What Chant Wwe

‘What’ chants are the worst thing about WWE and they need to stop

Stone Cold Steve Austin, then-WWE World Champion, made a statement in August 2001. On SmackDown, Steve Austin made his now-famous “What” chanting début during a promotional segment. It immediately rose to become the most cherished cry in the WWE, and it was actually amusing at the time it was introduced. 15 years later, “What” shouts are still the most annoying portion of WWE programming, and they are particularly detrimental to the company’s up-and-coming talents. Carmella has been the newest victim of the “What” chant, as she performed a fantastic job of roasting Nikki Bella on Tuesday night while the fans in Stone Cold’s home state chanted “What!” at every single pause.

During a 2015 episode of his podcast, Austin discussed the history of the “What” chant, and he stated that he had no regrets for initiating it.

The truth is, when someone is cutting a commercial and the audience begins yelling ‘WHAT, WHAT, WHAT’ every time they take a break, the best way to avoid this is to just don’t give them a pause in the first place.

Do I have any regrets?

  1. People used to have a lot of fun doing that back in the day, and guess what?
  2. We printed the words “what” and a question mark on the front of a t-shirt, and it resulted in a significant increase in sales.
  3. Instead, they may exploit that to their advantage by employing the skill.” Austin is correct about a couple of things here – it was entertaining back in the day, and he did sell a significant number of t-shirts at the time.
  4. When a crowd derails a nascent star’s (otherwise excellent) promotional campaign when they have done nothing to deserve it, it is not amusing.
  5. In spite of the fact that Carmella had the crowd enthralled with a wonderful “shut up, I’m talking” performed with a heavy New York accent, members of the audience attempted to hijack the promo.
  6. Some celebrities may be more adept at dealing with boisterous audiences, but attempting to make a point and advance your own personal plot while navigating a “What” chant shouldn’t be a weekly expectation for the majority of them.
  7. At the very least, the idea of fans harassing Chris Jericho with “sparklecrotch” chants is timely.
  8. It’s not even a chant that’s specifically intended against heels.

It’s insane, and it has to come to an end. In the case that you’re at a WWE live event and someone close to you joins in on the what chant, it is your responsibility as a fan to label them a dumb fool. The artists are deserving of a better deal.

WWE Twitter Account Asks Fans To Stop Doing The “WHAT” Chant

“Stone Cold”Steve Austin, future WWE Hall of Famer and future wrestling icon, found upon the world’s most convenient way to be irritating back in 2001. “What?” is a single, monosyllabic word that may be given in the middle of an adversary’s statement, and it can be used to be douchey, dismissive, and rude by everyone’s favorite heel in the game. It is that final one, some twenty years later, that is attracting the most attention. Fans, on the other hand, seized on the straightforward reaction and have been employing it ever since to express their dissatisfaction or discontent with a character or their current plot line.

  • Of course, when Austin pulled the stunt, he had every intention of making a fool of himself.
  • WWE executives, on the other hand, believe it is disrespectful to their talent since fans continue to use it to reject what they don’t like.
  • (They have since been removed, so feel free to interpret that anyway you wish.) This was the first message, which was posted during a RAW segment in which Jerry Lawler was interviewing Rusev, and it read: “Can we put an end to the shouts of ‘WHAT?'” It is no longer the year 2001.
  • The chant was directed towards @AngeloDawkins as he bid farewell to @WWENXT, then it was directed at a “Hall Of Famer” on RAW.
  • “And now we’re back to RAW.” Despite the fact that the brass made their opinions known, it is unlikely that it will have much of an impact on the audience.
  • When it comes to live crowds, it’s like a sea of marks and smarks, and they take pleasure in their collective trolling.
  • Recently, he told Busted Open Radio, “I did it as a running heel at the time, you know, I was wearing heels at the time, and I left that message on Christian’s voicemail.” It seemed like every time I said something, I’d pause and think, ‘what?
  • You’re right, aren’t you?
  • Isn’t it true that I’m jabbing you?
  • So that was my first attempt at putting it to good use.
  • A huge part of being in WWE or in the wrestling business is that the audience wants to be involved, whether they are rooting for you or against you, applauding for you or booing you, or whatever.

As a part of the show, it provided an opportunity for them to become involved and contribute.” In the meantime, they’re still taking part and saying things like ‘Austin, why in the heck did you invent that, I wish you hadn’t done that’.” I would have never imagined it in a million years that…

“I wouldn’t have predicted…” Do you believe that the chanting are insulting to the wrestlers and their efforts? Or is it merely a harmless show of support from the crowd? Please share your opinions in the comments section!

WWE News: Stone Cold Steve Austin Details Inventing The ‘What?’ Chant

It’s ice cold. ‘What?’ shouts, popularized by Steve Austin in 2001, have been explained in depth for the first time. Since his appearance as the Alliance’s shining light in the summer of 2001, Austin’s persona has morphed into an increasingly paranoid leader. Stone Cold would use the one-word slogan ad naseum throughout interviews in an attempt to encourage his warriors in their struggle against the then-World Wrestling Federation. Austin recounted where the inspiration for ‘What?’ came from during a talk with Randy Orton on the WWE Network’s The Broken Skull Sessions.

Stone Cold recounted:

“Another issue is that folks often seem to wonder how I come up with the ‘What?’ question.” I dialed Christian’s cellphone and spoke with him. Of course, he didn’t answer the phone because it was me who was calling. So I left him this long-winded message, and every now and then I’d say something idiotic and think to myself, ‘what was I thinking?’ Keep moving and thinking ‘what’ as you go, and keep going. In all honesty, by the time I hung up the phone, I’d left him something like a two-minute voicemail, and I was working hard at the time.

Steve Austin began structuring his promotional material in order to anticipate the ‘What?’ response from the audience.

The chat included Randy Orton discussing his new insight about how essential promos are in professional wrestling, which he shared with the audience.

Christian recalls a funny voicemail from Steve Austin that helped create the ‘What?’ chant

The ‘What?’ cry is one of the most well-known in wrestling history, and Stone Cold Steve Austin is the wrestler who is most closely connected with it than anybody else. Stone Cold was able to control the reaction of the audience so well during the peak of the Attitude Era in the WWE that he was able to get them to chant a simple four-letter phrase. Christian explained how he played a role in Steve Austin’s notorious cry and the history behind it in a recent interview with Wrestling Travel from the For The Love of Wrestling conference in Liverpool, which was published by Wrestling Inc.

He left a rambling voicemail on my answering machine, which I received. The things he said were completely random, such as: “I’m simply passing a tree.” What?! I mentioned that I was passing a tree. What?!’ Anything goes when it comes to randomness.

  • The ‘What?’ cry is one of the most well-known in wrestling history, and Stone Cold Steve Austin is the wrestler who is most closely connected with it than any other. A simple four-letter term was chanted by the crowd during the height of the Attitude Era in the WWE, thanks to Stone Cold’s ability to influence the crowd’s reaction through his promos. According to Wrestling Inc, Christian explained how he had a role in Steve Austin’s notorious cry and the history behind it in a recent interview with Wrestling Travel from the For The Love of Wrestling conference in Liverpool. In an interview with ESPN, the two-time World Heavyweight Champion said that The Texas Rattlesnake left a humorous message on his phone some years ago in which he was rambling on but also kept repeating the term “What? ” “I got a voicemail from him,” he explained. The message on my answering machine was a rambling rambling voicemail from him. “I’m simply passing a tree,” he said, and other such rambling statements. What?! In my previous statement, I stated that I was passing a tree What?!’ Anything goes when it comes to random thoughts and ideas.
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“When I arrived, I inquired as to the nature of the voicemail you had left for me. And he says, “I don’t know, I was just bored and started babbling.” “I really wish I had saved it.” In the next week or so, I was watching Raw from the back row and I could hear the audio of him promoting himself in the ring, and I heard him say, “What?!?” And I thought to myself, “How is he going to accomplish this, and how is he going to get this over with?” Sure enough, he was able to complete the chorus.

That was far back in the early 2000s, to be precise.

There have been several memorable incidents associated with the phrase throughout WWE history.

The following story preceded the preceding story: Sports News Now.

10 Chants That Don’t Need To Return With The WWE Universe

The return of the WWE Universe to the arena is something that everyone is looking forward to. A genuine atmosphere has been severely missed on Raw and SmackDown throughout the epidemic, and there is little question that the entire product will improve as a result of the return of the fans to the arenas. Live fans, on the other hand, are not always beneficial. There have been several instances in which the WWE Universe’s shouting has really interfered with a match’s outcome. Sometimes, supporters may make a significant difference in the outcome of a match.

10″What!”

When it comes to legendary wrestling chants, the “what” cry is without a doubt one that fans should refrain from bringing back with them when they return home. While it worked brilliantly for Steve Austin during his time on the show, the chant has continued to be used ever since, usually when a commercial is being aired. It’s something that frequently knocks a wrestler off their game in the arena, making it difficult for them to thrive and tell their story in the ring, which is an issue for the audience.

9″Fight Forever”

In terms of iconic wrestling chants, the “what” chant is without a doubt one that fans should not bring back with them when they return to their homes from their vacations. The chant, which was excellent for Steve Austin during his day, continues to be used now, usually when someone is making a promotional appearance on television. It’s something that frequently throws a wrestler off their game in the ring, making it difficult for them to thrive and tell their stories in the ring, which is a problem for the audience watching.

A wrestler may occasionally respond positively to it, but for the most part it is a source of frustration.

8″We Want Tables”

The fact that Money in the Bank will have a large number of supporters means that there is a significant probability this chant will be heard. We can only hope that is not the case, since this is one of the most obnoxious chants that the WWE Universe has ever come up with. A table is usually present in a match with no rules that involves weapons, with viewers constantly preferring to see one. But while the wrestlers almost always incorporate a table in their matches, it is not something that should be screamed because yelling about it might disrupt the flow of a competition.

7″This Is Wrestling”

One of the weirdest chants that supporters participate in is this one, which is just stating the obvious. While it is intended to be done in a way that demonstrates that the supporters are really impressed by the quality, it is not a particularly effective chant. Because everyone is aware that it is wrestling, which is something that people have paid to watch, the entire objective of the chant is defeated right from the outset.

6″You Can’t Wrestle”

Any time someone puts their body on the line inside the ring, they should be appreciated for their decision. Even though people demand the best from WWE, there will always be wrestlers that fall short of expectations. But everyone is making an effort and striving for improvement, and if they work for WWE, they have some worth, whether it’s in a promo or just by virtue of their star power alone. Chanting this at them is rude, and after being deprived of the opportunity to watch live wrestling for so long, it should not be reinstated.

5″10″

This is significantly less likely to happen now that Tye Dillinger is no longer a part of the WWE, but it did happen on a regular basis even when he wasn’t utilized much. This is something that supporters frequently do when the referee is counting someone out, and they usually do it at a different time than the player is counting them out. The fact of the matter is that this is plain bothersome. When done well, a 10 count may bring a great deal of drama and excitement to a match. However, when the crowd is engrossed in a chanting frenzy, the moment is rendered ineffective.

4″Boring”

Despite the fact that Tye Dillinger is no longer a part of the WWE, this still happened on a regular basis even when he wasn’t on the roster very often. The most of the time, this is something that supporters do when the referee is counting someone out at a different time than they are. The fact of the matter is that this is plain irritating. A properly executed 10 count may inject a great deal of drama and excitement into a match. It does not work, though, when the crowd is engrossed in chanting all over the place.

3″You’ve Still Got It”

Even though this cry is intended to be a complement to those who hear it, the talent often feels elderly or as if the audience did not expect them to perform well. This can be effective in some situations, as as when Ricky Steamboat battled Chris Jericho.

However, when someone who isn’t that old returns and is greeted with this chant, it doesn’t really make any sense to me at all. There won’t be any complaints if it doesn’t come back, and hopefully, that will be the case in this instance.

2″We Are Awesome”

This chant is intended to be a complement to those who are receiving it, but in fact, it makes the talent feel elderly or as if the audience wasn’t expecting them to be excellent. When done correctly, like in the case of Ricky Steamboat’s match against Chris Jericho, this may be effective. However, when someone who isn’t that old returns and is greeted with this chant, it doesn’t really make any sense all. There won’t be any complaints if it doesn’t show up, and hopefully that will be the case in this instance.

1″CM Punk”

One chant in particular should be avoided at all costs by the wrestling fans upon their return, and it is the one mentioned above. While CM Punk was a terrific wrestler and someone who would bring a lot to the table today, the reality of the matter is that he is no longer interested in becoming a professional wrestler. However, the repeated shouting of his name by the audience during various portions is quite irritating. It is not beneficial to the current product and does not demonstrate any respect for the abilities present in the ring at the time, which is why it should not be brought back.

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Is Kyle O’Reilly on his way to becoming AllElite?

Matthew Wilkinson may be reached on Twitter at @MC Wilkinson1 for further information.

r/SquaredCircle – What is up with “What?” chants?

Put myself out there and accepting the possibility of mockery for my naivete, but I would want to analyze any serious conversation about this and attempt to learn something if at all possible in the process. Despite the fact that I do not watch WWE, I read about Cena’s return from MitB on this site yesterday and was actually excited in seeing his appearance on Raw tonight. However, as soon as the “What?” shouts started, all interest in the passion underlying his performance and the efficiency of his promotional material was snuffed out.

It was terrible and felt out of place with the rest of the performance, but fortunately, it didn’t appear to catch on and didn’t last even for that little part.

Using the word “What?” during a promo appears to be a way for the audience to demean a character’s speaking cadence and/or take away their power, but seeing them in the Cena segment has me perplexed because it reads as an excited crowd that is on the Cena’s side suddenly sabotaging him, which is confusing to me.

  1. Alternatively, do “What?” chants have various meanings for the audience when in character?
  2. Can chants of “What?” serve as positive reinforcement or affirmation for a promotional campaign?
  3. I’m writing this from a place of real interest and an attempt to comprehend, since I can’t seem to “get” what a “What?” chant contributes to a promo other than disrupting a wrestler’s rhythm or the crowd simply wanting to yell.
  4. Having previously admired how in tune audience shouts in AEW appear to be when it comes to the crowd playing the part of a character in whatever tale is happening, hearing a large throng yell “What?” at someone they appear to support leaves me feeling a little disoriented and out of place.
  5. You can send me a video clip if you have any excellent instances of the “What?” chant so that I can try to acquire a different viewpoint on the subject.

Rather than debating whether these chants are appropriate, I’d like to hear some discussion about the reasoning behind them, what they contribute to the story as a character when performed by fans, and why fans at shows seem to enjoy performing them while nearly everyone on this site appears to despise them.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. I’m sure it won’t elicit a lot of responses, but any genuine and real responses are greatly welcomed.

WWE Encouraging Fans To Do ‘What?!’ Chants For Some Reason

Put myself out there and accepting the possibility of mockery for my naivete, but I would want to analyze any serious conversation about this and attempt to learn something if at all possible from the experience. However, even though I do not watch WWE, I read about Cena’s return from MitB on this site the day before yesterday, and I was quite eager in seeing his appearance on Raw tonight. However, as soon as the “What?” shouts started, all interest in the passion underlying his performance and the efficiency of his promotional material was snuffed out completely.

  • So to speak, that was the first time I had been face to face with them in their natural environment.
  • Hope that continues to be the case because something seemed very wrong with the program at that point.
  • It appears to be a massive trolling strategy that a big number of WWE fans seemed to find amusing and entertaining.
  • There appears to be more than one motive behind the crowd’s cries of “What?” as a character.
  • The question “What?” comes from a position of real interest and an attempt to comprehend, since I just do not understand what a “What?” chant contributes to a promo other than disrupting a wrestler’s rhythm or the crowd simply wanting to yell.
  • As someone who has really loved how in tune audience chants in AEW seem to be when it comes to the crowd playing the part of a character in whatever drama is developing, it is a very detached feeling I get when I hear a large crowd yell “What?” at a character they appear to favor.
  • You can send me a video clip if you have any excellent instances of the “What?” chant so that I can try to acquire a different viewpoint on the topic.
  • WWE battle royale discussion.

Since I am confident that this will not generate a large amount of interest, I thank you in advance for taking the time to read it. I welcome any thoughtful and honest answers you may have.

WWE: Inappropriate ‘USA’ Chants and What WWE Should Do About Them

WWE provided the photograph. Last night on Friday Night Smackdown, Jinder Mahal interrupted Michael Cole’s discussion with Randy Orton regarding his encounter with Kane at Extreme Rules, causing him to lose his cool. cries of “USA” erupted from the Grand Rapids, Michigan, audience as Jinder was ready to exit the ring (before being RKO’d by Randy Orton). When you consider that Jinder’s issue was with Randy Orton, rather than with the United States of America, the chanting sounded improper. There have been other such occasions throughout WWE history when American fans’ chants for the United States of America have been shamefully insensitive.

  • When Yokozuna and Bret Hart were introduced, the spectators frequently screamed “USA,” despite the fact that they were both from Japan and Canada, respectively.
  • ” “One of the guys is from Canada, while the other is from Japan.” When Justin Gabriel and Wade Barrett competed in an NXT bout, and when Jinder Mahal and Ezekiel Jackson competed in a Superstars match, scenarios similar to this one happened.
  • The supporters were promptly corrected by announcers Josh Mathews and Michael Cole, who were eager to point out their error.
  • It was the first occasion in recent memory that no announcer called the crowd out on their error.
  • Sometimes “USA” shouts by supporters are simply honest blunders on the part of the crowd.
  • The Soviet national anthem was thrown at WrestleMania III in Pontiac, Mich., as Nikolai Volkoff attempted to toss it amid an ocean of 93,173 booing.
  • “This (America) is the land of the free and the home of the brave,” Duggan said, and he refused to allow Volkoff to sing because “this (America) is the land of the free and the home of the brave.” I adore Hacksaw Jim Duggan, and I’ve always wanted to tell him how much I like him.
  • Who could forget Muhammad Hassan, the legendary jihadist?
  • Given Hassan’s tone of speech and attitude toward the WWE fans, the shouts thrown at him were understandable, but the chants of “USA” were a bit of a stretch.
  • Hassan was a native-born citizen of the United States.
  • Ultimately, the usage of “USA” shouts should be more selective.

Also important is that if the commentators see improper chanting, they should call the crowd out on it. Thank you for taking the time to read this! We really appreciate any feedback you may have!

5 best WWE crowd chants

With the COVID-19 closed set performances having concluded, the WWE Universe returned with a breath of fresh air. In terms of aesthetic appeal, the Thunderdome was impressive; but, it lacked any form of ambiance. WWE programming would be incomplete without the WWE Universe. They make noise by yelling, cheering, booing, and chanting. A large number of chants have been chanted by fans throughout the years, with some of them becoming a staple of most events even now. After that, let’s take a look at five of the most memorable WWE audience chants of all time.

5. You Suck! – WWE crowd chant

Upon returning to the WWE Universe following the COVID-19 closed set shows, it felt like a breath of fresh air. Even while the Thunderdome was a marvel to behold, it lacked any form of atmosphere. The WWE Universe is an important aspect of the WWE’s overall programming strategy. Throughout the game, they make a lot of noise and yell, shout, and boo. At almost three decades of live performances, fans have created a large number of chants, some of which are still used in almost every event. Let’s take a look at five of the most memorable WWE audience chants, shall we?

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This Day in Wrestling History (8/13) – Birth of “What?” Chant

Subscribe today to receive real-time updates straight to your device’s screen. As wrestling fans, we’re accustomed to a slew of catchphrases and chants that are frequently associated with a specific match or wrestler, and this day in wrestling history marks the birth of one that has stood the test of time. Following his betrayal of the WWE to join them, Steve Austin delivered a speech to the Alliance on August 13, 2001, in which he debuted what would become his new cry. In the history of professional wrestling, Hugh Morrus was the first person to be the recipient of the most famous chant, which was later followed by Raven and Taz.

  • You have a body weight of 275 pounds.
  • What?
  • What?
  • Is that meant to be humorous?
  • What?
  • Take a look at me!
  • Y2J gave you a good thrashing.
  • “Take a step back.”

Curious origins and legacy

The phrase was coined in the same way that most things are, which is to say entirely by chance. Austin claims that it all started when he was driving and that he contacted Christian and stated it in a voicemail at random. This virus swiftly gained momentum and quickly became the torment of many people’s lives, as it was handed down from fan to fan and continues to flourish today. A few years ago, Austin chatted with Sam Roberts on a variety of things, including his ideas on how the chant has survived from one generation to the next.

  1. Austin remarked that he hasn’t wrestled in twelve or so years, and Roberts stated that the folks in the audience at the time (in 2013) had never seen him wrestle before and were repeating the chant in response.
  2. Of course, some people still don’t enjoy the chant after all these years, and they aren’t afraid to express their displeasure with it.
  3. “Everyone constantly says ‘What?!’ which destroys everyone else’s promotional efforts.
  4. Don’t stop your cadence and give them that ‘What?!’ moment if you leave that space between your phrases, your words, your phrasing…
  5. If you simply keep talking, as I’m doing, I won’t give you a chance to express what you really want.” Simple as that, and we’ve seen that wrestlers like to pause at just the perfect moment to allow for some crowd contact throughout their matches.
  6. This Day in Wrestling History will go down in history as one of the greatest days in the sport’s history.

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Jim Ross Reveals The Origin Of Steve Austin’s ‘What?’ Chant

It’s ice cold. Steve Austin’s notorious “What?” chant is one of the most divisive chants in the history of professional wrestling. Many a commercial has been disrupted by a large group of people chanting the program’s catchphrase during the broadcast. Fox has taken a firm stance against the anti-gay slogans. On the most recent episode of the Grilling JRpodcast, Jim Ross revealed the origins of the chant. Ross claims that the whole incident started as a rib on Christian’s rib cage. Austin took it and put it into his character as a result.

  1. The question “what?” came into play at this point.” Crowd shouts are one of the most bizarre parts of wrestling, since they have the ability to completely affect the course of a session.
  2. Through their WWE on Fox Twitter account, even Fox, which broadcasts WWE SmackDown, expressed displeasure with the chant.
  3. The chant was directed towards @AngeloDawkins as he bid farewell to @WWENXT, then it was directed at a “Hall Of Famer” on RAW.
  4. “And now we’re back to RAW.” Austin himself made light of the issue, tweeting his own “What?” in response to the scenario.
  5. A skillful talker can easily skirt around them, or even flip them around on the audience, if the situation calls for them.
  6. In your perspective, what should be done about the “What?” chant?
  7. Please share your thoughts in the comments section.
  8. for providing the transcript!
  9. on November 30, 2021

Big E. Comments On Unexpected Chant From Fans During A Recent WWE Promo

To what extent did it matter to Big E. to have fans yell for Brodie Lee during a recent promo he gave on WWE television for Brodie Lee? If you want to know the truth, ask the WWE Champion himself. After The Rock appeared as a guest on her “Oral Sessions” podcast for an in-depth conversation, Renee Paquette made the decision to do just that with him. The following is an excerpt from Big E.’s response to the situation. “When I heard people chanting his name, I had a moment where I looked at Woods and just kind of thought, “I’m getting chills just thinking about it,” and I did get chills.

I wasn’t sure whether people would understand what I was saying, but gosh, it was so amazing and almost overwhelming to hear those chants and to know that people understood who I was talking about and that his memory is still remembered.

Maybe in the promos, but Brodie was always the main character.

Thank you very much for your kindness. It meant a great deal to me.” Take a look at Apple.com for the whole interview. Thanks to 411 Mania for his assistance with the transcription of the aforementioned quotes.

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Steve Austin On The Problem With The ‘What' Chant Being Used Today

Steve Austin was one of the most prominent figures in the WWE during the Attitude Era, and he was involved in one of the most memorable feuds in the company’s history with Vince McMahon. Austin turned on The Rock at WrestleMania 17 in 2001, and he later joined himself with Vince McMahon. The Alliance, which was formed months later by the merger of WCW and ECW, was formed to compete against WWE. “Stone Cold” Steve Austin, the WWE Champion, was the driving force for this partnership. While watching SmackDown, Austin summoned the Alliance in the ring to reassure them that they could rely on him even though Vince McMahon had stated that he was about to flip on them and defect back to WWE during a segment.

According to others, this portion was also responsible for popularizing the cries “What?” as they gained widespread acceptance.

Many fans, however, believe that while this chant was enjoyable during its initial run in the early 2000s, it has become a touch irritating in recent years.

“I had no idea the chanting of ‘What?’ would be around for as long as it has,” Austin reflected.

Sometimes that ‘What?’ chant may be really overpowering, and you may believe that people aren’t paying attention to what you’re saying.

“The crowd is losing out on what the wrestler is saying, so you have to time that ‘What?’ chant when there’s some bulls–t going on, and you have to be able to listen to a real deal promo in order to understand what’s going on in the storyline.” I feel for you, and I feel for the people who are attempting to make a nice promotional video.

If you utilize any part of these lines, please be sure to provide proper attribution to The Steve Austin Show, with a special thanks to Wrestling Inc. for the transcription. The Steve Austin Show is the source of this information.

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