What Did Crowd Chant At Debate

Here’s What Protesters Were Chanting During the #DemDebate

Crowd shouts interrupted the Democratic debate on Wednesday night, beginning at the opening comments of New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and extending into the opening remarks of New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker. “Fire Pantaleo,” a chorus of voices from the audience sang, alluding to Staten Island police officer Daniel Pantaleo, who was holding Eric Garner in a chokehold when Garner died in 2014. “Fire Pantaleo,” the audience chanted. Officer Pantaleo is still employed by the New York Police Department, where he has worked for many years.

Following the debate, TheWrap’s Lindsey Ellefson talked with civil rights activist Kirsten John Foy, who was one of the demonstrators inside Detroit’s Fox Theater, where the debate was held, about her experiences.

When asked if the mayor would have dismissed Pantaleo “immediately,” a de Blasio spokesperson responded that the mayor would have done so if he could.

For the past seven or eight years, I’ve had the pleasure of working with him, and I’m confident in saying that had the authority to do so, he would have dismissed him right away.” It is against the law for De Blasio to fire a New York City police officer; the choice to do so would fall solely on the shoulders of the city’s Police Commissioner.

  1. Minutes after the chanting ceased, Booker and de Blasio took to Twitter to express their support for the demonstrations.
  2. I understand what you’re saying.
  3. “Thank you very much,” Mayor de Blasio stated.
  4. “That is the process through which change is brought about.

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Here’s what protesters were chanting at the start of the Democratic debate

  • Detroit— Several protesters were escorted out of the Fox Theatre crowd after interfering with the Democratic presidential candidates’ speech during the second night of debates on Wednesday. Protesters interrupted the candidates’ introductory comments less than 20 minutes into the discussion, yelling “Fire Pantaleo!” and forcing U.S. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey to pause his speech in response. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio was the first to speak at Wednesday’s discussion, and he emphasized his accomplishments, including a reduction in crime, free early childhood education, and a raise in the minimum wage. Former Vice President Joe Biden and U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris of California were the targets of his first jab, in which he criticized them for having proposals that were not sufficiently bold. “Working people have taken it on the chin in this nation for the last four decades,” de Blasio added, before vowing that “we will tax the hell out of the affluent” in order to make the country a better place in the future. During de Blasio’s speech, one of the audience members began yelling “Fire Pantaleo!” The mayor has come under fire for refusing to back the family of Eric Garner’s requests that the police department fire New York Officer Daniel Pantaleo, as they have demanded. Garner died as a result of the officer’s actions, which sparked widespread public anger. While Booker was speaking, a large number of people joined in with the chorus. The candidates observed a minute of silence in response to the outrage. With the exception of Booker stopping, neither the candidates nor the moderators addressed the problem. I heard you, protestors in the crowd today, and I thank you for your participation. I was aware of your presence. Thank you very much. This is what democracy looks like, and no one ever said that it was attractive to look at. Bill de Blasio (@BilldeBlasio) on August 1, 2019 in the Democratic Debate. According to audience member Elizabeth Washington, at least two males and one women were escorted out of the theater as a result of the disruption. More individuals were removed from the 5,000-person crowd about an hour into the discussion for yelling “3 million deportations” and waving flags during Biden’s speech, which was being broadcast live on CNN. The protestor explains why she is interfering with the presidential discussion. Ofelia recalls crying out “3 million deportations” at the presidential debate in Detroit in order to draw attention to the country’s restrictive immigration policy. The Detroit News is a newspaper that covers the city of Detroit. While Biden was on stage, Biden’s team sent out a statement through Twitter. Human dignity is being violated by President Donald Trump’s immigration policy. We do not live in a country where children are denied soap and a toothbrush. This is not who we are as a group. Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) on August 1, 2019 in the Democratic Debate. The Detroit News was able to speak with a few of the demonstrators who were outside. Rev. Kirsten John Foy stated that they chose to show their dissatisfaction with Mayor de Blasio’s “lack of leadership” in failing to remove Daniel Pantaleo, the man responsible for the death of Eric Garner. He wants to come up and declare himself to be a progressive, therefore he should demonstrate his progressive credentials, Foy added. “Don’t sit there and claim you want to make the world a more equal place for everyone while, at the same time, permitting police officers to kill without redress or accountability.” Linda Sarsour, Mysonne Linen, and Tamika Mallory were among the other demonstrators who were evacuated from the scene. On Twitter, Mallory said, “Then minutes later, after numerous candidates spoke, a police officer walked over and displayed his handcuffs and threatened us with arrest if we did not leave immediately.” “. Cory Booker and the discussion were not stopped by us
  • Rather, the Detroit Police Department did so in order to frighten peaceful protestors who were standing up for the dignity of Black life and had already concluded their demonstration minutes before.” When the event occurred, Washington claimed she was seated to the left of the cinema and observed it unfold a few seats in front of her. “Everyone became silent, but the candidates went on as if nothing had happened,” the Dearborn resident explained. “Five security officers came up to them, and others in the throng started snapping photos of them. A large number of individuals appeared to be scared when the first man yelled. However, she claims that until they were hauled out, “the audience was paying more attention to them rather than the candidates.” Payne Lubbers, a Detroit News staff writer, contributed to this article. [email protected] Twitter:@SarahRahal_

‘Lock him up’ chant ignites a debate among Democrats: Give Trump his own medicine, or stick to the high road?

Detroit— After interfering with Democratic presidential candidates’ speech during the second night of debates on Wednesday, a number of protesters were escorted away from the Fox Theatre crowd. Protesters interrupted the candidates’ introductory statements less than 20 minutes into the discussion, yelling “Fire Pantaleo!” and forcing U.S. Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey to pause his remarks before continuing. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio was the first to speak at Wednesday’s debate, and he emphasized his accomplishments, which include a reduction in crime, free early childhood education, and a raise in the federal minimum wage.

  • Sen.
  • “Working people have taken it on the chin in this nation for the last four decades,” de Blasio stated, before vowing that “we will tax the hell out of the affluent” in order to make the country a better place in the coming years.
  • A nationwide outcry erupted after Garner died at the hands of the cop.
  • The candidates were forced to pause as a result of the outrage.
  • Please know that I was listening to the demonstrators in the crowd today.
  • Your assistance has been much appreciated.
  • On August 1, 2019, Bill de Blasio (@BilldeBlasio) spoke in the Democratic Debate in New York City.

More individuals were removed from the 5,000-person crowd about an hour into the discussion for yelling “3 million deportations” and waving flags during Biden’s speech, which was interrupted by the president.

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Ofelia recalls crying out “3 million deportations” at the presidential debate in Detroit in order to draw attention to the country’s immigration laws.

Human dignity is being violated by President Trump’s immigration policy.

What we’re doing here is not who we are.

Some of the demonstrators were interviewed by the Detroit News outside.

Kirsten John Foy, was based on his refusal to fire Pantaleo.

Do not sit there and claim that you want to establish a more egalitarian society for everyone while at the same time permitting police officers to kill without repercussions or accountability back home.

On Twitter, Mallory said, “Then minutes later, after numerous candidates spoke, a police officer walked over and displayed his handcuffs and threatened us with arrest if we did not leave right now.” “.

When the event occurred, Washington claimed she was seated to the left of the cinema and watched it unfold a few seats in front of her.

” Several folks appeared to be scared when the first man yelled.

She claims that as they were hauled out of the building, “the audience was paying more attention to them rather than to the candidates.” A contribution was made by Payne Lubbers, a staff writer for the Detroit News ([email protected]). Twitter:@SarahRahal_;

The debate over chanting “lock him up” at Trump, explained

During Game 5 of the World Series, President Donald Trump was welcomed with boos and a shout of “lock him up” by the Nationals Park crowd on Sunday night. And, since then, there has been a heated debate among those who are critical of Trump in the political arena. Was taunting the president with the phrase “lock him up” a permissible approach to mock the president, who has been under investigation for years? Was it a disturbing evidence of the degradation of standards about the rule of law and political dispute, or was it something else entirely?

  • Consequently, MSNBC anchors Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski argued on Monday morning that the shouts were “sickening” when directed towards Trump supporters, and that they were also “sickening” when directed at the president-elect himself.
  • a political rally).
  • Divided opinions on political rhetoric and criminal prosecutions, in particular, are indicative of divergent attitudes on the subject.
  • And, despite the incident’s seeming to be inconsequential, it raises concerns about how the Democratic Party will deal with the matter of potential Trump administration crime in the future.

How “lock her up” became “lock him up”

During the Republican National Convention in July 2016, the now-famous “lock her up” chant gained national attention and gained widespread adoption. Within two weeks, then-FBI Director James Comey announced that he would recommend no charges against Hillary Clinton following an investigation into her use of a personal email account for State Department business — dashed Republican hopes that Clinton would be indicted for using a personal email account for official business. A more complete picture is that Republican base supporters have been persuaded for decades by their elected officials and news media that the Clinton family is guilty of all kinds of sinister crimes, ranging from bizarre mass murder conspiracies to alleged financial malfeasance.

The phrase “lock her up” became the most popular cry of the convention audience, which was frequently encouraged by speakers from the platform throughout their speeches.

Trump himself does not lead the chant, but he frequently stands by and allows it to take place, occasionally interjecting with something to the effect of “lock her up, that’s what she deserves.” Many critics found this to be rather frightening – Trump was competing for the highest position in the land on the basis that his opponent should be imprisoned, according to many of them.

Comey claimed that “no rational prosecutor” would launch such a case against the Trump administration.

As soon as Trump was elected president, he immediately began attempting to politicize the Justice Department by asking prosecutors to investigate his opponents — and many are concerned that a recent inquiry into the origins of the Russia investigation is exactly that (though Clinton herself remains un-indicted).

In addition, Special Counsel Robert Mueller and prosecutors from the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York have been investigating Trump’s own behavior since the election.

Although the SDNY’s investigation prompted Cohen to testify in court that he broke campaign finance law by making hush-money payments at Trump’s direction, prosecutors have taken no further action in the matter for an unknown reason, according to sources.

Meanwhile, Trump’s detractors point to other possibly illegal activity — ranging from sexual assault charges to apparent corruption involving his business — that appears to have gone unnoticed by law enforcement and has not even been given a thorough investigation.

Into all this comes the World Series crowd

It was at the Republican Global Convention in July 2016, that the now-famous “lock her up” cry first gained national attention. The immediate context was that, just two weeks earlier, then-FBI Director James Comey announced that he would recommend no charges against Hillary Clinton following an investigation into her use of a personal email account for State Department business — dashed Republicans’ hopes that Clinton would be indicted for her actions. The larger picture, however, reveals that Republican base voters have been told for decades by their politicians and media sources that the Clinton family is responsible for a variety of nefarious crimes, including everything from bizarre mass murder conspiracy theories to alleged financial corruption.

The phrase “lock her up” became the most popular cry of the convention audience, which was frequently encouraged by speakers from the podium throughout their speeches.

Despite the fact that Trump himself does not lead the chant, he frequently stands by and allows it to take place, occasionally interjecting with something to the effect of “lock her up is right.” The fact that Trump was campaigning for the nation’s highest position on a platform that his opponent should be imprisoned was viewed as highly alarming by many pundits.

  1. “There is no sane prosecutor” who would pursue such a case, Comey asserted.
  2. As soon as Trump was elected president, he immediately began attempting to politicize the Justice Department by asking prosecutors to investigate his opponents — and many are concerned that a recent examination into the origins of the Russia investigation is exactly that.
  3. There have been a large number of Trump allies (from campaign chairman Paul Manafort to national security advisor Michael Flynn to lawyer Michael Cohen) who have been convicted of or pled guilty to crimes in recent months.
  4. However, Mueller ultimately decided not to take a position on whether Trump engaged in criminal obstruction of justice — in part because the Justice Department had already ruled that a sitting president cannot be charged — and instead chose to remain silent.

As well, Trump’s detractors have raised concerns about other possibly illegal activity — ranging from sexual assault charges to apparent corruption involving Trump’s company — that appears to have gone unnoticed by law enforcement or has even gone uninvestigated.

The interesting split among those who defended the chant

These were met with ridicule or mockery by other Trump detractors, who interpreted them as an effort to chastise baseball fans for failing to demonstrate their displeasure with President Donald Trump correctly. Nevertheless, while this second set of critics was unanimous in their belief that the chant was acceptable, there appears to be a fundamental difference in their reasoning for reaching that judgment. Commentators have emphasized the particular context of this incident — that it involved an incumbent president being taunted in his own words, making it more of a form of protest than, say, a crowd urging a potential (or actual) president to imprison despised political opponents — as a point of distinction: This appears to be an erroneous equivalency.

  1. A mob spontaneously hijacking a chant and turning it against its source is more of a joke than it is a genuine danger to the person who started it.
  2. In contrast to the RNC’s “lock her up” chanting, there is neither an illiberal aim nor an illiberal outcome in this case.
  3. On October 28, 2019, Ezra Klein (@ezraklein) tweeted: No, not at all.
  4. Americans who cry “lock him up” in response to a President who behaves like a tyrant and feels he is above the law are demanding responsibility from the White House.
  5. What appears to be implied in these arguments is that, in a different environment — say, a Democratic presidential campaign – cries of “lock him up” targeted at Trump would be completely improper and would be condemned.
  6. It’s difficult to blame folks for wanting to keep him in those conditions….
  7. But it’s equally wrong and unrealistic to suggest that we can’t react when our opponents are actually criminals because we don’t want to criminalize them in order to prevent criminalizing ourselves.
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He’s been involved in criminal activity.

Lock.Him.

N.

Jemisin (@nkjemisin) posted on October 28, 2019 about a new book.

If the Department of Justice’s regulations did not proclaim Trump above the law, he would very certainly be imprisoned or at the very least on his way to trial.

As with Clinton’s detractors, there is significant variety in what these critics believe Trump should be imprisoned for (albeit not as much as there was for Clinton’s critics).

With a simple statement that Clinton should be imprisoned, Trump established his case that she was crooked.

Some are wondering if they should truly hold back when they believe his behavior is considerably more terrible.

Coons’s remarks that “whipping up public furor” isn’t “useful.” The proponents of this point of view are concerned about mob justice or the politicization of justice, and they prefer that decisions concerning criminal charges be left in the hands of qualified experts.

It is expected that a Democratic candidate will win the presidential election next year, and that he or she would be appointed to the highest echelons of the Justice Department in early 2021.

That next government will be faced with a series of decisions about whether it is best to simply move on — or, maybe, if it is better to attempt to imprison certain individuals.

Listen toToday, Explained

The White House refused to cooperate with the impeachment investigation beginning in early October. Following that, the stonewall started tumbling down around them. Trying to keep up with the never-ending news cycle but don’t have time to read everything? At the conclusion of each day, Sean Rameswaram will lead you through the most important stories that have occurred. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Overcast, or any other podcasting platform that you use.

Was it wrong for baseball fans to chant ‘lock him up’ at Trump?

After watching the footage of fans yelling “lock him up” during the World Series, I thought to myself, “ha.” After that, I went on with my life as usual. Unfortunately, others did not. However, despite the fact that the United States is supposed to be a democracy in which free speech is fundamental, the episode has provoked pearl-clutching among commentators and politicians who appear to believe that protesting poses a grave threat to the very essence of America. For example, Democratic senator Chris Coons stated that it reminded him of “things that happen in nations where the rule of law is unknown or unestablished.” Let’s get a handle on things, shall we?

It wasn’t a horde of AR-15-toting thugs.

It was a group of people who spontaneously expressed their dissatisfaction with the fact that the president of the United States has not been held properly accountable for any of the numerous crimes for which he has been accused – ranging from sexual assault to election meddling – and has openly boasted about being above the law.

  • Is there anything that reminds me of nations where the rule of law is non-existent?
  • There were a lot of chants.
  • Some people have expressed their dissatisfaction.
  • Joe Scarborough of NBC, for example, tweeted sarcastically on Monday: “Let’s check if I’ve got this straight.
  • However, when the same chants are directed towards Trump, it becomes a blatant violation of the nation’s most fundamental first amendment rights.
  • There is a significant difference between people spontaneously yelling at a baseball stadium and politicians whipping up audiences at rallies into a frenzy of fury over unsubstantiated claims in a political campaign.

According to the evidence, unless there is some hidden Clinton conspiracy that I am not aware of, this wasn’t the case. If you’re one of the folks who is whining that this is just another example of civility being eroded in America, kindly reconsider your effing priorities.

Lloyd Green: ‘Lock him up’ is a demand for mob justice

In the wee hours of Sunday night, Donald Trump was given a taste of his own medicine. The president was booed by the audience during the third game of the World Series of baseball, and the crowd subsequently broke into a chorus of “lock him up” after his introduction. With Melania by his side, Trump was able to hear firsthand what a large portion of blue America thought of the vulgararian-in-chief for the first time. Make no mistake about it, Trump had unquestionably earned the hatred and ire of his supporters.

  • During Barack Obama’s administration, Trump had stoked the embers of birtherism, which had already begun to spread.
  • Donald Trump’s language and demeanor did not include the word “grace.” In the end, it was Trump who would lead his followers in the cries of “lock her up” – even after he had taken up residence in the White House.
  • It was his fans who were entitled to due process, not his political opponents.
  • Rather than being a performance, Trump’s bile on stage was a reflection of his true nature as a person.

However, despite the fact that Trump has debased the presidency by conflating it with himself, his opponents – of which there are many and whose disgust is more than warranted – should pause before repeating the same line that has deemed Trump unsuitable to occupy and maintain his current position.

  1. The desire is for mob justice, which is at conflict with the rule of law, and is therefore fundamentally different from just expressing displeasure of a government policy.
  2. Presidents Herbert Hoover and Harry Truman were both on the receiving end of such attacks in their respective eras.
  3. Despite the fact that our processes appear to be inconvenient, they continue to define us.
  4. Trump was drawn in by the phrase “lock him up.” However, it is not a substitute for the work that still has to be done.
  • Lloyd Green, an attorney in New York, worked as opposition research counsel for President George H.W. Bush’s 1988 presidential campaign and as a prosecutor in the Department of Justice from 1990 to 1992.

‘Fire Pantaleo’ Chant Emerges at the Second Democratic Debate

Lloyd Green, an attorney in New York, worked as opposition research counsel for George H.W. Bush’s 1988 presidential campaign and at the Department of Justice from 1990 to 1992; he was born in New York City.

Here’s What the Protesters Were Yelling to Joe Biden at the Nevada Democratic Debate

Lloyd Green, an attorney in New York, acted as opposition research counsel for President George H.W.

Bush’s 1988 presidential campaign and as a prosecutor in the Department of Justice from 1990 to 1992;

‘Fire Pantaleo’ chant interrupts Cory Booker opening remarks at presidential debate

During the opening comments of the Democratic presidential debate in Detroit on Wednesday night, audience members interrupted the proceedings with a shout of “Fire Pantaleo.” The chant is in reference to New York City police officer Daniel Pantaleo, who was recently cleared of all charges in the 2014 death of Eric Garner, a black Staten Island man who died after Pantaleo placed him in a chokehold during an arrest for selling loose cigarettes in the neighborhood.

  1. In his dying words, Garner said, “I can’t take a breath.” The remarks, which appeared to be directed against New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, were heard interrupting Sen.
  2. Booker didn’t mind pausing for a few seconds while the chant continued, but he didn’t want to interrupt it.
  3. A security officer informed them they could stay as long as they were silent, according to Mallory, after they had finished their chanting.
  4. Mallory explained that when the protestors refused to leave their seats, they were forcibly removed and began yelling “Fire Pantaleo” and “I can’t breathe.” The large turnout on Wednesday night contrasts with the comparatively small turnout on Tuesday, with many people leaving early.
  5. Take a look at the current situation: Protesters disrupted the opening comments of Sen.
  6. “Fire Pantaleo,” the demonstrators chanted, making reference to New York police officer Daniel Pantaleo, who is suspected of fatally choking Eric Garner.
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‘Three million deportations’

  • “Three million deportations,” chanted another audience member during the discussion, which was halted by former Vice President Joe Biden. A protester in the crowd chanted, “3 million deportations,” in reference to the number of immigrants deported under the Obama administration — Melissa Gomez (@MelissaGomez004) 1st of August, 2019 More:The second Democratic debate was subjected to fact-checking. This choir opened the second Democratic debate of the year.

Cory Booker pauses debate statement as protesters loudly chant “Fire Pantaleo” over Eric Garner’s death

Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey delayed his opening remark during night two of the second round of the 2020 Democratic primary debates on Wednesday night after protestors disrupted his address by yelling “Fire Pantaleo.” Booker was representing the state of New Jersey. In his opening address, Booker expressed his displeasure with President Donald Trump’s racial remarks directed at Democratic congressman Elijah Cummings and his Baltimore congressional district over the weekend. “The president of the United States launched an attack on a city in America last week, describing it as “a nasty rat infested rodent mess,” according to Booker.

  1. During the interruption, a CNN moderator requested that Booker “please stand by,” to which Booker answered, “I will stand by.” The candidate then paused for a moment to allow the shouting to die down before proceeding with his statements.
  2. The Department of Justice stated last month that it will not file civil charges against the officer, prompting Garner’s daughter to create a Change.org petition seeking for his dismissal from the New York City Police Department.
  3. Former Housing Secretary Julián Castro made mention to Pantaleo at a speech on police on Wednesday night, after Booker’s interjection.
  4. Although Eric Garner stated that he was unable to breathe and that he was aware that he was killing Eric Garner, he has not been brought to justice “The audience erupted in cheers as he finished his statement.

“That police officer need to be taken off the streets immediately.” During night two of the second Democratic debates on Wednesday, 2020 presidential hopeful Cory Booker took a brief break from his opening remarks to respond to chants of “Fire Pantaleo.” CNN/Screenshot

What Protesters at Wednesday’s Debate Were Yelling at de Blasio, Booker, and Biden

demonstrators disrupted Cory Booker’s opening remark during night two of the 2020 Democratic primary debates on Wednesday night, yelling “Fire Pantaleo.” As a result, Booker had to take a break from his address and delay his opening statement. Democratic congressman Elijah Cummings and his Baltimore district were the targets of racial remarks made by President Donald Trump over the weekend, which Booker rebuked in his opening speech to the Senate. “The president of the United States launched an attack on a city in America last week, describing it as “a nasty rat infested rodent mess,” according to Booker.

During the interruption, a CNN moderator asked Booker to “please stand by senator,” to which Booker answered, “I will stand by.

Mayor Bill de Blasio was supposedly targeted by the demonstrators’ slogans, which were intended to persuade him to fire a police officer called Daniel Pantaleo, who was allegedly responsible for the murder of Eric Garner.

As the petition stated, “Please sign this petition and assist us in our ongoing demand that Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York City Police Commissioner James O’Neill remove Officer Pantaleo.” Taking place in Detroit on Wednesday evening, night two included the last ten of the twenty contenders that qualified for the debates.

Former Housing Secretary Julián Castro made mention to Pantaleo during a speech on police on Wednesday night, following Booker’s intermission.

Although Eric Garner stated that he was unable to breathe and that he was aware that he was murdering Eric Garner, he has still not been brought to justice “As he finished, the audience erupted in cheers.

Demonstrators screamed “Fire Pantaleo” during the second Democratic debate on Wednesday night, forcing Cory Booker, the 2020 presidential contender, to delay his opening speech.

‘Fire Pantaleo!’: Hecklers interrupt Democratic debate, taunting Bill de Blasio about Eric Garner cop

On the second night of the Democratic presidential discussion, the 2014 death of Eric Garner, who died after being placed in a chokehold by police, unexpectedly grabbed center stage, as hecklers interrupted the candidates and the Democratic competitors repeatedly referred to the case as an injustice. Interruptions from protestors began during the candidates’ opening addresses, forcing Sen. Cory Booker, D-New Jersey, to take a brief break from his speech for a brief while. The hecklers chanted, “Fire Pantaleo!” in reference to Daniel Pantaleo, the New York police officer implicated in the chokehold murder of Eric Garner in 2014, whose dying words, “I can’t breathe,” became a rallying cry for rallies against police treatment of blacks across the United States.

Minutes thereafter, Booker’s team rushed to Twitter to congratulate the demonstrators on their efforts.

“He was well aware of what he was doing, that he was murdering Eric Garner, and yet he has escaped prosecution to this very day.

This month, the Justice Department declined to bring federal civil rights charges against Pantaleo on the basis of his religious beliefs.

In a tweet, Tamika Mallory, an activist and co-chairwoman of the Women’s March, stated that she and four other women were behind the “Fire Pantaleo” chant, which was intended to call attention to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s policies on policing in New York and to Pantaleo’s continued employment by the city.

“Fire Pantaleo,” “I can’t breathe,” and other cries could be heard as they were led away from the arena.

In a rally, according to a video shared on Twitter by the union, Lynch said, “We carefully reviewed that film second by second and what the evidence established is that police Officer Pantaleo responded correctly.” “Remember, the use of force is never a nice sight, but it is necessary to bring someone under arrest when the situation calls for it.

Then he turned to face Vice President Joe Biden and said, “Mister Vice President.” “Can you tell us what you did to attempt to get the Justice Department to take action in the Garner case?” they ask.

The de Blasio campaign, like Booker’s, rushed to Twitter to express gratitude to the demonstrators. Averi Harper and Aaron Katersky of ABC News contributed additional reporting.

Protest Over Eric Garner’s Death Disrupts Democratic Debate (Published 2019)

Two times on Wednesday night, protesters interrupted the Democratic presidential debate in Detroit, yelling from the crowded audience with enough volume to bring the candidates and the broadcast to a screeching stop. “Fire Pantaleo!” chanted a group of demonstrators during the opening speeches of Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey, a reference to Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who put Eric Garner in a deadly chokehold on the sate of New York’s Staten Island in 2014. Nationwide demonstrations erupted following the murder of Mr.

Barr, issued an order ordering the dismissal of the case against Officer Pantaleo, which took effect immediately.

Booker took a breath.

When it was his turn to speak, Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York, who had just finished speaking and who has refused to fire Mr.

A former housing secretary and former mayor of the city of San Antonio, Julián Castro, brought up Mr.

Photograph courtesy of Erin Schaff/The New York Times Mr.

In reference to Officer Pantaleo, Mr.

de Blasio stated that the Garner family will “certainly get justice.” “I am certain that it will happen in the next 30 days in New York,” he continued.

Booker took a shot at Mayor de Blasio on Twitter, and he complimented the demonstrators in the process.

Booker wrote in response to the protest.

Biden Jr.

While their shouts were difficult to distinguish, the organization has stated that it is calling on Democratic candidates to vow to halting all deportations on their first day in office if they win election.

This year, the same group staged a sit-in protest outside Vice President Joe Biden’s office in Philadelphia.

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