We Are What America Looks Like Chant

Opinion

When I saw the s pectacle of men and women yelling “Send her back!” at President Trump’s rally in North Carolina on Wednesday, it pained me so much that I could only watch for 10 seconds before shifting the channel to a baseball game for mental comfort. For me, seeing the president purposefully incite hateful cheers against Ilhan Omar, a Somali refugee who has become a citizen of the United States and is a member of Congress, served as a stark reminder that the United States has been through this far too many times and in far too many different ways in the past.

Do you have a soft spot for America?

It’s either you love it or you don’t.

I’d been an optimist most of my life, skeptical but not cynical.

  1. Ilhan Omar from consideration.
  2. Then I remembered Jim Shelton, a retired brigadier general whose burial my wife and I had visited at Arlington National Cemetery only a few days before he passed away.
  3. As much as I missed dad, I was relieved that he was not present to see the vile Trump rally in Charlottesville.
  4. As part of my research for my next novel, I reached out to him, who was serving in Vietnam at the time of a tragic fight in which the massively outnumbered Black Lions battalion of the First Infantry Division was trapped and nearly annihilated by a Viet Cong ambush.
  5. Colonel Terry de la MesaAllen, were killed in the battle.
  6. It was the defining day of his life, one about which he would eventually write a book and which he would remember for the rest of his life.
  7. As we were reminded at Big Jim’s Arlington burial, no yelling pseudo-patriot at the Trump rally could compare to Big Jim’s dedication to the United States of America.

While the Army band played “America the Beautiful” as a folded flag was delivered to his oldest daughter, a single bugler in the distance pursed his lips in preparation for the somber taps.

One of the aspects of the military that he admired the most was the fact that it was more integrated than practically any other institution in the United States.

A narrative shared by one of his eight children, Paul Shelton, who is now a colonel, came back to me at the reception at Patton Hall following his funeral, and it was this story that helped me comprehend how I could respond to the hatred of the current Trump rally.

A group of Shelton children were squeezed into the rear of their father’s car as the family headed somewhere.

We must have done something wrong, Paul reasoned, and he was right.

It was the racist graffiti, which included the n-word, that their father had noticed on the restroom wall earlier.

Big Jim then left the service station.

And a lesson for the rest of us. What is it about America that you adore? Take a stand against narrow-mindedness and racist thinking. Don’t turn your back on her. Continue to work on it until you have completed everything you can.

An Expert’s Take on the Symbolism in Childish Gambino’s Viral ‘This Is America’ Video

During this weekend’s episode of Saturday Night Live, Donald Glover debuted a new song and music video for “This Is America,” which he performed under the musical moniker Childish Gambino. The four-minute, single-take music video is laced with metaphors about race and gun violence in the United States. A controversial picture of the rapper is revealed in the “This Is America” video, which has already received more than 20 million views on YouTube. He is seen shooting at a choir at one point and dancing while mayhem erupts all around him.

Warning: graphic violence is present.

“You’re not intended to get the impression that this is the typical affluence of the music business.

The first gunshot

During this weekend’s episode of Saturday Night Live, Donald Glover debuted a new song and music video for “This Is America,” which he performed under his musical moniker Childish Gambino. The four-minute, single-take music video is laced with metaphors about race and gun violence in the United States. A controversial picture of the rapper is revealed in the “This Is America” video, which has already received more than 20 million views on YouTube. He is shown shooting at a choir at one point and dancing while violence erupts all around him in the film.

Please be advised that graphic violence is contained inside this publication.

This is not designed to be perceived as common fare luxury for those in the entertainment sector.

“This Is America” has four pivotal scenes, each of which is discussed in detail by Ramsay.

Gambino dancing with schoolchildren amid violence

D onald Glover debuted a new song and music video for “This Is America” under his musical name Childish Gambino on Saturday Night Live this weekend — and the four-minute, single-take music video is rife with analogies about race and gun violence in America. A controversial picture of the rapper is revealed in the “This Is America” video, which has already received more than 20 million views on YouTube. He is shown shooting at a choir at one point and dancing while mayhem erupts all around him.

Warning: graphic violence is contained inside this document.

“You’re not intended to get the impression that this is the usual richness of the music business. A counter-narrative is discussed, and it truly gives you the shivers.” Here’s what Ramsay had to say about four major scenes from “This Is America.”

The gunned down choir

In the midst of the video, an excited choir sings in a joyful tone until Gambino fires his gun at everyone in the group. Ramsey compares the attack to the 2015 Charleston shooting, in which white supremacist Dylann Roof massacred nine black people in a church basement, in which he was also a suspect, in which he was not. According to Ramsey, the visual and the feelings it elicits demonstrate how individuals struggle to reconcile and distinguish between various episodes of violence. As we get more accustomed to seeing and hearing violence on a variety of platforms, whether in the news, music videos, or television shows, it becomes more difficult to process very genuine instances of mass murder.

“However, in our digitally connected society, you’re being pushed to compartmentalize your feelings about it.

Gambino running away in the closing moments

As Young Thug sings, “You just a Black guy in this world / You just a barcode, ayy,” Gambino runs down a long, dark corridor, afraid, away from a group of people in the video’s final seconds. According to Ramsey, Gambino’s sprint is part of a long legacy of black Americans being forced to flee for their lives that dates back to slavery in the nineteenth century. One song from that era was titled “Run N— Run,” and it was written by a slave named “Run N— Run.” In his words, “a black person fleeing for his or her life has simply been a part of American society since the beginning of slavery.” For further information, please contact Mahita Gajanan at [email protected]

We Shall Overcome

On September 2, 1957, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. paid a visit to Highlander Folk School in Tennessee, where he was the keynote speaker. In order to assist civil rights activists in challenging unfair laws and racial practices that discriminated against African Americans, the school’s objective included assisting in the preparation of such workers. Blacks and whites were brought together at the school to exchange their experiences and learn from one another, which was a priority for the administration.

  • A time when southern laws kept blacks and whites segregated or separated, some white racists attacked African Americans with lethal violence throughout the Reconstruction era.
  • King gave the major address that day, which commemorated the school’s 25th anniversary and was presented in English and Spanish.
  • He pulled out a song that he had learnt at Highlander and led the audience in singing it as a result.
  • King found himself singing the song in his head.

The Civil Rights Movement

The song in question was “We Shall Overcome.” It quickly rose to prominence as the Civil Rights Movement’s song during the 1950s and 1960s. In the face of bigotry and hatred in the struggle for equal rights for African Americans, it provided bravery, comfort, and hope to those who participated. Pete Seeger is a folk singer from the United States. “We Shall Overcome” has a long and illustrious history, with contributions from a wide range of individuals and locations. It appears that a portion of the tune is derived from two European hymns from the 1700s, “Prayer of the Sicilian Mariners” and “O Sanctissima,” respectively.

  • In around 1900, it appears that the lyrics of another gospel hymn, “I’ll Overcome Someday,” written by the Methodist clergyman and musician Reverend Dr.
  • Atron Twigg and Kenneth Morris, two gospel arrangers, are credited with putting together the foundational elements of the now-famous words and tune sometime about 1945.
  • While picketing, African American women striking for a salary rise to 30 cents an hour sang to draw attention to their cause.
  • However, she instilled a tremendous sense of togetherness into the song by replacing the pronoun “I” to “We” as they sang together.
  • Simmons carried the song to Highlander Folk School in 1947, where he shared it with other labor activists who were also present.
  • The lines “We will” were changed to “We shall” at some time in the career of the nationally renowned folk singer.
  • According to Seeger, who spoke about the song in a subsequent interview, “It’s the brilliance of simplicity.” “Any…
  • Protesters sung it while they marched for the right to vote in the United States.
  • People all around the United States and the rest of the globe were outraged by the news and images of savagery.
  • Slowly and steadily, more and more Americans of all races came to acknowledge the legitimacy of the civil rights movement.
  • The new rule prohibited racial discrimination in public places such as schools, restaurants, theaters, and hotels.

President Lyndon B. Johnson, a southerner from Texas, signed the monumental legislation into law on August 6, 1964, marking the beginning of the modern era. The following is an excerpt from his special speech before Congress, in which he utilized the title of the song to express his beliefs:

“This great, rich, restless country can offer opportunity and education and hope to all: black and white, North and South, sharecropper and city dweller. These are the enemies: poverty, ignorance, disease. They are the enemies and not our fellow man, not our neighbor. And these enemies too, poverty, disease and ignorance, we shall overcome.”

“We Shall Overcome,” as the song was titled. Later, it became the Civil Rights Movement’s national song during the 1950s and 1960s. In the face of bigotry and hatred in the struggle for equal rights for African Americans, it provided bravery, solace, and hope to the protestors. The folk singer Pete Seeger was born on this day in 1927 in New York City and raised in the Bronx, New York, United States. It has been a long time since the song “We Shall Overcome” was written, and it has received contributions from many different individuals and locations.

  • In around 1900, it appears that the lyrics of another gospel hymn, “I’ll Overcome Someday,” written by the Methodist pastor and musician Reverend Dr.
  • Atron Twigg and Kenneth Morris, two gospel arrangers, are credited with putting together the foundational elements of the song’s lyrics and melody, which became renowned in 1945.
  • During their picket line, African American women striking for a salary rise of 30 cents an hour sung songs in support of their campaign.
  • They sang as a group, and she gave the song a tremendous feeling of togetherness by transforming the word “I” into the word “We.” Some other lyrics were improvised for pro-union objectives, such as “We will organize,” “We will win our rights,” and “We will win this war,” among others.
  • Zilphia Horton, the leader of the school’s cultural program, had learnt it and then passed it on to Pete Seeger, who had later learned it from her.
  • At many civil rights demonstrations, including sit-ins, marching demonstrations, and large-scale rallies, “We Shall Overcome” proven to be a simple song to learn and sing.
  • idiot has the potential to become complex.” As the Civil Rights Movement gathered steam, the song spread like wildfire around the globe.
  • When they were beaten up, attacked by police dogs, and carried off to jail for violating segregation laws, they sang it while they were beaten and taken off.
  • The year was 1964, and Martin Luther King Jr.
  • It took almost a century after the American Civil War forced the abolition of slavery before Congress finally passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
  • A southerner from Texas, President Lyndon B.

Johnson, signed the momentous legislation into law on August 6, 1964, marking the beginning of the civil rights movement. The following is an excerpt from his special speech before Congress, in which he utilized the title of the song to clarify his beliefs:

Free America

“We Shall Overcome” was the title of that song. It quickly rose to prominence as the anthem of the Civil Rights Movement throughout the 1950s and 1960s. In the face of bigotry and hatred, it provided bravery, comfort, and hope to those fighting for equal rights for African Americans. Pete Seeger is a folk singer and songwriter from the United States. “We Shall Overcome” has a long and illustrious history, with contributions from a diverse range of individuals and locations. Part of the tune appears to be derived from two European hymns from the 1700s, “Prayer of the Sicilian Mariners” and “O Sanctissima,” which were both composed in Italy.

  1. After 1900, it appears that the lyrics of another gospel hymn, “I’ll Overcome Someday,” written by the Methodist pastor and composer Reverend Dr.
  2. Atron Twigg and Kenneth Morris, two gospel arrangers, are credited with putting together the foundational elements of the song’s words and music, which became renowned in 1945.
  3. African American women on strike, seeking a salary increase of 30 cents an hour, sang as they demonstrated their solidarity.
  4. Other pro-union songs were improvised, such as “We will organize,” “We will win our rights,” and “We will win this war.” Simmons carried the song to Highlander Folk School in 1947, where he shared it with other labor activists who were present.
  5. The lines “We will” were changed to “We shall” at some time in the career of the nationally acclaimed folk singer.
  6. In a subsequent interview, Seeger described the song as “the brilliance of simplicity.” “Any…
  7. Protesters chanted it as they marched demanding the right to vote.
  8. People all throughout the United States and the world were outraged by the news and images of cruelty.
  9. Slowly and steadily, more and more Americans of all races came to understand the fairness of the civil rights movement.
  10. Racism was outlawed in schools, restaurants, theaters, and hotels under the new law.

On August 6, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson, a southerner from Texas, signed the groundbreaking act into law. A special address before Congress in which he utilized the title of the song to express his thoughts was delivered on the following day:

All the Chants I Heard at Saturday’s Anti-Trump Protest in NYC, Ranked

On November 12, 2016, anti-Trump demonstrators marched along Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. Photograph courtesy of L.V. Anderson/Slate The perfect protest chant is succinct, percussive, and conveys a strong message. I was at the anti-Trump demonstration in New York City on Saturday afternoon, which marched between Union Square and Trump Tower, and many of the slogans I heard did not fulfill those requirements. When a huge number of individuals come together to express their displeasure with a single individual, it is natural that their interests will differ.

  • However, when individuals with a variety of interests get together to achieve a common purpose, they must first choose what they want to express with their combined voices.
  • On the other hand, there are certain tried-and-true phrases that, with a little tweaking, can be made to work in our contemporary political environment.
  • “Secure him up!” says number twenty-five.
  • At the very least, anti-Trump demonstrators should agree on one point: we do not advocate imprisoning our political adversaries for political reasons.
  • Maybe.
  • “You’ve been fired, Donald!” says number 24.
  • In order to maintain meter, the speaker must emphasize “–ald,” which is odd.
  • Pussies are unable to grasp.
  • However, even if they were able to do so, they would be foolish to “grab back,” since we should not descend to Trump’s level.
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If that’s the case, I’d like not to be reduced to my genitals.) “My hands are too little!” “It’s impossible to construct a wall!” I’ve also heard a variation of this song in which the word “hands” was substituted with the word “dick.” Let’s stop from making fun of people’s physical qualities for the time being, shall we?

  • A call-and-response chant that lacks a clear antecedent requires improvement.
  • Okay, I get what you’re attempting to do here!
  • Perhaps if you put it in a whole statement, such as “We!
  • A Popular Vote,” it might be a bit higher on this list of the most ridiculous phrases.
  • Eh.
  • “Donald Trump!” exclaims the audience.
  • “You’re racist, sexist, and anti-gay!” Is anyone seriously believing that yelling a chant that closely resembles a nursery rhyme about the weather would cause Donald Trump to “go away”?

Protestors should stand up on behalf of those who have no voice, rather than berating them for being silent.

To be quite honest, I’m divided about the whole “not my president” thing.

On the other hand, he will truly be your president in the near future.

“I’m in love!” No, not hatred!

14.

Ho, ho, ho!

Even if you despise the chant formula, it will never go out of style.

Reject!

“We have a new president!” Compared to “Not my president!” this is a major improvement.

12.

Possibly a touch too succinct—the wait between the call and a response causes this chant to drag on quite a bit on occasion.

“There will be no fascist USA!” With an irrefutable message and a catchy beat that has built-in momentum, this song is a surefire hit.

10.

It is impossible for us to be beaten!” The above statement may be a tad overly optimistic.

“Make sure you pay your taxes!” This one speaks for itself.

And in terms of cadence, you can’t do much better than three words with only one syllable each.

This tagline does an excellent job of accomplishing that goal.

Perhaps the most effective three-word policy suggestion available.

“Black lives are important!” A simple phrase that is powerful and uplifting, as well as becoming increasingly relevant in a society where hate speech and hate crimes are on the rise.

“Muslim rights are human rights!” says the author.

The third option is “My body, my choice!” vs “Her body, her decision!” With Trump threatening to pick Supreme Court judges who would overturn Roe v.

I also enjoy the fact that ladies shout the call and men chant the response, which gives the impression that a protest is a large musical number, which is something I appreciate.

“There is no justice!” / “There is no peace!” Another important goal of a demonstration in this post-election, pre-inauguration period should be to send a message to Trump and his cronies that we will not simply sit back and allow them to violate our civil freedoms.

The following sentences are examples of “Show me what democracy looks like!” and “This is what democracy looks like!” Through the use of a syncopated rhythm, the meta-chant draws attention to the essentially patriotic character of protesting and serves as a reminder to onlookers that democracy is nothing without the freedom to peaceful assembly.

Traditional Work Songs

The performance of labour in traditional cultures all around the world is frequently accompanied with song. Work songs have been written for a variety of vocations in the United States, ranging from agricultural activities such as cotton picking to industrial jobs such as pulling railroad spikes. Legendary American personalities such as cowboys and sailors each had their own labor songs, which were crucial in keeping work flowing smoothly aboard tall ships during the era of sail. In most cases, work songs are sung for two reasons: to coordinate the labor of a group of people working together, which improvesthe efficiency of the work, and to alleviate the monotony of a tiresome task, which improvesthe quality of life of the employees.

  1. Occasionally, a plantation worker or sharecropper in one field would hear the arwhoolie of a neighboring field borne by the breeze and would respond with his or her own.
  2. “She Brought My Breakfast,” “Done Quit Shinin,” and even for mealtimes, such as “She Brought My Breakfast.”” As an analogy, a Texas musician may lament that there isn’t any more sugarcane on the Brazos River on a chilly October morning while out harvesting sugarcane.
  3. When you’re coming up with lyrics like those, it’s difficult to stay bored!
  4. The spikes are hammered in place by workmen who swing 10-pound hammers in full circles, striking each spike squarely and one after the other without wavering or skipping a stroke.
  5. A team must also tap on the rails with hammers or tug on them with crowbars to realign entire sections of railroad that have been displaced by trains – rails, ties, and everything – before they can be repaired.
  6. Songs such as ” Track Callin’ ” offer the beat that has them all tapping or pulling at the same time, all at the same time.
  7. Alan Lomax was a photographer who worked in 1934.
  8. A number of songs by Platt were recorded for John Lomax, including “Ain’t No More Cane on the Brazos.” The vast majority of field recordings of labor songs were not made when the performers were really at their respective jobs.

When prisoners were in a prison environment, the presence of the collector provided an interesting novelty to the prisoners, who in any case had no choice but to obey theirwardens, and work tasks, such as cutting down trees or hoeing fields, could be undertaken solely for the purpose of obtaining an audio recording of the conversation with the collector.

  • American sailors had a well-developed work-song tradition, which was documented by folklorists from the Library of Congress in the 1930s and 1940s when they gathered songs from retired sailors.
  • Most of the time, a leadsinger, or shantyman, would sing the most of the song, with the men who were working only singing the refrains and choruses.
  • Stamp-and-go or walkaway shanties, such as “Drunken Sailor,” were used for occupations that included going a few feet to take in a rope’s slack.
  • Halyard shanties, such as ” Hangin’ Johnny,” which were used to move the wooden yards that held the sails up and down, had even lengthier versions of the song than that.
  • 139 is an example of a detail.
  • Crew members working the capstan on the forecastle deck.
  • (J9.28.516n) – Ship BALCLUTHA Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record/Historic American Landscapes Survey are three of the most important historical records in the United States.
  • Prints and Photographs Division, Reproduction Number: HAER CAL,38-SANFRA,200-139.
  • Aside from worksongs, occupational songs are found in almost every work culture that has them.
  • A common theme in occupational songs is to relate stories about people on the job, to warn them about the risks of their profession, or to instruct them about the equipment and practices necessary to be a successful employee.
  • The majority of work songs have been collected from males, owing to the fact that women’s employment was not generally regarded as labor by male collectors.
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Folklorist Sidney RobertsonCowell discovered waulking songs, which were employed by Gaelic-speaking women in Scotland for fulling woven linen; an example is ” Fhillie duhinn s’tu ga m’dhi (My brown-haired lover, I’m without you),” which means “my brown-haired lover, I’m without you.” In fact, most folklorists today consider lullabies to be labor songs as well; after all, putting children to bed is a typical parental task in every culture throughout the world.

In common with other worksongs, lullabies feature a protest aspect, on which women express dissatisfaction with their lives and even hate against their children: why else sing about putting your infant in a tree-top so that “when the branch breaks, the cradle will fall?” Of course, this antagonism is not severe, but it does provide an opportunity for parents to release a little bit about the irritation that comes with the joy of parenting from time to time.

In the United States, fieldworkers from the Library of Congress have recorded lullabies in a variety of languages, including the English-language ” Come Up Horsey, Hey, Hey,” the Icelandic-language ” Budar ei lofti,” and the Arabic-language “Ughniyah li al-Atfal.” Cowboys needed to communicate with their animals in the same way as parents interact with newborns who haven’t yet learned to talk.

When they were trying to keep a herd of horses or cows under control, they made calming, whispering noises, with occasional yells and grunts thrown in.

” Night Herding Song,” for example, was gathered by John Lomax from its creator, the Texas rancher Harry Stephens, who was a member of the Night Herding Song group.

It’s hardly the only example of a work song that has found its way into popular culture: the “Night Herding Song.” Workers’ songs have been altered to match the styles of singers who have gone on to become role models for subsequent generations since the earliest days of recorded popular music (particularly the blues and country music).

As a result, one can still hear echoes of the cutting, hammering, and daydreaming of generations of American laborers in the driving rhythms and sorrowful lyrics of modern pop music.

Resources

  • Work is frequently accompanied with music in traditional civilizations all around the world. Work songs have been written for a wide variety of vocations in the United States, ranging from agricultural tasks such as cotton picking to industrial jobs such as driving railroad spikes and more. Cowboys and sailors both had their own labor songs, which helped to keep things running smoothly on tall ships throughout the history of the country’s most iconic characters. In most cases, work songs are sung for two reasons: to coordinate the labor of a group of people working together, which improvesthe efficiency of the work, and to alleviate the monotony of a tiresome task, which improvesthe lives of the employees. Worker weariness in southern cornfields and cotton fields was sometimes alleviated by a “arwhoolie,” or “Cornfield Holler,” which was a mournful chant with only a few lines that was performed by a worker in the fields to ease their tedium. In certain cases, a plantation worker or sharecropper in one field would hear the arwhoolie of a neighbor across the field and would respond with his own. When it came to quitting time, there were many particular calls, such as “The Sun, how I adore you. During example, “She Brought My Breakfast,” “Done Quit Shinin,” and even “She Brought My Breakfast” are used for mealtimes.” In a similar vein, a Texas singer would lament, while out cutting sugarcane on a chilly October morning, “Ain’t no more cane on the Brazos.” They had it all crushed up in molasses before they started working. When you’re coming up with lyrics like that, it’s difficult to stay bored. The railroad work song, for example, is an excellent example of the type of music required to organize labor. In order to secure rails and ties, workers must swing ten-pound hammers in a complete circle, striking each spike squarely and consecutively, without wavering or skipping a beat. When it comes to increasing productivity, the most effective method is to get the workers into a rhythm, which is traditionally provided by chants or songs such as ” Steel Driving Song,” which was collected from Henry Truvillion in Louisiana in 1939 by John and Ruby Lomax and published in their book ” Steel Driving Song.” A crew must also tap on the rails with hammers or tug on them with crowbars to realign entire sections of railroad that have been displaced by trains – rails, ties, and everything – in order to restore alignment. One guy tapping the rail alone, or five men tapping the rail at various times, will cause it to remain stationary
  • But, if five men touch the rail at the exact same moment, they will be able to make the rail move in any direction. Rhythmic songs such as ” Track Callin’ ” deliver the beat that has everyone tapping or pulling at the same time. In Sugar Land, Texas, there is a man named Moses Platt (Clear Rock). 1934. Photographer Alan Lomax is shown here. A reproduction number has been assigned to the Prints and Photographs Division by the Library of Congress. The number is LC-DIG-ppmsc-00285. In addition to “Ain’t No More Cane on the Brazos,” Platt sang a variety of songs for John Lomax. It is important to note that the majority of field recordings of work songs were not taken while the performers were really working. Workers found the remoteness of the regular work sites problematic, while collectors found it inconvenient because the recording equipment was present at all times in the office. When prisoners were in a prison environment, the presence of the collector provided an interesting novelty to the prisoners, who in any case had no choice but to obey theirwardens, and work tasks, such as cutting down trees or hoeing fields, could be undertaken solely for the purpose of obtaining an audio record. Early in the Morningin’ and ” Makes a Long Time Man Feel Bad” are examples of field recordings recorded under such settings that are good for gaining a feel of how the work went in conjunction with the song. During the 1930s and 1940s, folklorists working for the Library of Congress gathered work-songs from retired sailors, which were then preserved in the Library’s collections. Seagoing worksongs, often known as chanteys or shanties, were composed in a variety of styles depending on the duty they were intended to assist with. Men who were working would only sing the refrains and choruses of the song since a leadsinger, or shantyman, would sing the bulk of it. Shouts like ” Haul Away ” and other short-drag shanties had just brief refrains that could be accompanied by only a few of pulls on a rope. Slightly lengthier refrains were used in stamp-and-go or walkaway shanties, such as “Drunken Sailor,” for occupations that needed a short walk to pick up some slack in a rope. Many of the halyard shanties, such as ” Hangin’ Johnny,” which were used to raise and lower the wooden yards that supported the sails, had even lengthier tunes. In the end, for extended periods of time, continuous effort, capstan and pumping shanties had a slower rhythm and lengthy choruses, such as ” Away, Rio.” That sailors were only permitted to express their dissatisfaction with their working circumstances through the means of their shanties is intriguing. Because the songs were so vital to keeping things going, officials were willing to overlook a little complaining in the lyrics. From page 139: a detail Starring in the 1925 film THE STAR OF ALASKA Crew workers manning the capstan on the forecastle deck. (29.516n) – Ship BALCLUTHA at 2905 Hyde Street Pier in San Francisco, California. (29.528n) – Ship BALCLUTHA at 2905 Hyde Street Pier in San Francisco, California. Survey of historic American buildings and engineering records, as well as Survey of historic American landscapes (Historic American Buildings Survey, Historic American Engineering Record, and Historic American Landscapes Survey). Division of Prints and Photographs, Reproduction No.: HAER CAL,38-SANFRA,200-139. Prints and Photographs Division, Prints and Photographs Division, Prints and Photographs Division. Workers’ songs, which are songs that are sung while working, are recognized by folklorists as part of a larger genre known as “occupationalsongs.” Most work cultures that have worksongs also had occupational songs, however occupational songs are more prevalent in occupations where labor is done by individuals rather than in coordinated teams, such as coal miners and loggers or lumberjacks, than in other types of work cultures. Industrial songs usually recount anecdotes about people on the job, warn of risks associated with the trade, or instruct on how to use the equipment and procedures necessary to be a productive worker. Examples include ” The Miner’s Doom,” which George Korson recorded from Dan Walsh in Pennsylvania in 1947, and ” The Lumberjack’s Alphabet,” which Alan Lomax recorded from Gus Schaffer in Michigan in 1938. Most work songs have been collected from males due to the fact that women’s job was not usually regarded as labor by male collectors. But women also contributed to the development of labour songs. Wailing songs, such as “Fhillie duhinn s’tu ga m’dhi (My brown-haired sweetheart, I’m without you),” discovered by California folklorist Sidney RobertsonCowell, were used by Gaelic-speaking women in Scotland to fill woven fabric. In fact, most folklorists today consider lullabies to be labor songs as well
  • After all, putting children to bed is a typical parental task in every culture and society. When compared to other worksongs, lullabies feature a strong element of protest, in which women express dissatisfaction with their life and even hate against their children: why else sing about placing your infant on a tree-top so that “when the branch breaks, the cradle will fall”? This animosity, of course, is not severe, but it does provide an opportunity for parents to vent a little bit about the frustrations that can come with the joy of parenting from time to time. In the United States, fieldworkers for the Library of Congress have recorded lullabies in a variety of languages, including the English-language ” Come Up Horsey, Hey, Hey,” the Icelandic-language ” Budar ei lofti,” and the Arabic-language “Ughniyah li al-Atfal.” To communicate with their animals, cowboys had to utilize pure sound, similar to how parents interact with newborns who haven’t yet learned to speak yet. Their gentle murmuring noises were used to govern a herd of horses or cattle, with occasional yells and grunts thrown in for effect. They occasionally combined these noises into songs, and they physically sung to their animals in order to keep them calm and on the right course. ” Night Herding Song,” for example, was gathered by John Lomax from its creator, the Texas cowboy Harry Stephens, who was a part of the Night Herding Song collection. The success of Lomax’s publications led to versions of this song being recorded by Roy Rogers, Tex Ritter, Don Edwards, and other well-known cowboysingers in the following decades: One example of a work song that has found its way into popular culture is the “Night Herding Song.” Work songs have been altered to match the styles of singers who have gone on to become role models for subsequent generations since the beginning of recorded popular music (particularly the blues and country music). As an adaption of the classic song “Take This Hammer,” Mississippi John Hurt recorded “Spike Driver Blues” in 1929, which became a hit. Various rock bands, including Ram Jam (1977), Spiderbait (2004), and The Melvins, have covered the work song ” Black Betty,” which was initially documented by the Library of Congress (2011). In the pounding rhythms and depressing lyrics of modern pop music, one may still detect echoes of generations of hardworking Americans cutting, hammering, and daydreaming.
See also:  How To Pronounce Cthulhu Chant

What we know about the ‘send her back’ chants that erupted at Trump’s North Carolina rally

WASHINGTON, D.C. – On Wednesday evening, a chant of “send her back” erupted at a rally held by President Donald Trump after he began talking about Rep. Ilhan Omar. The president’s feud with The Squad, a group of four Democratic congresswomen of color, reached an all-time high. Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), Ayanna Pressley (D-MA), Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich) and Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) were slammed during a rally in Greenville, North Carolina, by Trump, who referred to them as “The Sqaud.” While he was riffing on Omar, chants of “send her back” erupted from the audience on several occasions.

Omar came to the United States as a child from Somalia and is now a naturalized citizen of the United States.

Some Republicans have also expressed displeasure with the chant.

How the chant happened

Trump slammed The Squad in a series of tweets on Sunday, stating that they should “go back and help fix the terribly broken and crime infested regions from which they came,” and that they should “go back and help restore the completely broken and crime infested places from which they came.” Except for Omar, all four congresswomen are American citizens, with three of them having been born in the United States.

  • Over the course of the week, the president has reiterated his earlier remarks, adding that if the politicians “hate” the United States, they should consider leaving the country.
  • With a vote of 240 to 187, the House of Representatives officially denounced Trump’s racist comments on Tuesday.
  • Further reading:Donald Trump accuses his fans of taunting a black lawmaker by saying, “Send her back.” ‘ ‘Still, like air, I’ll rise’:Ilhan Omar publishes a poem by Maya Angelou in response to the slogan “send her back” on Twitter.
  • He called out the names of each of the four progressive members of Congress.
  • Throughout the week, Trump has focused his attention on Omar, mentioning her by name multiple times and falsely accusing her of supporting Al-Qaeda during recent statements at the White House, among other things.

As she explained, “CAIR was established following 9/11 because they understood that certain people did something, and that we as a society were all beginning to lose access to our civil freedoms.” Muslims have been treated as “second-class citizens,” and Omar’s address at the time focused on how Muslims have been treated unfairly under the Trump administration.

“Obviously, and significantly,” Trump said at the rally as “send her back” yells became louder in the audience, “Omar has a history of unleashing terrible anti-Semitic screeds,” Trump said at the event.

“Send her back, send her back!” the crowd chanted for many seconds as Trump completed his rift with the first lady.

Omar’s response

The Minnesota Democrat replied by reading the poem “Still I Rise,” written by Maya Angelou, shortly after the video and news of the chanting went viral. After a tweet from former Barack Obama speechwriter Jon Favreau, who referred to the incident as “one of the most disturbing and terrible things I’ve ever seen in politics,” Omar responded by saying, “I agree.” In a retweet, Omar cited the first line of Angelou’s poem as inspiration. “Despite the fact that you can shoot me with your words, cut me with your looks, and kill me with your hatefulness, I will continue to soar like the wind.

  • According to a poll, the majority of Americans believe Trump’s tweets targeting four female congresswomen are ‘un-American.’ More:After the’send her back’ cry at a Trump rally, there was outrage and demonstrations of solidarity for Rep.
  • The shouting was met with a more scathing response by Omar on Thursday afternoon, in which she referred to Trump as a “fascist.” “We have already stated that this president is racist.
  • He appears to be a fascist to me “She told reporters on Capitol Hill that she was resigning.
  • Her other concern is not for her own safety, but rather for the protection of “those who share my identify,” according to her statement.
  • At a rally, Donald Trump singles out the’squad’ of female Congresswomen by name.
  • TODAY IN THE UNITED STATES

Many rushed to support Omar

Democrats have subsequently come to Omar’s defense and condemned the chanting. Lieu, who recently published an opinion piece on his own experience of being urged to “get back” to another country, questioned if the shouts would have occurred had Omar been a white woman. The racist shout of “throw her back” to an American citizen has been legitimized by the likes of @realDonaldTrump and other GOP accomplices. According to Lieu, “If @IlhanMN was white, they would not employ that racist cliche,” she said in a tweet.

“It is the very spirit of our country that is at risk.” Omar and Lieu, who both came to the United States from Taiwan and are naturalized citizens of the United States, stated in separate tweets that Trump and the Republican Party “don’t deserve to deport US citizens back just because they dislike Trump.” As he went on to say, “Immigrants are no less American than any other American.” “We are all citizens of the United States.” In addition, a number of Democratic presidential hopefuls have stepped out to defend Omar.

  1. Sen.
  2. The most disgusting and dangerous currents in our society are being stoked by Donald Trump.
  3. “In order to defeat the most dangerous president in the history of our country, we must unite.” More:The House of Representatives votes to condemn Trump’s racist remarks, with only four Republicans voting in favor.
  4. In the email, he sent a photograph of the two of them eating supper.
  5. “To my surprise, Ilhan was quite unaffected,” Sanders stated in an email to the press as well.
  6. “It’s horrible,” Sen.
  7. It’s a cowardly move.
  8. It’s anti-Semitic.
  9. And I’m not going to tell you about it here.

“Four days ago, the President of the United States of America recommended that four elected members of Congress, all of whom are women of color, should’return’ to the nations ‘from where they originated.’ The vice president of the United States of America tweeted, “And every day since he has continued this vile, racist refrain.” Senate Minority Leader Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, observed that the “send her back” chanting sounded a lot like the common “lock her up” cries that can be heard at Trump campaign rallies.

The latter cry was frequently used to make fun of Trump’s 2016 opponent, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

They are just ordering an American with whom they have a disagreement to return to his own country of Africa.” Trump’s ‘go back’ comments are deemed racist by Democratic members of Congress.

Four Democratic members of Congress responded to President Donald Trump’s apparent suggestion that they “go back” to the countries from which they “originally came.” TODAY IN THE UNITED STATES

Republicans denounce the chanting

The shout was rebuked by a number of Republican politicians and conservative pundits, but they maintained their opposition to the tone and policies of progressive Democrats, including Omar. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., tweeted on Thursday that he awoke “disgusted” by the chorus, which he described as “ugly,” and that he was “disgusted” by the chant. According to Kinzinger, “I strongly disagree with the radical left and have been appalled by their tone.” “I woke up this morning feeling the same way – slogans like’send her back’ are nasty, terrible, and would send chills down the spines of our Founding Fathers,” I said.

  1. Tom Emmer, R-Minn., who is in charge of the Republican campaign organization in the House, told reporters on Thursday that “that type of language has no place in our democracy.” Despite the widespread condemnation of Trump’s comments, he has since backed the president.
  2. What he was trying to convey was that if you don’t value our nation, you don’t have to be in it with us anymore.” “Disgusted,” says one Republican in response to yells of “Send her back” at Donald Trump event.
  3. Mark Walker, R-North Carolina, said that he “struggled” with the chant on Twitter.
  4. Omar,” he said on Twitter.
  5. That should be our primary goal, rather than using language that is offensive to our allies in minority groups.” “Nativist” and “awful,” according to conservative radio commentator Hugh Hewitt, who denounced the cry.
  6. In addition, electoral suicide is a possibility “he explained.
  7. @realdonald Trump won Pennsylvania and Michigan by 11K votes, and Pennsylvania by 44K votes.
  8. SendHerBack is a nativist movement.

Trump has blamed the audience

  • In a press conference on Thursday, the president expressed his disapproval of the chanting in question. “”I don’t agree with that,” he remarked in the Oval Office, according to Reuters. “I wasn’t pleased with the message I received.” According to Trump, journalists should return to North Carolina and question fans about why they began chanting at Wednesday’s event. The president responded to the chorus by saying, “I didn’t say that.” “That’s exactly what they did.” Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner are singled out by Meghan McCain, who asks them, ‘Where are you in this?’ More:Lindsey Graham on Donald Trump’s detractors: ‘I don’t recall John McCain having to go through this ordeal’, says the author. A total of two occasions occurred during which the North Carolina audience began yelling, “Send her back.” The president did not halt his address after the first interruption and proceeded on with his remarks. Trump, on the other hand, halted for several seconds during a second wave of chanting as the volume of the yells increased. The president, on the other hand, argues that he did put an end to the chant. “I believe I did — I got up and started talking really rapidly.” “he told a group of reporters William Cummings, John Fritze, David Jackson, and Michael Collins have all contributed to this work. Do you enjoy what you’re reading? More information may be found by downloading the USA TODAY app.

America — West Side Story

ANITA Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory. Allow my heartfelt devotion to return to the depths of the ocean. Always the hurricanes blowing, always the population increasing, and always the money owing, and always the sunlight pouring, and always the indigenous sweltering My favorite island Manhattan is the island Manhattan—smoke on your pipe and toss that in! WOMEN AND GIRLS (chorus) I enjoy being in America, everything is OK with me in America, and everything is free in America—BERNARDO In the United States, for a modest price.

BERNARDO They take one glance at us and charge twice as much.

JUANO What will you have to keep clean, on the other hand?

Another group of GIRLCadillacs zooms into the United States.

In America, there are twelve boys in a room.

BERNARDO A lot of doors slammed in our faces at the same time.

BERNARDO It’s best if you get rid of your accent.

EVERYBODY IS A BOY If you have the ability to fight in America.

EVERYBODY IS A BOY If you’re an all-white person in the United States.

) ANITA AND CONSUELO ARE a couple of friends who have a lot in common.

BERNARDAs long as you maintain your independence.

EVERYBODY IS A BOY Free to serve tables and shine shoes as much as you like.

It is a terrible moment in America.

ANITA You seem to have forgotten that I’m in America. (There is a brief interval of MORE DANCING.)BERNARDO I believe I will return to San Juan. ANITAI knows of a boat that you can board. BERNARDO Everyone in attendance will erupt in applause! ANITA Everyone will have relocated to this location.

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