What Do Mexicans Chant Independence

Cry of Dolores – Wikipedia

El Grito de Dolores
A statue ofMiguel Hidalgo y Costillain front of the church inDolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato
Observed by Mexico
Significance Commemorates the start of theMexican War of Independence, by repeating the words of Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla in the early morning of 16 September 1810
Date 16 September
Next time 16 September 2022
Frequency Annual

Mexico’s War of Independence began on September 16, 1810, when a Roman Catholic priest named Miguel Hidalgo y Costill raised his church bell and issued a call to arms, sparking theCry of Dolores (Spanish:Grito de Dolores) and igniting theMexican War of Independence. In celebration of Mexico’s independence, the President of Mexico re-enacts the shout from the balcony of Mexico City’sNational Palace, while striking the same bell that Hidalgo rang in 1810 to signal the beginning of the celebration.

Historical event

Mexico’s War of Independence began on September 16, 1810, when a Roman Catholic priest named Miguel Hidalgo y Costill raised his church bell and issued a call to arms, sparking theCry of Dolores (Spanish:Grito de Dolores) and igniting the Mexican Revolution. In celebration of Mexico’s independence, the President of Mexico re-enacts the shout from the balcony of Mexico City’sNational Palace, while striking the same bell that Hidalgo rang in 1810 to signal the beginning of the revolution.

Exact words and meaning

Scholars have been unable to come to a consensus on the precise words Miguel Hidalgo spoke during the event. It has been noted by historian Michael Meyer that “the actual words spoken in this most famous of all Mexican speeches are not known; rather, they are replicated in almost the same number of versions as there are historians to record them.” Meyer further contends that the message’s basic spirit is: ‘My children, today marks the beginning of a new dispensation. Will you be the one to receive it?

  • Will you be able to reclaim the territories that were stolen from your predecessors three hundred years ago by the dreaded Spaniards?
  • Will you stand up for your faith and your liberties in the sake of genuine patriotism?
  • Goodbye, incompetent government!
  • Cloud, are divided into two groups: Hidalgo and the audience.
  • “Will you remain slaves to Napoleon, or shall you protect your faith, your homes, and your liberties as patriots?” he said.
  • Religion, and especially our most holy lady of Guadalupe, should be preserved.
  • Good riddance to lousy administration, as well as death to the Gachupines!

In reality, his resistance was directed at Spain and its viceroy in Mexico, not at the monarchy as a whole; rather, it was directed at “poor administration.” It also highlighted the importance of religious fidelity, an attitude that could be shared by both Mexican-born Criollos and Peninsulars (native Spaniards), who were both born in Mexico.

The powerful anti-Spanish cries of “Death to Gachupines” (Gachupines being a term used against Peninsulares) would, on the other hand, have astonished Mexico’s ruling class.

National festivities

Scholars have been unable to come to a consensus on the precise words Miguel Hidalgo spoke during that period. In the words of historian Michael Meyer, “the precise words of this most famous of all Mexican speeches are not known; rather, they are replicated in almost as many permutations as there are historians to duplicate them.” Moreover, Meyer believes that:.the basic spirit of the message is A fresh dispensation has been granted to us today, my children.’ What are the chances that you’ll get one?

  • Whether or whether you will be successful in reclaiming the territories that were stolen from your forebears three hundred years ago by the vile Spaniards remains to be seen.
  • We must move quickly.
  • Our Lady of Guadalupe, long live the Virgin Mary!
  • To the Gachupines we say ‘Death’!
  • Cloud, are divided into two groups: Hidalgo and the audience.
  • When he questioned, ‘Will you be slaves to Napoleon or will you as patriots protect your faith, your hearths, and your rights?’ there was a resounding response: ‘We will defend to the death!’ Religion is alive and well, as is our most venerable Virgin of Guadalupe.
  • Goodbye to rotten administration, and hello to the Gachupines!
  • In reality, his resistance was directed against Spain and its viceroy in Mexico, not at the monarchy as a whole; rather, it was directed at “poor administration” in general.
  • The anti-Spanish chant “Death to Gachupines” (Gachupines being a slur used against Peninsulares) would, on the other hand, have surprised Mexico’s ruling class.

Presidential celebration at Mexico City

During the Grito, President Enrique Pea Nieto stood on the balcony of the National Palace. Mexico City, D.F., September 15, 2013 Every year on September 15th, at around 11 p.m., the President of Mexico stands on the balcony of the National Palace in Mexico City and rings the bell that Hidalgo rang in 1810, which was afterwards relocated to the National Palace in Mexico City. The President then recites a patriotic chant (aGrito Mexicano), which is based on the “Grito de Dolores,” and which includes the names of the most prominent heroes of the Mexican War of Independence who were there on that momentous day in history.

  • The following is the version of the speech frequently repeated by the President of Mexico: Spanish Mexicans, please!
  • ¡VivaHidalgo!
  • Joesefa Ortiz de Dominguez is still alive and well!
  • ¡VivaAldamayMatamoros!
  • Viva México!
  • Viva México!
  • Viva México!

EnglishMexicans!

Hidalgo is still alive!

Josefa Ortiz de Domnguez is still alive and well!

Aldama and Matamoros are still alive and well!

Mexico is still alive!

Mexico is still alive!

It draws up to 500,000 people from all around Mexico as well as tourists from all over the world to watch.

Following the recital, the President rings the bell one more time and raises the Mexican flag, which is met with cheers from the audience.

The celebrations are brought to a close with a magnificent fireworks display on the Zócalo grounds.

The parade begins in the Zócalo and its environs, passes the Hidalgo Memorial, and ends on the Paseo de la Reforma, passing ” El ngel de la Independencia ” memorial column and other locations along the way.

Recent exceptions

Dolores Hidalgo Parish in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato, Mexico, was the site of the Grito de Dolores on September 16, 1810. There are years when the Grito is not re-enacted at the National Palace; on those occasions, it is staged in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato, which is where it first occurred. Particularly typical during the last year of a President’s tenure. President Felipe Calderón made an exception by re-enacting the Grito de Dolores Hidalgo as part of thebicentennial celebrations on September 16, 2010, despite the fact that he had already done so the night before from the National Palacebalcony to officially kick off the celebrations the previous day.

  • The Grito in Dolores Hidalgo was not given by President Enrique Pea Nieto at any point during his six years in office, making him the fourth president in history to do so.
  • PresidentVicente Fox repeatedly tampered with it, adding and erasing items, addressing Mexicans in both male and female pronouns, and wishing “our accords” a long and prosperous life in 2001.
  • During Pea Nieto’s administration, the Grito became a vehicle for political protest against the president and his Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) (PRI).
  • Presidential nominee Donald Trump, hundreds of residents marched, chanted, and waved placards in support of him.
  • There was no mention of the demonstration in any of the Mexican news outlets.
  • In 2006, a rally known as the Plantón caused a snarl up in the Grito procession.
  • The Grito was not given at the Zócalo but instead was presented at Mexico’s National Palace.
  • The Grito will be conducted remotely in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemicca.

Celebrations by governors and municipal presidents

The ” grito ” of “Viva México!” was said by the municipal president during the start of Independence Day celebrations in Ixmiquilpan, Hidalgo, on September 16, 2008, at 11 p.m. On the 15th and 16th of September, similar festivities to the Presidential one take place in cities and towns throughout Mexico, as well as at Mexican embassies and consulates around the world. After ringing a bell, the chief executive, ambassador, or consul pronounce the traditional lines, which include the names of independence heroes and local patriots, before concluding with a three-fold scream of Viva Mexico!

Throughout Mexico, schools have festivities, and everytime the bell ringing is reenacted, the head of the school or university utters the traditional words of greeting.

Celebrations are also held outside of Mexico, for example, in states in the United States where there is a substantial concentration of persons of Mexican descent who participate in the occasion.

Notes

  1. Literary translations such as “shout of aches,” which are frequently generated by algorithms, should be avoided since they lack the context that Dolores is a geographical name in this context.

References

  1. AbKirkwood, Burton, and others (2000). Mexico’s historical development. Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated is based in Westport, Connecticut, United States. ISBN 978-0-313-30351-7
  2. Sosa, Francisco (1985) ISBN 978-0-313-30351-7 (in Spanish). Biographies of Notable Mexicans-Miguel Hidalgo, volume 472, page 472 Mexico City: Editorial Porra SA, pp. 288-292.ISBN968-452-050-6
  3. Virginia Guedea, “Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla,” in Encyclopedia of Mexico, Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn, 1997, p. 640
  4. AbMeyer, Michael, et al., “Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla,” in Encyclopedia of Mexico, Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn (1979). The Course of Mexican History, page 276 (New York, New York: Oxford University Press, 2006). US ISBN 978-0-19-502413-5
  5. Oxford University PressISBN978-0-19-502413-5
  6. ‘William F. Cloud’ is a pseudonym for William F. Cloud (1896). Between Church and State, or Mexican Politics from Cortez to Diaz, is an excellent read. PeckClark Printers, based in Kansas City, Missouri
  7. A little over 200 years ago, the first “Grito de Independencia” was said in Huichapan, Hidalgo (in Spanish). The newspaper La Jornada published an article on September 16th, 2010. Emmanuel Carballo’s article was archived from the original on September 17, 2010. (September 2009). “El grito de Dolores, from 1812 to 1968” “El grito de Dolores, from 1812 to 1968” (in Spanish). México’s National Autonomous University Hugh M. Hamill (2017-09-15)
  8. Hamill, Hugh M. (1966). This revolt was a prelude to the establishment of Mexican independence. Knight, Alan
  9. University of Florida Press, ISBN 0-8130-2528-1
  10. Knight, Alan (2002). Mexico during the Colonial Period. ISBN: 0-521-89196-5
  11. Saint-Louis, Miya. Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 0-521-89196-5
  12. In this article, we will discuss “How to Celebrate Mexico’s Independence Day: Grito de Dolores.” iexplore.com. Inside-Out Media is a production company based in New York City. “Mexico Celebrates Its Bicentennial – Photo Gallery – LIFE”, which was retrieved on September 15, 2016. “Calderón revives original grito in magnanimous celebrations for Mexico’s bicentennial,” according to a report published on April 8, 2011. (in Spanish). 8th of April, 2011
  13. Retrieved 8th of April, 2011
  14. Fernando Serrano Migallón is a Spanish actor and director (April 2008). “El Grito: smbolo, fiesta, mito, y identidad” (The Grito: Symbol, Festival, Myth, and Identity) (PDF) (in Spanish). On October 16, 2012, a PDF version of this document was made available for download. Retrieved2012-04-25
  15. s^ James Fredrick is a fictional character created by James Fredrick (2016-09-16). “Thousands of Mexicans demand that President Pea Nieto resign immediately during a demonstration on Independence Day.” The Telegraph is a British newspaper. The Telegraph of London. Retrieved2017-09-15
  16. s^ thousands of people gathered in the Zócalo to applaud
  17. Thousands of people gathered outside demanding that the EPN be disbanded (in Spanish). Retrieved on 2017-01-23 from Periodicocentral.mx (accessed on 2016-09-15). “Mexicans Take to the Streets in Support of a Recount.” The Los Angeles Times published this article. On the 22nd of August, 2006, the original version was archived. Retrieved 2018-09-17
  18. “A lo Miguel Hidalgo, Dolores will have their grito de independencia a pesar del COVID-19”
  19. “Paso, City of El Salvador will have their grito de independencia a pesar del COVID-19” (2019-09-10). A celebration of Mexican Independence Day will be conducted this weekend in El Paso, according to the newspaper. KFOX. Retrieved on 2009-09-09
  20. KFOX.
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Further reading

  • Isabel Fernández Tejedo and Carmen Nava Nava are the authors of this work (2001). “Images of Independence in the Nineteenth Century: The Grito de Dolores, History, and Myth” is a book published by the University of California Press. The authors William H. Beezly and David E. Lorey wrote a book called (ed.). Mexico is alive and well! Silhouettes: studies in history and culture series. Viva la independencia!: Independence Day celebrations on September 16. Margarita González Aredondo and Elena Murray de Parodi are two of the most talented women in the world (Spanish-English trans.). pp. 1–42.ISBN0-8420-2914-1.OCLC248568379
  • Sr. Antonio Barajas Becerra, “Entrada de los Insurgentes a la Villa de San Miguel El Grande, la tarde del Domingo, 16 de Septiembre de 1801”
  • Antonio Barajas Beccera, 1969, Generalisimo don Ignacio de Allende y Unzaga, 2a edicion,

External links

  • Mexico connect.com: “El Grito” (The Cry)
  • Bibliography and Hemerography: Miguel Hidalgo and Costilla
  • Miguel Hidalgo and Costilla – Documents from 1810 and 1811
  • Chronology of Miguel Hidalgo and Costilla
  • Miguel Hidalgo and Mexico Marks Its Bicentennial with a Slideshow courtesy of Life magazine

Everything You Need to Know About Mexican Independence Day

Traveler investigates the holiday’s history, rituals, and traditions, as well as how it is observed now in Mexico. Originally published as: Do you have a special method of commemorating the holiday? Please let us know via Facebook.

What is it?

Mexican Independence Day is not to be confused with Cinco de Mayo, which commemorates the Mexican army’s victory over Napoleon III’s French forces on May 5, 1862, at the Battle of Puebla. Mexican Independence Day is celebrated on September 16, 1810, the anniversary of the day when priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla urged Mexicans to rise up against the Spanish colonial government. When the scream was first heard, it was known as the Grito de Dolores, or Cry of Dolores, and was named for the town of Dolores, which is now known as Dolores Hidalgo, where the cry was first heard.

Will you be able to liberate yourselves?

We must take immediate action.”) Although freedom was not achieved immediately, that day—and the revolt that followed it—is widely regarded as the beginning of the conflict that finally resulted in the country’s independence in 1821.

How it’s celebrated in Mexico

Although the official celebration of Mexican Independence Day takes place on September 16, the festivities actually begin at 11 p.m. on September 15 when Mexico’s president rings a bell at the National Palace in Mexico City and repeats Hidalgo’s famous words to crowds gathered at the Plaza de la Constitución, also known as the Zócalo, one of the world’s largest public plazas. After each line, many of which include major characters in the revolutionary movement, the audience of more than 500,000 locals and tourists chants “Viva!” back at the performers.

  1. The heroes who gave us our freedom are still alive!
  2. Long live Hidalgo!
  3. Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez, long live!
  4. Aldama and Matamoros are still alive and well!
  5. Viva México!
  6. Viva México!
  7. Viva México!

Translation into English: Mexicans!

Hidalgo is still alive!

Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez is still alive and well!

Aldama and Matamoros are still alive and well!

Mexico is still alive!

Mexico is still alive!

Parades, rodeos, bullfights, and street celebrations are all planned, and more merchants than usual will be on hand to offer a variety of whistles, horns, and toys.

Pyrotechnics (and fire) are also a big element of the celebration: braided stalks of willow and palm are lit ablaze, and vendors sell fireworks and firecrackers, as well as launch them from the stalks.

Where you can celebrate

The event in Mexico City’s Zócalois neighborhood is shown on Univision every year in the United States. Looking to do more than just live vicariously via others, or have you missed the festivities in your city? You may still commemorate the date in a number of locations this year, including: At the Spreckels Organ Pavilion on Friday, the House of Mexico will conduct its first Mexican Independence Day celebration from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., during which the Mexican consul will perform the customary “grito.”

¡Viva México! 10 Songs to Celebrate Mexican Independence Day

Univision broadcasts the Zócalois celebrations in Mexico City every year in the United States. Not satisfied with only living vicariously through others, or perhaps you missed the festivities in your hometown? You may still commemorate the anniversary in a number of places this year, including: Mexican Independence Day will be celebrated for the first time at Spreckels Organ Pavilion in San Diego on Friday, July 1, from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. The Mexican consul will perform a traditional “grito” during the festivities.

Explore

View the most recent videos, charts, and news. View the most recent videos, charts, and news. Take a look at them in the gallery below. Viva México! Long live Mexico! Pedro Galindo Galarza created many wonderful songs during his career, but this is the one that stands out above the others. “Cielito Lindo” is a euphemism for “Little Angel.” Despite the fact that many have attempted it, no one does it justice quite like Pedro Infante, who personifies the golden period of Mexican cinema. “Mexico lindo y querido” means “Light and beloved” in Spanish.

  • “The 15th of September” Traditionally, the annual festivities of Mexican independence begin on the night of September 15, in commemoration of the well-known Grito de Dolores.
  • “Mexico en la Piel” translates as “Mexico on the Skin.” The fact that he is known as Luis Miguelel Sol de México (Mexico’s Sunshine) is not by chance.
  • Just by listening to a young Pedro Fernandez in the 1983 filmNio Pobre, Nio Rico, you could tell that he was going to be around for a long time.
  • The reason behind this is as follows.
  • If you’ve ever had the pleasure of witnessingVicente Fernandezsing “El Rey” in all of his charrosplendor, consider yourself extremely fortunate.
  • “We are a lot more Americans.” This norteo immigrant anthem by Los Tigres del Norte is more pertinent today than it has been in years.

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Top 10 songs to Celebrate Mexican Independence Day!

MEXICO ES MUY VIVA! As the country’s most vibrant festival approaches once again, Mexico’s Independence Day on September 16 will be celebrated nationwide (Dia de Independencia). Millions will take part in El Grito (the Cry), a customary yell of “Viva México!” that will start off the festivities. But how many people know how to rejoice with the most well-known songs? We’ve taken care of all the legwork for you. Check out these top 10 songs that will get you in the mood for a weekend of celebration!

  • Long live Mexico!
  • “Cielito Lindo” is a euphemism for “Little Angel.” Despite the fact that many have attempted it, no one does it justice quite like Pedro Infante, who personifies the golden period of Mexican cinema.
  • Jorge Negrete is linked with Mexican heritage, and this song serves as evidence of that claim.
  • To commemorate this momentous occasion, who better to sing about it than José Alfredo Jimenez, a native of Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato?
  • “Alla en el Rancho Grande,” as the song goes.
  • “Mi Ciudad” means “My Country.” Ranchera iconLola Beltránis regarded as a national treasure by her peers.
  • “El Rey” is the title of the king.
  • “What a beautiful world I live in.” Even after all these years, Javier Sol’s voice still has a golden ring to it.
  • For example, one of the most famous statements is, “I’d like to tell the Gringo that I did not cross the border, the border crossed me.” A freshly recorded edition of Maná’s song is currently being used to encourage Latinos in the United States to register to vote.

Mexican Independence Day — September 16

Mexican Independence Day, celebrated on September 16, is a time to be joyful and honor Mexican heritage.

History of Mexican Independence Day

Mexico, formerly known as New Spain, was a colony of the kingdom of Spain that was harshly ruled by the Spanish monarchy for more than 300 years. During this time, the indigenous population was oppressed, farmland and personal wealth were confiscated, and only Spaniards were permitted to hold political positions. Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, a Catholic priest in the town of Dolores, had had enough and decided to take action. A speech known as the Grito de Dolores (Cry of Dolores) was delivered on September 16, 1810, outside his church, calling for the abolition of Spanish rule.

  1. This marked the beginning of the bloody Mexican War of Independence, which would last for more than a decade.
  2. Father Costilla is now referred to as the “Father of Mexican Independence” by historians.
  3. Over the course of more than 200 years, Mexican Independence Day has grown into a massive national celebration.
  4. The colors red, white, and green — the colors of the Mexican flag — can be found everywhere in Mexico, as well as in cities in the United States with significant Mexican populations.
  5. On the evening of September 15, this event will be broadcast live to millions of viewers and listeners on Mexican television and radio.

The celebration of Cinco de Mayo commemorates the victory of the Mexican army over the powerful French militia during the Battle of Puebla in 1862, which was celebrated on May 5.

Mexican Independence Day timeline

The 21st of April, 1519 Three Hundred Years of Spanish Rule The invasion and fall of the great Aztec Empire begins with the arrival of Spanish commander Hernán Cortés and his forces off the coast of Mexico. The Cry of Dolores (El Grito de Dolores) is heard on September 16, 1810, when Father Costilla makes his famed sermon, inciting the inhabitants to rise up in revolt against Spanish tyranny. Father Costilla is put to death by Spanish forces in January of 1811. His army, which was made up of faithful revolutionaries, continued to battle in his name for the rest of his life.

  • The Treaty of Cordoba is signed by Spain, officially bringing the War of Independence to a close and proclaiming Mexico a free country.
  • Throughout public places, flowers and other decorations are displayed in the colors of the Mexican flag — red, white, and green — to commemorate the occasion.
  • Of course, one of the most essential components of Independence Day festivities is the food, which is available from restaurants and street vendors that specialize in traditional Mexican cuisine.
  • In addition to fruit punch and chocolates such as marzipan, there will be “pozole,” a soup made from hominy and pig, “Menudo,” a beef stew known as “Roast Lamb,” “Queso Fundido,” a Mexican cheese fondue, and tortilla chips with guacamole and salsa.
  • Mexico has a population of 127.6 million people.
  • 50 – the number of indigenous languages spoken in Mexico, according to Wikipedia.
  • 52 is the country code for Mexico when calling internationally.

Mexican Independence DayFAQ s

on the 21st of April, in the year 1519 Spanish Rule for 300 Years The invasion and annihilation of the great Aztec Empire begins when Spanish commander Hernán Cortés and his army land on the Mexican coastline. The Cry of Dolores (El Grito de Dolores) is heard on September 16, 1810, when Father Costilla makes his famed sermon, inciting the community to rise up in revolt against Spanish authority. Fr. Costilla is put to death by the Spanish army in January of 1811. It was in his honor that his army, which was composed of devoted revolutionaries, continued to fight.

  1. As a result of the signing of the Treaty of Cordoba, Spain declared Mexico a free country, thereby ending the War of Independence.
  2. Throughout public places, flowers and other decorations are displayed in the colors of the Mexican flag — red, white, and green — to commemorate the holiday.
  3. Unquestionably, food is a major component of Independence Day festivities – restaurants and street sellers offer traditional Mexican cuisine to customers.
  4. In addition to fruit punch and chocolates such as marzipan, there will be “pozole,” a soup made from hominy and pig, “Menudo,” a beef stew known as “Roasted Lamb,” ‘Queso Fundido,’ a Mexican cheese fondue, and chips with guacamole and salsa.
  5. The population of Mexico is 127.6 million people.

Fifty-one is the number of indigenous languages spoken across Mexico. As the world’s third-largest country in terms of land area, Mexico comes in at number thirteen. Mexicians can be reached using the international calling code 52.

Why is Mexican Independence Day not as popular a holiday as Cinco de Mayo is in the United States?

International relations specialists believe that Cinco de Mayo is more popular in the United States than Mexican Independence Day because it promotes Mexican culture as a whole and does not commemorate the beginning of a war in another country, as Mexican Independence Day does.

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Where exactly is the town of Dolores in Mexico?

The holiday of Cinco de Mayo, according to some foreign relations specialists, is more popular in the United States than Mexico Independence Day because it honors Mexican culture in general rather than the beginning of a war in another country, as Mexican Independence Day does.

How to Observe Mexican Independence Day

  • As with St. Patrick’s Day, you don’t have to be Irish to appreciate it, and you don’t have to be a Mexican to enjoy Mexican Independence Day, and vice versa. You may take in the events while you eat a full, savory dinner and sip on an ice cold cerveza.

Fly the Mexican flag

  • As with St. Patrick’s Day, you don’t have to be Irish to appreciate it, and you don’t have to be a Mexican to enjoy Mexican Independence Day. In fact, neither are required. Relax and take in the festivities while you eat a full, flavorful dinner and sip on an ice cold cerveza.

Watch or listen to the live broadcast of El Grito de Dolores reenactment

  1. On September 15, at 11 p.m. local time, turn on your television or radio and listen to the President of Mexico give El Grito de Dolores, replete with bell ringing, to the nation. Then let the festivities begin

5 Cool Facts About Mexican Independence Day

  • On September 15, at 11 p.m. local time, turn on your television or radio to hear the President of Mexico give El Grito de Dolores, which includes bell ringing. Now it’s time to start the festivities.

A Mexican household favorite

  • Frijoles de la Olla (beans in a pot), which is simply a pot of simmered beans combined with onion and garlic and topped with fresh sour cream, is a substantial Mexican dinner that can be made using fresh pinto or black beans that you can get at your local grocery store.

Wash it down

  • Drinks such as beer and margaritas should be avoided in favor of something unique, such as a traditional Mexican ponche (fruit punch) prepared from sugarcane, oranges, pears, guavas (with raisins), apples, and raisins seasoned with cinnamon and clove

Que es Queso?

  • Drinks such as beer and margaritas should be avoided in favor of something unique, such as a traditional Mexican ponche (fruit punch) prepared from sugarcane, oranges, pears, guavas (with raisins), apples, and raisins seasoned with cinnamon and clove
  • And

Hangover Cure

  1. If you’ve had a few too many cervezas on September 16, menudo, a rich, hearty stew made from stew beef, hominy (corn kernels), tripe (cow stomach lining), and onion, garlic, lime, and cilantro, is considered to be the traditional hangover cure. Menudo is made with stew beef, hominy, tripe (cow stomach lining), and onion, garlic, lime, and cilantro.

Why Mexican Independence Day is Important

  • Mexican Independence Day, like the Fourth of July in the United States and the Bastille Day in France, is a celebration of freedom. And we believe that there is nothing sweeter than freedom, unless you consider Mazapán, a delicious Mexican candy with a peanut flavoring
  • And

Two day fiesta

  • Many people begin preparing for the holiday on September 15, even though the official day of celebration is September 16, when banks, schools, and businesses are closed. The festivities culminate with the President’s reading of El Grito de Dolores live on television at 11p.m.

It’s not Cinco de Mayo

  1. We appreciate that Mexican Independence Day is celebrated in honor of a courageous holy man who offered his life in order to free his nation. Despite the fact that Cinco de Mayo is a wonderful holiday, it has been so commercialized that the majority of people who go to bars for tequila shots and 2-for-1 taco deals on May 5th are unaware that the holiday honors a long-ago historical conflict.

Mexican Independence Day dates

Year Date Day
2021 September 16 Thursday
2022 September 16 Friday
2023 September 16 Saturday
2024 September 16 Monday
2025 September 16 Tuesday

Mexican Independence Day is celebrated on September 16th this year.

Where to Celebrate “El Grito” for Mexican Independence Day

El Grito is a unique ceremony that takes place to commemorate Mexican Independence Day. During the celebration, the people are led by Mexican political leaders in a particular shout to honor the heroes of the country’s independence movement. El Grito takes occurs every year on the 15th of September, on the night of the same name. Every year, the historical event that marked the beginning of Mexico’s independence from Spain is commemorated in this manner.

Historical Background

On September 15, 1810, in the wee hours of the morning, Father Miguel Hidalgo, the priest of the parish church in Dolores, Guanajuato, rang the church bell and exhorted the people of Mexico to rise up against the rulers of the Spanish Empire. It is known as “El Grito de Dolores” since it took place in the town of Dolores, and it is a national holiday in Mexico. Even though Spain did not acknowledge Mexican independence until some eleven years later, this marked the beginning of Mexico’s War of Independence.

How to Celebrate El Grito

Every year, on the night of September 15th, the Mexican people celebrate this momentous event in their country. People congregate in theZocalo, town squares, and plazas to show their support for the country’s independence. Mexico City’s National Palace hosts a Grito on its balcony, and governors and mayors from throughout the country lead their respective communities in the celebration. Following each declaration made by the political leader, the mob yells out “Viva!” to indicate their approval.

  • Viva Hidalgo!
  • Viva Morelos!
  • Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez is alive and well!
  • Viva Allende!
  • Viva!
  • Viva Mexico!
  • Viva Mexico!
  • Viva Mexico!
  • Viva Mexico!
  • A bell, which commemorates Father Miguel Hidalgo’s appeal for people to rise up against the Spanish monarchy, is struck by the president, symbolizing that call.

Thousands of people take to the streets, waving flags, ringing noisemakers, and spraying foam. Then, as the audience erupts in applause, pyrotechnics illuminate the night sky. Later on, the Mexican national song is performed in its entirety.

Where to Celebrate “El Grito”

The el grito takes place in the town plaza of whatever city you happen to be in on September 15th, and if you enjoy being a part of a large crowd, you should make your way to the town plaza of whatever city you happen to be in by around 10 p.m. (or earlier if you want to get a good spot) to participate in the celebration. The most desirable locations are as follows:

  • Mexico City is a city that has a lot of history. On the Zocalo, Mexico City’s central square, President Enrique Pena Nieto launches the grito from the balcony of his presidential palace, thePalacio Nacional, to the delight of hundreds of thousands of viewers. An afterparty that includes pyrotechnics, singing of the National Anthem, and dancing follows the grito. Dolores Hidalgo is a Mexican actress and activist. This little village in the Mexican state of Guanajuato is referred to as the “Cradle of Mexican Independence.” Celebrations celebrating Hidalgo’s cry for independence might be held in the place where it all began on this day in 1810. This year’s municipal parade and other commemorative events will take place in the early morning hours of September 16, 2018. Queretaro This UNESCO World Heritage Site is the birthplace of Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez, known as La Corregidora, the heroine of Mexico’s independence struggle who alerted Hidalgo that the royal troops were aware of the rebels’ plans, causing him to declare war on the insurgents in 1810. (earlier than originally planned). In a magnificent style, the town celebrates, complete with fireworks and a happy mood. San Miguel de Allende is a city in Mexico. Known as the birthplace of Ignacio Allende, one of the most important leaders of the Mexican independence fight, San Miguel de Allende is a charming historical city that is particularly popular with foreigners. The festivities are raucous, and because the town’s Fiesta de San Miguel takes place around the same dates, there is lots to see and do.

Buenos Aires (Argentina) Buenos Aires (Argentina) The grito is initiated from the balcony of thePalacio Nacional by the Mexican president in front of hundreds of thousands of people in Mexico City’s biggest square, the Zocalo. Following the grito, the National Anthem is sung, and fireworks are sent off. Dolores Hidalgo is a Latina activist who lives in the United States. Known as the “Cradle of Mexican Independence,” this little town in Mexico’s state of Guanajuato is a popular tourist attraction.

On the morning of September 16th, there will be a municipal procession and various activities to mark the anniversary; Queretaro This UNESCO World Heritage Site is the birthplace of Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez, known as La Corregidora, the heroine of Mexico’s independence struggle who alerted Hidalgo that the royal troops were aware of the rebels’ plans, causing him to declare war on the insurgents in 1846.

(earlier than originally planned).

San Miguel de Allende (San Miguel de Allende in Spanish) San Miguel de Allende, the home of Ignacio Allende, one of the pioneers of Mexico’s independence fight, is a beautiful historical city that is particularly popular with foreigners.

Noche Mexicana

Mexico’s independence may be celebrated in a variety of ways other than the traditional method. In addition to the many other activities taking place that night, several restaurants, hotels, and nightclubs are hosting unique Noche Mexicana celebrations. A fantastic night out on the town is in store for you tonight. Many families have their own Noche Mexicana celebrations in their homes, occasionally asking friends and extended family to join them for typical celebratory Mexican meals such as pozole, chiles en nogada, and tacos, among other things.

‘Homophobic and not very clever’: why puto chants haunt Mexican football

To be fair to Mexican soccer supporters, they have managed to convert one of the sport’s least dramatic moments into one of its most contentious and obnoxious ones in recent memory. It’s a pattern that everyone is familiar with. When the opponent’s goalie sets up for a goalkick, the chant “Ehhhh…” starts to ring out. Once the kick is delivered, the Mexican supporters’ voices grow in synchrony until the kick elicits a ” puto!” yell. The word is homophobic slang for a male sex worker, and it is used to denigrate them.

  1. After the shouts were heard during El Tri’s triumph against Germany, Fifa said on Monday that it has initiated a disciplinary investigation against the country.
  2. During the 2018 World Cup qualifiers, Fifa took 51 disciplinary measures against players for homophobia.
  3. Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Paraguay, Uruguay, Greece, Hungary, and Serbia were all singled out by Fifa for homophobic chanting.
  4. As Joshua Nadel, author of Ftbol!
  5. A lot of the hand-wringing, adds Nadel, an assistant professor of Latin American and Caribbean history at North Carolina Central University, “is for show,” he believes.
  6. On Sunday, the cry made its first appearance in the 25th minute, as Manuel Neuer was about to take a free kick.
  7. The exact roots of the cry in Mexico are unclear, however it is believed to have originated at the club level before spreading internationally.
  8. The cry appeared on occasion at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, but the 2014 tournament in Brazil elevated it to a new level.
  9. “They can abstractly contemplate what the phrase means, but they don’t grasp the emotional gut punch you feel when you hear a slur in your own language,” Julia Jiménez Jaramillo wrote in Slate in 2014, lamenting Fifa’s apparent inaction on the problem.
  10. If nothing else, they could issue a symbolic statement condemning it, even if it takes decades for the fans to catch up with them.” In recent years, both the federation and the players have presented their cases for respective positions.
  11. The Mexican football organization sent a direct appeal to supporters earlier this month, along with a link to the tournament’s standards of decency, to desist from using the chant.
See also:  Songs Where Girls Chant

One of the most common responses was to make fun of the request with gifs and belligerent one-liners, with some even reusing the team’s motto and hashtag for the tournament: “Yo si voy a gritar, porqueNadaNosDetiene.” (“I’ll be yelling because #NothingStopsUs” will be my theme song.) It is possible that the increased attention has only served to enhance its use at Major League Soccer (MLS) and United Soccer League (USL) stadiums, where Latino support is strong.

  1. A series of “Pride Night” games at the LA Galaxy and New York City FC have been marred by chanting in recent weeks.
  2. I always thought it was an abstract concept, something we were communicating to the opponent in a joyful, communal manner.
  3. “Now that I’m an adult, things are different.
  4. I don’t think it’s that brilliant, and it’s homophobic.” Many supporters dismiss allegations of homophobia and argue that the chant is only a jest, according to the media.
  5. For some, the chant serves only to highlight the widespread homophobia that exists in society.
  6. Nadel explained that “it is the most obvious since the chant is accompanied by the national team.” ‘The issue of homophobia in football, both men’s and women’s, is a worldwide one.
  7. It is extremely difficult to eradicate.
  8. “I truly want people to believe that ‘puto’ is the objective of curses,” Doyle said.
  9. Perhaps she has a valid argument.

Mexico was eliminated from the tournament as a consequence of the following penalty, marking the team’s sixth consecutive exit from the last 16. As Doyle put it, “convince supporters that it brings bad luck to their own side” and “this farce will come to an end.”

¡Puto! Mexican soccer fans chant gay slur

Mexico’s soccer fans have carried their song, which is a homophobic slur, to the World Cup in Brazil, and have used it throughout the teams’ matches against Cameroon and Brazil, respectively. Anyone who was watching the games on television would have also heard it throughout both of Mexico’s games. ESPN has stated that it will make every effort to keep it from being heard on broadcast on Monday when Mexico takes on Croatia in a key Group A match for both sides. Kickoff is at 4 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time.

  1. Update: Regardless of how sensitive the situation was, ESPN broadcast audio of the audience yelling “puto” during the Mexico-Croatia match.
  2. The term is slang for “gay,” “man whore,” or “coward,” among other things.
  3. Andres Aradillas-Lopez, an economics professor at Penn State who was born in Mexico, expressed his displeasure with the term in an email to me: “I heard it during the Cameroon game and again today against Brazil.
  4. Every single time.
  5. Although I’ve resided in the United States for the past 15 years, I was born and raised in Mexico, where my family continues to reside.
  6. “I understand precisely what they’re talking about when they hurl that epithet.” This is something that no other country in the world does, and it would be intolerable in any American arena.
  7. “I am not homosexual, but I have always advocated for equal rights and tolerance for all people,” I said.

Therefore, there is no doubt that it is being used as a homophobic slur in this situation; there is no other way to put it.

It is as absurd as Dan Snyder and others stating that “redskin” is not a slur but rather a term of “endearment” when they are referring to their team’s homophobic rivalry.

“FIFA provides the audio for the video.” Due to the fact that we do not have particular microphones on the field, we have limited control over the audio volume.” The ” puto ” shout and its significance were known to those working at ESPN.

We are and will continue to be attentive in order to prevent such words from being broadcast over our airwaves in the future.

Because it is obvious when a goal kick is about to be taken, ESPN may use the same strategy as the other networks.

“It’s a word that has no place in soccer,” our colleagues at Gay4soccer wrote in an open letter to Major League Soccer, urging the league to take action against the usage of the term “puto.” Mike Woitalla of Soccer America stated that “teams all around the world are being penalized with financial penalties or stadium closures for racist chanting.” There have even been fines levied on those who boo during national anthems.

Nevertheless, the game’s ruling bodies, such as the FIFA, Concacaf, and Femexfut, do not seem to be concerned by this homophobic Mexican fan custom.” The usage ofputa is condemned by CONAPRED, the federal department in Mexico tasked with combating discrimination, which claims that it “reflects homophobia, sexism, and misogyny that are still pervasive in our culture.” The use of the phrase during Mexican soccer matches dates back only to 2003, making the argument that it is some sort of ancient custom ridiculous.

It is past time for homophobic and transphobic insults to be treated equally with racist slurs, and a good place to start is with the use of the term ” puto “. Update: The Football Association (FIFA) will examine homophobic remarks hurled at Brazil and Mexico fans.

Mexican soccer fans and pride marchers mingle in celebration

MEXICO CITY, Mexico (AP) – Soccer supporters gathered at Mexico’s Angel of Independence monument to commemorate the national team’s second World Cup victory, mixing with participants in the country’s annual gay pride parade, which has been criticized for anti-gay insults used during soccer matches. The Mexican team’s second consecutive triumph, a 2-1 victory over South Korea, was greeted with jubilation by the crowd, who marveled at the harmony that existed between the two celebrations. Some people carried rainbow flags.

Some people waved both hands.

“Today is a very crucial day for Mexico,” says the president.

In a message sent out on Saturday, the Mexican team applauded its fans for refraining from yelling the slur during the match against South Korea, noting that Mexico “triumphed on and off the field.” Fans use the insult, which literally translates as “man prostitute,” to divert the attention of players who are attempting to score goals.

  1. Eduardo Reyes, 24, admitted that he was originally apprehensive about attending Saturday’s gay pride activities because he was concerned that soccer supporters would swarm the parade route.
  2. “If you stop and think about it, they’re assaulting their own family.” When Reyes arrived for the march, he was dressed like a Mexican cowboy, complete with an embroidered sombrero and bolero jacket and a pair of tight boxer briefs.
  3. Mexico has made significant progress in the area of homosexual rights.
  4. However, according to a survey conducted by the National Autonomous University of Mexico in 2016, Mexico ranked second in Latin America for anti-LGBTQ offenses, after only Brazil.
  5. Crowds of soccer supporters cheered with guys dressed as samba dancers and sweet-15 princesses as they leaped for excitement.
  6. Spray foam was emitted into the atmosphere.

I was able to sense the unity among everyone,” said Renata Inurreta, 18, who rushed out onto the streets with her companions immediately following the match. “This is the core of Mexico — that we are passionate about having a good time.”

Calls for removal of fans as US team attacked with bottles and subjected to homophobic chants during Mexico game

The CONCACAF Nations League final between Mexico and the United States was abruptly delayed as the referee enforced anti-discrimination laws that had been broken by anti-gay chanting from Mexican spectators throughout the game. The players from Mexico implored with their own fans to stop the chanting. “Once again, I insist — I requested that you guys refrain from yelling,” Memo Ochoa, the Mexican goalkeeper, stated during a press conference prior of the final. A stoppage was also called in Mexico’s semifinal match versus Costa Rica because of a homophobic chant, which the Mexican soccer association has been attempting to eradicate for years but has been unsuccessful so far.

As a matter of fact, it has an impact on us,” Mr Ochoa continued.

“All of the team members are pleading with you, please, since this might have a negative impact on us in the long term,” he stated.

They also urge spectators to speak out if they hear someone yelling and to “call them out.” While the United States team emerged triumphant in an exciting game that went into overtime, Mexican supporters attacked the US squad with bottles and garbage before the game ended in a 3-2 victory for the Americans.

“There is a complete disregard for what is taking place on the pitch and for the effort that both sides are putting forth in the game.” “I think he’ll be fine, but he did take a blow to the head, and it could have been a lot worse,” US manager Gregg Berhalter said of the player.

It is unknown whether the fan was hurt or whether he was apprehended by security.

After their first offense, fans will be removed from the stadium, and their faces will be broadcast on the stadium’s jumbotron as they are escorted out.

“There will be warnings displayed on a large screen.” We don’t want to come to that stage, but if the match needs to be abandoned, it will be,” he said. “There will be detailed campaigns at the different venues,” he said.

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