What Do Dominicans Do Every Morning We Chant Western Dominican

What is Dominican Chant, and Why Do We Sing It?

Numerous friends of our community, as well as those who find us online, are aware that as nuns we devote our lives entirely to God via a life of prayer. However, the specifics of what we are doing in our prayer life are sometimes unclear! Attending Holy Mass in our chapel, or paying a visit to the Blessed Sacrament during the Divine Office, you would notice that a significant portion of our prayer is conveyed via the singing of the liturgy in chant — specifically, Dominican chant — over the course of the service.

What Is Dominican Chant?

Our community’s friends and others who discover us online are well aware that as nuns we devote our lives to God in a life of prayer and self-giving. The specifics of our prayer life, on the other hand, are frequently unclear. Attending Holy Mass in our chapel, or paying a visit to the Blessed Sacrament during the Divine Office, you would see that a significant portion of our devotion is communicated via the singing of the liturgy in chant — specifically, Dominican chant — as you would expect.

The Liturgy in Our Life (or, Why we Sing Dominican Chant)

Many of our friends in our community, as well as those who find us online, are aware that as nuns we devote our lives entirely to God via prayer. However, the specifics of what we are doing in our prayer practice are sometimes unclear. Attending Holy Mass in our chapel, or paying a visit to the Blessed Sacrament during the Divine Office, you would notice that a significant portion of our devotion is communicated via the singing of the liturgy in chant — specifically, Dominican chant. Due to Your honesty, humility, and justice; and Your right hand shall guide You marvelously; this is the Dominican Chant Responsory for the feast of the Nativity of Our Lady.

Today’s Examples, and More Dominican Chant

Have you been to Mass recently and heard chanting? It is still true today, despite the fact that most parishes use hymns for Sunday Mass, that there are specific Latin chants for the Entrance, Responsory (instead of the Responsorial Psalm as is usually done), Alleluia, Offertory, and Communion that are assigned to each Mass at the time of its celebration. They are both from the proper chants for the feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and we sang them during Mass today as well. Is it possible for you to hear any more Dominican chant?

In addition, the EWTN video titled “Introducing OPChant” is really good.

This is the life of a contemplative monk committed to this ultimate purpose of chant. If you are a young lady who is called to this life of being immersed in the Word of God, as Our Lady was, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Dominican Republic – Daily life

Travel to the Dominican Republic to discover the beautiful Caribbean environment, rainforest, and diverse flora and fauna that the country has to offer. The Dominican Republic is depicted in its entirety. Contunico is a trademark of ZDF Enterprises GmbH, Mainz. View all of the videos related to this topic. Their religious, linguistic, and historical heritages are shared, but their society remains fragmented and individualistic, and their day-to-day experiences are commensurate with the differences between their socioeconomic classes, ethnic groupings, and physical environments (among many other things).

  1. Furthermore, rural life in the Cibao Valley differs significantly from that of the southern sugar fields and other locations, and city life differs significantly from the frantic speed ofSanto Domingoto the more relaxing, traditional nature of Santiago and smaller cities.
  2. Others are barely more than palm-leaf and bamboo lean-tos, while others have double-reed walls packed with debris and coated with mud, and yet others are a combination of both.
  3. Although corrugated metal sheets are the most common type of roof covering, thatched roofs are sometimes found on lower-income dwellings.
  4. A common sight in inner-city ghettos and squatter communities is homes built from waste inner tubes and other salvaged materials like cardboard.
  5. Government initiatives, which are frequently sponsored by international loans, have subsidized the development of houses for lower- and middle-income households, particularly in Santo Domingo, where entire neighbourhoods have been constructed for this purpose.
  6. Cooking for Dominicans from the middle and upper classes generally includes significant amountsof fresh seafood, tropical fruits, and peppers; typical dishes include queso fresco (white cheese), fried plantains, hearts-of-palm salad, shrimp pilaf with chiles and onions, and grilled sea bass.

Rums from the Bermudez and Barcelo distilleries, which are both located in the Dominican Republic, are also popular.

The arts

Take a journey to the Dominican Republic and discover the beautiful Caribbean environment, rainforest, and diverse flora and fauna that the country has to offer you. Dominican Republic: a high-level overview The ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz is the company that created Contunico. This page contains a number of videos. Dominicans share religious, linguistic, and historical traditions, but their society remains largely fragmented and individualistic, and their day-to-day experiences are commensurate with the differences between their socioeconomic classes, ethnic groupings, and physical environments, among other factors.

  • Rural life in the Cibao Valley differs significantly from that of the southern sugar fields and other locations, while city life ranges from the frantic speed ofSanto Domingoto the more relaxing, traditional nature of Santiago and other smaller cities.
  • Others are barely more than palm-leaf and bamboo lean-tos, while others have double-reed walls that have been filled with debris and coated with mud.
  • Generally, corrugated metal sheets are used to cover roofs, however thatched roofs may be found on the homes of lower income families.
  • A common sight in inner-city ghettos and squatter communities is homes built from waste inner tubes and other salvaged materials such as cardboard or newspaper.
  • Construction of homes for lower- and middle-income families has been made possible by government initiatives, which are frequently supported by foreign loans.
  • Rice, beans, and veggies are staple diets for the poorest Dominicans.
  • Rums from the Bermudez and Barcelo distilleries, which are both located in the Dominican Republic, are also quite popular.

Literature

Take a vacation to the Dominican Republic and discover the beautiful Caribbean environment, rainforest, and diverse flora and fauna that the country has to offer. The Dominican Republic is depicted in this map. Contunico is owned by ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz. See all of the videos related to this topic. The Dominican people share religious, linguistic, and historical traditions, but their society remains largely fragmented and individualistic, and their day-to-day experiences are commensurate with the differences between their socioeconomic classes, ethnic groupings, and physical environments, among other factors.

  • Furthermore, rural life in the Cibao Valley typically differs from that of the southern sugar fields and other locations, while city life differs from the frantic speed ofSanto Domingoto the more peaceful, traditional nature of Santiago and smaller cities.
  • Others are barely more than palm-leaf and bamboo lean-tos, while others have double-reed walls packed with debris and coated with mud.
  • Roofs are often made of corrugated metal sheets, while those of poorer houses may be made of thatch.
  • Squatter colonies and inner-city ghettos are made up of scavenged materials such as cardboard, old inner tubes, and other abandoned items.
  • Government initiatives, which are frequently sponsored by international loans, have subsidized the development of homes for lower- and middle-income households, particularly in Santo Domingo, where whole neighborhoods have been constructed.

Typical Dominican dishes include queso fresco (white cheese), fried plantains, hearts-of-palm salad, shrimp pilaf with chiles and onions, and grilled sea bass. Rums from the Bermudez and Barcelo distilleries, as well as rums from other parts of the world, are very popular.

Sports and recreation

Travel to the Dominican Republic to see the beautiful Caribbean environment, rainforest, and diverse flora and animals. A general overview of the Dominican Republic. Contunico ZDF Enterprises GmbH, Mainz View all of the videos associated with this topic. The Dominican people share religious, linguistic, and historical traditions, but their society remains largely fragmented and individualistic, and their day-to-day experiences are commensurate with the differences between their socioeconomic classes, ethnic groups, and physical environments, among other factors.

  • Furthermore, rural life in the Cibao Valley usually differs from that of the southern sugar plantations and other locations, while city life differs from the frantic speed ofSanto Domingoto the more peaceful, traditional nature ofSantiagoand smaller cities.
  • Some bohios feature double-reed walls filled with debris and coated with mud, whilst others are barely more than lean-tos made of palm fronds and bamboo.
  • Roofs are most commonly made of corrugated metal sheets, while those of poorer houses may be made of thatch.
  • Urban squatter colonies and inner-city ghettos are made up of houses made of cardboard, old inner tubes, and other scavenged materials.
  • Government initiatives, which are frequently sponsored by international loans, have subsidized the development of homes for lower- and middle-income households, particularly in Santo Domingo, where entire neighborhoods have been developed.
  • Dominican cuisine, particularly that of the middle- and upper-classes, makes extensive use of peppers, fresh seafood, and tropical fruits; typical dishes include queso fresco (white cheese), fried plantains, hearts-of-palm salad, shrimp pilaf with chiles and onions, and grilled sea bass.

Introduction, Location, Language, Folklore, Religion, Major holidays, Rites of passage

PRONUNCIATION:dah-MEN-ih-kuhns AREA OF RESIDENCE: Dominican Republic and United States (primarily New York City) 7.8 million people live in the Dominican Republic; 0.5–1 million people or more live in New York City.

LANGUAGE:Spanish RELIGION: Roman Catholicism; Evangelical Protestantism; voodoo are examples of religion.

1INTRODUCTION

PRONUNCIATION:dah-MEN-ih-kuhns LOCATIONS: Dominican Republic and the United States of America (primarily New York City) 7.8 million people live in the Dominican Republic; 0.5–1 million or more people live in New York City. LANGUAGE:Spanish Roman Catholicism; Evangelical Protestantism; voodoo are examples of religious affiliations.

2LOCATION

The Dominican Republic has an area of around 18,819 square miles (48,741 square kilometers), which is almost the same size as both Vermont and New Hampshire combined in terms of land area. The island is bordered on the north by the Atlantic Ocean and on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and it is separated on the east by the Mona Passage, a body of water that stretches for seventy miles across the ocean. Rugged mountain peaks, rolling hills, verdant valleys, luxuriant sugarcane fields, and stunning, white beaches may all be found in the country’s landscape.

  • It is in the Dominican Republic that you will find the highest and lowest locations in the whole Caribbean area.
  • The Culde-Sac, which is the desolate plain between the two southern mountain ranges, is the lowest point on the mountain range.
  • The capital city of Santo Domingo has a population of little more than 2 million people and is the country’s largest metropolis.
  • With the exception of Santo Domingo, New York Metropolis has more Dominicans—between 500,000 and 1 million—than any other city in the world.
  • The money returned home by thesedominicanos ausentes(absent Dominicans), which is believed to be around $500 million per year, is a significant contributor to the economy of their country.
  • The Dominican people, on the other hand, employ a more detailed system of racial categorization.
  • In the Dominican Republic, mulattos (mulattos with some white or Amerindian ancestry) are classified as indio oscuro (dark Indian).

3LANGUAGE

The Dominican Republic’s official language is Spanish, which is also the most widely spoken language in the country.

If Dominican Spanish is compared to the Spanish spoken in other Latin American nations, it is regarded quite near to classical (Castillian) Spanish, yet it has a unique accent and includes several regional phrases. In the Dominican Republic’s capital city of Santo Domingo, some English is spoken.

4FOLKLORE

The Dominican Republic’s official language is Spanish, which is also the most widely spoken. The Dominican Spanish language is regarded close to classical (Castillian) Spanish when compared with other Latin American nations, but it has a unique accent and includes several regional phrases. In the capital city of Santo Domingo, a little amount of English is spoken.

5RELIGION

The cross and bible at the middle of the Dominican Republic’s coat of arms symbolize the country’s reverence for religion, which can be seen across the country. Despite the fact that 93 percent of the Dominican population is Roman Catholic, many Dominicans do not attend church on a consistent basis. Rosario processions, which are arranged to petition for assistance from a patron saint or the Virgin Mary, are among the religious practices practiced by Catholics. Over the last several years, evangelical Protestantism has gained in popularity.

Believers in spirit worship and witchcraft, which were brought to the nation by Haitian immigrants, are estimated to number around 60,000 people in the country.

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6MAJOR HOLIDAYS

The Dominican Republic celebrates a large number of religious holidays. Additionally, the feasts of Our Lady of Altagracia (January 21), Corpus Christi (June 17), and Our Lady of Mercy (September 24) are observed in addition to Christmas and Good Friday. The secular, or non-religious, holidays observed in the Dominican Republic are Da de Duarte (January 26), which commemorates the birth of national hero Juan Pablo Duarte, Independence Day (February 27), Labor Day (May 1), and Dominican Restoration Day (October 1).

As a celebration in honor of its patron saint, every town organizes an event that incorporates religious observances with non-religious activities like as dancing, drinking, and gambling.

In Santo Domingo, it is the occasion for a raucous Carnival celebration that attracts more than half a million visitors each year.

7RITES OF PASSAGE

Religious rituals are held to commemorate major life milestones like as birth, marriage, and death, which vary according to the faith group of each Dominican.

8RELATIONSHIPS

In the Dominican Republic, religious rituals are held to commemorate major life events such as births, marriages, and deaths, which are tailored to the beliefs of the individual Dominican congregation.

9LIVING CONDITIONS

Traditional rural cottages are constructed of wood with thatched or tin roofs, and they are sometimes painted in brilliant colors to stand out from the surrounding landscape. Cooking is frequently done in a separate building with slots cut into the sides to allow smoke and heat to escape. This helps to keep the home cool. A severe housing shortage in urban areas has resulted as a result of widespread rural-to-urban migration. In the Dominican Republic’s main city of Santo Domingo, slums and squatter communities have popped up.

The two main cities in the country, Santo Domingo and Santiago, are home to the majority of hospitals and medical practitioners.

Health programs are made available through the country’s welfare system, which serves between 70 and 80 percent of the population at any given time.

Those who can afford it seek medical care from private practitioners. Dominicans are among the least likely people in the world to possess an automobile. In most cities, the majority of passenger automobiles are driven by either the extremely rich or tourists.

10FAMILY LIFE

Traditionally, extended-family households with a strong father figure have been the standard among the middle and upper classes in the United States. Low-income families, on the other hand, have fewer permanent links, and many of these households are made up of either a couple (with or without children) living together in a common-law marriage or a female-headed home with an absentee father, depending on the situation. Despite the fact that women still perceive their husbands to be the head of the household, they have gained more power within the home, gained higher educational and employment options, and gained greater control over the number of children they have.

11CLOTHING

The Dominican Republic’s population dresses in Western-style clothes that is appropriate for the country’s tropical environment.

12FOOD

A mainstay of the Dominican cuisine is the classic Caribbean meal of rice and beans (arroz with habichuelas), which is a combination of rice and beans. It is referred to as “the flag” (la bandera) and is typically served with stewed beef. One of the most popular dishes is sancocho, which is a stew cooked with local meats and vegetables, which frequently includes plantains. Despite the fact that plantains are closely related to bananas and may be found in abundance across the Caribbean islands, they are particularly popular in the Dominican Republic.

Chicarones (pieces of fried pig) and empanadillas are two of the most popular snack dishes (tangy meat tarts).

Puddings, such as sweet rice pudding, corn pudding, and banana pudding, are popular treats.

Recipe

  • 6 bananas that are overripe, peeled, and mashed sugar
  • 3 tablespoons melted butter or margarine
  • 3 egg whites beaten to stiff peaks
  • 1 cup melted butter or margarine 1 cup orange juice
  • 2 teaspoons sweetened shredded coconut for garnish
  • 1 cup shredded coconut

Directions

  1. 6 bananas that have become overripe, peeled and mashed 1-1/2 cups sugar
  2. 3 tablespoons melted butter or margarine
  3. 3 egg whites whisked to stiff peaks
  4. 1 cup melted butter or margarine 1-1/2 cups freshly squeezed orange juice
  5. 2 teaspoons sweetened shredded coconut for garnish

13EDUCATION

In 1990, the estimated literacy rate (the percentage of the population who can read and write) was 83 percent, according to the United Nations Development Programme. Students are required to attend school for a minimum of eight years, although many drop out sooner to help support their families and earn a living. Additional education-related issues include a scarcity of instructors, particularly in rural regions, and a lack of suitable facilities for students and teachers. The Autonomous University of Santo Domingo (UASD) and four private universities are among the country’s higher education institutions.

14CULTURAL HERITAGE

Since the early twentieth century, the Henriquez-Urea family has been at the heart of the Dominican Republic’s literary tradition. Salomé Urea de Henriquez (1850–97) was a nineteenth-century poet and educator who was instrumental in establishing the Instituto de Seoritas, the country’s first higher education center exclusively for women. Pedro Henriquez-Urea, a critic who lived in the twentieth century, was profoundly interested in the field of education. Gaston Fernando Delingue (1884–1946) is often regarded as the Dominican Republic’s national poet.

Juan Bosch, the country’s most well-known writer outside of the country, was also its president for a brief while. The Dominican Republic is home to a National Symphony Orchestra and a National School of Fine Arts, both of which are based in the capital city of Santiago.

15EMPLOYMENT

Agribusiness has traditionally been the most important source of employment in the Dominican Republic, but an increasing proportion of Dominicans are now employed in service-related occupations, particularly in the tourist industry. Unlike in the United States, most Dominican farmers do not own their property and instead work as sharecroppers or tenant farmers. Those who do own their own farms often have less than two hectares (five acres) of land and plant only enough food to provide for their own families’ nutritional needs.

Dominicans’ work opportunities have generally been limited by their race, which has historically been a prominent influence.

Women have a greater unemployment rate than men, and many are denied full employment benefits as a result.

16SPORTS

Baseball is the official sport of the Dominican Republic, with a season that runs from October to February. The games in Santo Domingo’s stadiums are attended by tens of thousands of people. A large number of Dominican baseball players play for major and minor league baseball teams in the United States. Other prominent Dominican sports include horse racing and cockfighting, which are both illegal in the United States.

17RECREATION

In the Dominican Republic, dance is a national passion that is celebrated across the country. Themerengue is the most popular dance, and it is typically accompanied by music provided by a trio of musicians. Dance halls may be found in even the tiniest of communities. In Santo Domingo, Puerto Plata, and Sosa, there are yearly Merengue Festivals to attend. Additionally, Salsa music is quite popular. The larger towns, particularly Santo Domingo, are home to a plethora of nightclubs and gambling casinos where visitors may legally partake in games including as blackjack, craps, and roulette.

18CRAFTS AND HOBBIES

Dominican folk music is influenced by Spanish, African, and Amerindian music traditions, among others. Thegüira, a traditional percussion instrument from the island, is a relic of the island’s first occupants. The güira is used to accompany romanticdecimas, and it is accompanied by maracas, palitos (which are also members of the percussion family), and guitar (folk songs.) In addition to thebalsié (accordion) and thepandero, other prominent folk instruments include: (tambourine). Themerengue is the national dance of the Dominican Republic, and it is characterized by a stiff-legged movement that resembles a limp in appearance.

Woodcarvings, pottery, handcrafted rocking chairs (which have become increasingly popular since a rocking chair was donated to U.S.

Kennedy as a gift), ceramics, macramé, and handknitted clothes are among the crafts available in the area.

Dominicans also make hand-crafted jewelry out of amber andlarimar, sometimes known as Dominican Turquoise, a light-blue stone that is peculiar to the region and is used in traditional Dominican ceremonies.

19SOCIAL PROBLEMS

The Dominican Republic is afflicted by severe economic and social difficulties, which include a 30 percent unemployment rate, among other things. Another 20% of the labor force is classified as unemployed or underemployed. Migration from rural to urban regions has resulted in a lack of housing as well as an increase in violence in metropolitan areas. Santo Domingo, the country’s capital city, has a lot of housing that is inadequate, and the water quality there is bad.

20BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alexander Creed is credited with inventing the term “creed.” Dominican Republic is a country in Central America. Chelsea House Publishing Company, New York, 1987. Kai P. Schoenhals is from the Dominican Republic. Clio Press, based in Santa Barbara, California, published this book in 1990. Walton, Chelle Koster, and others. Caribbean Ways: A Cultural Guide to the Region Riverdale Publishing Company, Westwood, Massachusetts, 1993.

Dominican culture and customs: know before you go · Visit Dominican Republic

If this is your first trip in the Dominican Republic, having a basic understanding of the culture and customs will give you the confidence to go out and meet the people, find your way about, eat off the menu, and shop and haggle. Spanish Spanish is the official language of the Dominican Republic, and if you aren’t already fluent in the language, brushing up on your travel-related Spanish before you go is a wonderful idea. La Siesta and Business Hours are both observed. When it comes to lunchtime, the Dominicans are not to be trifled with.

People in the Dominican Republic might become agitated when there is no sleep time; bear this in mind if you’re with a guide or on an excursion at lunchtime, and expect a substantial break around midday.

In order to introduce yourself upon entering a company, store, or house (including your own), it is usual to say Buenos Dias!

(good afternoon), and Buenas Noches!

Failure to extend these greetings will be regarded as quite disrespectful, but fortunately, it is a simple habit to learn – simply yell a nice “Buenos Dias!” and watch as practically everyone in unison responds with excitement with their own “Buenos Dias!” Religious Observances Although the Dominican law guarantees religious freedom, Christians (Catholics, Protestants, and Evangelicals) constitute 80 percent of the population, and Christian religious holidays play a significant role in the Dominican calendar and social life.

The days that are most often observed are as follows:

  • Holy Week/Spring Break
  • Corpus Cristi (Body of Christ)
  • Dia de San Andres (egg-throwing festival)
  • And Dia de La Altagracia (Virgin of Altagracia) are some of the holidays celebrated in Mexico. Holidays such as Christmas and Los Reyes (Day of the Three Kings) are celebrated throughout Mexico.

Dominicans have the entire weekend off on each of these holidays to spend time with relatives and friends who live in various parts of the country.

Santo Domingo: The city that kept slavery silent

Santo Domingo: The city that kept slavery out of the public eye (Photo courtesy of Stanley Chen Xi/Getty Images) ) Black people were initially settled in the Dominican Republic, which was the birthplace of the Americas’ first black people. Then how come the oldest permanent community in the Americas, which is also the oldest in Europe, has abandoned its African heritage? I walked through thick red-brick walls as I made my way inside the guarded remains of the Hospital de San Nicolás de Bari, which date back to the 16th century and are located in the heart of Santo Domingo’s Unesco-listed Colonial City.

  • According to Nuez, “there was a black lady healing the ill in her poor shack, which was located directly across the street from where Hospital de Bari was erected.” “She used her understanding of natural medicine to save lives,” says the author of the book.
  • (Photo courtesy of Westend61/Getty Images) It is documented in a 16th-Century manuscript that scholars at the City University of New York’s Dominican Studies Institute transcribed when researching the first African presence in the Dominican Republic.
  • “Let us remember Micaela and preserve her memory alive!” said the group.
  • “Let the National Congress, as well as the entire nation, acknowledge her!
  • Within seconds, a small group of Afro-Dominican ladies, including Nuez, took to the stage and began dancing in the scorching heat.
  • In today’s Dominican Republic, many Dominicans of African origin may trace their ancestors back to the “faceless” woman who assisted in the establishment of the hospital (Photo courtesy of Lebwit Lily Girma).
  • Few people are aware that the Dominican Republic was the first black people in the Americas.

And, following Haiti, which was almost next door, it was the second country to abolish African slavery, doing so in 1801.

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As part of an endeavor to increase tourism, the Colonial City underwent more than $100 million in renovations over a three-year period beginning in 2014.

The Zona Colonial, as the locals refer to it, has retained little of its African heritage to this day, despite its historical significance.

The Colonial City, which has been dubbed “a city of firsts,” is the oldest permanent European urban settlement in the Americas, and there’s little doubt that this 10-block neighborhood is a historical and architectural treasure.

There are pastel-colored stone buildings in various shades of pink, green, and yellow that line the narrow cobblestone streets, many of which have been restored to their original metal doors, arched entrances and windows, stucco walls, and wrought-iron balconies.

Statues and busts of Spanish colonial leaders continue to dot the landscape of sprawling plazas.

It was here on the west bank of the Ozama River that the Spanish decided to establish a permanent settlement following two unsuccessful attempts to do so on the island’s north shore.

In order to transition from gold to sugarcane, the Spanish acquired African slaves to work on the first sugarcane plantations in the New World, which were established in the 16th century.

Walking through the Colonial City today, however, it’s easy to believe that the Spanish were the only people who played a role in the city’s illustrious history and tradition.

The term “Maroon Awareness Tour” refers to escaped African slaves who established free communities in secluded areas throughout the Caribbean.

The trip makes stops at historical sites across the city of Santo Domingo, illuminating the role played by Africans in the development of the Dominican Republic.

“It’s about honoring ourselves,” says the author.

(Photo courtesy of Stanley Chen Xi/Getty Images.) After we were discharged from the hospital, Nuez drove us 24 kilometers south-west of Santo Domingo to the little town of Nigua, which was previously the center of the Spanish-run sugarcane farms and mills.

“Boca de Nigua was the most significant expression of African resistance to slavery in the Spanish part of the island,” said Dario Solano, an Afro-Dominican history expert and native of Nigua who serves on the Dominican Republic Committee of the United Nations Slavery Route.

the first insurrection with a political component, with the goal of ending slavery and establishing a government that represented the ethnic variety that existed on the island.” A portion of the planned attack included taking the property’s ammunition and setting fire to the sugarcane fields and the home of the plantation’s owner, among other things.

  1. You might also be interested in the following: Cuba’s apparently vanished indigenous population Is it possible to live in the most evil city on the planet?
  2. There are no interpretative centers or signage in this area – just ruins.
  3. “There’s a muting effect; they want to conceal what happened here from being heard.” Solano is one of several famous Dominicans who are attempting to bring the country’s often-overlooked African ancestors to the public’s attention.
  4. Abolition of slavery, as well as the contribution of enslaved Africans to Dominican history, are celebrated at Nigua, which is the country’s sole municipality dedicated to the cause of emancipation from slavery.
  5. While Boca de Nigua’s insurrection was inspired by Haiti’s revolution of 1791, history demonstrates that black resistance in the Americas originated right here in the Dominican Republic, where it is still practiced today.
  6. ‘The guys who revolted belonged to the Wolof ethnic group, which originated in the Senegambia,’ Solano said.
  7. Martin Luther King Jr.

The year was 1532, and Lemba managed to escape enslavement and go on an epic 15-year trip throughout the Dominican Republic, gathering an army of 200 to 400 Marooned Africans who helped him in liberating oppressed populations throughout the country.

Today, the Dominican Republic is a melting pot of cultures that represent the country’s illustrious history (Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Isaac Greenberg/Alamy).

Their forefathers’ drumming traditions and syncretic faiths have been passed down to them through their successors.

The chapel and administrative headquarters of Los Morenos are housed in a turquoise-colored timber structure with zinc roofing.

I asked what they were doing there.

The sun was lowering, and a rainstorm followed, yet the drums, tambourines, and call and response outweighed the sound of the rain splattering above the heads of the participants.

I inquired of Solano about the large drums that I had noticed in the city center but had never heard before.

In the Dominican Republic, “that’s thepalooratabales – it’s our own musical expression,” he explained.

“Palo is the national song of our country.” Subscribe to BBC Travel on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter and Instagram to join the more than three million other BBC Travel lovers.

If you like this story, you should subscribe to “The Essential List,” a weekly features email published by bbc.com. The BBC Future, Culture, Worklife, and Travel newsletters are delivered to your email every Friday and include a chosen selection of articles.

‎Dominican Compline

Santo Domingo, the city that kept slavery out of the public eye (Photo courtesy of Stanley Chen Xi/Getty Images) ) Black people were initially brought to the Americas by the Dominicans, who settled in the country in the 16th century. Then how come the oldest permanent community in the Americas, which is also the oldest in Europe, has abandoned its African roots? In the heart of Santo Domingo’s Unesco-listed Colonial City, thick red-brick walls towered over me as I made my way inside the guarded remains of Hospital de San Nicolás de Bari, which date back to the 16th century.

According to Nuez, “there was a black lady healing the ill in her poor shack, which was located directly across the street from where Hospital de Bari was constructed.” In order to save lives, she applied her natural medicine skills.

The image is courtesy of Westend61/Getty Images.

As the Archbishop of Santo Domingo said in a letter to the Spanish Crown about the new hospital, its beginnings may be traced back to “a holy black woman who shelter[ed] all the destitute people she could and healed them to the best of her abilities.” The recently mounted tourism plaque, whose caption acknowledged the city’s previous Spanish governor for its founding, but excluded Micaela – his African muse and the first person in the Americas to create and administer a hospital, caught my eye as I stood outside the ruins.

  1. It’s important that we pay tribute to Micaela and keep her legacy alive!
  2. After only a few seconds, a small group of Afro-Dominican ladies, including Nuez, took to the stage and began dancing in the scorching heat.
  3. In today’s Dominican Republic, many Dominicans of African origin may trace their ancestors back to the “faceless” woman who assisted in the establishment of the hospital (photo courtesy of Lebwit Lily Girma).
  4. It was also the site of the beginning of the Atlantic slave trade in 1503, which was 116 years before the first slaves arrived in the United States Colonies of Virginia and Massachusetts.
  5. From where I stood that morning, where the ladies were dancing in commemoration of their forebear, the tale of the country’s colonial past started.
  6. Painting and restoring building facades allowed them to be transformed into bistros, art galleries, and stores for the locals to enjoy.
  7. Visitors who come to the Dominican Republic learn just one version of the country’s history: that of Spain, and they depart with that understanding.

There are still defended gateways to this old walled city, which also boasts the earliest paved roadways as well as the first military fort, church, convent, and university to be constructed in the New World.

The sculptures and busts of Spanish colonial leaders still stand in the midst of large plazas.

Santo Domingo is the oldest permanent European urban city in the Americas.

Over a two-decade span, the advent of Christopher Columbus in 1492 and his pursuit of the island’s gold on behalf of the Spanish Crown resulted in the slavery and slaughter of more than 400,000 indigenous Taino.

There are approximately 28 African tribes who were brought to the island over the course of three centuries, and their history is entwined with the history of the city.

Nuez organizes aJornada de Visibilización del Cimarronaje, also known as a “Maroon Awareness Tour,” every year with the help of the University of Santo Domingo and Afro-Dominican activist groups such as Afros RD and Reconodi.do.

Students from local universities, locals from the surrounding area, and expatriates like me are drawn to the two-day festival, which takes place every October and aims to educate people about the city’s little-known African history.

In Nuez’s words, “we have to put faces on our heroes.” This is about putting ourselves first.

The image is courtesy of Stanley Chen Xi/Getty Images.

It was also the site of one of the island’s greatest rebellions, which took place on October 30, 1796, in the Ingenio Boca de Nigua mill, which was home to 200 enslaved Africans.

According to Nuez, one of the uprising’s organizers was a lady named Ana Mara, who was dubbed “queen of the liberated slaves” during the revolt.

Is this the world’s most evil city?

As Solano points out, although Boca de Nigua is listed in the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) project “Places of Memory on The Slave Route in the Latin Caribbean,” the site’s significance on a national level is “relatively obscure.” Nothing but ruins can be seen here: no interpretative center, no signage, nothing.

The Dominican Republic’s often-overlooked African ancestors are being brought to light by Solano and other famous Dominicans.

To commemorate Boca de Nigua’s uprising, the city of Solano holds an official Festival del Cimarronaje, or “Maroon Festival,” at this location on the 30th of October every year.

According to Solano, “this year, we’ll make a formal proposal to the national committee for Unesco as well as the Ministry of Culture to have Boca de Nigua considered as a contender for UNESCO World Heritage Site designation.” Another proposal is to designate the 30th of October as ” Da de la Africanidad ” (African Heritage Day) in Nigua, which Solano believes would grow into a national event in the future.

  1. While Boca de Nigua’s insurrection was inspired by Haiti’s revolution of 1791, history demonstrates that black resistance in the Americas began right here in the Dominican Republic, where Boca de Nigua lived.
  2. He explained that the men who revolted belonged to the Wolof ethnic group, which originated in the Senegambia.
  3. Another important turning point in the Dominican Republic’s resistance movement occurred thanks to Juan Sebastian Lemba, who was a youngster when he was forcibly transported to Santo Domingo from what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the early 1600s.
  4. Located about a 15-minute drive east of Colonial City, Lemba’s monument — the only one of its kind honoring an African in the United States – sits at the entrance of the Museum of Dominican Man.
  5. During our final stop on our Maroon Awareness Tour, we traveled 20 minutes north of Santo Domingo to the village of Villa Mella, which is known for centuries-old brotherhoods created by enslaved Africans beginning in the 16th Century.
  6. Los Morenos de Villa Mella is one of the groups that falls within this category.
  7. When I first walked into the building, I noticed a group of three guys gathered around the altar, each holding a tall, goat-skin covered drum that was attached to their lower waists with a thin rope cord.
  8. The sun was lowering, and a rainstorm followed, yet the drums, tambourines, and call and response outweighed the sound of the rain splattering above the heads of the musicians.
  9. The tall drums that I had never heard before in the city center piqued my interest, so I inquired Solano about them.
  10. In the Dominican Republic, “that’s thepalooratabales – that’s our unique musical expression,” he explained.
  11. ” Pala is the song of our people.” Subscribe to BBC Travel on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter and Instagram to join the more than three million other BBC Travel followers.

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Ratings and Reviews

Santo Domingo: the city that kept slavery out of the public eye (Photo courtesy of Stanley Chen Xi/Getty Images) ) Black people were initially settled in the Dominican Republic, which was the birthplace of the Americas’ first black population. As a result, why has Europe’s earliest permanent colony in the Americas chosen to ignore its African heritage? I walked through thick red-brick walls as I made my way inside the guarded remains of the Hospital de San Nicolás de Bari, which date back to the 16th century and are located in the heart of Santo Domingo’s Unesco-listed Colonial City My tour guide, Maribel Nuez, an activist and leader of Acción Afro-Dominicana, a non-profit organization based in the Dominican Republic’s capital, began telling the story of Micaela – “la negra del hospital,” or the black woman who lived here in the early 1500s and inspired then-Spanish governor Nicolás de Ovando to build this historic, first hospital in the Americas.

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According to Nuez, “there was a black lady healing the ill in her poor shack, which was located precisely next to where Hospital de Bari was later erected.” “She used her understanding of natural medicine to save lives,” says the author of the story.

(Image courtesy of Westend61/Getty Images) When researching the first African presence in the Dominican Republic, scholars at the City University of New York’s Dominican Studies Institute discovered a 16th-century manuscript that documented the life of this faceless, nameless Afro-Dominican heroine – whom Nuez decided to call “Micaela” in order to humanize her story, because part of the dehumanisation of slavery was the erasure of people’s names – who was a slave in the Dominican Republic.

The Archbishop of Santo Domingo described the hospital’s roots as being tied to “a holy black woman who harbored all the destitute people she could and treated them to the extent that she was able.” The recently placed tourism plaque, whose caption acknowledged the city’s former Spanish governor for its founding, but ignored Micaela – his African muse and the first person in the Americas to construct and administer a hospital.

“Let’s remember Micaela and preserve her memory alive!” says everyone.

“Let the National Congress, as well as the entire nation, acknowledge her!” We need a banner that tells the tale of this courageous black woman!” Using a handheld loudspeaker, she broadcast a traditional African chant known asOgun Balenyó, which was devoted to an African god, which echoed off the surrounding ruins.

  • They wiggled their hips and put their hands on their waists as the circle at the foot of the ancient hospital got larger.
  • It was also the site of the beginning of the Atlantic slave trade in 1503, 116 years before the first slaves arrived in the United States Colonies.
  • In the spot where I stood that morning, where the ladies were dancing in remembrance of their ancestor, the tale of the country’s colonial past started.
  • Painting and restoring building facades allowed them to be transformed into bistros, art galleries, and businesses.
  • Visitors that come to the Dominican Republic learn just one version of the country’s history: that of Spain.
  • The old walled city – with its original guarded gateways still remaining – is home to the world’s first paved roadways, as well as the world’s first military fort, cathedral, convent, and university.
  • Statues and busts of Spanish colonial leaders still stand in the midst of huge plazas.

After two failed attempts to establish towns on the island’s northern shore, the Spanish picked this area on the west bank of the Ozama River.

In order to transition from gold to sugarcane production, the Spanish brought African slaves to labor on the first sugarcane plantations in the New World.

Walking through the Colonial City today, though, it’s easy to believe that the Spanish were the only people who played a role in the city’s illustrious history.

The term “Maroon Awareness Tour” refers to escaped African slaves who established free communities in secluded areas throughout the Caribbean.

The trip makes stops at historical sites in Santo Domingo, illuminating the role played by Africans in the development of the Dominican Republic.

“It’s about honoring oneself,” she says.

(Photo courtesy of Stanley Chen Xi/Getty Images) Nuez picked us up from the hospital and drove us 24 kilometers south-west of Santo Domingo to the little town of Nigua, which was previously the center of the Spanish-run sugarcane farms and mills.

“Boca De Nigua was the most significant expression of African resistance to slavery in the Spanish part of the island,” said Dario Solano, an Afro-Dominican history expert and native of Nigua who serves on the Dominican Republic Committee of the United Nations Slavery Route.

“The first insurrection having a political dimension, with the goal of ending slavery and establishing a government that represented the ethnic variety that existed on the island.” A portion of the planned attack included capturing the property’s ammunition and setting fire to the sugarcane fields and the home of the plantation’s owner.

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  2. There are no interpretative centers or signage in this area – just a collection of ruins.
  3. “There’s a muting; they want to conceal what happened here from being heard.” Solano is one of several famous Dominicans who are attempting to bring the country’s often-overlooked African ancestors to the public’s awareness.
  4. Abolition of slavery, as well as the contribution of enslaved Africans to Dominican history, are celebrated at Nigua, which is the country’s sole municipality dedicated to the cause of emancipation.
  5. In fact, history shows that black resistance in the Americas began in the Dominican Republic, where Boca de Nigua’s uprising was inspired by Haiti’s revolt of 1791.
  6. “The guys who revolted belonged to the Wolof ethnic group, which originated in the Senegambia,” Solano explained.
  7. In 1532, Lemba escaped enslavement and embarked on an epic 15-year trip throughout the Dominican Republic, gathering an army of 200 to 400 Marooned Africans who helped him in liberating oppressed populations throughout the country.

Today, the Dominican Republic is a melting pot of cultures that reflects the country’s illustrious history (Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Isaac Greenberg/Alamy).

Their drumming traditions and syncretic beliefs have been passed down to them by their forefathers.

The chapel and administrative headquarters of Los Morenos are housed in a turquoise-colored timber building with zinc roofing.

They welcomed us with a spiritual chant and drumming, and they were encircled by other members of the community.

Waists bowed, hips rocking, and arms going side to side, our group took up the empty floor facing Los Morenos.

There are still several settlements in the Dominican Republic that were established by Africans centuries ago and have retained their old musical traditions (Photo courtesy of Lebawit Lily Girma).

In the Trujillo era, Merengue became official, almost as if it were an imposition, yet the African palo was already in use.

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Love it! Can’t wait for more!

I truly adore this application! It makes me more enthusiastic about singing, especially during the chanting of the Church’s Prayer! As a Dominican aspirant, I am pleased to see that the central province is working so much to preserve Dominican beauty and to showcase it to the rest of the globe. God’s Blessings!

3 compline

My favorite hours are spent in a Dominican environment. This is an excellent method of attracting anyone’s attention to the OPs’ prayer life. Due of my increased knowledge of the Western Province’s customs and traditions, I have noticed several small changes in the text and music. Even if there is no music accessible, I would want to have the Latin Completarium added into this site. This has proven to be a really relaxing way to end each night. Continue to do excellent work! Hi! Thank you for your feedback.

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On February 27, 1844, revolutionary fever erupted on the eastern side of the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, resulting in the death of a revolutionary leader. After years of clandestine plotting, a group known as La Trinitaria was able to capture control of the castle of Puerta del Conde in the city of Santo Domingo, thereby kicking off the Dominican War of Independence. In the early 1800s, most of what is now the Dominican Republic had been de facto autonomous, with the Spanish occupied by Napoleon’s invasion and the Haitians to the west battling off their French colonists in what is now the Dominican Republic.

In spite of the fact that it was technically free, the less-wealthy and less densely inhabited half of the island came under the influence of Haiti and joined the neighboring country in a formal union in 1822, notwithstanding its legal independence.

It was clear that political influence lay in the western half of the island, despite their nominal union.

In 1838, three Dominicans called Juan Pablo Duarte, Ramón Matias Mella, and Francisco del Rosario Sánchez, all of whom were educated and “enlightened,” came together to form a rebel movement.

Using this very secretive method, La Trinitaria went about gaining support from the general people, and even managed to discreetly convert two regiments of the Haitian army throughout the process.

However, while Duarte was gone on the mainland, attempting to rally assistance from the newly freed peoples of Colombia and Venezuela, La Trinitaria got information that the Haitian government had been made aware of their actions.

Using the fort’s cannon, Sánchez raised the Dominican Republic’s tricolor (blue, red, and white) flag, which is still flying today.

After that, for the next few years and even into the following decade, the countries of Haiti and The Dominican Republic were at war with each other, with each nation attacking the other as a result of prior invasions.

On February 27, 2006, baseball pioneer Effa Manley is inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, being the first woman to do so.

click here to find out more In the early morning hours of February 27, 1864, the first Union prisoners began arriving at Andersonville jail, which was still under construction in southern Georgia.

Henry Wirz, the man in charge of Andersonville, was one of them.

Temple was born in 1928 in Santa Monica, California, and made his cinematic debut in a series of short films called Baby, which were spoofs of current Hollywood pictures.

The decision was made in Washington, D.C.

The Grammy award for Best Disco Recording was given just as disco was about to die.

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In South Dakota, some 200 Sioux Native Americans, headed by members of the American Indian Movement (AIM), have taken control of Wounded Knee, the site of the historic 1890 murder of 300 Sioux by the United States Seventh Cavalry.

click here to find out more When a group of students dressed in masks and costumes parade through the streets of New Orleans, Louisiana, it marks the beginning of the city’s world-famous Mardi Gras celebrations.

click here to find out more The Langley, the United States Navy’s first aircraft carrier, is sunk by Japanese airplanes (with a little assistance from American destroyers), resulting in the loss of all 32 of the carrier’s aircraft.

The Jupiter was built after World War I.

The next day, the United States defeats Czechoslovakia to earn its first-ever Olympic gold medal in ice hockey at the Winter Olympics.

More information about President Abraham Lincoln’s first portrait, taken on February 27, 1860, by famed Civil War-era photographer Mathew Brady, may be found here.

Abram Lincoln, of Illinois, Republican,” the portrait is featured on the cover of Harper’s Bazaar a few days later.

When police arrived at the residence in response to a 911 call from Artie’s girlfriend, they saw Jim roaming aimlessly outside with a weapon in his possession. After being shot in the chest many times, Artie was taken to the hospital. click here to find out more

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