What Do Maori Say In Chant When Doing Haka

Ever wondered what they’re saying in the haka?

The ritual, which was conducted by the Maori, the indigenous inhabitants of New Zealand, was an ancient posture dance that was done right before soldiers were sent into combat. Haka can be performed in a variety of ways. For the first time since 1888, the All Blacks have done the identical Haka – Ka mate, Ka mate. The words “Ka Mate!” and “Ka Mate!” are synonymous with “Ka ora!” Ka ora! Ka ora! Ka ora! Ka Mate!” and “Ka ora!” When the Kapa O Pango was performed in 2006, it sparked controversy, with former Wallabies coach John Connolly spearheading a petition for a ban on a particular haka ceremony that involved players executing a throat-slitting motion.

ka upa…ne, ka upa…ne!

Hi!

I’m going to die!

  1. I’m still alive!
  2. I’m going to die!
  3. I’m still alive!
  4. One more step forward!
  5. An upward stride, another…
  6. Te Rauparaha, a Maori warrior chief in the early 1800s, is credited with writing the song Ka mate, Ka mate, which means “Ka mate, Ka mate.” According to legend, he was on the run from an opposing tribe and hiding in a hole when he came up with the phrases.
  7. Kapa O Pango kia whakawhenua au I ahau!

Hello, Aue ii!

Au, au, aue, aue, aue ha!

‘Au, au, aue ha!’ says the narrator.

Ihiihi ka tu te ihiihi “I’m sorry, but I don’t know what you’re talking about.” Etu Iho Ni Iho Ni Iho Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ni Ponga ra, ponga!

Ponga ra, ponga!

This is our territory, and it rumbles with activity.

It’s my time to shine!

It’s my turn now!

Our preeminence Our superiority will triumph, and we will be rightly recognized and elevated to a position of honor.

All-Blacks on the field!

All-Blacks on the field!

When the All Blacks performed their two hakas, their opponents employed a variety of strategies, including warming up on the other side of the field and marching straight up to the New Zealand players during the dance.

Loading Several other rugby teams, including those from Fiji, Samoa, and Tonga, do war dances before to their games. Tomorrow night, the Wallabies will take on the All Blacks in a Bledisloe Cup match at ANZ Stadium in Sydney.

What is the Haka, and why do the All Blacks perform it before every match?

Welsh rugby players will have the opportunity to confront the world-famous ‘Haka’ when they take on New Zealand in the autumn internationals. And they’ll have to be careful not to break any of World Rugby’s rules, after England was fined £2000 in 2019 for doing so. 3 Large quantities of yelling are used in conjunction with the usage of the arms and legs in order to terrify the opponent during the Haka. Image courtesy of Getty Images

What are the lyrics to the Haka and is it always the same song?

In New Zealand, a song called Ka Mate, which is a Maori battle cry created in 1820 by a Maori chief named Te Rauparaha, was historically sung at all times. Until 1986, it was exclusively performed by the All Blacks in away matches, and it was the first time they did it in 1888. It is also done during high-profile funerals and to meet visiting foreign dignitaries, among other occasions. However, in 2005, they created a fresh version of the song called Kapa O Pango, which is only played by the All Blacks rugby team and is only performed during specific matches.

During the team’s performance of Kapa O Pango against South Africa, Read and Perenara were the leaders.

Ka Mate Maori Lyrics

Kikiki! Kakaka! Kualana kei waniwania, taku tarakei tarawahia, toku te rua toku toku toku toku toku toku toku! He pounga rahui te uiraka rarapa ketekete kau anaTo peru kairiri mau au e koro e! He pounga rahui te uiraka rarapa ketekete kau anaTo peru kairiri mau au e koro e! Hi! Ha! – If you have a wehi or ka matakana, then you should know that the rere ure tirohangang’ rua’ rerarerang’ rua kuri kakanui I raro! Aha! That’s right! Ka mate, ka mate! Ka ora, ka ora! Ka mate, ka mate! Ka mate! Ka mate!

  1. Ka ora!
  2. Ka mate!
  3. ka upane!
  4. ka upane!

Ka Mate English lyrics

Allow your courage to soar! Allow your valour to rage! We’ll keep these spectral hands at bay while still shielding our wives and children! When I’m fighting for thee, I defy the lightning bolts of hell while my opponents look on in disbelief! O God, to think that I would cower in the presence of a pack of wolves that were frightened or fleeing, for they would undoubtedly fall into the pit of humiliation and become food for the dogs who chow down in joy! Oh, what is it with the name…? It’s the end of the world!

(or: I’m about to die)’ ‘It’s life!

(or: I have a chance to live)’ It’s the end of the world!

It is the way of life!

Another step forward, and another stride forward! Another step forward, and so forth. The sun is shining! 3 At the Rugby World Cup, Captain Kieran Read and TJ Perenara led the Haka in a victory against South Africa. Image courtesy of Getty Images – Getty Images

Kapa O Pango Maori lyrics

Bring on the bravery and valour! Bring up the anger of your heroism. In order to safeguard our women and children, we will fend off these spectral fingers! I will defy the lightning bolts of hell for thee, while my foes look on in bewilderment. O God, to think that I would cower in the presence of a pack of wolves that were frightened or fleeing, since they would undoubtedly fall into the pit of humiliation and become food for the dogs who chow down in glee is beyond comprehension. I’m not sure what to make of that, but…

  • “It is death!” (or “I may die”) cries out the protagonist.
  • (Or, “I may live”) It’s the end of the world.
  • What a wonderful time to be alive!
  • This is the man with the long hair who summons the sun and causes it to shine brighter than before.
  • Another stride forward, another step backward, and so on.
  • 3 While playing against South Africa at the Rugby World Cup, Captain Kieran Read and TJ Perenara led the Haka.
  • Photo via Getty Images.

Kapa O Pango English lyrics

Allow your valor to soar! Allow your bravery to rage! We’ll keep these spectral hands at bay while still shielding our wives and children. I will defy the lightning bolts of hell for thee, while my adversaries look on in disbelief! O God, to think that I would tremble in front of a pack of wolves if they showed signs of fear or fled, for they would undoubtedly fall into the pit of humiliation and become food for the dogs who chow down in joy! Oh, what’s with the name…? It is the end of the world!

  • (or: I’m about to die) ‘ ‘It’s life!
  • (or: I have the opportunity to live)’ It’s the end!
  • It’s life!
  • This is the bald guy who summons the sun and causes it to shine brightly.
  • Another step forward, and another.
  • 3 At the Rugby World Cup, Captain Kieran Read and TJ Perenara led the Haka against South Africa.

Why were England fined for their response to the Haka?

When confronting the Haka, the vast majority of teams form a straight line on their own ten-metre line. England, on the other hand, lined up in a V shape for the semi-final and were fined £2000 for it. However, rather than being imposed because of their answer, the punishment was imposed because six Red Rose stars wandered over the halfway point of the competition. “England have been penalised for a violation of World Cup competition regulations dealing to cultural challenges, which dictate that no players from the side receiving the challenge may move beyond the halfway line,” according to a World Rugby statement.

Who leads the Haka?

There are no established guidelines for who should take the lead during the Haka. It is frequently led by the captain, as was the case when Richie McCaw was the captain, but it may also be led by players with Maori descent who are fluent in the language and who put in the greatest performance. Perenara and captain Kieran Read shared the responsibility of leading the Haka in prior matches, but against the Springboks, New Zealand switched things up and had Perenara and Read lead it jointly. Perenara also expressed his admiration for Read’s new leadership position.

Image courtesy of Getty Images

Ka Mate – Wikipedia

In the North Island of New Zealand, Te Rauparaha, the war chief of the Ngti Toatribe, authored a Morihaka, known as ” Ka Mate ” ().

Composition

In the North Island of New Zealand, Te Rauparaha, the war chief of the Ngti Toatribe, penned a Morihaka known as ” Ka Mate ” ().

Kikiki! Kakaka!Kauana kei waniwania taku tarakei tarawahia, kei te rua i te kerokero!He pounga rahui te uiraka rarapa ketekete kau anaTo peru kairiri mau au e koro e!Hi! Ha! – Ka wehi au ka matakana,ko wai te tangata kia rere ure tirohangangā rua rerarerangā rua kuri kakanui i raro! Aha ha! Let your valor rise! Let your valor rage!We’ll ward off these haunting handswhile protecting our wives and children!For thee, I defythe lightning bolts of hellwhile my enemies stand there in confusion!O God – to think I would trembleto a pack of wolves seeing fear, or running away,because they would surely fall in the pit of shameas food for the hounds who chow down in delight! Oh, what in the name…?

The major body of the haka is then introduced:

Ka mate, ka mate! ka ora! ka ora!Ka mate! ka mate! ka ora! ka ora!Tēnei te tangata pūhuruhuruNāna nei i tiki mai whakawhiti te rāĀ, upane! ka upane!Ā, upane, ka upane, whiti te ra! ‘Tis death! ’tis death!(or: I may die)’Tis life! ’tis life!(or: I may live) ‘Tis death! ’tis death! ‘Tis life! ’tis life!This is the hairy manWho summons the sun and makes it shineA step upward, another step upward!A step upward, another. the Sun shines!

It was the idea of “Ka Mate” to be an invigorating haka of the ngeritype that would be performed in a short amount of time and where the performers would be allowed to extemporize their chanting and motions as they saw fit, with no requirement for synchronization.

Use in rugby

External video
“Ka Mate”, accompanied by a translation — viaYouTube

KAMATE is intended to be a quick, invigorating haka of thengeritype in which the performers are allowed to extemporizetheir chanting and motions as they see appropriate, without the requirement for synchronization, due to the absence of predetermined movements.

Ownership

It was the idea of “Ka Mate” to be an invigorating haka of the ngeritype that would be performed in a short amount of time and where the performers would be allowed to extemporize their chanting and motions as they saw fit, without the requirement for synchronization.

See also

  • The haka (sports), the haka in popular culture, the kapa haka, and Mori music are all examples of haka.

References

  • The tale behind “Ka Mate” — which includes a recording – is as follows: An further and distinct translation of haka– this one explains what is meant by the translation
  • A comparative analysis of the word “Ka Mate” from 10 distinct sources
  • Ancient variants of Ka Mate
Culture of indigenous Oceania
List of resources about traditional arts and culture of Oceania
Art
  • Ahu (Australia)
  • Austronesia (Cook Islands)
  • Kapa (Hawaii)
  • Lei (Hawaii)
  • Magimagi (New Zealand)
  • Moai (New Zealand)
  • Nguzu nguzu
  • Oceania
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Reimiro
  • T moko
  • Tabua
  • Taovala
  • Tapa
  • Tattoo
  • Tfui
  • Tivaevae
  • Areca nut, also known as “yaqona” in Fiji and “sakau” in Pohnpei
  • Kava culture, Lapita, Mori, and Polynesia are all terms that come to mind. Ceremony of the Smoa ‘ava
  • Wood carving
  • The Austronesian countries are: Austronesia, the Carolines, Pwo, the Chatham Islands, the Cook Islands, Easter Island, and Fiji.
  • Kiribati, the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia, the Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, New Caledonia, and New Zealand are among the countries represented.
  • Papua New Guinea, Pitcairn Islands, Smoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Torres Strait Islands, Vanuatu, Wallis and Futuna
  • Polynesian navigation
  • Micronesian navigation
  • Marshall Islands Papua New Guinea Niue Norfolk Island
  • The Alingano Maisu, the Bangka, and the Drua are all examples of Aboriginal dugouts. The Hklea, the Kaep, and the Karakoa are examples of Mori migration. The Outrigger, the Paopao (Tuvalu), the Paraw, and the Polynesian sailing are examples of Aboriginal dugouts.
  • Fire dance and firewalking are examples of ‘Aparima’, cibi, fara, haka, hivinau, hula, kailao, and kapa haka. Kiribati is another example of meke. The words ote’a, pa’o’a, poi, Rotuma, siva, Tahiti, tmr, tautoga, Tonga, and Tuvalu are all derived from the Hawaiian language. ‘upa’upa
  • Fire dance and firewalking are examples of ‘Aparima’, cibi, fara, haka, hivinau, hula, kailao, and kapa haka. Kiribati and meke are examples of other words that begin with the letters M. The words ote’a, pa’o’a, poi, Rotuma, siva, Tahiti, tmr, tautoga, Tonga, and Tuvalu are all derived from the Greek word for “water.” ‘upa’upa
  • Australia, the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu are among the countries represented.
  • Australia, the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu are among the countries represented in the Pacific.
  • Australia, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu are among the countries represented.
  • Among the nations represented are American Samoa
  • Christmas Island
  • The Cocos (Keeling) Islands
  • Easter Island
  • French Polynesia
  • Guam
  • Hawaii
  • New Caledonia
  • The Northern Mariana Islands
  • The Pitcairn Islands
  • Tokelau
  • Wallis and Futuna.
  • American Samoa
  • Christmas Island
  • The Cocos (Keeling) Islands
  • Easter Island
  • French Polynesia
  • Guam
  • Hawaii
  • New Caledonia
  • Norfolk Island
  • The Northern Mariana Islands
  • The Pitcairn Islands
  • Tokelau
  • Wallis and Futuna
  • The Marshall Islands
  • Niue, the Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Polynesia, Samoa, the Slit Drum, the Solomon Islands, Tahiti, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, and Wallis and Futuna
  • The following are examples of indigenous peoples: Australian Aboriginal, Fijian, Mangarevan, Maohi, Mori, Melanesian, Menehune, Micronesian, Oceanian legendary creatures, Polynesian, Rapa Nui, Samoa, Tuvaluan, and Vanuatuan.
  • Asian American and Pacific Islander Policy Research Consortium
  • Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
  • Asian American and Pacific Islander Policy Research Consortium
  • Asia-Pacific Islander Policy Research Consortium
  • Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
  • Asian American and Pacific Islander Policy Research Consortium
  • Australia, the Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu are among the countries represented.
  • Among the nations represented are American Samoa
  • Christmas Island
  • The Cocos (Keeling) Islands
  • Easter Island
  • French Polynesia
  • Guam
  • Hawaii
  • New Caledonia
  • The Northern Mariana Islands
  • The Pitcairn Islands
  • Tokelau
  • Wallis and Futuna.
Not included: Oceanian:cinema, (indigenous) currency, dress, folklore,cuisine.Also seeCategory:Oceanian culture.

What is the Haka, and why do the All Blacks perform it before every match?

Welsh rugby players will have the opportunity to confront the world-famous ‘Haka’ when they take on New Zealand in the autumn internationals. And they’ll have to be careful not to break any of World Rugby’s rules, after England was fined £2000 for doing so in 2019. 3 Large quantities of yelling are used in conjunction with the usage of the arms and legs in order to terrify the opponent during the Haka. Image courtesy of Getty Images

What are the lyrics to the Haka and is it always the same song?

In New Zealand, a song called Ka Mate, which is a Maori battle cry created in 1820 by a Maori chief named Te Rauparaha, was historically sung at all times. Until 1986, it was exclusively performed by the All Blacks in away matches, and it was the first time they did it in 1888. It is also done during high-profile funerals and to meet visiting foreign dignitaries, among other occasions. However, in 2005, they created a fresh version of the song called Kapa O Pango, which is only played by the All Blacks rugby team and is only performed during specific matches.

During the team’s performance of Kapa O Pango against South Africa, Read and Perenara were the leaders.

Ka Mate Maori Lyrics

Kikiki! Kakaka! Kualana kei waniwania, taku tarakei tarawahia, toku te rua toku toku toku toku toku toku toku! He pounga rahui te uiraka rarapa ketekete kau anaTo peru kairiri mau au e koro e! He pounga rahui te uiraka rarapa ketekete kau anaTo peru kairiri mau au e koro e! Hi! Ha! – If you have a wehi or ka matakana, then you should know that the rere ure tirohangang’ rua’ rerarerang’ rua kuri kakanui I raro! Aha! That’s right! Ka mate, ka mate!

Ka ora, ka ora! Ka mate, ka mate! Ka mate! Ka mate! Ka ora! Ka ora! Ka mate! Ka mate! Tnei te tangata phuruhuruNna nei I tiki mai whakawhiti te ru, upane! ka upane! Tnei te tangata phuruhuruNna nei I tiki mai whakawhiti te ru, upane! ka upane! , upane, ka upane, whiti te ra, whiti te ra!

Ka Mate English lyrics

Allow your courage to soar! Allow your valour to rage! We’ll keep these spectral hands at bay while still shielding our wives and children! When I’m fighting for thee, I defy the lightning bolts of hell while my opponents look on in disbelief! O God, to think that I would cower in the presence of a pack of wolves that were frightened or fleeing, for they would undoubtedly fall into the pit of humiliation and become food for the dogs who chow down in joy! Oh, what is it with the name…? It’s the end of the world!

  1. (or: I’m about to die)’ ‘It’s life!
  2. (or: I have a chance to live)’ It’s the end of the world!
  3. It is the way of life!
  4. Another step forward, and another stride forward!
  5. The sun is shining!
  6. Image courtesy of Getty Images – Getty Images

Kapa O Pango Maori lyrics

Kapa o pango kia whakawhenua au I ahau! Kapa o pango kia whakawhenua au I ahau! Hello, Aue! Hello, Aue! Ngunguru nei ko Aotearoa e ngunguru nei! ‘Au, au, aue ha!’ says the narrator. Ko Kapa o Pango e ngunguru nei! Ko Kapa o Pango e ngunguru nei! ‘Au, au, aue ha!’ says the narrator. I had a good laugh! Ihiihi ka tu te ihiihi The word “wanawana” means “new beginning” in Te Reo Mori. “Ka” means “new beginning,” “wanawana” means “wanawana,” and “wanawana” means “new beginning” in Te Reo Mori. Ponga ra, ponga!

Kapa o Pango, kapa o Pango!

Aue hey!

Kapa O Pango English lyrics

Please allow me to return to my first gulp of air. New Zealand is the one who is thundering right now. And now it is my turn! It’s my time to shine! The flames of desire are stoked! This is what distinguishes us as the All Blacks. And now it is my turn! It’s my time to shine! The excitement builds to a climax! Feel the force of it. Our domination is increasing, and our supremacy is emerging. to be elevated to a high position Silver Fern, indeed! All-Blacks on the field! Silver Fern, indeed! All-Blacks on the field!

Why were England fined for their response to the Haka?

When confronting the Haka, the vast majority of teams form a straight line on their own ten-metre line. England, on the other hand, lined up in a V shape for the semi-final and were fined £2000 for it. However, rather than being imposed because of their answer, the punishment was imposed because six Red Rose stars wandered over the halfway point of the competition. “England have been penalised for a violation of World Cup competition regulations dealing to cultural challenges, which dictate that no players from the side receiving the challenge may move beyond the halfway line,” according to a World Rugby statement.

Who leads the Haka?

There are no established guidelines for who should take the lead during the Haka. It is frequently led by the captain, as was the case when Richie McCaw was the captain, but it may also be led by players with Maori descent who are fluent in the language and who put in the greatest performance. Perenara and captain Kieran Read shared the responsibility of leading the Haka in prior matches, but against the Springboks, New Zealand switched things up and had Perenara and Read lead it jointly. Perenara also expressed his admiration for Read’s new leadership position.

Image courtesy of Getty Images

The Haka: Poetry in Motion

Who should lead the Haka is entirely up to interpretation. As was the case when Richie McCaw was the captain, the team is frequently led by the captain, but it may also be led by players with Maori descent who are fluent in the language and who put out their best effort on the field. While TJ Perenara has traditionally led the Haka in recent matches, New Zealand switched things up against the Springboks, with Perenara and captain Kieran Read leading the Haka together on the field. Perenara also expressed his delight at Read’s promotion to the position of executive director.

Getty Images is credited with this photograph.

What is the Haka?

The haka is to Maori culture what the hula is to Hawaiian culture in terms of popularity. During a birth or wedding, Maoris may choose to dance to express their happiness, or to convey a feeling of purpose while meeting a group of strangers for the very first time. War dances, which are characterized by wildly gesticulating bodies and scary face expressions, are intended to get the blood pumping. War dances performed by the Maori were traditionally used to terrify and subdue opposing tribal groups.

Haka Peruperu vs Haka Taparahi

Historically, battle dances have been classified into two categories: combat and ceremonial. The haka peruperu is done using weapons held in the hands of the performers. The haka taparahi, which is the variation of the dance that most tourists see, is an unarmed version of the dance. When the All Blacks, New Zealand’s national rugby team, do a passionate haka taparahi before international matches, you might think you’re seeing things. If you’re a rugby fan, you could think you’re seeing things.

One of the most popular includes the poi, which is a little, lightweight ball that is linked to a string.

Women used poi during lengthy canoe trips before the arrival of the Europeans to assist male paddlers in maintaining their rhythm.

When it comes to the music, the melody is created by voices raised in singing, and the rhythm is created by body slapping and foot tapping. In most cases, the guitar is the only musical instrument utilized to accompany dance performances.

Maori Chants and Their Meaning

Maori dance can be fierce, gently flowing, or joyful, and it is always accompanied by music, songs, or chants. These songs, known as waiata, are used to communicate emotions and narrate events from the past. “Ka Mate!” narrates the story of Chief Te Rauparaha and is one of the most well-known songs in the world, owing to the All Blacks rugby players once again. When he was a young man, the leader hid in a food storage hole in order to avoid being pursued by warriors. At first, he thought he was bound to failure.

Fortunately, according to the song, he was rescued by a figure known as “the hairy man” (perhaps an allied chief, the notoriously hirsute Te Wharerangi), who diverted the pursuers’ attention away from the hole and then dragged the chief to safety.

Haka Dance Meaning: Legendary Beginnings

How did all of the giggling, wagging of the tongue, and stomping of the feet come to be recognized as the quintessential New Zealand experience that it is today? It all started off innocently enough. According to Maori folklore, the sun deity, Te Ra, had two wives at one point in his life. One wife represented the spirit of summer, while the other represented the spirit of winter. Te Ra and his summery wife had a son named Tanerore, who they named after the god of the sun. Tanerore used to dance around the house to entertain his mother when he was a child.

  1. As a result, haka was born.
  2. An similarly amusing tradition connects the origins of comedy in dance back to ancient Greece.
  3. These ladies were dispatched by the ancestor Tinirau to apprehend the person responsible for the death of his pet whale.
  4. The women created a brilliant strategy to encourage their audience to laugh by dancing, making funny expressions, and otherwise entertaining them.
  5. Naturally, the end product is a more lighthearted version of the haka.
  6. People communicate their ideas via the use of words and sounds produced by their tongues.
  7. The traditions, chants, and songs of the Maori kapa haka are carried down from generation to generation through the use of gifted languages, which are passed down down the generations.

The Haka

For most non-Maori New Zealanders today, their awareness of the Haka is likely confined to the song “Ka mate, Ka mate,” which was created by Ngati Toa Chieftain Te Rauparaha about 1820 and is the most often performed version of the Haka today. Many sports teams and people representing New Zealand in foreign countries include the haka “Ka mate” as part of their overall program when they travel.

Internationally, the All Blacks, who do the haka before their matches, are the sports team that has given the haka the most recognition and exposure. It has emerged as a distinguishing characteristic of the All Blacks.

ORIGIN OF THE HAKA

Tamanu tora (the Sun God) was said to have had two wives: Hine-raumati (the Summer maid) and Hine takurua (the Winter maid), according to Maori lore and mythology. Tane-rore was the kid born to him and Hine-raumati, and he is widely regarded as the father of the dance’s inception. During the summer months, tane-rore refers to the shaking of the air that can be observed on hot days, and it is reflected in the dance by the quivering of the hands. The term “haka” refers to any and all Maori dancing forms.

The majority of haka performed nowadays are haka taparahi, or haka performed without weapons.

The Haka was not just a Maori pleasure, but it was also a highly socially significant habit in the welcome and entertaining of visitors.

The haka expressed the worries and issues of the time, acts of defiance and protest, as well as actual incidents and events occurring at the time of the performance.

HAKA HISTORY

The importance of the haka in the heritage of All Black rugby is not a recent development in the country. Since a visit by the “New Zealand Natives” headed by Joseph Warbrick in 1888, the haka has been intimately identified with New Zealand rugby, particularly the All Blacks. With the ferocious determination, devotion, and top level talent that have always been the hallmarks of New Zealand’s National game, the game’s allure has become stronger. With the haka, you may add a distinctive element to your performance that is drawn from the indigenous Maori of New Zealand and is aligned with the larger Polynesian cultures of the Pacific.

KA MATE

The famous haka, Ka Mate Ka Mate, was composed by Ngati Toa Chieftain Te Rauparaha around 1820, with the story of its composition being well known within the oral histories of Ngati Toa and Ngati Tuwharetoa, the two iwi (tribes) most associated with its origins. The story of its composition is well known within the oral histories of Ngati Toa and Ngati Tuwharetoa, the two iw While Te Rauparaha was being followed by warriors from a rival iwi, he was taken refuge in a kumara (local sweet potato) pit dug by Te Wharerangi of Tuwharetoa, with Te Wharerangi’s wife Te Rangikoaea being instructed to sit on top of the hole.

Te Rauparaha remained undetected by the Tohunga thanks to the spiritual powers of both food and the woman above him, and when the searchers passed overhead, he whispered “Ka ora Ka ora” (It is life, it is life).

Hi!) When the New Zealand Native team went on their long and hard tour of the United States in 1888/89, they played Ka Mate, and the “Original” All Blacks did the same in 1905.

KAPA O PANGO – THE ALL BLACKS’ OWN HAKA

In 1820, Ngati Toa Chieftain Te Rauparaha composed the famous haka, Ka Mate Ka Mate, which has become well known throughout the world, particularly among the oral histories of Ngati Toa and Ngati Tuwharetoa, the two iwi (tribes) most associated with the haka’s origins. The story of the composition of Ka Mate Ka Mate is well known throughout the world, particularly among the oral histories of Ngati Toa and N While Te Rauparaha was being followed by warriors from a rival iwi, he was taken refuge in a kumara (local sweet potato) pit dug by Te Wharerangi of Tuwharetoa, with Te Wharerangi’s wife Te Rangikoaea being instructed to sit on the kumara’s surface.

Te Rauparaha remained undetected by the Tohunga, thanks to the spiritual powers of both food and the lady above him.

Tenei te tangata puhuruhuru nana mai whaka whiti te ra” was the mantra that Te Rauparaha used to climb out of the kumara pit once the warriors had finally dispersed.

Hi!) When the New Zealand Native team went on their long and hard tour of the United States in 1888/89, they played Ka Mate, and the “Original” All Blacks did so the following year in 1905.

KAPA O PANGO

Right on, Kia! Right on, Kia! Greetings, Mau! Hi! I ahau, kia whakawhenua o te ahau! Hello, Aue! Hi! We, the people of Aotearoa, salute you! Hello, au! Au! Aue, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, Hi! Ko kapa o pango, e ngunguru nei! Ko kapa o pango, e ngunguru nei! Hello, au! Au! Aue, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, Hi! I had a good laugh! I’m from Te Rangi, and I’m from Ki runga, and I’m from Tu Iho Nei, and I’m from Tu Iho Nei, and I’m from Tu Iho Nei, hey! Ponga ra, ponga! Ponga ra, ponga!

  1. Allow my life power to be returned to the ground if you will.
  2. And now it is my turn!
  3. The flames of desire are stoked!
  4. And now it is my turn!

It’s my time to shine! The excitement builds to a climax! Feel the force of it. Our supremacy continues to grow. Our superiority manifests itself. to be elevated to a high position Silver fern, indeed! All-Blacks on the field! Silver fern, indeed! All-Blacks on the field! Hello, aue!

Kapa O Pango explained

Without a doubt, if you have learned anything about New Zealand culture, you have heard of the Haka, which is a traditional dance performed throughout the country. This mesmerizing chant, which can be heard before many key New Zealand events, most notably before a rugby match against the All Blacks, has piqued the interest of people all over the world in Maori culture. Of course, one of the best ways to learn more about Maori culture is to visit New Zealand and immerse yourself in it for yourself.

It is recommended that you immerse yourself in Maori culture by participating in a cultural display, eating a hangi feast, learning about greenstone carving, and many other activities.

Where Did the Haka Come From?

Because Maori history has been passed down via songs and oral tradition, there is no definitive account as to when and where the haka first appeared on stage. A few of well-known anecdotes about the haka are, nevertheless, related with the dance.

The Haka in Maori Legend

There are several Maori traditions that speculate about the origins of the Haka, but one of the most popular is the story of Tama-te-nui-ra, the sun god. On sweltering days, his summer maid, Hine-raumati, would make the air appear to dance and quiver with her movements. The quivering motion made by haka performers with their hands reflects this.

The Haka Meaning – Haka Translation

However, although there is no direct translation for the haka, the word itself may be found in other Polynesian cultures, where it means “dance.” So, when it comes to understanding what the haka dance means, it all boils down to the meaning of the haka dance itself, which we shall go into further detail about below.

The Haka is Maori History

Chief Tinirau and the ladies of his tribe performed an early rendition of the haka, which is still in use today. He was out for vengeance against a tohunga (priest) named Kae, who he believed was responsible for the death of Tinirau’s pet whale. He dispatched the ladies of his tribe to track down Kae, but all they knew about him was that he possessed crooked teeth. When they arrived at their adversary’s camp, they did the haka in order to make the men grin and display Kae’s teeth, therefore revealing his identity.

NZPocketGuide.com is an online resource for New Zealanders.

The Different Types of Haka

While there are many more forms of haka than the ones mentioned here, here are some of the most common types of Maori haka to get you started.

Peruperu Haka

Traditionally, it was performed before a fight as a “war dance,” and the Peruperu is one variety of haka that is done in this manner.

It is characterized by jumps in which the legs are pushed beneath the torso, and it is frequently accompanied by weapons. The protruding tongue and bulging eyes are intended to scare the opponents while also invoking the God of War, according to the legend.

Ngeri Haka

Unlike other traditional dances, the Ngeri haka has a distinct purpose: to excite both performers and soldiers. It is often done without the use of weapons, and the motions are more free as a means of the performers expressing themselves.

Manawa wera haka

This haka is typically done at funerals or shortly after someone has passed away. Once again, there are no weapons utilized, and the movement is more liberating. Take a look at our te reo Maori pronunciation guide to find out more about how to pronounce Maori terms. NZPocketGuide.com is an online resource for New Zealanders.

Who Can Perform the Haka?

It is customary to conduct this haka during funerals or when someone has passed away. The mobility is more free this time because there are no weapons used. Take a look at our te reo Maori pronunciation guide to find out more about how to pronounce Maori terms correctly. NZPocketGuide.com is a website that provides information on New Zealand.

The All Blacks Haka

It is customary for this haka to be done during funerals or shortly after someone has died. Again, there are no weapons utilized, and the movement is more liberating. Take a look at our te reo Maori pronunciation guide to discover more about how to pronounce Maori terms. This website is owned and operated by NZPocketGuide.com.

Ka Mate Haka

Ka mate, ka mate! Ka ora, ka ora! Ka mate, ka mate! Ka mate! Ka mate! Ka ora! Ka ora! Ka mate! Ka mate! Tnei te tangata phuruhuruNna nei I tiki mai whakawhiti te ru, upane! ka upane! Tnei te tangata phuruhuruNna nei I tiki mai whakawhiti te ru, upane! ka upane! , upane, ka upane, whiti te ra, whiti te ra!

English translation of the Ka Mate Haka

‘It is the end!’ It’s the end of the world! (Alternatively: I may die) It is the way of life! It is the way of life! (or: I have a chance to live) It’s the end of the world! It’s the end of the world! It is the way of life! It is the way of life! This is the one who brought the sun into being and caused it to shine. Another step forward, and another stride forward! One step forward, another… the sun is shining! NZPocketGuide.com is an online resource for New Zealanders.

The History of the Ka Mate Haka

The Ka Mate Haka was penned in 1820 by Te Rauparaha, a war commander of the Ngati Toa iwi (tribe) and a member of the Ngati Toa ancestors. He was running from his opponents, who were from the Ngati Maniapoto iwi and the Waikato tribes respectively. Opotaka, a place on the beaches of Lake Rotoaira, was designated as a safe harbor for him. He took refuge in a kumara hole. In this location, it is said that he said, “Ka mate, ka mate, ka ora, ka ora,” and then continued to compose the lyrics for the Ka Mate haka until his pursuers were unsuccessful in their pursuit, and until Te Rauparaha emerged from the pit and was welcomed by the tribe of Opotaka, where he was befriended.

Opotaka

Known as the Ka Mate Haka, it was penned in 1820 by Te Rauparaha, who was a war commander for the Ngati Toa iwi (tribe). As a result, he was forced to run from his adversaries among the tribes of Ngati Maniapoto and the Waikato. At a place named Opotaka, on the banks of Lake Rotoaira, he was offered asylum. It was in a kumara hole that he took refuge. In this location, it is believed that he said, “Ka mate, ka mate, ka ora, ka ora,” and then continued to compose the lyrics for the Ka Mate haka until his pursuers failed to apprehend him and Te Rauparaha emerged from the hole and was welcomed by the tribe of Opotaka, where he was befriended.

It was more of a victory dance for life over death than it was a traditional battle dance for Te Rauparaha.

Author

Ka Mate Haka was penned in 1820 by Te Rauparaha, a war chief of the Ngati Toa iwi (tribe) and member of the Ngati Toa ancestors. He was trying to get away from his opponents from the Ngati Maniapoto iwi and the Waikato tribes. Opotaka, a place on the banks of Lake Rotoaira, was designated as a safe haven for him. He took shelter in a kumara pit. In this location, it is reported that he said, “Ka mate, ka mate, ka ora, ka ora,” and then continued to compose the lyrics for the Ka Mate haka until his pursuers failed to apprehend him and Te Rauparaha emerged from the hole to befriend the tribe of Opotaka.

haka

Haka (Maori for “dance”) is a traditional Maori dance. Maoriposturedance is characterized by forceful rhythmic motions that include the full body, including swaying, slapping of the chest and thighs, stamping, and gestures of stylised aggression, among other things. When it is performed, there is usually some sort of chant accompanying it, as well as intimidating facial expressions such as bulging eyes and sticking out of the tongue. In spite of the fact that it is frequently connected with the traditional combat preparation of male warriors, haka may be performed by both men and women, and numerous variants of the dance serve social roles within Maori society.

  • One of the wives of the sun godTamanuite-ra, Hine-raumati, who symbolizes the essence of summer, had a son namedTane-rore, who is also known as Tane-rore the sage.
  • This light, fast movement is at the heart of allhaka, with the performers’ trembling hands in particular reflecting Tane-dance rore’s for his mother.
  • Examples of occasions forhaka in the modern age are birthdays, weddings, funerals, and other types of celebratory gatherings.
  • Since 1972, the performance of hakahas been one of the highlights of the hugely popularTe Matatiniperforming arts festival, which is held biennially in New Zealand and attracts thousands of visitors.
  • Located in Washington, D.C., the Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection/Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-112686) The most well-known haka is “Ka Mate,” which was penned in 1820 by Maori chief Te Rauparaha and is still performed today.
  • John M.

What is and what does the New Zealand All Blacks Haka mean?

According to Maori tradition, the Haka was a warfare ritual that was performed to terrify and mentally prepare the opposing forces for fight.

It is extremely easy to remember seeing more than 15 rugby players (that is, very large and muscular people) doing a tribal dance in a threatening manner. If you’ve ever seen an All Blacks game begin, you’ll understand what we’re talking about. The All Blacks are the New Zealand rugby team.

The origins of the Haka

It was traditionally used to terrify the adversary and prepare them emotionally for combat. It was a furious display of pride, power, and solidarity within the tribe that was performed. A crude yet powerful music is played in the background while they pound their feet against the ground, make hideous grimaces with their tongues, and rap their bodies to the beat. Currently, in New Zealand, the Haka is performed in a variety of ceremonies, including funerals, since it has evolved into a folkloric exaltation of the extremely adaptable native pride that it represents.

And it is not a new phenomenon; the first time it was demonstrated on a sporting field was on October 3, 1888, when the New Zealand native team played against Surrey, as part of a tour to the colony by the home countries of the British Empire (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland).

In 2011, however, it was their performance at the 2011 World Cup that drew perhaps the greatest media attention.

But what does what they sing in the Haka mean?

For those of you who are too interested to wait until the end of the post to find out what the song is about, the translation is as follows: KA MATE IN A MAJOR VERSIONKA MATE in a major version! Greetings, buddy! Greetings, Ka ora! Greetings, Ka ora! Greetings, buddy! Greetings, buddy! Greetings, Ka ora! Greetings, Ka ora! Tenei te tangata puhuruhuru, tenei te tangata puhuruhuru Nana I tiki mai nana I tiki mai Whakawhiti te raA upane, te raA upane! ka upane, ka upane! We have a new upane kaupane, and it’s called Te Ra!

  1. KA MATEI die is now available in English translation!
  2. I’m still alive!
  3. I’m going to die!
  4. I am alive!
  5. This is the hairy man (for the Maoris, hairy is synonymous with bravery) who brought the sun and made it shine once more in the world.
  6. Another step forward!
  7. Another step forward!

Kapa o Pango, the All Blacks’ own Haka

At Carisbrook in August 2005, the All Blacks performed for the first timeKapa O Pango, a new haka written just for and about the All Blacks. This was in advance of their Tri NationsTest match against South Africa. Derek Lardelli, a specialist in Maori culture and customs, wrote the song Kapa O Pango just for the squad. Its words and deeds pay homage to the country of New Zealand, the silver fern, and the soldiers in black who protect it. The name may be interpreted as ‘team in black’ in its simplest form.

  1. THE MOST IMPORTANT VERSION OF KAPA OR PANGO Taringa whakarongo!
  2. Right on, Kia!
  3. Greetings, Mau!
  4. I ahau, kia whakawhenua o te ahau!
  5. Hi!
  6. Hello, au!
  7. Aue, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, Hi!

Ko kapa o pango, e ngunguru nei!

Au!

I had a good laugh!

Ponga ra, ponga!

Hello, Aue!

Kapa o pango, oh my!

Ha!

Allow me to return to my very first gulp of air.

New Zealand is the one who is thundering right now.

It’s my time to shine!

This is what distinguishes us as the All Blacks.

It’s my time to shine!

Feel the force of it.

to be elevated to a high position Silver fern, indeed!

Silver fern, indeed!

Other articles that may be of interest to you include: 5 reasons why you should take up rugby as a sport Rugby’s respect for others, as well as other ideals that you may not have been aware of Featured image courtesy of the All Blacks Official Facebook page.

Interview with Patricia Garca, one of the world’s top rugby players

The Misappropriation of “Ka Mate”

The All Blacks, New Zealand’s national rugby team, are well-known for two things: their winning record and their ability to do the haka before each game they play. In addition to being an Indigenous performance art that use song and movement to challenge, welcome and celebrate or defy, haka is also a vessel that carries holy parts of the Maori worldview, also known as Mtauranga Mori (Maori worldview). Since its inception in 1987, the All Blacks have largely played “Ka Mate,” a haka penned by Te Rauparaha, a chief of the Ngti Toa tribe of New Zealand’s North Island, and performed by the New Zealand national rugby team.

  • Shelford, the team’s captain and the haka’s leader, warned his players that if they were going to do “Ka Mate,” they had best do it well (expletives deleted).
  • This means that the pronunciation must be flawless, and actions must be carried out with pinpoint accuracy.
  • The custom of performing “Ka Mate” and other other haka during athletic events has spread around the world, beginning in New Zealand and now include many other countries.
  • She attended one of these games and felt the performance of “Ka Mate” was a joke, according to Sharon Toi, a Mori Fulbright Scholar at the University of Arizona.
  • For us, the haka represents status, or mana, and the laughing made me feel embarrassed and humiliated.

It was authored by Te Rauparaha, an eminent warrior chief and combatant chief, for whom any affront on his mana foretold the impending death of anybody who dared to challenge him.” Apart from performing “Ka Mate” before each game, the University of Arizona football team has also produced two films on YouTube that attempt to “teach” the haka.

It is irresponsible on the part of the University of Arizona to approve a performance and production of “Ka Mate” that is disrespectful and incorrect, and which, when performed without authorization, breaches the intellectual property rights of Mori.

The Treaty of Waitangi is the fundamental source that governs and regulates the cooperation between Mori and the New Zealand government.

It has also been argued that rangtiratanga refers to the authority and control over taonga, which is correct.

The Ngti Toa tribe, as the descendants of Te Rauparaha, are the custodians, or kaitiaki, of Te Rauparaha’s creation.

They are responsible for safeguarding, among other things, the whakapapa, the korero, and the mauri that are ingrained in their taonga (family heirloom).

It has korero because it talks and imparts a valuable lesson to the audience.

Despite the fact that the University of Arizona is not obligated by the Treaty of Waitangi, it should not be complicit in any infringement of the rights guaranteed by the Treaty.

For example, they can confer with the tribe before using “Ka Mate,” which is one way to do this.

To its credit, the New Zealand government acknowledged the rights of the Ngti Toa tribe when it established the Haka Ka Mate Attribution Act, which recognized the rights of the tribe.

“Te Rauparaha was the composer of ‘Ka Mate’, and he was also the chief of Ngti Toa Rangatira,” the Act states.

In the words of Te Ariki Kawhe Wineera, who is a direct descendant of Te Rauparaha, the Ngti Toa tribe is delighted that their haka is being utilized by New Zealanders as a “unique display of passion,” such as when national teams win sporting competitions.

The pronunciation in the YouTube video is so terrible that the words have lost their meaning entirely.

The “teaching” segment of the movie, on the other hand, displays an attitude that is disrespectful to the kaitiaki and Te Rauparaha by indicating that you should “get down” and do the haka.

Because the team consists of players from all across the Pacific, for example, the Samoan players might educate everyone about traditional performing arts from their own culture, such as the siva tau, given the squad’s international makeup.

For anyone interested in performing a haka, they may follow the lead of the Brigham Young University rugby team, who commissioned a haka to be composed expressly for them that expressed the spirit and culture of their school.

A key component of the athletics department’s reputation is ensuring that “Ka Mate” is conducted with respect and with the approval of the Ngti Toa tribe.— Brendan M.

He was born and reared in Aotearoa/New Zealand and speaks fluent English.

Image number one: A performance of the haka by the New Zealand national rugby union team, formally known as the “All Blacks,” before to a match in Wellington.

Our website contains material and publications that date back over five decades. Any information that is more than ten years old is considered archival, and Cultural Survival does not necessarily agree with the content or word choice used at the time of publication.

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