What Did The Macedonian Pikemen Chant At Gaugamela

Question for my own health [Alexander film]

Posted on the 12th of January, 2006 at 17:41 EDT (US) Please refrain from arguing, discussing, screaming, or raving. “Alexander” is one of my favorite songs. For some reason, every day as I walk slowly (like I’m marching), the line the Macedonians shout at the Battle of Gaugamela becomes stuck in my brain. I adore the movie “Alexander.” So, for the sake of my own sanity, can you tell me precisely what they are saying?! Furius VenatorLegionary was published on the 12th of January 2006 at 17:44 EDT (US) as 1 / 35 of the total.

Is it a coincidence that the Greek war cry ‘alalalalai!’ is used?

As a result, civile, si ergo fortibusis in ero It is Vassis inem who causes the dux.

posted on the 12th of January, 2006 at 17:49 EDT (US) 2 / 35 by AndarielBanned Although it may have sounded ominous and Persian in nature, alalalalai was not the source of the scary sounding phrase.

  1. Also, there is what I believe to be a reference to RTW in the film, namely the characteristic “Hooting,” which grants things like -1 command and -1 morale to the characters.
  2. The Persians were laughing and bobbing their heads back and forth, as if they were saying, “Hoo-Ha!
  3. Hoo-Ha!” I assume Darius possessed that characteristic, since his Persians were laughing and bobbing their heads back and forth, as if they were saying, “Hoo-Ha!” Furius VenatorLegionary was published on the 12th of January 2006 at 17:57 EDT (US) and received 3 / 35 votes.
  4. It may have seemed ridiculous to you, but I’m guessing it terrified the living daylights out of the majority of those who heard it.
  5. As a result, civile, si ergo fortibusis in ero It is Vassis inem who causes the dux.
  6. ReynaertLegionary posted on the 12th of January, 2006 at 18:51 EDT (US) 4 out of 35 It is the year i-yos.
  7. I’m having trouble getting a handle on it (but then, Greec isn’t my strong suit).

Eis polemon would refer to the battlefield, eis stratopedion to the camp, and eis echthrous to the adversaries, so I suppose that would make sense in this context.

The ending -os is conceivable (where the second word has a substantive ending in -os, which are words that are typically quite tangible objects, like as the anthos flower) in some cases.

I’d say the last part is a substantive, but there might be an adjective or an adverb in the center of the sentence as well.

AndarielBanned posted on the 12th of January, 2006 at 18:52 EDT (US) 5 out of 35 stars I was undoubtedly startled by their chant in “Alexander,” and it was cohesive rather than a slew of random shouts like others.

Furius VenatorLegionary was published on the 12th of January 2006 at 19:15 EDT (US) and received 6 / 35 votes.

That is, I believe, fairly well established.

It almost sounds like what Andariel believes she is hearing.

As a result, civile, si ergo fortibusis in ero It is Vassis inem who causes the dux.

AndarielBanned posted on the 12th of January, 2006 at 19:19 EDT (US) 7 out of 35 stars The answer is that it shouldn’t, for ululation in the manner of Saracen madmen isn’t befitting of a great Macedonian kingdom — It was horrifying and clever at the same time, and it wasn’t just mindless jabbering or yelling, as I had previously said.

  1. (Take a peek at your soldiers) ReynaertLegionary was published on the 12th of January 2006 at 19:24 EDT (US) and received 8 / 35 votes.
  2. (I preferred that movie over Troy.) After all, weren’t the Greec Phalanxes accompanied by a whistleplayer to indicate the beginning and end of the thread?
  3. If you imagine yourself standing in the middle of a field with thousands of feet stamping on the ground at the same time, it becomes more difficult.
  4. It should, by all rights, be!
  5. If done properly (as Reynaert proposes, followed by silence), it has the potential to be quite successful.
  6. As a result, civile, si ergo fortibusis in ero It is Vassis inem who causes the dux.
  7. They were all screaming and yelling like idiots.

I believe you are referring about Roman legion cohorts.

Hollywood, on the other hand, knows better.

Aside from the commanders shouting orders, they made noise by rocking their sarissas forward and back in one hand while standing up, which sounded frightening enough, like the legs of an AT gun.

The Spartans employed music to help them maintain better track of time.

As a result, civile, si ergo fortibusis in ero It is Vassis inem who causes the dux.

posted on the 13th of January, 2006 at 15:23 EDT (US) 12 / 35 by AndarielBanned There has been no response to my question: S as a result, this is a BUMP ReynaertLegionary was published on the 13th of January, 2006 at 18:26 EDT (US).

Eastern Daylight Time (US) 14 / 35 The DVD player won’t play it at all when I try to view it right now.

If you can’t see Troy, it’s a blessing in disguise, because Alexander puts up a wonderful show.

Seriously, though, the reproduction of the Combat of Gaugamela was the greatest portion of Stone(dfilm, )’s and it may well be the best battle reenactment ever shown on screen in the history of the medium of film.

In the letter sent by Phillip II of Macedon to his son Alexander the Great, Furus VenatorLegionary posted on January 14, 2006 12:54 EDT (US) on the 17th day of January, 2006.

As a result, civile, si ergo fortibusis in ero It is Vassis inem who causes the dux.

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Military historians have been debating it for 2000 years, and we are the first to have’seen’ it in person in that time period.

It’s a shame the remainder of the film was given the Hollywood makeover.

Pax Romana means “peace in Rome.” ‘Pax Britannia’ means “peace in Britain.” The United States of America is in a state of peace.

Yeah, that’s right.

Few—to be routed or whatever happened to them (they couldn’t have lasted long, lest they smash the entire Phalanx).

It’s referred to as a piper.

And, indeed, the Greeks utilized pipers and musicians to preserve the rhythm of the festivities.

Archaeologists believe that the boy skeleton found in the Marathon burial mound belonged to one of the Athenian pipers, according to archaeological evidence.

ReynaertLegionary was published on 14 January 2006 at 16:50 EDT (US) and received 21 / 35 votes.

I was under the impression that only scythe chariots existed.

I’m very certain they were chanting the Macedonian Paean at the time.

By this, I sincerely promise that the day will come when the Greeks, one and all, will mourn the loss of Achilles, and you, in your grief, will be unable to save them as they fall in their thousands to the man-slaying Hector.

Achilles, the Iliad’s quick-footed hero ReynaertLegionary was published on 15 January 2006 at 04:02 EDT (US) and received 23 / 35 votes.

I’m not sure if Macedonians are also considered to be a Dorian people, but I suppose that after 500 to 700 years, the boundaries may have shifted a little.

Were they doing music?

As a result, civile, si ergo fortibusis in ero It is Vassis inem who causes the dux.

In gnosis, the Devil is revealed to be the devil. AndarielBanned posted on the 15th of January 2006 at 14:14 EDT (US) at the 25th position out of 35. They weren’t singing, to be sure. However, I’d like to know what they were singing in the movie despite the fact that it was simply a song.

Battle of Gaugamela

Home History of the WorldWars, Battles, and Armed Conflicts331 BCE Alternative titles include: The Battle of Arbela was fought between the Romans and the Arabs. ByRupert Matthews|Edit History|View History Britannica has not yet given this contribution the formal editing treatment it deserves. Read on to find out more Articles like this one were obtained and published with the primary goal of extending the amount of knowledge available on Britannica.com at a faster and more efficient rate than has previously been the case.

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  • An astonishing victory was gained on Persian territory against a numerically superior force in a terrain chosen by the Persians.
  • With the goal of stopping Alexander’s progress into the Persian empire, Darius constructed a battleground on the Plain of Gaugamela, near Arbela (modern-day Irbil in northern Iraq), and placed his men there to await Alexander’s arrival.
  • With around 40,000 soldiers and 7,000 cavalry, Alexander’s overall forces were vastly outnumbered by his adversary.
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  • Against Darius’ huge battle line, Alexander’s well-trained army prepared for combat and organized for assault, storming the Persians’ left flank with archers, javelin throwers, and cavalry, while protecting against Darius’ outflanking cavalry with reserve flank guards.
  • After being brought into battle by the conflict, Darius’ cavalry on his left flank was able to retreat, leaving the Persian infantry in the middle of the battle line vulnerable to attack.
  • In response, Darius fled, causing panic to spread across his entire army, which began a hasty retreat while being cut down by the oncoming Greek forces.
  • The Macedonian victory marked the end of the Persian empire, which had been established by Cyrus the Great, and established Alexander as the ruler of southwest Asia.

Macedonian losses totaled 700 out of 47,000; Persian losses totaled potentially 20,000 out of 100,000. Rupert Matthews is an American businessman and philanthropist.

Historical memes? – r/MemeEconomy

Phalangitai were the Macedonian pikemen who fought against the Turks. There were a variety of factors contributing to this, the most significant of which being the degeneration of Macedonia following decades of conflict with the several shattered kingdoms Alexander left behind him. A significant section of Macdeon’s professional combat force accompanied Alexander on his journey throughout the world. A significant number of them died, without a doubt, but a large number of them also settled in several of the conquered nations, where they were given prominent roles and titles as a reward for their achievements.

  1. This, along with the fact that there was no genuine successor to Phillip II or Alexander, resulted in Macedonia being in a significantly weakened position.
  2. One of the most striking aspects of this fight is how the Roman professional army took advantage of the phalanx’s frailty and exploited it with superior equipment, discipline, and leadership.
  3. This is how the Roman heavy infantry fought during the Second Punic War.
  4. With this in mind, the Romans were able to quickly engage and remove troops from battles and reapply their power where it was required.
  5. A steep terrain with several elevation changes and impediments was put upon the Phalanx by the Roman commanders.
  6. Despite the fact that Rome has always had inferior cavalry, the Romans were able to hold their own in the cavalry engagement on the flanks (often delegated to mercenaries of conquered peoples).
  7. After this, the Phalanx’s supremacy was effectively terminated since the Greek/Macedonian influence across Asia was no longer strong enough to maintain their martial traditions, and Rome gradually absorbed most of the old domains.
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The Battle of Gaugamela, 331 BCE

Phalangitai was the name given to the Macedonian pikemen. In fact, there were a number of factors contributing to Alexander’s demise, with the most notable being the degeneration of Macedonia following decades of battle with the several shattered kingdoms that Alexander had left behind. Macdeon’s professional combat corps, which numbered in the thousands, journeyed throughout the globe with Alexander. Obviously, many of them perished, but a large number of them also settled in many of the conquered countries, where they were given major responsibilities and titles in recognition of their achievements.

  • Macedon was in a significantly worse position as a result of this, as well as the fact that there was no real substitute for Phillip II or Alexander.
  • One of the most striking aspects of this fight is how the Roman professional army took advantage of the phalanx’s frailty and exploited it.
  • This is how the Roman heavy infantry fought throughout their campaigns in Britain.
  • In practice, this meant that Rome could quickly engage and retire troops from a combat, and reapply their power where it was necessary.
  • A steep terrain with several elevation changes and impediments was put upon the Phalanx by the roman commanders.
  • Despite the fact that Rome has always had inferior cavalry, they were able to hold their own in the cavalry battles on the wings (often delegated to mercenaries of conquered peoples).

After this, the Phalanx’s power was effectively terminated since the Greek/Macedonian influence across Asia was no longer strong enough to maintain their martial traditions, and Rome gradually absorbed the majority of the previous areas under their control.

Alexander sets up Camp

Alexander brought his army to a halt and established a fortified encampment. The distance between the two forces had grown to around seven miles, despite the fact that neither side could see the other due to a low range of hills separating them. Alexander departed his campsite after dark, leaving his baggage, camp followers, and prisoners under watch, and his army were ready for combat. The Macedonian force climbed the hills at nightfall, taking in the hundreds of glittering Persian campfires below them.

He was persuaded by his generals to launch a night attack, but Alexander declined.

Alexander had gained a great deal from his conquest of the Persians.

Alexander was aware of these traps, and it is unknown when they were made ineffective by Alexander.

Battle Lines

The actual combat began about ten o’clock in the morning. This must have been an awe-inspiring sight for Alexander’s troops as they faced this scenario. It was a long way across the plain before the Persian line caught up with the Macedonians. The cavalry on the Persian left wing included Bactrians, Scythians, and Arachotians, who were considered to be some of the best mounted fighters in the Empire. More cavalry and 100 scythed chariots were stationed in front of this force to keep it at bay.

  • They were the best foot warriors in the Achaemenid force, and Darius was counting on them to prevent the march of the dreaded Macedonian phalanx, which was approaching from the north.
  • The cavalry on the Persian right – Syrians, Mesopotamians, and soldiers from the Persian Gulf – held the most of the battle.
  • Darius’ army was estimated to have numbered between 90,000 and 250,000 warriors, according to modern estimations.
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  • The soldiers, known as thepezhetairoior phalangites, fought in a phalanx formation that was closely packed.
  • The Macedonian infantry had a significant advantage simply because of the length of the battle, as they were able to begin slaughtering the enemy while they were still striving to bring their own weapons to bear on the battlefield.
  • Soldiers fighting in the front columns of the phalanx were well-armored with cuirasses, helmets, and greaves; in addition, each soldier carried a round shield about two feet in diameter.

Although the Persian force was huge, it lacked cohesiveness and discipline, owing in large part to the fact that most of the troops were levies with little military experience.

In addition to Alexander’s troops, this information would have affected them.

The smooth plain, on the other hand, was suitable for the deployment of the Macedonian phalanx, as previously stated.

The smooth plain, on the other hand, was perfect for the deployment of the Macedonian phalanx, since even the smallest dip or barrier might destabilize the cohesiveness of an advancing phalanx, and the bristling hedge of shining pikes would deter any horse from charging through it.

Companion cavalry carried thexyston – a double-headed lance that was handled with both hands – along with them on the battlefield.

During the harsh scrummage of close-quarters fighting, companions donned breastplates and helmets, and they brandished akopis (choppers).

Alexander’s left flank was commanded by General Parmenio, who was in charge of more infantry and the Thessalian cavalry (which was sometimes considered to be the best cavalry in Alexander’s army).

Alexander, cognizant of the fact that the phalanx would be vulnerable while he and his cavalry were engaged, stationed a second phalanx behind the main battle line, which was composed primarily of Greek mercenaries.

In the case of an encirclement, which is a fairly possible scenario given Darius’ massive numbers, this rear phalanx would turn to face the front.

Opening Moves

At first, Alexander marched his cavalry out to the right flank. Darius ordered his left-wing Bactrian and Scythian cavalry, which was under the leadership of his cousin Bessus, to keep up with Alexander’s outflanking maneuvering on the left flank. As the Macedonian line progressed, they were vulnerable to a phenomenon known as ‘phalanx drift,’ in which each soldier instinctively snuggled behind his right-hand partner’s shield, causing a steady crabbing drift to the right as the line moved forward.

  • A strong assault on the heart of the Persian left flank, which was met by a counterattack by Scythian and Bactrian cavalry, followed by a successful counterattack by Alexander.
  • Alexander’s cavalry were up against some of the best horsemen the ancient world had to offer – many Scythians, or Saka, were exceptionally well-armored in the cataphract style, which was particularly effective against Alexander’s cavalry.
  • Alexander’s Attack on Gaugamela is depicted on this map of the battle.
  • They came up against a densely packed formation of Macedonian light infantry, which snatched the chariot reins and slaughtered the horses and drivers.
  • Thepezhetairoi also beat the shafts of their sarrissae on the shields of their chariot horse teams, generating a terrifying noise that caused the chariot horse teams to flee.
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Mid-Battle Maneuvres

As a result, Darius sent reserve Persian cavalry to control Alexander’s right flank, creating a gap in his center of defenses. Alexander spun his squadrons to the left, abandoning his commander Aretas and some cavalry to cope with the Persian horsemen who were still attempting to round the Macedonian right flank. This entire 180-degree maneuver demonstrates the Macedonians’ discipline and training. The manouevre would have been made much more difficult by the heavy shroud of suffocating dust and overall mayhem that had descended upon the battlefield by this point.

  • The phalanx, as well as Thracian mercenaries and light infantry, followed, and the sheer momentum of their assault propelled them far into the Persian lines, where they were defeated.
  • Thousands of Persian infantrymen began to flee the battlefield in panic.
  • Victory in Battle: Alexander the GreatWarner Brothers (Copyright, fair use) Meanwhile, Parmenion, a member of the Macedonian left, was in difficulty.
  • This caused a gap in the Macedonian battle line, and Persian and Indian cavalry surged through it, causing the Macedonian battle line to fall apart.
  • As a result, they made a critical tactical error: if they had all swung about to attack the Macedonian left instead, they might have easily destroyed a significant portion of Alexander’s army.
  • The Macedonian rear phalanx went back to defend the camp, which was an incredible effort considering that the fight had already been raging for several hours and that they were running in full armour and with their weapons, which was a tremendous feat in and of itself.
  • He was completely ignorant that Darius had departed the battlefield, and it is possible that the Persian right felt they were on the verge of victory.
  • Miraculously, this messenger was successful in his mission, and Alexander abandoned his pursuit of the retreating Persian center and raced back to assist Parmenion in his time of need.
  • Following the arrival of Alexander’s army, Mazaeus saw that his Persian force was being routed and began to retreat, being chased fiercely by Parmenion and his Thessalian cavalry.
  • At twelve o’clock in the morning, they set out towards Arbela, where they subsequently discovered Darius’ chariot, weapons, and wealth.

Parmenion occupied the Persian camp, seizing their camel baggage train and elephants, and destroying their tent (curiously little is mentioned of the elephants role in the battle).

Victory

According to Arrian, almost 300,000 Persians were slaughtered and many more were taken, with just 100 Macedonians dying in the process. These estimates are very definitely exaggerated to a colossal degree. A more modest estimate puts the number of Persians killed at 40,000, and Alexander himself said that his army had suffered roughly 500 deaths and 5,000 wounds. As a result of the constantly changing casualty records, it is practically difficult to estimate how many people died or lost limbs during the Battle of Gaugamela.

However, his behavior would imply otherwise, and Alexander was ready to take advantage of the situation when it presented itself.

With his defeat, and after taking a month’s respite at Arbela, Alexander was now free to march into the heartland of AchaemenidPersia and conquer the kingdom.

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Bona221’s “How to command the Macedonian military”

According to Arrian, almost 300,000 Persians were slaughtered and many more were taken, with just 100 Macedonians dying in the overall conflict. Almost without a doubt, these estimates have been exaggerated significantly. 40,000 Persians were slain, according to a realistic estimate; Alexander himself reported that his army had suffered 500 deaths and 5,000 wounds. It is practically hard to establish how many people lost their lives or limbs at Gaugamela because of the constantly changing casualty lists.

However, his behavior would indicate otherwise, and Alexander was eager to take advantage of the situation when it presented itself to him.

Because of his loss, and after taking a month’s recuperation at Arbela, Alexander was now free to march into the heartland of AchaemenidPersia and seize control of the kingdom.

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