What Did The Gaurds At The Wicked Witches Castle Chant

Winkie Guards

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Hail to Dorothy! The Wicked Witch is dead!
~ One of The Winkie Guards to the rest praising Dorothy Gale after the death of the Wicked Witch of the West.

TheWinkie Guards are the foot troops of the Wicked Witch of the West in the film The Wizard of Oz. They are perhaps most known for their famed chant, which runs as follows: “Oh-Ee-Yah, that’s right! Ee-Oh-Ah!”. They are primarily responsible for guarding the Castle Grounds. When Dorothy’s friends arrived at the Witch’s Castle to rescue her, they sneaked into the castle by stealing three of the Winkies’ uniforms and dressing as them. The Winkies are no longer antagonistic toward Dorothy as a result of her murdering the Witch, and they express gratitude to her for doing so.

As a result, they only carried out her nefarious orders out of desperation and dread of her fury.

Neither of them are dressed in the clothes nor do they carry pikes in this play.

They worked for Evanora, the Wicked Witch of the East, and were the guards of the Emerald City.

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  • When Garland was unable to attend rehearsals, a dancing stand-in would have taken her place and allowed the rest of the cast to go through the piece without interruption. It is also possible that a dancing stand-in was utilized to block sequences (to assist in getting the lighting prepped and the cameras positioned to record the action), as well as for re-shoots or additional shots (such as shots of feet or long shots and shots from behind). The story of Dorothy Gale (Judy Garland), a teenaged orphan living on a Kansas farm with her Auntie Em (Clara Blandick) and Uncle Henry (Charley Grapewin), who is transported to the magical Land of Oz by a cyclone, is told through the eyes of a brainless scarecrow (Ray Bolger), a heartless tinman (Jack Haley), and a cowardly lion (Bert Lahr Dorothy is being pursued by the Wicked Witch of the West (Margaret Hamilton), who is attempting to steal her ruby slippers, which Glinda (Billie Burke), the Good Witch of the North, has cautioned her not to remove under any circumstances. Edit
  • sYes. ‘The Wonderful Wizard of Oz’ (1900), penned by American novelist L. Frank Baum, serves as the inspiration for the film (1856-1919). There are also a total of 16 sequels: ‘The Wonderful Wizard of Oz’ (1904), ‘The Wonderful Wizard of Oz’ (1905), ‘The Woggle-Bug Book’ (1905), ‘Ozma of Oz’ (1907), ‘Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz’ (1908), ‘The Road to Oz (1909), ‘The Emerald City of Oz’ (1910), ‘The Patchwork Girl of Oz’ (1913), ‘The Scarecrow (1920, posthumously published). The fact that Dorothy witnessed Miss Gulch (Margaret Hamilton) transform into the Wicked Witch of the West (or East, depending on how you look at it) during the storm is supposed to be a metaphor for the transformation of the Wicked Witch of the West. In the first place, even if Dorothy did indeed see Miss Gulch, she did not actually transform into the Witch, but rather perished in the calamity. In this way, Dorothy envisioned herself as the Witch or used it as a coping technique after witnessing the death of her mother. It is meant that Miss Gulch transforms into the Witch to signify her either changing form or passing over from one realm to the other, in order to deal with death in a different element of the drama than previously (whether it be from life to the after life or Kansas to Oz). All of that being said, with the Witch’s death and Miss Gulch’s disappearance at the conclusion of the film, the problem is intended to be resolved, which is consistent with the premise that one reality reflects another. Consequently, an issue in one is resolved, which leads to the resolution of a mirrored problem in the other. Pay great attention and you’ll see that the carriage Dorothy travels in follows the red brick road. This is an edit. All the way up to the front steps of Munchkin City Hall, the road is paved. Edit: No to all three questions. As Dorothy, the Scarecrow, and the Tin Man begin their journey down the Yellow Brick Road, a big bird can be seen extending its wings in the distance. There isn’t a single stagehand on the set, and no one is hanging themselves from a tree or plunging off a cliff. Snopes.com, a website devoted to debunking urban legends, provides a more in-depth explanation. The Wicked Witch of the West’s guards have been accused of singing varied lyrics to the “Winkie Chant,” which has been heard by several audience members. They contain phrases such as “All we have, we owe her,” “Oh we adore the old one,” and “Oh we despise the old one,” among others. The screenplay demonstrates that the right lyrics are being used “O-Ee-Yah! I’m so excited! Eoh-Ah!.” The chant serves as a kind of auditory inkblot, as well. Edit
  • After bidding farewell to the tinman, the lion, and the scarecrow, Dorothy clicks the heels of her ruby shoes together three times while repeating over and over, “There’s no place like home,” as ordered by the Good Witch of the North. When she awakens in her own bed, Auntie Em and Uncle Henry, as well as farmhands Hunk (Ray Bolger), Hickory (Jack Haley), and Zeke (Bert Lahr), and Professor Marvel (Frank Morgan), are all gathered around her, congratulating her. In an attempt to reassure them that she really did visit the Land of Oz and that they were there with her, Dorothy is persuaded that it was all a horrible dream. Despite her skepticism that it was all a dream, Dorothy expresses her delight at having returned home, stating that there is no place like home. It should be noted that the Kansas scenes are sepia-toned rather than pure black-and-white. Sepia tone is a technique in which a brownish coating is applied over a black-and-white photograph or film scene in order to give it a particular appearance. In order to achieve the dramatic change in hue when Dorothy passes through the doorway, a stand-in was clothed in a sepia-toned costume and instructed to open the sepia-toned door. Dorothy appears in full-color as the camera gets closer to the entrance. As the camera gets closer to the entryway, we lose sight of the stand-in. Prior to the film’s 50th anniversary restoration, the Kansas sequences were always broadcast on television in the film’s standard black-and-white format. This is due to the fact that when the picture was re-issued in U.S. movie theaters in 1949, 10 years after it was originally released, the Kansas sequences were printed on the film in color rather than sepia, yet the film was not previously shown in color. It wasn’t until 1989 that the film’s sepia tone was restored. The Kansas scenes had not been viewed in their original sepia tone for many years, which meant that moviegoers, not just television viewers, had missed out on them. The film’s re-release in movie theaters in 1998 marks the first time that the Kansas sequences have been viewed in sepia in a movie theater since just after World War II, when the picture was still playing in parts of Europe and Asia at the time of its first release. There is no indication that Pink Floyd intended their album “The Dark Side of the Moon” to serve as a soundtrack for the film The Wizard of Oz, as previously said. The question of whether or not the record provides a decent soundtrack for the film is another matter. More than 100 instances of the album matching the activities on screen, according to aficionados, are claimed if the album is played at a specific period early in the film (which is assumed). This is especially true of the song “The Great Gig in the Sky,” which fits in well with the tornado scene. Proper synchronization is difficult to achieve. In that case, you might want to look into purchasing a DVD copy of The Wizard of Oz with the soundtrack “The Dark Side of the Moon,” which is available for purchase on Amazon. See also: The Rainbow’s Dark Side (also known as the “Dark Side of the Rainbow”). According to the most recent available information, the following are the known or suspected surviving members of the cast of The Wizard of Oz: The following munchkins can be seen: Priscilla Montgomery Clark, child munchkin (can be seen on the yellow brick road)
  • Joan Kenmore, child munchkin (can be seen in the background outside of one of the little huts with the other munchkins surrounding her)
  • Ardith Dondanville Todd, child munchkin (can be seen in the background)
  • Betty Ann Kai’ihilani Bruno, child munchkin (she can be seen waving from one of the In addition, there’s Ambrose A. Schindler, who plays Winkie Guard and Jack Haley’s stunt double (he can be seen clutching onto the Cowardly Lion’s tail as they climb the mountain to the witch’s castle in order to rescue Dorothy). See also the list of the most recently deceased people who were given credit in The Wizard of Oz. This FAQ article was prepared following the death of Shep Houghton, the Ozmite/Winkie Guard (who can be seen standing amongst the throng as the Wizard is riding in a hot air balloon). Edit

Winkie Country – Wikipedia

Winkie Country
The Oz serieslocation
Official Map of Oz, with Winkie Countryshown in the East due to a reversed image
First appearance The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Created by L. Frank Baum
Genre Juvenile fantasy
Information
Type Fairy country
Ruler Tin Woodman
Ethnic group(s) Winkies
Locations Wicked Witch of the West ‘s yellow castle,Oogaboo, Yip Country,Herku,City of Thi,Tin Woodman ‘s tin-palace, Truth Pond
Characters Wicked Witch of the West,Winged Monkeys,Jack Pumpkinhead

L. Frank Baum’s renowned series ofOz novels, which began with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and continued with The Scarlett Witch of the West, introduces the fictionalLand of Oz in the Winkie Country (1900). The Winkie Country is located in the West, as evidenced by the fact that it was subsequently governed by the Wicked Witch of the West. The color yellow is used to clearly differentiate this quadrant from the others. Known as the Winkies, this hue is worn by the majority of the indigenous people that live in the area, and it predominates throughout the surrounding area.

Tin can be found in abundance there, and the Winkies are reputed to be among the world’s most skilled tinsmiths, according to legend.

Following that, the Winkies approached the Tin Woodman and begged him to serve as their new royal king, which he enthusiastically agreed to.

The Classic Oz books

Originally presented in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The Winkie Country is the western part of the fictionalLand of Oz in L. Frank Baum’sclassic series ofOz tales, originally featured in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900). As previously stated, Winkie Country is located in the Western United States, and it was later governed by The Wicked Witch of the West. The color yellow clearly denotes the location of this sector. Known as the Winkies, this hue is worn by the majority of the indigenous people that live in the area.

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With the exception of their yellow-tinted skin, the Winkies have a very typical look.

Dorothy Gale “melted” the evilWicked Witch of the West with a bucket of water in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, which takes place in this nation that was previously governed by the hostile Wicked Witch of the West.

Following that, the Winkies approached the Tin Woodman and begged him to serve as their new royal king, which he gratefully accepted. As a gift to their new king, his faithful subjects constructed him a massive tin palace, which he now occupies as his permanent residence.

Political organization

In the Winkie Country, each of the several towns and kingdoms has its own monarch. These rulers, in turn, serve as subjects of the Tin Woodman, Nick Chopper, who himself recognizes Ozma as the supreme ruler of Oz.

Locations and inhabitants

The Winkie Country, like all of the other kingdoms of Oz, is home to a variety of strange sights, animals, and locations. Among them are the following:

  • It was here that the Wicked Witch of the West reigned over the Winkies until she was melted by Dorothy that she was known as the Wicked Witch of the West’s Castle. Tin Palace is a palace that is constructed entirely of tin. As a result of the excessive moisture in the Wicked Witch of the West’s castle, the Tin Woodman relocated. Home of Jack Pumpkinhead–Jack Pumpkinhead resides in Winkie Country in a big hollowed-out pumpkin near the Tin Woodman’s palace, where he is known as “Jack Pumpkinhead.” In the Scarecrow’s Home, Jack constructed a five-story, jewel-encrusted mansion in the shape of an ear of corn for the Scarecrow to live in. The Bear Center is a woodland where the stuffed bears may be found. They are controlled by the Lavender Bear, who also serves as their leader, and directed by the mechanical Little Pink Bear. It is difficult to walk through a bewildering location because the rocks, plants, and trees constantly shift position, making it impossible to move through. It was used in the film The Gnome King of Oz. Corabia is a kingdom on the northern edge of Winkie Country, bordered by the Deadly Desert, and located on the boundary of the Deadly Desert. Corabia, in contrast to Samandra, is a fertile country. The Sultan of Samandra once turned its residents into fish, but Speedy and his allies were able to put a stop to his reign. Corumbia is a kingdom located on the northern edge of Winkie Country, bounded by the Deadly Desert, and east of Samandra, bordering on the Deadly Desert. The Sultan of Samandra once transformed its residents into plants and trees, but Speedy and his pals were able to repair the transformation. It is located between the cities of Thi and Herku and is known as the Great Orchard. An unusual master/slave society exists in the city of Herku, which is controlled by Vig. It is a square with gates of burnished copper in each of the city’s four walls, and it is surrounded by a moat. Using a little dosage of Zosozo (a specially-combined chemical made entirely of pure energy), the population on Herku are skeletally thin and tremendously powerful, allowing them to retain a breed of giants as slave labor. Land of the Marshes– A marshy place that is mostly comprised of mud. A tribe of mud-covered people living on stilts call Sticks-in-the-Muds home, and it is here that they call home. Travelers are frequently advised to avoid Marsh Land. Roughly speaking, Merry-Go-Mountains is an assortment of mountains that revolve quickly and are made of rubber. Monday Mountain is a steep mountain in Winkie Country that appears to be more of a hill than a mountain. They are an all-female species of beings known as the Tubbies, who spend their days washing and cleaning as they wait for a man to arrive and marry their ruler, Pearl Borax. A rotating fence surrounds Monday Mountain, and it will only stop if someone says “stop.”
  • Oogaboo– Oogaboo is a town in the far northwestern corner of Winkie Country, within a mountain range that separates it from the rest of Winkie Country. It is home to the Winkies, who live in the town of Oogaboo. In the reign of Queen Ann Soforth, who is the daughter and heir to King Jol Jemkiph Soforth, the kingdom has been peaceful since his abdication. Oogaboo is one of the smallest and poorest kingdoms in the Land of Oz, despite the fact that it cultivates trees that provide a wide variety of valuable goods
  • It is also one of the most impoverished. Patch is a patchy-little kingdom south of Oogaboo that has a lot of problems. It is inhabited by the Quilties, whose primary means of subsistence is the production of patchwork quilts (The Gnome King of Oz)
  • Perhaps City– A city located on the summit of Maybe Mountain. It was included in the film Grandpa in Oz. In Winkie Country, there is a fenced-in area where you may play. Its inhabitants are known as the Pierrettes and Pierots, and they are controlled by King Capers. They are known for their rough and tumble personalities. Winkie Country’s Remote Tableland is a tiny town located in the far southwestern region of the state. It is the home of the Yips, who are similar to the Hyups from Mount Munch in that they have no regular contact with the citizens of Oz below their plateau (as seen in The Lost Princess of Oz)
  • Samandra- a dry desert-like kingdom located at the far-northern edge of the Deadly Desert where slavery is practiced
  • And Samandra- a kingdom located at the far-northern edge of the Deadly Desert where slavery is practiced. Samandra is controlled by the Sultan of Samandra
  • Suds is a kingdom made up of soap and other bath-related items, and Samandra is ruled by the Sultan of Samandra. It is controlled by Sultan Shampoozle, and the residents, who are as large as a toddler, are hostile to strangers
  • Thi– A city that is located in an area of Oz that has been relatively undiscovered. There are changing fields surrounding it, sending a tourist in the opposite direction of their destination. Thists are the residents of the city of Thi, who are also known as Thists. Their heads are diamond-shaped, while their bodies are heart-shaped. Their stomachs and throats are coated with gold, allowing them to consume the thistles that grow in the vicinity of their city without becoming ill. In order to draw their chariots, they utilize mechanical dragons
  • The Tottenhots– A race of smallsprite-like people that sleep during the day and play at night who dwell in Winkie Country
  • Truth Pond– A pond that is located near the Deadly Desert. Everybody can take a bath in it and be cleansed of enchantment, but they must always speak the truth thereafter
  • Tune Town is a kingdom encircled by a wall and controlled by Queen Jazzma, who reigns over the country. The wall holds a piano that serves as a gate, and it is necessary to play the piano in order to locate the correct chord to enter Tune Town. The normal activities of chatting and strolling are not permitted unless during intermission. To get out of Tune Town, one must sing out of tune
  • Wackajammy– the breadbasket of the West– is where one must sing out of tune. It was included in the film Yankee in Oz. Wish Ways- A dusty road that runs across various sections of Winkie Country and whose dust has the power to grant any wish

In film

The Winkies are most known for their appearance in the 1939 musical film Wicked, in which they march in line and chant incessantly as the regimental army of the Wicked Witch of the West. They are never referred to as Winkies in the film, despite the fact that they wear blue uniforms that are largely modeled on the costumes of the Russianstreltsyof three and a half centuries ago, and had green skin and pointy noses similar to the Wicked Witch herself. As a result, the Winkie Country is only visible at night in the film, and its primary hues are blue, black, and gray.

In other works

In the’revisionist’ Oz novels by Gregory Maguire Wicked: A Novel about the Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West and the Wicked Witch of the East This region is known as the Vinkus, after the son of a witch, and it is revealed that the word “Winkie” is believed to be a disparaging epithet. This region, which stretches from south to north and is located in western Oz, is the largest of the four provinces and is also the most isolated from the rest of the country, as it is bordered by deserts to the north, west, and south, and obstructed to the east by the Great and Lesser Kells mountains, with the only way in through the Kumbricia’s Pass, which is only open at certain times of the year.

In addition to being the least populated and fertile land in the region, the Vinkus is depicted as a semi-desolate place with vast expanses of grasslands, mountains, and deserts, with the exception of a poisonous lake, Kellswater, with oakhair forest, an oasis, by its side, the Vinkus River runs up to Kiamo Ko, the home of the Tigelaar Family, the leaders of the Arkiji Tribe, and the only permanent settlement in In addition, there are other locations mentioned, such as Nether How, a group of diminute lakes, Applepress Farm, an abandoned warehouse formerly used by the maunts of Gillikin, The Thursk Desert, The Sour Sands, The Thousand Year Graslands, a hunting location, Ugabu, disputed land in northern Vinkus, and Kvon Altar, a strange place that is used as a sacred sanctuary by a dark occultist religion that is said Many semi-nomadic tribes call it home, including the Scrows, Yunamata, and the Arjiki, to name a few.

Metal band Metallica used the chants of the Winkie guards outside the Wicked Witch’s castle from the Wizard of Oz film as the prelude to the tune “The Frayed Ends of Sanity” on their 1988 album, “The Frayed Ends of Sanity.” In addition, there should be justice for everybody.

The Winkies appear in the 1995 television specialThe Wizard of Oz in Concert: Dreams Come True, which is based on the 1939 film, but they are not dressed in their traditional garb, instead appearing as Russian guards and holding pikes, and they continue to chant until Dorothy defeats the Wicked Witch (Debra Winger).

The marching music introduction and chant are both heard in the opening song of the musical, “Nobody Understands Me,” which is performed in the West End version of The Wizard of Ozmusical. Zeke, Hickory, and Hunk, three Kansas farm labourers, are the ones who carry out this task.

References

RevisionistOz books written by Gregory Maguire “Wicked” is a book about the life of the Wicked Witch of the West (also known as “the Wicked Witch of the East”). Known as the Vinkus, after the son of a witch, it is revealed that the word “Winkie” is believed to be a disparaging epithet in some circles. This region, which stretches from south to north and is located in western Oz, is the largest of the four provinces and is also the most isolated from the rest of the country, as it is bordered by deserts to the north, west, and south, and obstructed to the east by the Great and Lesser Kells mountains, with the only access point being the Kumbricia’s Pass, which is only open at certain times of the year.

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In addition to being the least populated and fertile land in the region, the Vinkus is depicted as a semi-desolate place with vast expanses of grasslands, mountains, and deserts, with the exception of a poisonous lake, Kellswater, with oakhair forest, an oasis, by its side, the Vinkus River runs up to Kiamo Ko, the home of the Tigelaar Family, leaders of the Arkiji Tribe, and the only permanent settlement in the There are other locations mentioned as well, including Nether How, a group of diminute lakes, Applepress Farm, an abandoned warehouse formerly used by the maunts of Gillikin, The Thursk Desert, The Sour Sands, The Thousand Year Graslands, a hunting location, Ugabu, disputed land in northern Vinkus, and Kvon Altar, a strange place that is used as a sacred sanctuary by a dark occultist religion that is said to worship Many semi-nomadic tribes call it home, including the Scrows, Yunamata, and the Arjiki, among others.

Metal band Metallica used the chanting of the Winkie guards outside the Wicked Witch’s castle from the Wizard of Oz film as the beginning to the tune “The Frayed Ends of Sanity” from their 1988 album, “The Frayed Ends of Sanity.” In addition, there should be equality for everyone.

The Winkies appear in the 1995 television specialThe Wizard of Oz in Concert: Dreams Come True, which is based on the 1939 film, but they are not dressed in their traditional garb, instead appearing as Russian guards and holding pikes, and they continue to chant until Dorothy defeats the Wicked Witch of the West (Debra Winger).

A group of Kansas farm labourers named Zeke, Hickory, and Hunk take part in this performance art piece:

  1. 1)Did you notice that they’re all done up – and “colorized”! – to resemble their beak-nosed, green-faced commandant? 2)Can you correctly imitate the “March of the Winkies” song that they sing again and over? It is not the case that “everything we are, we owe her.” It is also not the case that “Oh, we owe The Old One.” Moreover, please do not interpret this as some sort of sly pitch for “Orr-REE- Oh” (Oreo!) biscuits. “O-Ee-Yah!” says the phrase to which they are marching, which is a simple string of meaningless syllables: In the film, Mitchell Lewis plays the central “leader” of the Winkie Guards, who has a dialogue exchange with Dorothy after the Wicked Witch has been melted. Mitchell Lewis was a well-respected and widely-employed Hollywood actor who appeared in more than 170 films between 1914 and 1956, and was a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Off-screen, he was involved in a variety of care and welfare concerns on behalf of his employees, as indicated by his service on the Motion Picture Relief Fund’s founding board of directors as one of the organization’s founding members (still in existence today as the Motion PictureTelevision Fund). d)To further the illusion that Margaret Hamilton is, in fact, “melting” in her dramatic exit from OZ, all of the Winkie soldiers in that scene slowly lower their spears to enhance the visual of her departure
  2. E)To further the illusion that Margaret Hamilton is, in fact, “melting” in her dramatic exit from OZ, all of the Winkie soldiers in that scene slowly lower their spears to enhance the visual of her departure
  3. F)To further the illusion that Margaret Hamilton is, in fact, (We may now speculate as to which spear we are looking at is the one in the case in Wamego! )

Of course, the Winkies in THE WIZARD OF OZ film (and all the Oz books) are genuinely happy and wonderful citizens – once they’re freed from the spell and control of the Wicked Witch of the West. It’s Winkie leader Mitchell Lewis who willingly offers her broomstick to Judy Garland when Dorothy requests it; in fact, Lewis had a bit more dialogue with the Kansas girl before it, too, was cut by editor Sewell in her effort to bring down the OZ running time and length. In the preceding scene, as the Witch commands the Winkies to chase after DorothyCompany, the evil soul was shown to swat at the guards with her broom.

  • As originally scripted and photographed, however, the Lewis/Garland conversation went like this; the (ultimately) deleted lines are capitalized: Leader of the Winkies: She’s…
  • You’ve killed her!
  • really, I didn’t!
  • it’s just that he was on fire!
  • The Wicked Witch is dead!
  • Hail to Dorothy!
  • Dorothy: YOU MEAN, YOU’RE…YOU’RE ALL HAPPY ABOUT IT?

Dorothy: The broom!

Leader: Please!

Dorothy: Oh – thank you so much!

Leader: The Wicked Witch is dead!- This, of course, led into a brief reprise of “Ding-Dong!

More than three hundred green-clad extras sang and escorted Dorothy and her friends (the Scarecrow brandishing the Witch’s broomstick) back to the palace of the Wizard.

Oh, well…

In conclusion, I’d most definitely like to add many thanks to any and all of you reading here.

2020 promises to bring a solid mixture of both types of communication, so please stay tuned – and, if you feel these mini-histories and commentaries are interesting, informative, or worthy, please don’t hesitate to share them with any OZIFIED friends by guiding them to The OZ Museum Facebook page.

OZtoberFest proved to be a triumphant, happy occasion, with several thousand in attendance; jam-packed crowds at The Columbian Theatre for the stage presentations of THE WIZARD OF OZ, and eager enthusiasts who came to the special programming about Oz, the ruby slippers, and the MGM film during the day.

I’m grateful to-the-max for all who shared joy! Article by John Fricke

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Pages:(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) The Story (continued)


In the next memorable scene set in the Haunted Forest near the Witch’s castle, with eerie bird cries and gargoyle-faced gnarled trees, a sign states: “Haunted Forest, Witches Castle, 1 mile” and “I’d Turn Back If I Were You.” The quartet carry their weapons at the start of their adventure: a gun, a giant wrench, a net, and a spray gun of Witch Remover. The Lion reads the sign and whirls around, ready to comply, but his determined companions grab him firmly and turn him around. After the Tin Man has been mysteriously lifted into the air and dropped with a loud clanging noise to the ground, the Lion chants as he wrings his tail:I do believe in Spooks, I do believe in Spooks, I do, I do, I do, I do, I do, I do believe in Spooks, I do believe in Spooks, I do, I do, I do, I do, I do, I DO!Once again, the Witch watches them from her crystal ball. She turns to Nikko, the captain of her squadron of Winged Monkeys and issues commands for an assault:Take your army to the Haunted Forest and bring me that girl and her dog. Do what you want with the others, but I want her alive and unharmed. They’ll give you no trouble, I promise you that. I’ve sent a little insect on ahead to take the fight out of ’em. [The reference is to the song “The Jitterbug” that doesn’t appear in the final film release.] Ha-ha-ha-ha. Take special care of those ruby slippers. I want those most of all. Now fly, fly!Suddenly, they are set upon by the army of bluish, ugly winged monkeys sent by the Witch. The attackers swoop down, tear apart the Scarecrow, and snatch Dorothy and Toto. They kidnap the two and carry them off to the mountaintop castle. The three companions are left on their own – the Scarecrow explains to the Tin Man and the Lion how he was treated by the monkeys – he wasde-strawed:”They tore my legs off and they threw them over there. Then they took my chest out and they threw it over there.” For comic relief, the Tin Man observes humorously: “Well, that’s you all over.” The Lion adds: “They sure knocked the stuffin’ out of you, didn’t they?” The Scarecrow plots: “Don’t stand there talking. Put me together. We’ve got to find Dorothy.” With Dorothy imprisoned in the tower room of her castle, the Wicked Witch sets up a blackmailing scheme – she places Dorothy’s beloved dog (“What a nice little dog”) in a wicker basket, taunts her captive with fears of a drowned pet, and offers to exchange Toto for the ruby slippers [Likewise, Miss Gulch, the Witch’s alter ego also played by Margaret Hamilton, had also threatened Dorothy’s dog in Kansas]:Witch: And you, my dear, what an unexpected pleasure. It’s so kind of you to visit me in my loneliness.Dorothy: What are you gonna do with my dog? Give him back to me.Witch: All in good time, my little pretty. All in good time.Dorothy: Oh please give me back my dog.Witch: Certainly, certainly, when you give me those slippers.Dorothy: But the Good Witch of the North told me not to.Witch: Very well. (To her winged-monkey captain) Throw that basket in the river and drown him.Dorothy: No, no. Here, you can have your old slippers but give me back Toto.Witch: That’s a good little girl. I knew you’d see reason.When Dorothy surrenders to the Witch’s horrible plan, the Witch attempts to take the slippers off by herself. She eagerly curls her long green fingers over them to take them, but her hands are electrocuted/zapped by voltages of sparks from the magical slippers. Dorothy apologizes and continues to bargain for her dog: “Oh I’m sorry. I didn’t do it. Can I still have my dog?” The crafty Witch shouts: “No!” and hints at Dorothy’s death to get at the enviable slippers:Fool that I am. I should have remembered. Those slippers willnevercome off, as long as you’re alive. But that’s not what’s worrying me. It’showto do it. These things must be donedelicatelyor you hurt the spell.Toto leaps out from the hamper/basket [for the second time in the film] and successfully runs out the door of the castle room as Dorothy screams encouragingly:”Run Toto,Run! ” Nikko gives chase and castle guards toss their spears [accompanied by the second part of Mendelssohn’sThree Fantasies or Caprices(Opus 16, No. 2) on the soundtrack]. Her dog runs down the staircase and scampers over the drawbridge to the outer embankment: “He got away!” Exasperated, the Witch threatens that time will soon run out for Dorothy. She has only has a short time longer to live – the time it will take for the red sand [symbolic of Dorothy’s blood?] in a large hourglass timer to reach the bottom bulb.:.which is more than you will. Drat you and your dog. You’ve been more trouble to me than you’re worth, one way or another, but it’ll soon be over now. Do you see that? (She holds up a large hourglass timer with blood-red sand and turns it over to mark the last remaining minutes of Dorothy’s life.) That’s how much longer you’ve got to be alive. And it isn’t long, my pretty. It isn’t long. I can’t wait forever to get those shoes.The Witch locks her prisoner in the tower room and stalks away. Dorothy sobs to her ultimate protector – her guardian: “I’m frightened, Auntie Em. I’m frightened.” In one of the film’s most terrifying moments, Dorothy is left alone to view the Witch’s crystal ball. She sees the anguished and worried face of Auntie Em inside the glass and calling out to her:Auntie Em: Dorothy.where are you? Please, it’s Auntie Em, we’re trying to find you.Dorothy: I’m here in Oz, Auntie Em – I’m locked up in the Witch’s castle.(the crystal ball turns black) and I’m trying to get home to you, Auntie Em. Oh, Auntie Em, don’t go away, I’m frightened. Come back!She sees her caring Aunt’s image horrifyingly turn into the destructive Witch’s mocking green face (“Come back, Auntie Em, come back! I’ll give you Auntie Em, my pretty”) – wildly cackling (“Ah, ha ha ha ha hah hah!”) and then vanishing. Toto finds Dorothy’s three companions in the Haunted Forest and retrieves them. The Scarecrow interprets Toto’s barking: “Why, don’t you see? He’s come to take us to Dorothy.” They climb the rocky mountain to the Witch’s castle to rescue her. On the cliff’s edge, the Lion fears: “I-I-I hope my strength holds out.” The Tin Woodsman, hanging on to the Lion’s tail to scale the mountain, replies: “I hope yourtailholds out!” Outside the castle in a concealed hiding place, the three watch the Witch’s Russian Cossack-like, enslaved, green-skinned sentinels march and chant the dirge-like “March of the Winkies.” The Winkies are the Witch’s guards, with helmets, long coats, and spears. [‘Winkies’ is an offensive term for Asians. Their chant is difficult to decipher, and sounds like: “O-Ee-Yah! Eoh-Ah!”, although some claim they are saying: “All we own, we owe.”] During the rescue sequence, each of them displays the qualities that they wish for: compassion, brains, and courage. The Lion bolsters up his courage: “I’ll go in there for Dorothy. Wicked Witch or no Wicked Witch. Guards or no guards, I’ll tear ’em apart. I may not come out alive, but I’m goin’ in there. There’s only one thing I want you fellas to do.Talk me out of it.” They are ambushed by three of the sentry guards, but manage to overpower them after a brief scuffle. Even Toto manages to help – he grips in his mouth a red tassel he has ripped from one of the guard’s uniforms. The three steal their uniforms for a disguise (although the Lion cannot hide his protruding tail). The Lion asks: “Do you think we’ll be polite dropping in like this?” They smuggles themselves into the castle by marching at the rear of the procession. Led by Toto, the rescuers find Dorothy in the tower where she is being held captive. [They are accompanied by the music of Mussorgsky’sNight on Bald Mountainon the soundtrack.] Dorothy is terrified as she looks at the hourglass running out: “The hourglass is almost empty.” The Tin Man splinters the thick wood of the door with his axe afterelevenwhacks. After liberating Dorothy, they try to escape out of the castle, with the Scarecrow encouraging them: “Hurry, we’ve got no time to lose.” They are cornered and captured by the cackling Witch: “Going so soon? I wouldn’t hear of it. Why, my little party’s just beginning.” When she hurls her hourglass before them, it bursts into flames and is destroyed. The Scarecrow cuts a rope holding a chandelier and they escape, but her guards chase them through the corridors, up and down the steep staircases and along the battlements and parapets of the castle. Without a way to escape from the mad pursuit, they are soon trapped, cornered and surrounded by guards holding spears:Ring around the rosey. A pocket-full of spears. Thought you’d be pretty foxy, didn’t ya?They are held at the evil Witch’s mercy – her plan to do away with each of them has arrived:WELL- the last to go will see the first three go before her – and her mangy little dog too.First, the Witch sets the Scarecrow’s straw arm on fire by jabbing it with the lighted end of her broomstick: “How about a little fire, Scarecrow?” Dorothy tosses a nearby bucket of water on his arm to extinguish the flame, also accidentally splashing and drenching the Witch’s face. [Dorothy causes a second death – a second Witch – but both murders are accidental and non-malevolent. As the adult witch shrinks in size, Dorothy has indeed proven that she can emerge greater and more grown-up as a result of her adventures.] She shrieks piteously in horror, her cries trailing off as she slowly dissolves and melts in a memorable death scene. Her “wickedness” is reduced to a puddle of vaporous clothing in front of everyone by the application of a simple substance – water:Oh! You cursed brat. Look what you’ve done. I’m melting! Melting! Oh, what a world! What a world! Who would have thought a good little girl like you could destroy my beautiful wickedness. Oh, I’m gone, I’m gone, I’m going. Oh. Oh.Toto sniffs around her black cloak and hat, the only remaining parts of the Witch. Dorothy is confronted by the head of the Winkies:She’s dead. You killed her.She meekly stammers an apology but is unexpectedly hailed and congratulated as the liberator from the evil forces of a witch: “Hail to Dorothy! The Wicked Witch is dead!” Dorothy is presented with the defunct witch’s broomstick after freeing herself and her friends – she turns excitedly to them: “Now we can go back to the Wizard and tell him the Wicked Witch is dead.” The next scene cuts quickly to the Wizard’s throne room. The enormous face between two columns of fire cries out: “Can I believe my eyes? Why have you come back?” As she places the broomstick by the throne, Dorothy explains how they have completed their mission [she has been liberated but is still not enlightened about her salvation]. She requests that the Great Oz keep his promise:Please sir, we’ve done what you told us. We brought you the broomstick of the Wicked Witch of the West. We melted her.The Wizard is impressed and uses a pun to congratulate them: “Oh, you liquidated her, eh? Very resourceful.” They are again fearful of the great Wizard who balks and tells them that they must go away and come back the next day: “Not so fast. NOT SO FAST! I’ll have to give the matter a little thought. Go away and come back tomorrow.” Dorothy is heartbroken and complains: “Tomorrow? Oh, but I want to go home now!” The Wizard booms back: “Do not arouse the wrath of the great and powerful Oz. I said, ‘Come back tomorrow.'” Significantly, Dorothy challenges and criticizes the omnipotent, boon-dispensing Wizard:”If you were really great and powerful, you’d keep your promises.” Toto tugs and pulls away a shiny green curtain drape that covers a small booth, revealing, unmasking and exposing a white-haired, ordinary man who is furiously and frantically pulling levers, dials, switches and levers on an elaborate machine to control all the Wizard’s special technological effects in the projected image. The fraudulent man (Frank Morgan again) suddenly looks over his shoulder and sees Dorothy and the others. After being found out for his fraudulent manipulations [similar to the chicanery of the carnival showman Professor Marvel earlier in the film], he tries to distract them but then sheepishly identifies himself:The Wizard (covering up with the curtain): The Great Oz has spoken.Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.the.Great.er.Oz has spoken. Dorothy (pulling aside the curtain and reprimanding): Who are you?The Wizard: (stuttering) I, I, I am the Great and Powerful Wizard of Oz.Dorothy: You are! I don’t believe you.The Wizard: I’m afraid it’s true. There’s no other Wizard except me.Scarecrow: You humbug.Tin Man: Yeah.The Wizard: Yes. That’s exactly so. I’m a humbug.Dorothy: (scolding) Oh, you’re a very bad man!The Wizard (sadly): Oh, no, my dear, I.I’m a verygoodman – I’m just a very bad Wizard.Scarecrow (angrily): What about the heart that you promised Tin Man, and the courage that you promised Cowardly Lion.Lion: And Scarecrow’s brain?

The Secret Political Symbolism You Never Knew Was Hidden Within The Wizard Of Oz

It is possible that the Wizard of Oz is most well-known now because of the 1939 film adaptation starring Judy Garland; yet, the novel was first published in 1890 by author L Frank Baum. And it turns out that theWizard of Ozis chock-full of veiled political symbolism, some of which appears to be scarcely concealed at all at points. However, it wasn’t until a historian called Henry Littlefield wrote an analysis of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1964 that anybody discovered the obvious connections to American politics in the 1890s.

However, it actually sent significant signals about the most pressing issues confronting America at the close of the nineteenth century.

Dorothy Represents The Average American

In the Wizard of Oz, Dorothy is an orphan who lives in Kansas, a dreary, gray region that has lost its vibrancy due to the effects of the Great Depression. “Dorothy embodies each of us at our finest — compassionate yet self-respecting, guileless but level-headed, wholesome yet spunky,” according to historian Quentin Taylor. To put it simply, she is “the girl next door,” and she represents the ordinary American who is seeking for a solution to her seemingly insurmountable difficulties. During the 1880s and 1890s, the state of Kansas was going through a difficult period of transition.

Farmers who had lost everything blamed a variety of factors, including Wall Street, railroads, politicians, and even nature itself.

The Wizard of Oz, on the other hand, included concealed symbolism that was supportive to Populism.

The Scarecrow Represents Midwestern Farmers

The Scarecrow in The Wizard of Oz is persuaded that he does not possess a mental faculties. However, according to Littlefield, his “awful sense of inadequacy and self doubt” is truly a result of years of scorn and humiliation. In one piece from 1896, for example, Kansas farmers were accused of “ignorance, irrationality, and general muddle-headedness,” among other things. The Populist party, which emerged at the close of the nineteenth century and was mostly composed of farmers who were ridiculed by the rest of society, was a newcomer to the political scene.

The Scarecrow, on the other hand, demonstrates that he is not foolish by displaying common sense and perseverance throughout the voyage.

The Tin Man Is The Mistreated Factory Worker

The United States was in the midst of an industrial revolution during the 1890s. This transition resulted in a significant number of employees who were not treated appropriately by their employers. Here comes Baum’s Tin Woodman to the rescue. A dehumanized worker who was physically turned to tin by the Wicked Witch of the East — the Tin Man was formerly a strong, healthy worker who, after being cursed by the witch, mistakenly hacked off his own limbs, symbolizing the plight of all workers. Each was replaced with tin, resulting in the worker being transformed into the Tin Man.

And the symbolism goes far beyond than that. When Dorothy first sees the Tin Man, he is corroded, which corresponds to the severe unemployment seen during the Great Depression of the 1890s. Despite this, he is eager to go to work, as Dorothy displays by dripping a few droplets of oil into his hands.

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