What Do Greek People Say When They Finish Eating Chant

Opa (Greek expression) – Wikipedia

Waiter yelled “Opa” in front of the entire restaurant when igniting the saganakion fire in Chicago. Opa (Greek: ) is a typical emotional term in the Mediterranean region. Traditional dance and weddings are two occasions when it is regularly employed. In Greek culture, the word “plate smashing” is occasionally used to refer to the act of crushing a plate. It can also be used to show excitement, astonishment, or surprise, or simply to express regret after making a mistake. Opa is also used in Albania and by several of the South Slavic countries, such as Bulgaria, Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and North Macedonia, as a way of expressing shock and surprise, or in their traditional folk dances, as well as in the United States and Canada.

Occasionally, Arabs in the Eastern Mediterranean pronounce it as “obah” (in Arabic, due to the absence of the letter ‘p’), and they particularly employ the word while picking up or playing with youngsters.

“epa” is a less common spelling option.

For example, when throwing a basketball into a basket, getting off a bicycle, or picking up a child, it is used in both Romanian and Russian cultures to indicate a brief period of concentrated attention on an action, the expectation of a successful process occurring during that action, and the subsequent completion of that action.

References

Waiter yelled “Opa” upon igniting the Saganakion fire at a Greek restaurant inChicago. Opa (Greek: ) is a typical emotional phrase in the Mediterranean region, particularly in Greece. Traditional dance and weddings are two occasions where it is regularly employed. Occasionally, in Greek culture, the word “plate smashing” is used in conjunction with the act of smashing a plate. Also, it may be used to indicate excitement, astonishment, or surprise, as well as to show regret after making a miscalculation.

It is known as formazel tov in Jewish culture.

The character Opa can also be seen in Brazil and Portugal.

Also known as “epa,” the word opa (or epa) can be used to call someone’s attention (akin to the English phrase “Hey!”).

Many Eastern European countries, including Romania and Bulgaria, make frequent use of this phrase.

General

Many years (hronia polla, hronia polla, hronia polla, hronia polla, hronia polla): meaning “many years,” as in “and many more” or “many joyful returns,” it is the most frequent Greek wish, and it is used at almost every celebration, including birthdays, name days, and holidays. And next year (kai tou hronou): This phrase, which literally translates as “and next year,” is used in the same manner as hronia polla is, to express joy and good times. Specific wishes for the upcoming year, such as the phrase “me igeia,” which means “with health,” might be added thereafter.

Kali epitihia ( ) is a Greek phrase that literally translates as “good luck.” It is most typically used when someone is about to embark on a tough task, such as taking an exam or starting a business.

Kali evdomada ( ) is a greeting that is used on Mondays and literally translates as “happy week.” Kalo mina ( ): This phrase, which translates as “happy month,” is pronounced on the first of every month.

Na pas sto kalo (na pas sto kalo): this is a farewell phrase that is spoken when someone is leaving.

Holidays

Christos anesti (Christ has risen): This phrase, which translates as “Christ has risen,” is chanted on the eve of Holy Saturday at the Anastasi celebration of Christ’s resurrection, which takes place in Athens. Alithos o kirios ( o ): literally, “really, the lord,” this is the response to “Christos anesti,” which means “Christ’s anesti.” Kales giortes ( ): Literally “happy holidays,” this phrase is used to wish someone a joyful religious holiday or to express good wishes to someone. Merry Christmas (kala hristougenna) is an expression that literally translates as “Merry Christmas.” The phrase “a nice Clean Monday” (kala koulouma) is uttered on the first day of Lent, in the run-up to Easter, and literally translates as “a good Clean Monday.” This prayer, which translates as “happy resurrection,” is performed throughout Holy Week, in the lead-up to the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, and is spelled out in Greek.

Kali hronia ( ) is a Greek phrase that translates as “Happy New Year.” Kali protohronia ( ) is a Greek phrase that translates as “Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.” Kali sarakosti ( ): literally, “happy 40-day lent,” this is a blessing that is spoken before the beginning of Lent, in the weeks leading up to Easter.

Kalo pasha ( ) is a greeting that translates as “Happy Easter.”

Weddings

Christos anesti (Christ has risen): This phrase, which translates as “Christ has risen,” is spoken on the eve of Holy Saturday at the Anastasi celebration of Christ’s resurrection. Alithos o kirios ( o ): literally, “really, the lord,” this is the answer to “Christos anesti,” which means “Christ is risen indeed.” “Kales giortes” (happily holidays) is a greeting used to wish someone a pleasant religious holiday, which literally translates as “happy holidays.” It is said “Merry Christmas” in Greek, and it literally means “Merry Christmas” in English.

Kali hronia ( ) is a Greek phrase that translates as “Happy New Year.

“Happy Easter,” or kalo pasha ( ), is a Turkish greeting.

Baptisms/new baby

Christos anesti (Christ has risen): This phrase, which translates as “Christ has risen,” is chanted on the eve of Holy Saturday at the Anastasi celebration of Christ’s resurrection. Alithos o kirios ( o ): literally, “really, the lord,” this is the response to “Christos anesti,” which means “Christ has come.” Kales giortes ( ): literally translated as “joyful holidays,” this phrase is used to wish someone a pleasant religious holiday. Kala hristougenna ( ) is Greek for “Merry Christmas.” Kala koulouma ( ) is a Greek phrase that means “a nice Clean Monday,” and it is used on the first day of Lent, the day before Easter.

Kali hronia ( ) is a greeting that translates as “Happy New Year.” Kali protohronia ( ) is a Greek phrase that translates as “Happy New Year.” This is uttered during the beginning of Lent, in the run-up to Easter, and literally translates as “happy 40-day lent.” Kalo pasha ( ) is a greeting that meaning “Happy Easter.”

Birthdays

Hronia polla (v): this is a Latin phrase that translates as “many years,” as in “and many more.” “May you treasure…” (Na hairese…) is a Greek phrase that translates as “May you cherish…” To complete this desire, include anything that is positive in the person’s life who is being honored, such as “tin ikogenia sou,” which translates as “your family.” If you live to reach one hundred years old, it is said, “May you have a long and prosperous life.” Na ton/tin hairese (na ton/tin hairese): This phrase, which translates as “Cherish him/her,” is spoken to the family of the birthday celebrant.

It is written as Oti epithimeis (), which translates as “May your wishes come true.” Polihronos/polihroni (/): a Greek word that translates as “long-lived,” this is used to wish the birthday celebrant a long and prosperous life.

Name days

Hronia polla (v): this is a Latin phrase that translates as “many years,” as in “and many more.” Keep your name sacred ( ): this phrase translates as “Hold on to your identity.” It is customary to say “Na ton/tin hairese,” which translates as “Cherish him/her,” to the relatives of the person who is having their birthday on the same day. It is written as Oti epithimeis (), which translates as “May your wishes come true.” (You may find out more about Greek name days and how they are honored, as well as when yours is, by visiting this page.)

Funerals

Zoi se mas ( ): literally translated as “life to us,” this courteous method of expressing the concept that life continues on is used amongst members of a bereaved family to communicate the idea that life goes on. Zoi se sas ( ): This Greek phrase, which translates as “life to you,” is said to the grieving by individuals who are not members of the family. Silipitiria () is a Greek word that translates as “condolences.” Eonia I mnimi (v I mnimi) is a Greek phrase that literally translates as “everlasting memory,” as in “May he/she be remembered forever.” na zisete na ton/tin thimaste (in English: “May you live to remember him/her” or “May you live to remember her/him”) means “May you live to remember him/her.”

When you get something new

When a bereaved family uses the phrase “Zoi se mas,” which translates as “life to us,” it is a polite way of expressing the concept that life goes on in the midst of tragedy. In Greek, this phrase translates as “life to you,” and it is said to the grieving by individuals who are not members of the family. Silipitiria () is a Greek word that literally translates as “condolences”. It is possible to say: “May he/she be remembered forever” in Greek with the word Eonia I mnimi (v mnimi), which means “everlasting remembrance.” If you live long enough to remember him/her, you will be remembered as well (na zisete/na tin thimaste/na zisete/na thimaste): “May you live long enough to remember him/her.”

During a meal

“Geia sta heria sou” (Geia sta heria sou) is a Greek phrase that literally translates as “health to your hands” and is used as a blessing for the person who prepared your dinner. Kali honepsi ( ): This phrase, which translates as “excellent digestion,” is stated after the conclusion of a meal. Kali orexi ( ) is a greeting that translates as “excellent appetite” and is said before a meal. It is customary to raise glasses in toasts with the phrase “to our health,” which means “to our well-being” in Greek ( / ).

For health

Yiasou (oo): this is a Greek word that meaning “your health,” and it is used to signify “Bless you” when someone sneezes. A sneeze can be referred to as geitses (), which comes from the same root as “yiasou” (“health,” which means “well-being”). Kali anarosi ( ) is a Greek phrase that translates as “excellent recuperation.” The phrase kala apotelesmata ( ) literally translates as “excellent outcomes,” and it is used to wish someone successful medical test results. Perastika () is a Greek word that means “passing,” and it is used to signify “Get well soon.” Originally derived from the Greek word “sidero,” which means iron, this phrase is used to offer someone strength when they are suffering a medical condition or sickness.

Illustration courtesy of Philippos Avramides Illustration courtesy of Philippos Avramides

Travelfun

This phrase, which literally translates as “your health,” is used when someone sneezes as a way to say “Bless you.” It is spoken when someone sneezes and comes from the same root as “yiasou” (“health,” which means “well-being”). In Georgian, the phrase “good recovery” (kali anarosi) indicates “excellent health.” It is customary to wish someone favorable medical test results by using the phrase kala apotelesmata ( ), which translates as “good outcomes.” When someone says “Get well soon,” they are referring to the Greek word perastika, which literally translates as passing.

Philippos Avramides created the illustration.

Work, schoolmilitary service

The Greek word kala apotelesmata ( o) literally translates as “good outcomes,” and it is used to wish someone excellent test results on an examination. The term “kales doulies” (good business) is used when someone starts a new business or when the start of a busy season is approaching in Lithuania. Kali arhi ( ): literally translated as “good start,” this is said to someone who is starting a new work or school. When someone says “kali proodo” (meaning “excellent progress”), they are congratulating someone who has graduated from high school.

Kali thiteia ( ) is a Greek phrase that translates as “good service” and is said to someone who is about to enter military duty.

To individuals who have completed their military duty and those who have completed their prison sentence, the phrase “kalos politis” (good citizen) is used to express their gratitude.

Send us any recommendations for this list via Instagram, @greece is, and we’ll include them.

How do you say “See you!” and “We will see!” in Greek?

Within the scope of this essay, we shall cover the extremely common terms “See you later” and “We’ll see.” Because the expressions seem so similar, foreigners are frequently perplexed and end up uttering the incorrect expressions at the wrong moment in Japanese. For example, assume that you meet up with your gorgeous Greek friend(s), you all have a fantastic time, you kiss them goodbye, and you are going to say ‘See you later in Greek’ to them. In an attempt to interpret “See you,” many non-Greeks respond with ‘!’ instead…

Don’t be concerned; the majority of Greeks will comprehend what you were trying to communicate! It is, on the other hand, really simple to learn how to pronounce the terms correctly. More information is provided below – Take pleasure in your lesson! ‘K’ is for ‘King’!

1) “See you” = Ta leme – Τα λέμε

Indeed, Greeks “chat” all of the time, organize get-togethers, and “communicate everyday over the phone.” Then, when they come to the end of a conversation and want to end it with “See you” or “Bye, see you soon,” they really say “speak to you” instead of “see you”! As a result, you do not require the verb “to see,” but rather the verb “to talk.” ” (= to express oneself, to inform oneself). You just need to conjugate that verb in the present tense, the “we-form” = “leme”!’, to make this sentence work.

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* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * See you later!

“O” is an abbreviation for “Oh!” (= See you in the morning!

A Greek song: “Ta leme”!

In addition, the title of a magnificent song sung by “Eleonora Zouganeli,” a brilliant female musician from the new generation of Greek vocalists, is “T!.” When a guy wants to break up with his girlfriend, he prefers to tell her ‘!’ and depart rather than expressing it straight to her. The girl is aware that he is deceiving her…

2) “See you” = Tha ta poume – Θα τα πούμε

Ta leme is another way of saying “See you (soon)”, and it has precisely the same meaning as “Tha ta poume,” which was previously discussed here. So what is it about this song that makes it seem so different? Actually, you’re just repeating the same word in a different tense this time around! As a result, instead of saying “We talk,” you now say “We shall talk.” Because it is an irregular verb, it sounds significantly different in the future tense, which helps to explain the ambiguity of the term in the next section.

!

3) “We will see” = Tha doume – θα δούμε

Ta leme is another way of saying “See you (soon)”, and it has precisely the same meaning as “Tha ta poume,” which was previously stated. So what is it about this song that makes it sound so unique? Actually, you’re merely repeating the same word in a different tense this time around. In other words, instead of saying “We talk,” you say “We shall talk” now. Because it is an irregular verb, it sounds significantly different in the future tense, which helps to explain the ambiguity of the term in the next paragraph.

T!

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Ta leme is another way of saying “See you (soon)”, and it has precisely the same meaning as “Tha ta poume,” which was previously discussed here! So what gives it such a distinct sound? Actually, you’re just repeating the same verb, but this time in the future tense! As a result, instead of saying “We talk,” you say “We shall talk.” Because it is an irregular verb, it sounds completely different in the future tense, which helps to explain why some people are confused by the sentence below.

Remember that in this scenario, you must always include the “ta,” which stands for “discuss “about things.” T! You may expect to hear from me on Tuesday (or “speak to me” on Tuesday).

4 Essential Phrases for Travelers in Greece

With a diverse mainland and dozens of islands, Greece offers a plethora of opportunities for exploration. Greeks are extremely proud of their language and culture, and they enjoy it when others make an attempt to communicate in their language. Learning some of the language before you travel would only enhance your whole experience, but when you’ve mastered the niceties, what should you focus on learning? Here are some Greek words to learn before you go that will assist you in fully immersing yourself in Greek culture once you are there.

  • Greek coffee is a long cry from the cup of joe you’d get at your local Starbucks.
  • In Greece, drinking coffee is considered a leisurely activity, and a coffee break might last several hours.
  • Sketos — unsweetened ice cream Metrio is a somewhat sweet wine.
  • Drinking Greek coffee, which is traditionally served black and with a glass of water on the side, is an experience you won’t want to miss.
  • 2.
  • If you want to spend a significant amount of your time in Greece at one of the numerous tavernas, you’ll undoubtedly want to learn how to make a toast.
  • As a matter of fact, there is a hypothesis that this ritual dates back to the Ancient Greeks.

Also, you can toast someone else by sayingstinygiasou(to your health) in casual contexts andeis igan siif you find yourself at an event with a more formal setting.

Greetings, Opa!

It can be used to indicate “oops!” or to summon attention, and it is also yelled when the flame is kindled on the flambé dish saganaki (saganaki is Greek for “flambé dish”).

In 2010, Greek musician Giorgos Alkaios sang his song “OPA!” at the Eurovision song contest as a message to the Greek people, encouraging them to dance and be cheerful in the midst of the country’s economic crisis.

4.

Fili mou means “my buddy,” Moro mou means “my baby,” and Agape mou means “my love,” among other things.

Send us a simple email to inquire about courses in your location if you want to learn more useful Greek phrases before you depart on your travels. Do you have any knowledge of the Greek language? What more words and phrases are required for a truly genuine Greek experience?

14 Delightful Little Greek Words You Absolutely Need to Know — The TravelPorter

Anastasia Valti-Spanopoulou contributed to this article. When Shakespeare famously penned the line “It all sounds Greek to me,” he very well summed up how the Greek language has sounded to foreign ears since the beginning of time. While Greek may appear to be unintelligible at first glance, it is a language that is notoriously rich in expressions and meanings, which is one reason you should try to learn it; however, learning some basic Greek can also be very beneficial if you are planning a trip to Greece, as it can make your travel experience a whole lot less complicated.

1 Yia Sou

Anastasia Valti-Spanopoulou contributed to this report. “It all sounds Greek to me,” Shakespeare famously penned, accurately capturing the way the Greek language has sounded to alien ears from the dawn of time. While Greek may appear to be unintelligible at first glance, it is a language that is notoriously rich in expressions and meanings, which is one reason you should try to learn it; however, learning some basic Greek can also be very beneficial if you are planning a trip to Greece, as it can make your travel experience a whole lot less stressful.

2 Yia Mas

Anastasia Valti-Spanopoulou contributed to this post. “It all sounds Greek to me,” Shakespeare famously penned, summarizing how the Greek language has sounded to alien ears from the dawn of time. As incomprehensible as Greek may appear to you, it is notoriously rich in expressions and meanings, which is one reason you should attempt to learn it; but, more importantly, if you’re planning a trip to Greece, learning somebasic Greekcan be just the thing to make your travel experience a whole lot less complicated.

3 Kalimera

In addition to ‘Kalimera,’ which means ‘good day,’ is another really fundamental, important, and lovely term. The correct usage of it is until 12:00, after which it is preferred to say “kalispera,” which translates as “good afternoon” or “good evening.” The pronunciation of these phrases is rather simple, so if you want to impress your Athens tour guide or the Greek restaurant owner you just met, casually dropping the words “kalidimera” or “kalispera” into the discussion will most likely result in a nice pat on the back from both parties (or, in the latter case, even a drink or small dish on the house).

4 Malaka

Kalimera is another really fundamental, helpful, and lovely phrase, which literally translates as ‘good morning.’ The correct usage of it is until 12:00, after which it is preferred to say “kalispera,” which translates as “good afternoon” or “good afternoon.” The pronunciation of these phrases is rather simple, so if you want to impress your Athens tour guide or the Greek restaurant owner you just met, casually dropping the words “kalidimera” or “kalispera” into the discussion will most likely result in a nice pat on the back from your audience (or, in the latter case, even a drink or small dish on the house).

5 Ela

As you’ve undoubtedly guessed by now, we’re big fans of Greek words that have numerous meanings, and ‘ela’ is another one of those terms. Its primary meaning is ‘come’ or ‘come on,’ but Greeks also use it to answer the phone informally 99 percent of the time if they know who is calling them. It’s clear that they don’t anticipate the caller to come over, so how they came to use the word “ela” as a method of acknowledging who they’re talking to will continue to be a mystery to those who study the interesting history of Greece.

6 Filoxenia

In case you hadn’t guessed it by now, we are huge fans of Greek words that have various meanings, and ‘ela’ is another one of them. Its primary meaning is ‘come’ or ‘come on,’ but Greeks also use it to answer the phone informally 99 percent of the time if they know who is calling and when. It’s clear that they don’t anticipate the caller to come over, so how they came to use the word “ela” as a manner of acknowledging who they’re talking to will continue to be a mystery to those who study Greek culture.

7 Efharisto

You’ll probably want to say ‘efharisto’ to a few individuals throughout your trip to Greece because of all the many types of filoxenia you’ll receive while there. Simply said, this is the Greek word for ‘thank you.’ No matter how little Greek you know, understanding this one small word will make the people you meet and interact with while on your Greek vacation extremely happy and satisfied.

8 Parakalo

The natural response to the phrase “efharisto” is “parakalo,” which means “you’re welcome,” in case you were wondering. In practice, however, as we have previously established, the Greek language frequently gives numerous meanings to a single word that we really like using, and so the term ‘parakalo’ may also be translated as ‘please’, or it can be used to express the question ‘how can I assist you?’ As an example, imagine that you have just arrived at one of the many wonderful restaurants in Athens and that the waiter approaches you: he may say ‘parakalo’, which is a way of asking you what you would like; after you have finished your delicious meal and paid the bill, he will obviously say ‘efharisto,’ to which you may also respond with a ‘parakalo.’ So there you have it!

After three simple words, you’re already conversing in Greek.

9 Peratzatha

The term ‘peratzatha’ refers to the idle but immensely calming hobby of people-watching, which is one of several that may teach you something about Greek society. Many Greeks believe this to be one of the most enjoyable activities in life, and if you’ve ever visited Greece, you’ve definitely seen that many taverns and cafés in Athens have tables set out outside for patrons to enjoy. While this is obviously done to take advantage of the spectacular weather that Greece is known for, it is also done because there is something curiously captivating about watching people pass by while you sip your coffee or drink.

If you’re looking for a genuine Greek travel experience, we didn’t only teach you a pretty great Greek term; we also showed you a very Greek alternative to the typical local activities that most local city tours contain.

‘must’ reading for fun things to do in greece:

In addition to being closely connected to peratzatha, the term “aragma” alludes to the simple pleasures of life, and more specifically, to the all-time favorite practice of “cooling.” For Greeks, ‘aragma’ takes place in their homes with their friends, but it may also take place at coffee shops (if you’ve ever been to Greece, you’ve probably observed how long their version of ‘going for coffee’ can last for hours and hours).

When it comes to summer, Aragma’s house is unavoidably transformed into a beach, which is why we were so excited to put together that guide to the top Athens beachesyou heard about recently.

11 Meraki

After you’ve taken a few sightseeing trips and seen the country’s local attractions, you’ll undoubtedly come away with the notion that Greeks put a lot of meraki into almost everything they do. This is one of the most beautiful and difficult-to-translate terms in Greek, and it alludes to the love and happiness that one has for what they do, and, by extension, the excellent results that their efforts generate. We have plenty of meraki to devote to writing this blog, so taking a look at, instance, ourAthens day tours guide or ourpost on romantic Athenswill most likely provide you with a decent understanding of what we mean by this unusual phrase.

12 Kefi

Continuing our discussion of words that are emblematic of what Greek culture is all about, ‘kefi’is an expression that describes the loud singing, excessive drinking, and frantic dancing that takes place in circles, on tables, on the sidewalks, or wherever else is possible, and which is what the vast majority of tourists associate with Greek entertainment. ‘Kefi’ is a loose term that can be translated as ‘joviality’ or ‘conviviality’ in English; however, many Greeks refer to ‘kefi’ as if it were a uniquely Greek characteristic because, after all, no one knows how to party quite like the Greeks, and so kefi has come to refer to this supposedly unique Greek ability to have perfect fun.

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13 Ginete

Peter Economides, a world-renowned brand strategist, has gone into great detail about the meanings of this word in his inspirational talks in Greece (which have been linked to the words’meraki’ and ‘kefi,’ as well as, ironically, to the word ‘aragma,’) but, for the sake of brevity, we’ll just cover the basics. Remember this: ‘ginete’ is an impersonal verb that, in its most basic form, signifies that something is becoming, and this is true in a wide sense. In the case of food cooking in the oven, you might say that it is “being” cooked in the oven, for example.

For example, if you wish to inquire with, say, your concierge about a particular arrangement in your room, you can simply include the phrase ginete?’ at the conclusion of your request.

It is possible that the most beneficial version of this verb for you is found in the phrase “ti ginete?” (how are you doing?) which loosely translates as “how are you doing?” and is a fantastic way to welcome those with whom you are on casual terms.

14 Filia

Many languages employ a term that literally means ‘kisses’ as a type of leave-taking ritual, and the Greek word ‘filia’ is just that. Contrary to popular belief, it normally does not suggest closeness, despite the fact that you would only say ‘filia’ to someone you know quite well, whether at the end of a phone call or before hanging up the phone, regardless of how close you are. The ‘cuter’ variation is ‘filakia,’ which literally translates as ‘small kisses,’ and is something you’ll hear more often from younger ladies.

Keep in mind that the Greek word for ‘kisses’ should not be confused with the Greek term for ‘friendship’.

Not at all.

These typical Greek phrases and terms will not only help you create a good impression when meeting Greeks everywhere you go, but they will also hopefully give you a decent taste of what the amazing Greek culture is all about even before you set out to experience it for yourself first-hand in Greece.

Oh, and the word ‘filia’!

Do you speak Greek?

For leave-taking conventions, several languages employ a phrase that translates as “kisses,” and the Greek word ‘filia” means “kisses.” Although you would only say ‘filia’ to someone you know fairly well, contrary to popular belief, it does not typically suggest intimacy, even if you would only say it to someone you know fairly well, whether at the end of a phone call or before hanging up. In Greek, ‘filakia’ (meaning “small kisses”) is a ‘cuter’ variant of the phrase, which you’ll hear more often from younger ladies.

Keep in mind that the Greek word for ‘kisses’ should not be confused with the Greek word for ‘friendship.

In any case, I don’t think so.

Hopefully, these typical Greek phrases and terms will not only help you create a good first impression when meeting Greeks everywhere, but they will also provide you with a decent taste of what the amazing Greek culture is all about even before you travel to Greece to experience it for yourself.

Aside from it, there is the word “filia.” The phrase “Yia sas” means “Young Sailor.”

7 Greek Easter traditions explained (includes the easter wishes in Greek!) — Danae Florou

Have you ever visited Greece during the Easter season? The weather is pleasant, the fragrance of flowers is delightful, and the anticipation is exhilarating. The message of love, the fresh beginnings, and the emotional Holy Week – or Passion Week, as we still refer to it in Greek – are all things that Greeks like about Easter. Everything about this particular festival is related to the culture and customs of the people who celebrate it. Traditions are something that we can’t actually trace back in time.

Many of them are, of course, fairly similar for Orthodox Christians, but there are always some things that may surprise you along the road. At the very end of the article, you’ll find a list of Easter-related vocabulary words.

1 Sarakosti

Is it possible for you to travel to Greece over the Easter holidays? While the weather is pleasant, the scent of flowers is heavenly, and the anticipation is breathtaking, The message of love, the fresh beginnings, and the emotional Holy Week – or Passion Week, as we still refer to it in Greek – are all things that Greeks like about Easter! It is the culture and customs that connect everything about this wonderful festival together. It is impossible to trace the origins of traditions back in time.

You’ll find a list of Easter vocabulary terms at the conclusion of the post as well.

2 Easter candlethe Godparents

Children are overjoyed this season since the Easter break lasts the same amount of time as the Christmas break. Two entire weeks have passed! However, it is not the sole reason to be content. Theirv(godmother) orv(godfather) presents them with theirv(Easter candle) as well as the traditional Easter gift, such as new shoes or money. A large chocolate egg is also a popular Easter confection. In Greek culture, the relationship between the (godmother) or the (godfather) and the child is particularly important since it begins at the child’s baptism and continues for the rest of the kid’s life.

3 Wishes

There is, without a doubt, some ambiguity over the wishes in Greek at the moment. Without a doubt, we appreciate our desires. We have a lot of them.

  • “Happy Easter” ( ) is a greeting used only before and only before Easter to allude to the Easter celebrations and the Holy Week as a whole in Greek. As the day of the Resurrection approaches on Sunday, the Greeks say “vvvv”
  • However, on the day of Easter, on Sunday, you would say ” ” (Easter Sunday)

Confused? It’s all about the sequence leading up to the Resurrection: The first of them is “I don’t know what you’re talking about” (for the holiday period only) The second part of the sentence reads as follows: (for the night of Resurrection) • • • • • • • • • • • • • (it means the Christ is risen, so it is saidonEaster Sunday) I couldn’t possibly leave you without making a bonus wish. When someone says to you, “He has genuinely risen from the dead,” the response is (He has truly risen from the dead).

And, of course, don’t forget about, which is the all-year-round, most popular request.

4 Baking

This particular day is designated as “baking day.” The sweet bread that we cook (and devour in enormous numbers!) during Easter is called “o.” There are several fragrant spices in this dish, including mahleb, mastic, and coriander, and it smells really amazing. There are also the unique cookies (which look a little like braided or circular cookies) that we bake on this particular day.

5 Eggs

This is also the day when eggs are traditionally colored. The traditional color is red, but over the years, several additional colors and ornaments have been added to the design. There is no Easter egg search or Easter Rabbit, but a bunny or a small chick is used as a decoration on the table. So, what are you going to do with all of these coloured eggs?

You crack them open on Easter Sunday, as shown in this slow motion video! Two people have different desires: one wishes v and the other wishes It’s entertaining to watch who manages to acquire the most durable egg. The ones with a variety of colors are made of wood. Don’t fall for the ruse!

6 The Holy Week or the Great Week

The “Great Week” is referred to as M in Greek, and it begins on (you’ll notice the abbreviation “. ” as well) and continues until., with the last day being . (Easter Sunday). During this period, some of the most beautiful hymns are recited. The highly emotional song sang on is titled . (Good Friday). More information about this extremely unique day may be found here. Andhereyou may see Glykeria chanting this song with Greek subtitles in the background. Beautiful and poignant, it’s undoubtedly my favorite moment of the entire Easter season.

7 Easter day

The midnight mass on.o (Holy Saturday) is always a magnificent event, complete with pyrotechnics and the ringing of the Church bells. People then return to their houses and have a late meal of an unique soup made with vegetables and lamb offal, which they prepare themselves. In addition, they make wishes to one another while breaking the first red eggs (see #5 above!). The preparation of the lamb begins first thing in the morning on Sunday morning. In the past, you may have seen a whole lamb being roasted over a fire pit on the ground or over a large barbeque, and this is often how lamb is prepared for Easter dinner.

The feast does not come to a conclusion until later in the day!

Your Easter vocabulary:

  • Easter is represented by the Greek letter. Sarakosti (Lady Sarakosti) is a Greek word that means “lady Sarakosti.” This is the week before Easter
  • It is also known as Holy Week. In Greek, the word epitaph means “eternal resting place.” Easter Sunday is pronounced like “eastern Sunday.” “Easter candle” is an abbreviation for “Easter candle.” The terms “godfather” and “godmother” are interchangeable. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year (during the holiday time)
  • For the night of Resurrection, the greeting “Happy Ressurection” is appropriate. = Christ has ascended to the right hand of the Father
  • I believe he has actually resurrected from the dead. The Greek word for Easter bread is, which means “sweet” or “sweet bread.” The term “Greek Cookies” refers to cookies made in Greece. The egg is represented by the symbol. “The red eggs” translate as “the crimson eggs of the sun.” Lamb is represented by the Greek letter.

Here’s a little exercise for you: on Easter Sunday, how would you express your wishes in Greek? Please share your thoughts in the comments section. Thank you for spending today with me as we learned about the Greek Easter! Danae is a woman who lives in the United States.

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I’ll send you some sunlight, too, if you’d want more of my greatest learning suggestions and learning offerings tailored just for Greek language fans. here: There will be no spam ever. You can unsubscribe at any time. Thank you very much! Danae Florou is a model and actress. Since 2003, I’ve been teaching the Greek language, and since 2016, I’ve been teaching it online. I enable enthusiastic learners at the intermediate level and higher dig deep into the language and connect with the Greek people in your life as well as the languageculture of your heart.

Christmas in Greece on whychristmas?com

Christmas Eve is a popular time for youngsters to go out and sing kalanda (carols) on the streets, especially for guys. As they sing, they accompany themselves with drums and triangles. Occasionally, they will even have model boats that are ornamented with nuts that have been painted gold. The practice of transporting a boat in the Greek islands dates back thousands of years. They may be rewarded with money as well as food items like nuts, chocolates, and dried figs if they perform well during the singing competition.

  • A branch of basil has been wound around a wooden crucifix and is suspended from a piece of wire.
  • The cross and basil are dipped into holy water once a day by someone, usually the mother of the household, who then uses the cross and basil to sprinkle water in each room of the house.
  • This 12-day period between Christmas and Epiphany is designated as the kallikantzaroi’s season of appearance (January 6th).
  • The kallikantzaroi are responsible for tasks such as putting out fires and making milk go off.
  • Every December, a massive Christmas Tree and a three-masted sailing ship are erected in Aristotelous Square in the city of Thessaloniki (which is the second largest city in Greece), marking the beginning of the holiday season.
  • In addition to Athens, there are significant boat shows in other major Greek towns.
  • In Greece, Christmas trees are quite popular.
  • Over time, and particularly in the late twentieth century, it became increasingly customary to decorate Christmas trees rather than boats.
  • Attending a Midnight Mass Service is extremely essential to the majority of Greeks.
  • The main course for Christmas dinner is often lamb or hog, which is cooked in an oven or over an open spit.

Some other traditional Christmas and New Year foods include ‘Baklava’ (a sweet pastry made of filo pastry filled with chopped nuts and sweetened with syrup or honey), Kataifi (a pastry made from a special form of shredded filo dough that is flavored with nuts and cinnamon), and Theeples (a type of stuffed pastry made of filo pastry filled with raisins) (a kind of fried pastry).

  • Another famous Christmas delicacy is melomakarono, which are egg or oblong-shaped biscuit/cakes prepared from wheat, olive oil, and honey and rolled in chopped walnuts.
  • Another famous biscuit in Greece is kourabiedes, which is a butter and almond cookie that is similar to shortbread in taste and texture.
  • It’s a delicious bread that’s spherical in shape and scented with cinnamon, citrus, and cloves.
  • The bread is prepared on Christmas Eve so that it can be consumed on Christmas Day.
  • Many families will gather for a large lunch and to play games on New Year’s Eve.
  • It is also possible to sing New Year’s kalanda songs or carols.
  • (bouna-MA-thes).
See also:  How To Attract A Fairy With A Chant

The Pothariko is another major ceremony that takes place in many homes on New Year’s Day (pothari-KO).

This is done with the right foot, according to tradition.

In certain parts of Greece, the individual enters the house with a pomegranate in their hand, which they smash at the front entrance before going inside.

There is also an unique St Basil’s Day cake known as ‘Vasilopita’ that is served on this day (vasi-LO-pita).

When it comes to Greek cake, certain regions prefer a sweeter texture while others prefer a more dense texture similar to bread.

In some households, the Vasilopita is sliced and the pieces are distributed by the father of the household.

The remaining slices are distributed among the members of the family/household in order of age, with the oldest individual receiving the first slice.

The celebration of Epiphany in the Greek Orthodox Church commemorates Jesus’ baptism as a man while he was a child.

In many parts of the nation, young men compete to be the first to reach a cross that has been consecrated by a priest and then thrown into a lake, river, or the sea by diving into extremely cold bodies of water.

The person who receives the cross first is said to have good fortune in the upcoming year. Boat blessings, ship blessings, music, dancing, and a lot of food are all part of the Epiphany celebrations.

Culture: Greek Customs

Christmas Eve is a popular time for youngsters to go out into the streets and sing ‘kalanda’ (Christmas carols). They accompany their singing with drums and triangles. They may also have model boats that are ornamented with nuts that have been painted gold on them from time to time. It is an ancient tradition in the Greek Islands to transport a boat. They may be rewarded with money as well as food items like nuts, chocolates, and dried figs if they perform well during the singing contest. A small wooden bowl with a length of wire suspended over the rim is a very old and very classic item of décor.

A small amount of water is kept in the bowl to ensure that the basil remains alive and healthy.

A traditional belief is that doing so will keep the “kallikantzaroi” (evil spirits) away.

According to legend, they arrive from the center of the earth and enter people’s homes through the chimney!

Keeping a fire going for the entire twelve days of Christmas is also intended to keep the kallikantzaroi away from your house (burning old shoes is meant to be a very good way of scaring off the kallikantzaroi).

It’s a well-known tourist destination in the area.

When sailors returned from sea expeditions, it was customary in Greece to display little decorated ships in their houses, which was a centuries-old practice.

A enormous decorated boat stood adjacent to the earliest known Christmas tree in Greece, which was put up by King Otto in 1833.

However, owning both a boat and a tree is getting increasingly common!

Individuals are free to return home and complete their Advent fast following the ceremony.

It’s frequently served with a spinach and cheese pie, as well as a variety of salads and vegetable side dishes.

It is customary to consume the pastries for breakfast or as an appetizer.

Kouribiedes, another famous Greek biscuit that is similar to shortbread in texture, are made with butter and almonds.

Cinnamon, citrus, and cloves flavor this circular sweet bread, which is baked to perfection.

Making the bread on Christmas Eve so that it is ready to be served on Christmas Day is a traditional family tradition.

Due to the fact that the 1st of January is St Basil’s Day in Greece, it is common for Aghios Vassilis / b (Saint Basil/Saint Vasilis) to bring gifts to children on that day.

Many people exchange warm greetings and good wishes for the new year at midnight.

The tradition of Bounamathes is observed on New Year’s Day in various parts of Greece (bouna-MA-thes).

On New Year’s Day, the Pothariko is another major celebration in many households (pothari-KO).

It is believed by the Greeks that this will bring good fortune to a household throughout the year.

The pomegranate seeds are sprinkled about the house, symbolizing happiness and good fortune for the family – and the more pomegranate seeds there are, the better.

Basil’s Day is an unique cake known as the ‘Vasilopita’ (vasi-LO-pita).

It is sweet in certain regions of Greece, while it is more like a loaf of bread in others.

According to some traditions, the Vasilopita is sliced and distributed among family members.

And the remaining slices are divided among the family/household members, starting with the oldest member and progressing in order of their age.

The feast of the Epiphany is celebrated in the Greek Orthodox Church to commemorate Jesus’ baptism as a man.

There are several competitions held around the nation in which young men plunge into freezing lakes, rivers, and the sea in an attempt to be the first to retrieve a cross that has been blessed by a priest and tossed into the water.

According to legend, whomever receives the cross first will be blessed with good fortune during the next year. Boat blessings, ship blessings, music, dancing, and a lot of food are all part of the Epiphany celebration.

  • On Christmas Eve, many youngsters, particularly males, take to the streets to sing ‘kalanda’ (Christmas carols). They accompany themselves with drums and triangles. They may also have model boats that are ornamented with nuts that have been painted gold. The habit of transporting a boat in the Greek islands dates back thousands of years. If the children do well, they may be rewarded with money as well as food items such as nuts, candy, and dried figs. A small wooden bowl with a piece of wire suspended over the rim is an antique and extremely traditional ornament. A basil herb is wound around a wooden crucifix and suspended from a wire. A small amount of water is kept in the bowl to ensure that the basil stays alive and fresh. The cross and basil are dipped into holy water once a day by someone, usually the mother of the household, who then uses it to sprinkle water in each room of the house. This is thought to keep the ‘kallikantzaroi’ (evil spirits) at bay. The kallikantzaroi are only supposed to occur during the 12-day period between Christmas and Epiphany (January 6th). They are said to go all the way from the center of the earth and enter people’s homes through the chimney! The kallikantzaroi perform tasks such as putting out fires and setting milk on fire. Keeping a fire going for the entire twelve days of Christmas is also intended to keep the kallikantzaroi away from your home (burning old shoes is meant to be a very good way of scaring off the kallikantzaroi). Every December, a massive Christmas Tree and a three-masted sailing ship are erected at Aristotelous Square in the city of Thessaloniki (which is the second largest city in Greece). It is a well-known tourist destination. Other major Greek towns, such as Athens, host significant boat shows as well. In Greece, there is a long-standing practice for little ships to be displayed in houses after sailors return from long adventures at sea. In Greece, Christmas trees are often used. The first documented Christmas tree in Greece was set up by King Otto in 1833, close to a magnificent decked boat, and was dedicated to the memory of King Constantine I. Christmas trees that have been adorned have become more popular throughout time, particularly in the late twentieth century. However, having a boat in addition to a tree is getting increasingly fashionable! For most Greeks, attending a Midnight Mass Service is extremely essential. After the service, folks will be able to return home and complete their Advent fasting. Lamb or pork, roasted in an oven or on an open spit, is frequently served as the main course for Christmas dinner. It’s frequently served with a spinach and cheese pie, as well as a variety of salads and vegetable dishes. Other traditional Christmas and New Year’s foods include ‘Baklava’ (a sweet pastry made of filo pastry filled with chopped nuts and sweetened with syrup or honey), Kataifi (a pastry made from a special form of shredded filo dough flavored with nuts and cinnamon), and Theeples (a type of stuffed pastry) (a kind of fried pastry). The pastries are either served for breakfast or served as appetizers at a dinner party. An additional popular Christmas treat is melomakarono, a type of biscuit/cake prepared from flour, olive oil, and honey and rolled in chopped walnuts. Melomakarono are egg or oblong-shaped biscuits or cakes that are baked in the oven. Another popular biscuit in Greece is kourabiedes, which is a butter and almond cookie that is similar to shortbread in texture and flavor. Loaves of ‘Christopsomo’ (Christ’s Bread or Christmas bread) are a typical table decoration in Italy. It’s a sweet bread that’s spherical in shape and scented with cinnamon, orange zest, and cloves. A cross is embroidered on the top of the dress. It is best to make the bread on Christmas Eve so that it may be consumed on Christmas Day. Happy/Merry Christmas is pronounced ‘Kala Christougenna’ in Greek. There are several more languages in which to say “Merry Christmas.” On the 1st of January, which is St Basil’s Day in Greece, Aghios Vassilis / B (Saint Basil/Saint Vasilis) is frequently seen bringing gifts to youngsters. On New Year’s Eve, many families will gather to eat a large supper and participate in activities. Many people exchange warm greetings and best wishes for the New Year at midnight. It is possible to hear New Year’s kalanda songs/carols being sung. Bounamathes is a custom that takes place on New Year’s Day in several parts of Greece (bouna-MA-thes). Parents and grandparents provide their children with money and presents to greet them on the first day of the New Year’s celebration. On New Year’s Day, the Pothariko is still another major celebration in many households (pothari-KO). The first person to enter a house each year must be a youngster who is considered ‘fortunate,’ or the first-born of a family or, more often, the man of the house – and they must do it with their right foot, according to custom. They think that doing so will bring good fortune to the home throughout the year. In certain parts of Greece, the individual enters the house with a pomegranate in their hand, which they smash at the front door before entering the house. The seeds are dispersed throughout the house, symbolizing happiness and good fortune for the family – and the more pomegranate seeds there are, the better! There’s also an unique St Basil’s Day dessert called ‘Vasilopita’ that’s only available on this day (vasi-LO-pita). The cake has a coin baked into the center of it. It is sweet in certain places of Greece, while it is more like a bread in others. The person who discovers the penny in their slice is considered to be lucky for the rest of the year. In certain families, the Vasilopita is sliced and the parts are distributed by the father of the home. The first slice is traditionally reserved for Jesus, the second for Mary, the third for the poor, and the fourth for the entire family. The remainder of the slices are distributed among the members of the family/household in order of age, with the oldest individual receiving the first slice. On the 6th of January, people in Greece also commemorate the Feast of the Three Kings. The celebration of Epiphany in the Greek Orthodox Church commemorates Jesus’ baptism as a man when he was thirty years old. It is often referred to as “The Blessing of the Waters.” In many parts of the nation, young men compete to be the first to reach a cross that has been blessed by a priest and then thrown into the water. The person who receives the cross first is said to have good fortune in the next year. Boat blessings, ship blessings, music, dancing, and tons of food are all part of the Epiphany celebrations.

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