What Did The Troll Chant In Billy Goats Gruff

Three Billy Goats Gruff

Aarne-Thompson type 122 folklore is a form of folklore that is based on a true story. D. L. Ashliman translated and/or modified the text in 2000.

Contents

  1. The Three Billy Goats Gruff (Norway)
  2. The Three Goats (Poland/Germany)
  3. The Three Goats (Poland/Germany). How the Goats Arrived in Hessen (Germany)
  4. Additional Resources

The Folktexts section of the site contains a collection of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology written by D. L. Ashliman.

The Three Billy Goats Gruff

Once upon a time, there were three billy goats that were to be sent up to the hillside to gain weight, and the names of all three of them were “Gruff.” On the way up, they had to pass a bridge over a cascading stream, and under the bridge resided a huge, obnoxious troll with eyes the size of saucers and a nose the length of a poker. As a result, the youngest Billy Goat Gruff was the first to cross the bridge to safety. “Trip, trap, trip, trap!” screamed the bridge as it crossed the river. When the troll saw someone tripping over his bridge, he said, “Who is that?” In such a low voice, the billy goat explained, “Oh, it is only me and the smallest Billy Goat Gruff, and I’m going up to the hillside to make myself fat.” “Now, I’m on my way to devour you,” the troll said.

  1. Please don’t do that!
  2. I’m too little, that’s what I’m saying “The billy goat expressed himself.
  3. He’s a lot bigger than me.” “All right, I’ll be going with you,” the troll replied.
  4. The bridge went trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap.
  5. “Now I’m on my way to devour you,” the troll declared emphatically.
  6. Please don’t do that!
  7. Wait a bit longer till the great Billy Goat Gruff arrives.

I’ll leave it to you, “said the troll in jest.

Trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap!

Who was there trampling across my bridge?” shouted the troll in disbelief.

Billy Goat Gruff, the imposing figure “The billy goat, who spoke in an unattractive raspy voice of his own, stated this.

Come on, let’s do this!

Along with a pair of curling stones, I’ll use them to poke your eyeballs out of your ears, and I’ll smash you to pieces, body and bones included.

And then he flew at the troll, poked his eyes out with his horns, crushed him to pieces, body and bones, and threw him out into the waterfall, and then he soared up to the hillside with his horns.

The billy goats gained so much weight at that place that they were unable to travel back home. In addition, if the fat hasn’t dropped off them yet, why, they’re still fat; and as a result, snap snap snout This story has been recounted in its entirety.

  • Source: Peter Christen Asbjrnsen and Jrgen Moe, “De tre bukkene” (The Three Bukkens). Norwegian Folkeventyr, no. 37, pages. 275-276. Bruse who wanted to go to the setters and make himself a feast, translated by George Webbe Dasent in Popular Tales from the Norse, 2nd edition (London: George Routledge and Sons
  • New York: Harper and Row, n.d.), no. 37 (p. 275-276). D. L. Ashliman made revisions to the translation. To return to the table of contents, click here.

The Three Goats

Several sources, including Peter Christen Asbjrnsen and Jrgen Moe’s De tre bukkene, are consulted. Norwegian Folkeventyr, no. 37, pages. 275-276. Bruse who wanted to go to the setters and make himself a feast, translated by George Webbe Dasent in Popular Tales from the Norse, 2nd edition (London: George Routledge and Sons; New York: Harper and Row, n.d.), no. 37. D. L. Ashliman made revisions to the original translation. Redirect your attention to the table of contents.

  • Source: Karl Haupt, “Die trois Ziegen,” in Sagenbuch der Lausitz, v. 2 (Leipzig: Verlag von Wilhelm Engelmann, 1863), no. 320, p. 222
  • Karl Haupt, “Die drei Ziegen,” in Sagenbuch der Lausitz, v. 2 (Leipzig: Verlag von Wilhelm Engelmann, 1863), no. 320, p. 222
  • Karl Haupt, “Die drei Ziegen,” in Sagen D. L. Ashliman has provided the translation. The natural gender of the goats (as opposed to their grammatical gender) is not specified in the original text. This story originates from Lusatia (GermanLausitz), which was traditionally centered on the Neisse and upper Spree rivers and included a mixed Slavic and German population. I have arbitrarily rendered them masculine. Now, the eastern portion of Lusatia is part of Poland, and the western part is part of Germany. To return to the table of contents, click here.

How the Goats Came to Hessen

No. 320 on page 222 of Karl Haupt’s “Die drei Ziegen” in the Lausitz’s “Sagenbuch der Lausitz,” volume 2 (Leipzig: Verlag von Wilhelm Engelmann, 1863), no. 320 on page 222 of the Lausitz’s “Sagenbuch der Lausitz,” no. 320 on page 222 of the Lausitz’s “Sagenbuch der Lausitz,” volume 2 (Leipzig: Verlag von Wilhelm Engelmann D. L. Ashliman has translated this work. Natural (as opposed to grammatical) gender of the goats are left unspecified in the original text. This story comes from Lusatia (GermanLausitz), which was traditionally centered on the Neisse and upper Spree rivers and possessed a mixed Slavic and German population.

Today, the eastern portion of Lusatia is part of Poland, while the western part is part of Germany.

  • Source: Karl Haupt, “Die drei Ziegen,” in Sagenbuch der Lausitz, vol. 2 (Leipzig: Verlag von Wilhelm Engelmann, 1863), no. 320, p. 222
  • Karl Haupt, “Die drei Ziegen,” in Sagenbuch der Lausitz, vol. 2 (Leipzig: Verlag von Wilhelm Engelmann, 1863), no. 320, p. 222
  • Karl Haupt, “Die drei Ziegen,” in Sagenbuch der D. L. Ashliman provided the translation. The natural (as opposed to grammatical) gender of the goats is not specified in the original text. This story comes from Lusatia (GermanLausitz), which was traditionally centered on the Neisse and upper Spree rivers and included a mixture of Slavic and German populations. The eastern section of Lusatia is now part of Poland, while the western part is part of Germany. Redirect back to the table of contents

Related links

  • Eat Me When I’m Fatter, a collection of folktales of the Aarne-Thompson type 122F
  • D. L. Ashliman’s Folktexts, a collection of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology
  • And Eat Me When I’m Fatter, a collection of folktales of the Aarne-Thompson type 122F.

Song Lyrics and Sound Clip

This song is available on Andrew Queen’sGROWThis song is also available on Andrew Queen’sFairy Tales Volume 2Oh Ho! We are the Billy Goats Gruff! Oh Ho! The Billy Goats Gruff are we!Oh Ho! We are the Billy Goats Gruff! Oh Ho! The Billy Goats Gruff are we!Our story begins as the littlest Billy Goat Gruff crosses the bridgeTrip trop, trip trop, … And the Troll said,“Who’s that trip tropping over my bridge? I’m a hungry Troll with an empty fridge!”“Oh Ho! Please be kind to me! I’m the littlest Billy Goat Gruff as you can seeOh Ho! I’m much too skinny for you. You should wait for my big brother, he’ll bealong soon”The Troll grumbled while he thought about it“Hmmmmm…. Very well. Be off before I change my mind. You may cross mybridge just this one time.”By and by, along came the middle-sized Billy Goat GruffTrip trop, trip trop, … And the Troll said,“Who’s that trip tropping over my bridge? I’m a hungry Troll with an empty fridge!”“Oh Ho! Please be kind to me! I’m the middle sized Billy Goat Gruff as you can seeOh Ho! I’m much too skinny for you. You should wait for my big brother he’ll bealong soon”The Troll grumbled while he thought about it“Hmmmmm…. Very well. Be off before I change my mind. You may cross my bridgejust this one time.”By and by, along came the great BIG Billy Goat GruffTrip trop, trip trop, … And the Troll said,“Who’s that trip tropping over my bridge? I’m a hungry Troll with an empty fridge!”“Oh Ho! Please be kind to me! I’m the great big Billy Goat Gruff as you can seeOh Ho! You can’t carry on bullying everybody who comes along”“Well you know the only reason I act this way is because I’ve never had a friend tohang out with or playNobody seems to want to make friends with a Troll. Sometimes I just want to crawlinto a deep dark hole.”“Oh Ho! Why don’t you come with me. Come be friends with us, the Billy GoatsThreeOh Ho! If you’ll stop playing rough, you can be friends with us, the Billy GoatsGruff”See more of ourClassical Children’s Literture,Anti-BullyingandAnimalSong LyricsMany thanks to Andrew Queen for permission to publish these lyrics.© Andrew Queen.All rights reserved. Used with permission. Fairy Tale Song LyricsAnti-Bullying Song LyricsAnimal Song LyricsFairy Tale Music Products
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Three Billy Goats Gruff – Wikipedia

Consume Me When I’m Fatter, a collection of folktales of the Aarne-Thompson type 122F; D. L. Ashliman’s Folktexts, a collection of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology; and D. L. Ashliman’s Folktexts, a collection of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology

Plot

The narrative features three Billy goats (malegoats), who are occasionally referred to as a kid, father, and grandpa, but who are most commonly referred to as brothers in the story. A baby or young goat, as well as a mother and a father goat, can be found in different variations. “Gruff” was the family name given to them in the first English translation, which was done by Dasent; the Norwegian edition, on the other hand, used the name “Bruse.” When they reach to ” ster ” (a meadow) or slope on the other side of a stream, they find that there is virtually no grass left for them to eat near where they dwell, so they must cross a river to eat and fatten themselves up.

  • The troll threatens to “gobble up” the tiniest billy goat, who is the first to cross the bridge and is halted abruptly by the troll.
  • The greedy troll agrees and allows the tiniest goat to pass through.
  • His sibling is more careful, but he is also stopped by the troll and threatened with the same outcome as his brother.
  • Even though the third billy goat manages to climb across the bridge, he is halted by the ravenous troll, who threatens to eat him to death.
  • The troll then leaps to his feet.
  • Troll falls into the stream and is swept away by the river, where he eventually drowns.

From that point forward, the bridge is safe, and all three goats are able to go to the lush fields around the summer property in the mountains. The three billy goats Gruff eat a lot of grass and are content with their lives for the rest of their days.

Adaptations and cultural references

  • A trio of Billy goats (malegoats) appear in the narrative, who are occasionally referred to as an infant, a father, and a grandpa, but are more frequently referred to as brothers. A newborn or young goat, a mother and a father goat are depicted in various variations. ‘Gruff’ was the family name given to them by Dasent in the earliest English translation
  • “Bruse” had been given to them by their Norwegian creators. According to the narrative, there is virtually no grass left for them to eat near where they reside, so they must cross a river to reach to ” ster ” (a meadow) or a hillside on the other side of a stream where they may graze and fatten up. Firstly, they must cross a woodenbridge beneath which resides a terrifying and hideoustroll who is so territorial that everyone who attempts to cross the bridge gets eaten. The troll threatens to “gobble up” the tiniest billy goat, who is the first to cross the bridge and is halted abruptly by him. The small goat persuades the troll to hold off until his older brother arrives, claiming that he is larger and would provide a more satisfying dinner. This is agreed upon by the greedy troll, who allows the tiniest goat to cross the bridge. This is followed by the medium-sized goat. His sibling is more careful, but he is also stopped by the troll and threatened with the same outcome as his older brother is. In addition, after informing the troll that the biggest billy goat should be waiting for him because he is the tallest of the three billy goats, the second billy goat is let to pass. Even though the third billy goat manages to climb across the bridge, he is halted by the ravenous troll, who threatens to eat him to death! The troll is challenged by the third billy goat, who dares him to take part in the contest. Immediately following that, the troll leaps to his feet. He gets knocked off the bridge by the horns of the giant billy goat gruff. Troll falls into the stream and is swept away by the tide, where he is killed. From that point forward, the bridge is secure, and all three goats are free to roam the lush fields around the summer farm in the hills. A lot of grass is devoured by the three billy goats, and they live happily ever after.

Comics

  • The goats are mentioned in Bill Willingham’s 2002 comic bookFables, and the troll is a recurring character
  • Pierry Radrik’s 2020 One comic book
  • And Bill Willingham’s 2002 comic bookFables.

Films

  • In the Norwegian filmTrollhunter (2010), the titular character seeks to bait a troll by placing three goats on a bridge
  • In Mike Flanagan’sKickstarter-funded film, the title character attempts to bait a troll by placing three goats on a bridge. ‘Absentia’ (2011) is a modern-day retelling of the classic tale that revolves around a tunnel, a series of kidnappings, and a troll-like creature
  • ‘Team Juan’ at the Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design at the University of Dundee created a Spanish-language version of the story that is as follows: The Three Billy Piatas (2015, 2016)
  • In the anime film My Neighbor Totoro (1988), the eponymous critter Totoro is called after the mispelling of the Japanese word ‘Toro-ru,’ which translates as ‘troll.’ In the final scene, a book of the story “Three Billy Goats Gruff” with Totoro on the cover is visible, indicating that Totoro is named after this story
  • In Toy Story 4, it is revealed that Bo Peep’s three-headed sheep, previously unnamed, were named “Billy,” “Goat,” and “Gruff,” after the story
  • And in Toy Story 5, it is revealed that Bo Peep’s three-headed sheep, previously un

Games

  • The story is also referenced in the first King’s Quest game, which was released in 1983. Graham is about to cross a bridge, and a troll is keeping watch. The most optimal solution to the challenge is to use a goat to lure it across the bridge to your location. As soon as the goat spots the troll, he becomes enraged and butts it into the river below
  • During Magicland Dizzy, the story is also brought into play (1990). A troll is standing watch over a bridge that Dizzy must cross. He claims that the only way to cross is to give him 30 diamonds before kicking Dizzy in the air away from him, but this is a red herring, since there are 30 diamonds in the entire game, including one behind him and many more in the Ice Palace later, thus this is a fake herring. In order to solve the problem, you must first break the rope binding the goat with the dagger, then beat him with the stick to cause him to dash towards the troll, which is the only way out. The goat bumps the troll into the air as he makes his way through the forest. The story is also featured in the video gameSimon the Sorcerer (1993), which was released in 1993. There is a stone bridge by a waterfall in the video game The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim (2011), which is located near a location named Purewater Run. If it is the player’s first visit, they will see three goats
  • If they check beneath the bridge, they will discover a dead troll
  • If it is the player’s second visit, they will see three goats. An interactive rendition ofThree Billy Goats Grufffor mobile devices was created by Saturn Animation Studio in 2016, and a game adaption for tablets and mobile phones is being developed by the Norwegian gaming studioAgens. The game was developed with the assistance of the Norwegian Film Institute in 2011. In the card gameMagic: The Gathering, a card with the name “Clackbridge Troll” was printed in the 2019 expansionThrone of Eldraine, which was released in January 2019. Three goats are visible on the bridge, under the watchful eye of a troll shown in the artwork.
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Literature

  • In Gordon R. Dickson’s “3-Part Puzzle,” a shortened version of this narrative is utilized, which is translated into an ET language as “The THREE (Name) (Domestic Animals) (Name)” (as well as the (horrific, carnivorous, mythological beast)). The ET Envoy is perplexed by the enthusiasm with which youngsters respond to this “basic and uninteresting” “lesson in tactics”
  • Stephen King’s novel It(1986) makes reference to this narrative
  • Golden Books published a version of the story that was quite similar to the book. There is only one difference between this story and the others: after the troll is washed away by the stream, he is later mentioned as having moved into a cave. This story is mentioned in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novelLords and Ladies(1992), as well as in a joke made in the first chapter ofMonstrous Regiment(2003). Neil Gaiman adapted the story forSnow White, Blood Red(1993), an anthology of children’s A little child who has crossed the bridge is approached by the troll in Gaiman’s rendition, which is dubbed “Troll Bridge,” and the troll asks to “devour his life.” Later, the youngster convinces the troll that it is better to wait until he has experienced more life, after which he will return to his bridge home. It is the protagonist himself who portrays the goats in this rendition as a youngster, then as a teenager, and lastly as a middle aged man. The tale was nominated for a World Fantasy Award in 1994
  • The Billy Goats Gruff make an appearance in Jim Butcher’s novelSmall Favor(2008), which is the eleventh novel in the Dresden Filesseries
  • And Andri Snr Magnason’s retelling of the story is included in the children’s bookTamakistan(1998) (2013). This variation includes a child, the child’s mother, and the woman’s spouse. When the mother goat requests the troll to eat her husband instead of her, the monster is horrified and runs away “The troll’s appetite had been sated. ‘Is this what the world has come to?’ he said. I am told to eat the child’s mother, and the mother in turn instructs me to devour her husband! ‘What a crazy family!'” It is from this story that Kevin P. Futers drew inspiration for his novel, The Adventures of the Billy Goats Gruff, which is set in seventh-century Northumbria and features goats named Edgar, Bert, and Frith
  • The story is also the inspiration for the film Billy Goats Gruff, which was released in 2005. Bjrn F. Rrvik is the author and artist of this work. Gry Moursund has written three novels in Norwegian based on this story, which may be found here. One of the most popular is Bukkene Bruse p badeland (The Three Billy Goats Gruff at the Waterpark), which was published in 2009 and has sold more than 110,000 copies by 2014 in Norway, making it one of the country’s best-selling children’s picture books. According to Nielsen BookScan, the three books had sold over 450,000 copies in Norway by March 2019. A portion of the story in the children’s bookThe TrollbyJulia Donaldsonis based on the tale, with a troll who lives under a variety of bridges and waits for goats, but in this story only other animals cross the bridges

Music

  • In Gordon R. Dickson’s “3-Part Puzzle,” a shortened version of this narrative is utilized, which is translated into an ET language as “The THREE (Name) (Domestic Animals) (Name)” (as well as the (horrific, carnivorous, mythological beast)) Stephen King’s novel It(1986) references to this narrative, and Golden Books published a version of it that was quite similar to the book. The ET Envoy is perplexed by the delight that youngsters express over this “basic and dull” “lesson in tactics.” There is only one difference between this story and the others: after the troll is washed away by the stream, he is later mentioned as having moved into a cave. This story is mentioned in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novelLords and Ladies(1992), as well as in a joke made in the first chapter ofMonstrous Regiment(2003). Neil Gaiman adapted the story forSnow White, Blood Red(1993), which was an anthology of children A little kid who has crossed the bridge is approached by the troll in Gaiman’s rendition, which is dubbed “Troll Bridge,” and the troll demands to “devour his life,” as the story goes. He ultimately persuades the troll to wait a little longer, after which he will return to the bridge with the help of the youngster. As a youngster, a teenager, and eventually a middle-aged man, the protagonist takes on the role of the goats in this rendition. The tale was nominated for a World Fantasy Award in 1994
  • The Billy Goats Gruff make an appearance in Jim Butcher’s novelSmall Favor(2008), which is the eleventh novel in the Dresden Filesseries
  • And Andri Snr Magnason’s retelling of the story is included in the children’s bookTamakistan (Timuristan) (2013). There is a child, its mother, and her spouse in this variation. Whenever the mother goat instructs her husband instead of herself, the troll becomes enraged and attacks the mother goat “Troll’s hunger had been sated. Then he said, ‘What has the world come to?!’ I am told to devour the child’s mother, and the mother in turn instructs me to eat her husband. ‘What a crazily dysfunctional household!'” It is from this story that Kevin P. Futers drew inspiration for his novel, The Adventures of the Billy Goats Gruff, which is set in seventh-century Northumbria and features goats called Edgar, Bert, and Frith
  • The story is also the source for the film Billy Goats Gruff. The author and illustrator Bjrn F. Rrvik In response to this narrative, Gry Moursund has written three volumes in Norwegian. One of the most popular is Bukkene Bruse p badeland (The Three Billy Goats Gruff at the Waterpark), which was published in 2009 and has sold more than 110,000 copies by 2014 in Norway, making it one of the country’s best-selling children’s books. Within a year, the three books had sold over 450,000 copies in Norway
  • A portion of a story in Julia Donaldson’s children’s book The Troll, which is loosely based on the tale, involves a troll who lives under a series of bridges and watches for goats, but in this story only other animals cross the bridges
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Stage productions

  • Gwen Edwards turned the story into a successful children’s musical, Billy, Goat, Gruff: The Musical, which premiered at the Barter Theatre in Abingdon, Virginia, in the summer of 2007
  • And Billy Goat Gruff(2009), a straightforward play for young children, was released by Lazy Bee Scripts. The Singapore Repertory Theatre commissioned a musical adaption by the British composition partnership of George Stiles and Anthony Drewe, which was written for the stage production. It had its world premiere there in 2015, and its North American premiere took place at the Aurora Theatre in Lawrenceville, Georgia, in 2017.

Television

  • In 1994, for the second season premiere of Animaniacs, the short “Take My Siblings, Please!” served as the show’s own spoof of the original narrative. It is the Warner Brothers and their sister Dot that play the characters of the goats in this narrative. Ultimately, Yakko just beats the troll with a massive mallet
  • In 1996, the television showAaahh! Real Monsters recounted its own version of the Three Billy Goats Gruff in the episode “Oblina and the Three Humans.” This version of the story has the goats represented by humans, with the monster under the bridge serving as the story’s central character
  • Between the Lions featured several short episodes that featured characters reading from the story
  • And in 2008, the BBC produced a modern adaptation for itsFairy TalesTV series. Here, the narrative is given a new twist, with the troll shown as a tragic and unfairly mistreated victim:

In addition to being nasty and odoriferous, the troll character is feared by everyone, which I believe heightens the sorrow of the finale, which is a witch hunt without any evidence.

  • It is mentioned in the April 19, 2015 part of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver regarding “patent trolls,” where it is stated that “trolls really do stuff, they manage bridge-access for goats and ask people entertaining riddles.” Similarly, in the television seriesThomasFriends, an episode entitled “Three Steam Engines Gruff” is a homage to this story

References

  1. “Trolls really do stuff, they manage bridge access for goats and ask people entertaining riddles,” says John Oliver in a piece about “patent trolls” on Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, which aired on April 19, 2015. This event is alluded to in an episode of the television seriesThomasFriends, titled “Three Steam Engines Gruff.”

External links

The Three Billy Goats Gruffis a well-known Norwegian folktale that will enchant any youngster who hears it. Under a bridge dwells a ruthless and hungry troll who hunts for food. He’s starving and would love nothing more than to seize and consume any goat that comes close to crossing his bridge. What is the best way for the three goats to cross safely? They have to be really intelligent! This is a lovely children’s story to read aloud in a school or before sleep for young children. This story is included in our collection of favorite fairy tales.

  • As a result, the youngest Billy Goat Gruff was the first to cross the bridge to safety.
  • When the troll saw someone tripping over his bridge, he said, “Who is that?” In such a low voice, the billy goat explained, “Oh, it is only me and the smallest Billy Goat Gruff, and I’m going up to the hillside to make myself fat.” “Now, I’m on my way to devour you,” the troll said.
  • Please don’t do that!
  • I’m too little, that’s what I’m saying “The billy goat expressed himself.
  • He’s a lot bigger than me.” “All right, I’ll be going with you,” the troll replied.
  • The bridge went trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap.
  • “Now I’m on my way to devour you,” the troll declared emphatically.

Please don’t do that!

Wait a bit longer till the great Billy Goat Gruff arrives.

I’ll leave it to you, “said the troll in jest.

Trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap, trip, trap!

Who was there trampling across my bridge?” shouted the troll in disbelief.

Billy Goat Gruff, the imposing figure “The billy goat, who spoke in an unattractive raspy voice of his own, stated this.

Come on, let’s do this!

That’s what the huge billy goat had to say about it.

The billy goats gained so much weight at that place that they were unable to travel back home. In addition, if the fat hasn’t dropped off them yet, why, they’re still fat; and as a result, snap snap snout This story has been recounted in its entirety.

Piccolo Music – The Three Billy Goats Gruff Lyrics

Piccolo Music’s The Three Billy Goats Gruff has lyrics written for it. Three tiny goats, Duffel, Under, and Over, went out on a walk one day. In the midst of the clover, he’s skipping around, munching grass. “This grass is short, it has a bad flavor (ewww!) and it is unsightly. It will not make us healthy and robust; therefore, let us cross the bridge to the other side, where the grass is greener and longer! -” Trip trap, trip trap, trip trap “What’s it looming above my head? It appears like dinner is on its way “The troll sprang to his feet and said.

Duffel, the poor little thing, cried out in terror.

You are not after me since I am nothing but skin and bone.

Trip trap trip trap trip trap “What’s it looming above my head?

It was him who pushed himself up onto the bridge and gave the goat a scare, Boo!

The sight caused her to tremble.

My brother is much larger and more delicious to eat, so please leave me alone.” He then ran over the bridge to play with his younger brother, leaving the hairy troll to wait (Shhhhh!) for another opportunity to grab one of his brothers.

It appears like dinner is on its approach “The troll sprang to his feet and exclaimed It was him who pushed himself up onto the bridge and gave the goat a scare, Boo!

He threw the troll into the air with one powerful slam, ensuring that the bridge was safe and that the troll was no longer there (huzzah!).

So, if you’re going to cross a wooden bridge, be sure you’re not too heavy on your feet.

awaiting the arrival of something to eat!

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