons and equip themselves with wide-ranging surveillance technologies
  • They stop, search, and arrest Black people at wildly disproportionate rates
  • They treat the Constitution not as a legal mandate but, at best, as a series of suggestions that can be ignored when it is inconvenient
  • And they frequently act with impunity, unchecked by any meaningful external or even internal accountability…. Please make no mistake about it: the police were delivering a clear and frightening message to communities of color in St. Louis: we do not care about your suffering or displeasure. Moreover, rather than requiring progressive reform of harmful police practices, Jeff Sessions’ Department of Justice has exacerbated the national crisis over police-community relations by scaling back federal oversight of police departments engaged in unconstitutional conduct, including repurposing the Department’s Community Oriented Policing Services program to facilitate more aggressive policing rather than prioritizing community relations. President Trump, on the other hand, has deregulated the flow of military equipment to local police departments, increasing the likelihood that police departments across the country will escalate tensions between themselves and the public, as they did in Ferguson three years ago, as a result of his actions. By now, we should have reached a more favorable situation. But, three years after the shooting death of Michael Brown and the deaths of over one thousand other Black individuals, nothing has changed in terms of seriousness or significance. St. Louis police officers believe it is fair to proclaim ownership over public streets from the very community whose blood has been spilt on those streets, which is a practice that has been adopted across the country. If the city’s police officers continue to conceal their identity tags in order to avoid being held accountable for expected illegal, criminal, and perhaps violent actions, little has changed. The police continue to herd demonstrations into a small area like livestock and then arrest individuals en masse without any evidence of wrongdoing. This is despite all we’ve been through as a country. Despite this, the police chief, the governor, and the state attorney general all remain silent or ambiguous in their response to these heinous crimes against humanity. Unfortunately, we have not yet witnessed the level of leadership required to bring about criminal justice changes that are critical to the protection of our towns and inhabitants. It was demanded by the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri that the mayor of St. Louis denounce the inciting and disgusting chanting of the city’s police force in the harshest terms possible and to make it plain that the police are there to serve the people and not themselves. After hearing the yelling, Mayor Krewson replied by labeling it unprofessional. However, the situation is far worse. In this society, too many police agencies have a corrosive and antagonizing culture, and this is only one manifestation of that toxicity. As a result, it will need far more dramatic and comprehensive remedies to remove it than simply issuing a few reprimands. It is imperative that police departments adopt de-escalation as their guiding principle
  • Seek reconciliation with communities that they have harmed, a “process that recognizes the very real American history of abusive law enforcement practices toward minority communities, beginning with slavery
  • ” support newer, stronger civilian complaint review boardsthat have meaningful investigative and disciplinary authority
  • And end the selective and overenforcement of low-level offenses in communities of color, much of which is racially motivated. Lawyers and judges must also work together to modify a present legal norm that is extremely permissive when it comes to when the police can use lethal force, resulting in “lawful but horrifying” police shootings. The use of force rules of police agencies must be more limiting until they may climb beyond the constitutional floor, which is not now the case. The police do not have the right to patrol the city streets at all hours. They are considered to be members of the group. Police reform has been overdue for a very long time.. We can’t afford to lose any more time in this situation!
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This week in St. Louis, the adversarial “we against them” ethos that pervades many police agencies’ relations with people of color was on full, terrifying display. In reaction to protests by community residents following the acquittal of police officer Jason Stockley in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith, a number of St. Louis police officers provocatively screamed, “Whose streets? “Our streets!” they exclaim. That’s right: in one of the nation’s most racially segregated cities, where zip codes separated by only a few miles can mean an 18-year difference in life expectancy, a police department entrusted with serving the community asserted aggressive ownership over public streets while mocking protestors expressing the community’s pain and frustration.

  1. As if that weren’t enough, they did it less than 10 minutes from the site of Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson.
  2. Louis: We do not care about your suffering and fury.
  3. We are unconcerned about your fury at a white police officer who declared he was “going to kill this motherfucker” before shooting Anthony Smith five times and apparently placing a pistol in Smith’s car.
  4. When it comes to killing its citizens, the St.
  5. Once again, the St.

Instead, they dug an even deeper trench between themselves and the people who had gathered to express their collective frustration, anger, and sadness — people of color, peace activists, and parishioners alike — by digging an even deeper trench between themselves and those who had gathered to express their collective frustration, anger, and sadness.

Police saturate Black and brown neighborhoods with aggressive patrols; they carry high-powered weapons and equip themselves with wide-ranging surveillance technologies; they stop, search, and arrest Black people at wildly disproportionate rates; they treat the Constitution not as a legal mandate but, at best, as a series of suggestions that can be ignored when it is inconvenient; and they frequently act with impunity, unchecked by any meaningful external or even internal accountability.

Make no mistake, the police were delivering a clear and frightening message to communities of color in St.

Furthermore, rather than demanding progressive reform of harmful police practices, Jeff Sessions’ Department of Justice has exacerbated the national crisis over police-community relations by pulling back on federal oversight of police departments engaged in unconstitutional conduct, including repurposing the Department’s Community Oriented Policing Services program to facilitate more aggressive policing rather than prioritizing community relations.

  1. President Trump, for his part, has deregulated the supply of military weapons to local police agencies, raising the likelihood that police departments around the country would exacerbate tensions between themselves and the public, as they did in Ferguson three years ago.
  2. But, three years after the shooting of Michael Brown and more than one thousand other Black individuals, nothing has changed in terms of gravity.
  3. Louis police officers to assert ownership over public streets from the very community whose blood has been spilled on those streets.
  4. Even after all we’ve been through in this nation, the police are still corralling activists into a tiny area like livestock and then rounding them up and detaining them all at once without any evidence of their crimes.
  5. Unfortunately, we have not yet witnessed the level of leadership required to bring about criminal justice changes that are critical to defending our communities and their citizens.
  6. Louis denounce the provoking, disgusting chanting of the city’s police force in the harshest words possible and make it plain that the police are here to serve the people, not themselves.
  7. However, the situation is far worse than that.
  8. And it will need far more radical and fundamental remedies to abolish it than a few mild reprimands.
  9. Furthermore, attorneys and judges must alter a present legal norm that is extraordinarily liberal when it comes to when the police can use lethal force, resulting in “lawful but awful”shootings that are carried out by police officers.

The streets are not the property of the police. They are a part of the community. Police reform has been overdue for a long time. We can’t afford to lose any more time.

Police chant “whose streets, our streets” after arresting St Louis protesters

After making arrests during the third straight night of protests in St Louis, Missouri, police were allegedly heard yelling “whose streets, our streets” after making the arrests. Following the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley in the fatal shooting of black man Anthony Lamar Smith, a wave of demonstrations erupted. During the fights on Sunday night, David Carson, a writer for the St Louis Post-Dispatch, reported that he overheard police shouting the phrase, according to Carson.

  1. “I talked with the commander at the scene, and he stated that he did not hear the chant, but that the chant was not appropriate, and that he would deal with it,” Mr Carson wrote on Twitter.
  2. A large crowd has assembled every day since the “not guilty” decision was revealed in Mr Stockley’s trial, amounting to several hundred people.
  3. A number of buses transporting police officers in full riot gear and shields arrived late Sunday night, and some officers were injured, though none were considered life-threatening, according to St Louis Police Department comments.
  4. Hundreds of demonstrators were kettled by police in the early hours of Sunday morning before a large number of people present were arrested in a mass arrest.
  5. Faulk had tweeted soon before his arrest: “We are surrounded on all four sides.” “There are those who are flipping out.” After video evidence showed an elderly woman being shoved to the ground during a confrontation with officers, the St.
  6. As seen in the video, police officers with plastic shields advance on the lady, eventually shoving her to the ground.
  7. According to St Louis Police, an elderly woman who was pushed down by cops was violating commands, and she has been charged with “interfering” with an officer’s duties.
  8. In an attempt to excuse the crime, state prosecutors said that Mr Stockley put a handgun in Mr Smith’s car after Mr Smith’s murder, pointing out that Mr Stockley’s DNA was found on the weapon, but Mr Smith’s DNA was not.

The state had failed to establish, according to Judge Timothy Wilson, that Mr Stockley had not acted in self-defense, according to his judgement. It is anticipated that protests would continue into a fourth day on Monday.

The problem with St. Louis police chanting “Whose streets? Our streets!”

More than 80 persons were detained by police in St. Louis, Missouri. After a court acquitted a white former police officer accused in the 2011 murder of a black man, protesters took to the streets on Sunday (Sept. 17), marking the third day of demonstrations. At least one group of cops was captured on tape yelling “Whose streets? ” when they responded to protestors who broke windows and flipped garbage cans during the demonstration. “These are our streets!” It was strange to hear something like that coming from police officers.

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Because of the historical context, the fact that cops would appropriate that precise terminology offends many who have a historical perspective as the United States struggles with the newest incidence of unrest following a police shooting of a black man.

A rallying call of the oppressed

“Whose streets are these?” goes the protest chant. According to Tamar Carroll, a professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology, the phrase “Our streets!” has been used often over the previous several decades to deliver a message about the competition for space throughout the years. Anti-war demonstrators have used it in the immigration debate, during times of heightened racial tension (such as in New York in 1990 and Oakland and Ferguson, Missouri in 2014), and in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when AIDS activists and LGBTQ people responded to violence against their community.

Early this year, Carroll co-curated a show at The Bronx Documentary Center, which was titled after the cry and investigated protests for social change throughout history and into the modern day and was dedicated to the memory of Martin Luther King Jr.

An analysis conducted earlier this year by The New York Times(paywall) revealed that, with the exception of a few cases, cops have escaped conviction in high-profile incidents with the exception of a few cases.

Louis adopt the chant, it sends a terrifying message to protestors and the larger community that the officers serve, according to Carroll: “It’s a way for marchers to say: ‘You have to reckon with us…by virtue of our numbers, you must pay attention.” Using a chant that has been extensively adopted by numerous social-justice movements, particularly Black Lives Matter, is terrible, and it has the potential to be incendiary,” says the author.

To be sure, several St.

The damage of appropriation

“Whose streets?,” protesters chanted. According to Tamar Carroll, professor of history at the Rochester Institute of Technology, the phrase “Our streets!” has been used often over the previous few decades to communicate a message about the fight for space. Anti-war demonstrators have used it in the immigration debate, during times of heightened racial tension (such as in New York in 1990 and Oakland and Ferguson, Missouri in 2014), and in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when AIDS activists and LGBTQ people responded to violence directed at their community.

At The Bronx Documentary Center earlier this year, Carroll co-curated an exhibit titled “Stand Up for Social Justice” that studied rallies for social change across history and into the present day.

According to a New York Times(paywall) study published earlier this year, cops have escaped conviction in high-profile cases with the exception of a few instances.

Louis adopt the chant, it sends a terrifying message to protestors and the larger community that the officers serve, according to Carroll: “It’s a way for marchers to say: ‘You have to reckon with us…by virtue of our numbers, you must pay attention.’ “I believe it is terrible, and possibly incendiary, for the police to take a cry that has been extensively adopted by many social-justice movements, including Black Lives Matter,” I believe.

To be sure, several cops in St. Louis, including one who talked with a photojournalist, expressed their displeasure with the phrase’s use.

St. Louis police crossed the line with ‘Whose streets? Our streets’ chant

When St. Louis police officers in riot gear scream “Whose streets? Our streets,” they are threatening and excluding people. As well as celebrating the acquittal of Jason Stockley, the white former officer who shot and killed a black driver, Anthony Lamar Smith, who was 24 years old at the time of the shooting. TNS On behalf of immigrants or in opposition to police brutality, demonstrators cry, “Whose streets? Our streets,” which implies that our cities, and, in an even broader sense, the public space of the square, are collectively ours to use and enjoy.

  • Louis police officers in riot gear scream the same phrase, it is intended to intimidate and exclude.
  • Police officers, rather than the people they serve, have the idea that they control the streets and the criminal justice system as a whole, which is why protestors are out protesting in the first place.
  • Considering that they live just a few miles away from Ferguson, where a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown three years ago, their reaction is particularly disheartening.
  • instead of dispersing peaceful demonstrators, St.
  • After that, some cops appeared to feel the need to reinforce their point by repeating the insult, “Whose streets?
  • “This is our city, and we’re going to make sure it’s protected.” The police, on the other hand, do not own the night or St.
  • He used some of the same words that Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz used in the wake of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings: “It’s time to get back to work.” “It’s all right, Boston,” he remarked after the team’s first game following the tragedy.

It has the word ‘Boston’ on it.

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Nobody is going to be able to dictate our freedom.

However, in St.

The court ruled that the dashcam footage of the cop promising to “kill this mother-er” was too unclear to be used as evidence in any case.

As a result of the fact that Smith’s DNA was not found on it, However, nonviolent protestors sang, “We will win together,” as they marched through the streets on Monday.

And, certainly, it is the only way we will ever be able to. The original version of this story was published on September 19, 2017 at 4:33 p.m.

St. Louis mayor decries officers’ chant of “Whose streets? Our streets!” during protests

ST LOUIS -St. Louis is a city in the United States of America. It was not appropriate, according to Mayor Lyda Krewson, for cops to yell “Whose streets are they? Our streets, indeed! “on Sunday, after clearing away demonstrators and observers from the city’s central business district. During a press conference held on Tuesday, the mayor denounced the shout. When an organized demonstration came to an end and destruction erupted, officers in riot gear were heard yelling after making arrests and after making arrests.

  • A St. Louis police vehicle reverses in the direction of demonstrators. It’s recorded on video

As a demonstrator approaches, a St. Louis police cruiser reverses direction. a video recording of it is available;

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St. Louis police probe whether officers chanted ‘Whose streets? Our streets’

ST. LOUIS (Reuters) – The city of St. Louis has been hit by a tornado. In response to the acquittal of a white former police officer who shot and killed a black man in 2011, the St. Louis Police Department is examining if some of its officers screamed “Whose streets? Our streets” during protests. Even though several hundred protestors marched through the streets of St. Louis once more on Monday evening, the demonstrations remained calm as intermittent rain appeared to keep some demonstrators at home.

  • David Carson, a photojournalist for the St.
  • Our streets,” appropriating a phrase that had been used by the demonstrators themselves.
  • It depicts a group of policemen.
  • A court ruled on Friday that police officer Jason Stockley, 36, was not convicted of first-degree murder in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith, 24, in 2011.
  • The skirmishes brought up memories of riots that erupted in Ferguson, Missouri, after a white police officer fatally shot a black teenager in 2014.
  • Our officers are held to the highest levels of professionalism, and any officer who fails to achieve those standards will be held responsible.
  • Louis police civilian oversight board, which is also conducting an investigation, would only serve to exacerbate tensions.
  • There is “no need 2 chant,” according to the Ethical Society of Police, a group of black St.
  • While the majority of protests were peaceful, some became violent at night, with individuals taking to the streets armed with firearms, bats, and hammers, among other weapons.
  • It stated that it delayed publicizing the decision in order to avoid interfering with the trial.

Chris Kenning contributed reporting and writing from Chicago; Dan Whitcomb contributed additional reporting from Los Angeles; and Ben Klayman, Cynthia Osterman, and Michael Perryfor edited the piece. -phone -onlyfor-tablet-portrait-upfor-tablet-landscape-upfor-desktop-upfor-wide-desktop-up

Police officers in St Louis chant after breaking up protests

Saint Louis (Reuters) – The city of Saint Louis is preparing to host the World Cup this weekend. While protesting the acquittal of a white former police officer who shot and killed a black man in 2011, the St. Louis Police Department is looking into whether some of its officers screamed “Whose streets? Our streets.” On Monday evening, several hundred people marched through the streets of St. Louis, but the demonstrations remained calm as intermittent rain appeared to keep some protestors at home.

  1. Several others, including a photojournalist for the St.
  2. Our streets,” appropriating a phrase that had been used by the protestors.
  3. A police commander on the scene told Carson that any such chanting would be inappropriate and that he would take care of the situation.
  4. The judgment sparked a wave of demonstrations around the country.
  5. Reuters received an email from police spokeswoman Schron Jackson, who stated that the department was aware of the video spreading on social media and was evaluating it.
  6. The executive director of the St.
  7. Her response was emphatic: “Certainly, we do not want it to happen.” There is “no need 2 chant,” according to the Ethical Society of Police, a group of black St.
  8. While the majority of protests were peaceful, others became violent at night, with individuals taking to the streets armed with firearms, bats, and hammers, among other things.
  9. The decision was delayed in order to prevent affecting the outcome of the trial, according to the organization.

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St. Louis officers chant ‘whose streets, our streets’ while arresting protesters against police killing

More than 80 individuals were detained by St. Louis police on Sunday as a peaceful demonstration became violent as the evening wore on. Officials said that some demonstrators destroyed windows and overturned garbage cans in a concentrated area downtown, while others hurled chemicals and rocks at police, according to officials. Although this advertisement has not yet been loaded, your article continues below it. It was the third day of unrest in the city since former police officer Jason Stockley was acquitted Friday on charges of killing a black motorist in 2011.

  1. After the demonstration organizers stated that the daytime protest was ended, Mayor Lyda Krewson claimed in a press conference at approximately 1 a.m on Monday that the protest was done.
  2. Although this advertisement has not yet been loaded, your article continues below it.
  3. Adding to the heightened tensions, a St.
  4. According to a later tweet by the photojournalist, David Carson, he had spoken to a commander on the scene who stated that he had not heard the chant but that it was inappropriate and that he would “deal with it.” It was also reported by the Associated Press, who did so independently.
  5. Louis, Missouri, police detain a demonstrator who was protesting the in the city.
  6. The St.
  7. Sunday that “several warnings to disperse” had been issued near the junction of Washington Avenue and North Tucker Boulevard.

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Mike Faulk, a writer for the St.

A short time later, Faulk was one of those that were detained.

Interim Police Chief Lawrence O’Toole repeatedly referred to people who had been detained as “criminals” during a press conference held early Monday morning.

“This is our city, and we’re going to make sure it’s protected.” Demonstrators clash with police as they demonstrate their displeasure over the acquittal of former St.

Photograph courtesy of Scott Olson/Getty Images O’Toole stated that some cops had “moderate or mild” injuries, although he did not specify how many officers were injured.

Louis is safe and that the police owned tonight.” Another bunch of thugs has taken to the streets to smash windows and demolish properties.

A group of around 1,000 people had assembled outside a downtown police station before sundown, according to local media, and had marched peacefully before dark.

After some time had passed, the demonstrators were met by police officers equipped in riot gear.

In an earlier article published on Sunday, news sources stated that the Department of Justice had decided not to pursue a federal civil rights investigation against former officer Stockley.

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Louis police officer Jason Stockley, police made a number of arrests.

Stockley and his colleague had attempted to arrest Smith for a suspected drug deal at a Church’s Chicken restaurant but had been unsuccessful.

As heard on a film taken during the chase, prosecutors claim Stockley told his partner, “I’m going to murder this motherf-er, don’t you know it,” before directing his companion to crash into Smith’s slowing vehicle.

Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson of the St.

As the trier of fact, he stated that “this Court is just not firmly convinced of the defendant’s guilt.” Protests erupted on the streets of St.

In response to a not guilty conviction in the trial of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, protestors took to the streets on Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017 to demonstrate their dissatisfaction with the decision. Photo courtesy of Jeff Roberson/Associated Press

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