What Do I Chant For In Nichiren Buddhism

Why Do Nichiren Buddhists Chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo?

A: According to Nichiren Daishonin, the practice of meditation is encompassed within the chanting of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo (Nam Myoho Renge Kyo). Meditation has a lengthy history in both the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, dating back thousands of years. It was first documented approximately 1500 BCE, and it was then imported and assimilated into Buddhism during the period of the Buddha, Shakyamuni, who was the founder of the religion. Even throughout the Lotus Sutra, Shakyamuni speaks of himself and others as being in various states of samadhi, which is a form of meditative concentration that is focused on concentrating one’s thoughts.

This meditation technique, which is founded on the premise of “three thousand worlds in a single moment of existence,” was created as a means of helping individuals summon the state of Buddhahood from within themselves by understanding the actual nature of their own lives.

Due to the fact that it required a tremendous deal of attention and time, individuals living everyday lives in harsh realities did not have the luxury of devoting the necessary time and energy to such an endeavor.

“Even though the sutra talks of Shakyamuni attaining samadhi, this does not imply that members of the Latter Day Saints should seclude themselves in the mountains and forests and practice sitting meditation,” President Ikeda writes in The Heart of the Lotus Sutra.

26–27).

To help all people awaken to Buddhahood within their own lives during this defiled age of the Latter Day of the Law, he instituted the practice of chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo and directly manifested the Mystic Law with which he had become enlightened in the form of the Gohonzon, which is still in existence today.

In addition, these five characteristics, known as the Myoho-renge-kyo, are included inside the single existence of each of us,” according to Nichiren Daishonin’s “The Doctrine of the Three Thousand Realms,” which appears in The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol.

85.

Essentially, chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the most comprehensive Buddhist practice available today, allowing all individuals to awaken to their Buddha nature, the most authentic component of their lives.

chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo It was Nichiren who first articulated the core of the Lotus Sutra as Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, opening the door for all individuals to gain enlightenment, or total bliss, via the practice of meditation.

(p. 6)

(Photo courtesy of Tatiana / Pexels.com) In this video, Buddhist scholar Daisaku Ikeda discusses what to chant and how to maintain concentration during your daily chanting regimen. Despite your best efforts, it’s easy to become sidetracked, and that’s perfectly OK. Rather than being stiff and unpleasant, chantingNam-myoho-renge-kyois intended to be joyful. We wanted to give some useful hints as well as a different point of view that you might adopt when your mind starts to wander or you find it difficult to concentrate.

  1. 223–24) has the following passage.
  2. If he chanted about a single item at a time, waiting for that prayer to be answered before moving on to the next, or if he could pray for several things at the same time, he wanted to know what the proper procedure was.
  3. A person who has numerous wants and aspirations should pray diligently for each and every one of them to come true.
  4. You are the only one who has the ability to bring your aspirations to fruition; no one else’s faith or practice can help you achieve your goals.
  5. To purchase something that costs three hundred dollars, you must first have three hundred dollars in your bank account.
  6. If you intend to purchase something, you must ensure that you have sufficient funds on hand.
  7. You are the only one who has the ability to bring your aspirations to fruition; no one else’s faith or practice can help you achieve your goals.

When they chant, they become distracted and their thoughts begin to stray.

Given the fact that we are human, it is normal for our minds to wander and for all kind of ideas and memories to come to mind.

When it comes to praying, there is no particular format or plan to follow.

To put it another way, it highlights the importance of being natural.

With time, and as your faith grows, you’ll find it simpler to concentrate your thoughts when you’re chanting.

Yes, everything is fine.

There’s no need to pretend that you’re praying for anything important when you aren’t actually praying for anything.

Eventually, you will create a higher and more spacious life-condition as a result of chanting spontaneously, without affectation or reluctance, for whatever it is that you most desire in life.

With time, and as your faith grows, you’ll find it simpler to concentrate your thoughts when you’re chanting.

You have the freedom to chant for whatever you want to. It is all up to you. The recitation of the sutra in the morning and evening, as well as the chanting of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are not required. They are a fantastic privilege that you have.

Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō – Wikipedia

Namu Myhr Renge Kyo (also spelled Namu Myhr Renge Kyo) (English:Devotion to the Mystic Law of the Lotus Sutra/Glory to the Dharma of the Lotus Sutra) are words that are chanted in all forms of Nichiren Buddhism. Namu Myhr Renge Kyo (also spelled Namu Myhr Renge Kyo) is a phrase that is chanted in all forms of Nichiren Buddhism The phrase Myhh Renge Kyrefer to the Japanese title of the Lotus Stra, which is pronounced Myh Renge Ky. On April 28, 1253, the Japanese Buddhist priestNichirenon on Mount Kiyosumi, which is now remembered by theSeichi-jitemple in Kamogawa, Chibaprefecture, Japan, first publicly uttered the mantra, which is referred to asDaimoku() or, in honorific form, O-daimoku(), which means title in English.

Early Buddhist proponents

It is believed that theDaimoku was founded by the Tendai monks Saicho and Genshin, but the Buddhist priestNichirenis widely recognized as its most prominent proponent today. “The Lotus Sutra,” which has been generally regarded as the “king of texts” and the “ultimate word on Buddhism,” is commemorated by the mantra. “Namu Ichij Myhh Renge Ky,” according to Jacqueline Stone, was made famous by Tendai founder Saicho “as a means to celebrate the Lotus Sutra’s status as the One Vehicle teaching of the Buddha.” As a result, the Tendai monkGenshin promoted the mantraNamuAmida, NamuKanzeon, and Namu Myhh Renge Kyo in order to worship the three jewels of Japanese Buddhism: the Amida, the Kanzeon, and the Myhh Renge Kyo.

Those who follow Nichiren, who himself was a Tendai monk, have cut these chants down toNamu Myhh Renge Ky, which has gained widespread popularity and usage across the globe.

Nichiren

Known proponents of this recitation include the Japanese Buddhist priestNichiren, who claims that it is the only path to pleasure and redemption suitable for the Third Age of Buddhism. In the translation by Kumrajva, Nichiren cited the mantra in hisOngi Kuden, a transcription of his lectures on the Lotus Sutra. Namu() is a transliteration into Japanese of the Sanskritnamas, and Myhh Renge Ky is the Sino-Japanesepronunciationofthe Chinese title of the Lotus Sutra (henceDaimoku, which is a Japanese word meaning ‘title’).

See also:  What Is Haka Chant

When referring to a Buddha or comparable object of adoration, the prefix namu is used to signify taking shelter in him or her.

Bysyllabary,Namu — Myh — Renge — Ky comprises of the following letters: Namu — Myh — Renge — Ky

  • Namu, which means “devoted to,” is a translation of the Sanskritnamas
  • Myh, which means “exquisite law”
  • My, from Middle Chinesemièw, means “strange, mystery, miracle, cunning” (cf. Mandarinmiào)
  • H, from Middle Chinesepjap, means “law, principle, doctrine” (cf. Mand.f)
  • Chinese words for strangeness, mystery, miracle, and cleverness include My (from Middle Chinesemièw) and H (from Middle Chinesepjap), which mean “law, principle, and doctrine” (cf. Mandarinfu)
  • And Chinese words for mystery, miracle, and cleverness include Miào (from Mandarinmiào)
  • And Chinese words for mystery and cleverness include Miào (from Mandarinfu).
  • Ky is derived from Middle Chinesekjeng, which means “sutra” (cf. Mand.jng).

Buddhists, including practitioners of theTiantai and related JapaneseTendaischools, see the Lotus Sutra as the climax of Shakyamuni Buddha’s fifty-year teaching career. In contrast, followers of Nichiren Buddhism believe that Myhh Renge Ky is the name of the ultimate law that exists in every part of the universe and works in harmony with human life. Through certain Buddhist practices, followers of Nichiren Buddhism believe that realization, also known as “Buddha Wisdom” or “attaining Buddhahood,” can be manifested.

Associations to film

  • The Lotus Sutra is considered by Nichiren Buddhists, as well as practitioners of theTiantai and similar JapaneseTendaischools, to constitute the climax of Shakyamuni Buddha’s fifty-year teaching career. The name Myhh Renge Ky is considered by adherents of Nichiren Buddhism to be the name of an ultimate rule that permeates the cosmos and works in harmony with human existence, and which can express enlightenment, also known as “Buddha Wisdom” or “attaining Buddhahood,” through certain Buddhist practices.

Associations to music

Buddhists, including practitioners of theTiantai and related JapaneseTendaischools, see the Lotus Sutra as the culmination of Shakyamuni Buddha’s fifty years of teaching. The name Myhh Renge Ky is considered by followers of Nichiren Buddhism to be the name of an ultimate law permeating the universe and working in harmony with human life, which can manifest realization, sometimes referred to as “Buddha Wisdom” or “attaining Buddhahood,” through certain Buddhist practices.

  • “Welcome Back Home” —The Byrds
  • “Let Go and Let God” —Olivia Newton-John
  • “Nam Myoho Renge Kyo” —Yoko Ono
  • ” Boots of Chinese Plastic ” —The Pretenders
  • ” Concentrate ” —Xzibit
  • ” B R Right ” —Trina(2002)
  • ” Cleopatra ” —Samira Efendi(2020)
  • ” Beyond Conner Reeves’ 1997 film “They Say” is followed by “Creole Lady” (1975), “Nam Myo Ho” (2003), “Tribute to The Mentor” (2008), “No More Parties in L.A.” (2016), and “No More Parties in L.A.” (2017). Lighthouse’s 1970 film, “The Chant,” is followed by “The Chant” (2016) and “No More Parties in L.A.” (2016).

See also

  • Index of Buddhism-related articles
  • Kotodama
  • Secular Buddhism
  • Index of Buddhism-related articles

Notes

  1. AbcKenkyusha 1991
  2. Anesaki 1916, p.34
  3. Anes (2001). Gender equality is a Buddhist principle. Ryuei 1999, p. 136, 159–161, ISBN 0820451339
  4. Peter Lang, p. 136, 159–161, ISBN 0820451339
  5. Ryuei 1999, p. Is it Nam or Namu? Is it really that important
  6. P. M. Suzuki and co-authors (2011). Livemint.com has a copy of The Phonetics of Japanese Language: With Reference to Japanese Script by Routledge, which is on page 49. ISBN 978-0415594134
  7. (2008-04-16). “The ‘Lotus Sutra’ will be on display in the capital.” Gandhiji’s Prayer Meeting – whole audio recording (31 May 1947)
  8. Archived atGhostarchive and theWayback Machine: “Gandhiji’s Prayer Meeting (full audio recording)”. Gandhi and You Tube are there to serve you. Gandhiserve Foundation is a non-profit organization that helps those in need. Gandhi, Rajmohan. “Gandhi Voyage begins in the world’s largest Muslim nation”. Retrieved 6 September 2019. www.rajmohangandhi.com. Gandhi, Rajmohan
  9. Gandhi, Rajmohan
  10. Gandhi, Rajmohan (1 March 2008). Gandhi: the man, his people, and the empire are all discussed (1 ed.). UC Press (University of California Press)
  11. Gandhi, Rajmohan. “What Gandhi desired for India.” In Gandhi, Rajmohan. It’s a new week. 6th of September, 2019
  12. Retrieved abcde”Myo in the Media” is an abbreviation for “Myo in the Media.” Buddhas in Fort Worth. Soka Gakkai International Headquarters is located in Fort Worth, Texas. “The Queen of Hope” was retrieved on April 7, 2020. Buddhism in the Modern World / World Tribune. “Orlando Bloom on Buddhism, Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, and Daisaku Ikeda,” Soka Gakkai International-USA, August 1, 2018. Retrieved January 11, 2019
  13. Archived atGhostarchive and theWayback Machine: “Orlando Bloom on Buddhism, Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, and Daisaku Ikeda.” SGI-USA Media is a media company based in the United States. Soka Gakkai International-USA (Soka Gakkai International-USA) on January 31, 2019. It was retrieved on July 16, 2019
  14. It was archived atGhostarchive and theWayback Machine: “Let Go and Let God.” “Grace & Gratitude,” YouTube, November 30, 2013, retrieved on July 16, 2019. “yoko ono namyohorengekyo music video” has been archived in theGhostarchive and theWayback Machine. Namyohorengekyo, a video uploaded to YouTube on March 16, 2013. It was retrieved on September 28, 2021.

References

  • Masaharu Anesaki, Masaharu Anesaki (1916). Nichiren, the Buddhist prophet, was born in Japan. Kenkyusha Publishing, Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Harvard University Press (1991). Kenkyusha’s New Japanese-English Dictionary is a new Japanese-English dictionary published by Kenkyusha. Kenkyusha Limited is based in Tokyo. Ryuei, Rev. ISBN4-7674-2015-6
  • ISBN4-7674-2015-6
  • (1999). “Commentaries on the Lotus Sutra.” Nichiren’s Coffeehouse is a coffeehouse dedicated to the teachings of Nichiren Daisaku Ikeda. The original version of this article was published on October 31, 2013. SGDB, retrieved on October 30th, 2013. (2002). “The Soka Gakkai Dictionary of Buddhism,” as the title suggests. Soka Gakkai International is a Japanese Buddhist organization. Watson and Burton (2013), retrieved on October 30, 2013. (2005). The Written Record of the Teachings that were Orally Transmitted (trans.). Soka Gakkai (Soka Gakkai, ISBN4-412-01286-7)

Further reading

  • Masaharu Anesaki is the author of this work (1916). Buddha’s prophet, Nichiren Daisaku Ikeda. Kenkyusha Publishing Company, Cambridge, Massachusetts (1991). Kenkyusha’s New Japanese-English Dictionary is a new Japanese-English dictionary published by Kenkyusha Publishing Company in Japan. Kenkyusha Limited is a Japanese company headquartered in Tokyo. Rev. Ryuei, Ryuei, ISBN4-7674-2015-6
  • ISBN4-7674-2015-6
  • (1999). In this section, you will find “Lotus Sutra Commentaries.” In the coffeehouse run by Nichiren, you can have a cup of joe and a piece of cake. On October 31, 2013, an archived version of this article appeared. As of October 30, 2013, the SGDB has this information (2002). Soka Gakkai Dictionary of Buddhism, published by the Soka Gakkai International Foundation. Soka Gakkai International is an organization dedicated to the spread of Soka. Watson and Burton (2013), retrieved on October 30th, 2013. (2005). Documentation of the Teachings that were orally delivered (trans.). For more information, see Soka Gakkai (ISBN: 978-1-412-01286-7).

Keeping the faith with chanting

Masaharu Anesaki, Masaharu Anesaki, Masaharu (1916). Nichiren, the prophet of the Buddhist faith. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press; Kenkyusha Publishing Co. (1991). Kenkyusha’s New Japanese-English Dictionary is a comprehensive resource for learning Japanese and English. Kenkyusha Limited, based in Tokyo. Ryuei, Rev. ISBN4-7674-2015-6; Ryuei, Rev. (1999). “Lotus Sutra Commentaries” is an abbreviation. Nichiren’s Coffeehouse is a coffeehouse dedicated to the teachings of Nichiren Buddhism.

  1. SGDB, retrieved on October 30, 2013.
  2. “The Buddhism Dictionary of the Soka Gakkai.” Soka Gakkai International is a Japanese religious organization.
  3. (2005).
  4. Soka Gakkai (Soka Gakkai, ISBN 4-12-01286-7);
See also:  Why Do Buddhists Chant

How chanting can transform your life for good

You will be guided through the process of obtaining the numerous advantages of chanting by Amrita Srivastava. In the midst of the tumult of 13th-century Japan, Nichiren Daishonin, a Japanese sage, embarked on a never-ending journey to restore Buddhism to its original form, which had been lost following Shakyamuni Buddha’s death. He wanted to accomplish this for the sake of a large number of people who were suffering, and his inexorable journey led him to become aware of the fundamental rule of life: Nam Myoho Renge Kyo.

In the sense that it allowed ordinary people who were overwhelmed by illusion and sorrow to bring forth their natural knowledge, compassion, bravery, and creative energy to address their own issues and assist others in doing so, this rule was referred to as mystic.

The Sanskrit letter ‘Nam,’ which denotes reverence or devotion, has its origins in this language.

Aspects of life that are concrete, observable, and visible are referred to as ‘Ho’ in the kanji.

Meanwhile, Myo is associated with the latent state that life goes through before birth and after death, and “Ho” is associated with the manifest aspect of life from its origin through birth, development and ripening before degeneration and death before life returns to the latent state and merges with all of creation.

In the same way, humans may bring forth the exquisiteness and dignity of their existence even in the middle of their daily struggles.

Kyo is a Japanese word that literally translates as “sutra,” and it signifies that all phenomena are signs of the Mystic Law. Gains in AbundanceChanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo provides a wide range of advantages…

  1. It aids in the eradication of your worries, anguish, and traumatic memories by doing the following:

The following are some of the ways it can assist you in overcoming your anxieties, sadness, and traumatic memories:

  1. It gives you the ability to alter your karma: It is said that by chanting Nam Myho Renge Kyo one is given the ability to take control of one’s own destiny and guide one’s destiny in the direction of happiness. The spiritual effort that one puts out in an attempt to change one’s fate and unlock one’s ultimate potential
  2. Enhances your overall level of well-being: When you recite Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, you have the ability to greatly improve the quality of your life. A person can quickly earn admittance into the vast and freeing living state of limitless compassion and unlimited wisdom from the repressive and stifling realm of hell, provided they are willing to work hard. Allows you to amass an enormous amount of good fortune: The intangible benefits of chanting, such as enhanced health, happiness, meeting the right people at the right time and overall well-being, manifest in your life when you chant
  3. The concrete rewards include financial gain. Inner change occurs as a result of this: Using this mantra might assist you in changing your bad inclinations and unattractive characteristics. It is really effective. Your inner state of being is transformed as a result of this, with even your worst pain being transformed into ultimate delight. It cleanses your six senses as follows: Practicing this mantra results in the purification of one’s six sense organs by assisting them in developing a living condition in which one is able to discern the actual nature of any event and nurture a knowledgeable mind that observes things as they really are

The ability to alter one’s fate is provided by the following: When one chants Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, one is given the ability to take control of one’s own destiny and guide it in the direction of happiness and fulfillment. The spiritual effort one goes through in an attempt to change one’s fate and unlock one’s maximum possible potential; Improving one’s emotional and physical well-being Nam Myoho Renge Kyo is a powerful chant that has the ability to substantially improve the quality of one’s life.

Contributes to your ability to amass a large amount of good luck: The intangible advantages of chanting, such as enhanced health, happiness, meeting the right people at the right time and overall well-being, manifest in your life when you begin to chant.

It is really powerful.

  1. Allows you to alter your karma: Chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo gives one the ability to take control of one’s destiny and lead it in the direction of happiness. The spiritual effort one puts out in an attempt to change one’s fate and unleash one’s ultimate potential
  2. Improves the quality of your life: When you recite Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, you have the ability to substantially improve your living situation. From the restrictive and stifling environment of hell, one can quickly achieve admittance into the vast and freeing life state of endless compassion and unlimited intelligence
  3. Aids you in amassing a great deal of good fortune: The intangible advantages of chanting, such as enhanced health, happiness, meeting the right people at the right time and overall well-being, manifest in your life when you chant. Inner change occurs as a result of: This mantra has the ability to assist you in altering your bad habits and unwanted characteristics. This, in turn, alters your inner life condition by transforming your worst sorrow into ultimate delight
  4. It cleanses your six senses: Chanting this mantra results in the purification of one’s six sense organs by assisting them in developing a living condition in which one is able to discern the actual nature of any event and nurture a knowledgeable mind that observes things as they truly are

Amrita Srivastava has eight years of substantial experience working in the education field under her belt. During the last 12 years, she has been practicing Nichiren Daishonin’s Buddhism, as well as singing his mantras. (If you would like to receive our E-paper on WhatsApp every day, please click here.) Sharing the PDF of the document on WhatsApp and other social media sites is permitted.) Published at 4:45 a.m. on Sunday, July 29, 2018 in India.

The Meaning of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo

Ms. Amrita Srivastava has eight years of substantial expertise in the field of education management. Nichiren Daishonin’s Buddhism, as well as chanting, has been a part of her life for the past twelve years. Click here to subscribe to our E-paper via Whatsapp, which is sent daily.) WhatsApp and other social media sites are permitted to share the paper’s PDF file. on July 29, 2018 at 4:45 a.m. in the Indian Standard Time

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Nam-myoho-renge-kyo –

It was taught by Nichiren that simply chanting Myoho-renge-kyo, the title of the Lotus Sutra, one can reap the blessings of all of the knowledge contained within it. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the expression of the universal rule of life; repeating this helps each individual to tap into the knowledge of their existence and unveil their Buddha nature. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the expression of the universal law of life. Chanting these words and passages from the Lotus Sutra are at the heart of this Buddhist practice, which is complemented by research and the assistance of others in revealing their own Buddhahood as well.

  1. “There is no actual happiness for human beings other than singing Nam-myoho-renge-kyo,” Nichiren teaches us (“Happiness in This World,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol.
  2. 681).
  3. WND-1, 681) refers to this as the “boundless pleasure of the Law,” which underlies and exceeds the cycles of fleeting happiness and misery that all humans go through on a daily basis.
  4. The Lotus Sutra’s full title is “The Sutra of the Lotus.” Nichiren Daishonin remarks on the meaning of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo in great length and from a variety of perspectives in his writings and recorded oral teachings, which are available online.

The Lotus Sutra is known by the Sanskrit title Saddharma-pundarika-sutra, which means “Saddharma-pundarika-sutra.” When the great fourth-century Buddhist scholar and translator Kumarajiva realized what was meant by the Lotus Sutra’s title, he translated it from Sanskrit into Chinese asMiao-fa lien-hua-ching, he became known as the Lotus Sutra.

It represented a way of life.

He added Namto Myoho-renge-kyo and established the practice of chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo as a means of aligning one’s life with this Law, which he saw as the law of life itself.

Nam is derived from the Sanskrit wordnamas, which means “to commit one’s life” and has been translated into Chinese and Japanese as “to dedicate one’s life.” In the words of Nichiren, “dedication” is to “dedicate oneself to the principle of everlasting and unchanging truth” (The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, p.

  1. “Life” signifies that, when we commit ourselves to this concept, our lives become founded on intelligence that sees that truth and responds appropriately to every changing environment.
  2. As long as we live our lives in accordance with the Mystic Rule (also known as “the ultimate truth or law of life”), we will have the knowledge to cope successfully with every situation, resulting in the most valued conclusion possible.
  3. He implies in this passage that the teaching of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is not restricted to a single language or culture, but is universal.
  4. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is a phrase that embodies the voices of all mankind, and it is a worldwide teaching since it is a fusion of the languages of the East and the West.
  5. This resulted in painful persecutions, just as the Lotus Sutra promised would befall its votary, or proper and committed practitioner, in the course of his work.

This is what he means when he says, “The Buddha’s will is the Lotus Sutra, but the soul of Nichiren is nothing other than Nam-myoho-renge-kyo” (“Reply to Kyo’o,”WND-1, 412): “The Buddha’s will is the Lotus Sutra, but the soul of Nichiren is nothing other than Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.” Nichiren Daishonin is revered as the authentic Buddha of the Latter Day of the Law because he was the first to manifest this Law in his life for the benefit of all people.

  • He is known as the “Latter Day Buddha” because he was the first to manifest this Law in his life for the benefit of all people.
  • For the uninitiated, the Greek words myoofmyohome mean “amazing” or “mystic,” andhome imply law, principle, instruction, or phenomenon.
  • “Myo signifies the Dharma nature or enlightenment, whereas Hore represents darkness or ignorance, according to Nichiren Daishonin.
  • Consequently, Myoho represents both the enlightened essence of Buddha and the deluded nature of an average individual, as well as the truth that they are fundamentally intertwined.

As an example, in “The Heritage of the Ultimate Law of Life,” he writes: “Shakyamuni Buddha, who reached enlightenment thousands of kalpas ago, the Lotus Sutra, which leads all people to Buddhahood, and we ordinary human beings are in no way different or separate from one another.” “To chant Myoho-renge-kyo with this knowledge is to inherit the ultimate Law of life and death,” explains the Buddha.

” (WND-1, 216).

As he says in “On Attaining Buddhahood in This Lifetime,” the mystic nature of existence is “myo,” and “ho” is the manifestations of myo, according to him (WND-1, 4).

Renge, which literally translates as “lotus blossom,” has a significant connotation in Nichiren Buddhism as well.

The terms “cause” and “effect” relate to the efforts or practices that one engages in with the goal of becoming a Buddha, while the terms “cause” and “effect” allude to the actual achievement of Buddhahood.

This is known as the Law of Cause and Effect.

Kyo, which may be translated as “sutra” or “teaching,” refers to the teaching that the Buddha elucidated via his voice.

This implies that when we chant or talk to others about Nam-myohorenge-kyo, our voices resonate with and arouse the Buddha nature that exists within us, within others, and in our surrounding environment, respectively.

The most essential thing to remember about this ceremony is that it represents our commitment to the Mystic Law.

Nichiren claims that while Buddhist instructors in the past were aware of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, they did not teach it to others or propagate it extensively.

Is There Anything We Should Keep in Mind While Chanting?

We will only be able to reveal the true power of chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo when we take action and apply our Buddhist practice to our everyday difficulties.

When it comes to chanting, according to Nichiren Daishonin, it is one’s faith, or the state of one’s heart, that is vital (see “The Strategy of the Lotus Sutra,” WND-1, 1000).

It is only through this that we will be able to see for ourselves the true force of the Mystic Law in our lives.

Ikeda, president of the SGI, states that “Nam-myoho-renge-kyo…

Those who adhere to the teachings of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo have far, far more riches than those who have amassed the most astonishing fortunes or reside in the most opulent houses on the planet.

The chanting of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo assures us that we have nothing to be concerned about.

The goal of our religious beliefs and practices is to bring pleasure and triumph into our lives as much as possible.

“This is what Buddhism is really like.” On March 5, 2010, the World Tribune published an article on page 4.

The outcome is that they have been able to demonstrate its positive capacity for the benefit of humanity on a worldwide scale. In An Introduction to Buddhism, pages 11–15, it is said that

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