What Do People Chant At Hate Rallies

When white nationalists chant their weird slogans, what do they mean?

‘You Will Not Be Able to Replace Us,’ says the author. Marchers carrying torches in Charlottesville chanted slogans such as “Blood and Soil,” “Russia is Our Friend,” and other catchphrases. White nationalists chanting in Charlottesville, Virginia, again: video 039;You Will Not Be Able to Take Our Place. 039;This video was taken by rally attendees. White nationalists wielding torches under the leadership of a Nazi “alt-right” figure In a repeat of their appearance on August 11, when a similar polo-shirt-bedecked crowd carried tiki torches to the University of Virginia, chanting a variety of slogans and far-right catchphrases, Richard Spencer and his supporters marched in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend.

A rendition of the adopted Confederate hymn, “Dixie,” was afterwards sung, as well as the cries of, “Russia is Our Friend!” and “The South Will Rise Again!” were also heard.

The rally took place eight weeks after the “Unite the Right” rally, which turned into a murderous melee the following day when an alt-right protester rammed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one and injuring a slew of others.

The marching white nationalists, like they had done at the last demonstration, yelled a variety of slogans, each with a very specific meaning to their cause, as they had done at the previous event.

Take, for example, the chants from the August 11th march on the University of Virginia campus, which are as follows: Alt-Right Demonstration Blood and Soil!039; and 039;Hail Trump!039; are chanted by marchers in Charlottesville, Virginia, in this video taken from social media sources.

  • “You will not be able to take our position!” According to Nathan Damigo, founder of the white-nationalist campus group Identity Evropa, who responded to an anti-Donald Trump “He will not divide us” campaign by actor Shia LeBeouf on social media with the following: “Shia LeBeouf, you will not replace us with your globalism,” the slogan was born. As with the white-nationalist “White Genocide” meme, the cry is a reflection of white nationalists’ beliefs that white people and white culture are under threat from multiculturalism and nonwhite races. As reported by the Anti-Defamation League, the slogan first appeared on white supremacist fliers and banners in May and has since gained widespread popularity. (At times during the first Charlottesville march, the chorus changed to “Jews Will Not Replace Us!”)
  • “Blood and Soil!” (At times during the first Charlottesville march, the chant changed to “Jews Will Not Replace Us!”)
  • This is the English translation of Nazi Germany’s most ardent song, “Blut und Boden!” It is perhaps the most distressing of all the chants heard in Charlottesville. A slogan developed by German nationalists in the nineteenth century and popularized by Nazi thinker Richard Walter Darre, the term is meant to elicit patriotic connection with one’s original national identity and is founded on anti-Semitism and racism on an extreme scale. Following World War II, it became a vital component of Adolf Hitler’s “Lebensraum”program, which sought to expand German-occupied lands and was a major element in the Holocaust. The alt-right, particularly its overtly neo-Nazi portion, has appropriated the phrase “White Lives Matter!” to stress its own nativist and eliminationist objective
  • “White Lives Matter!” Supposedly intended as a retaliation to the anti-police brutality movement This catchphrase quickly became both a slogan and the name of an outright white-supremacist movement aimed at undermining black civil rights. The movement is ostensibly “dedicated to the promotion of the white race and taking positive action as a united voice against issues facing our race,” according to its supporters. There are other neo-Nazi groups around the nation that have reformed themselves under the banner of the “WLM,” and the movement was labeled as a hate group in 2017. “Hail Trump!” they chant. It is unnecessary to explain why this slogan is used as a marching cry, but its inclusion is crucial. Donald Trump is regarded as a hero by the alt-right, with some leading figures referring to him as “Glorious Leader” and other such epithets. This is largely due to the fact that he follows their agenda and talking points, and has on numerous occasions shied away from denouncing white nationalists, most recently after the events in Charlottesville. In addition to Trump’s signature “Make America Great Again” ball hats, many of the demonstrators in Charlottesville were wearing them.

At Saturday’s event, the crowd yelled, “You Will Not Replace Us,” for the second time. Along with singing “Dixie,” the rallygoers also came together in a rendition of the unofficial song of the Confederacy, which was a nod to their ties with the far right neo-Confederate movement (as well as the fact that the rally occurred at the base of the statue of General Robert E. Lee, slated for removal by Charlottesville city officials, the focus of the alt-right protests). Soon, a number of different chants could be heard, including:

  • “Russia is one of our closest allies!” With open adoration for Russia’s authoritarian strongman ruler, Vladimir Putin, and the nationalist agenda he has supported both in Europe and the United States, the alt-right has been shameless in its open admiration for him. The Russian dictatorship, which has also played a significant role in funding far-right movements in Europe, has well-documented relationships with a number of alt-right individuals, including Spencer, according to the Washington Post. According to subsequent revelations following the 2016 election, Russia’s propaganda machine worked in close collaboration with the alt-right in disseminating its ideas and memes through social media during the campaign
  • “The South Will Rise Again!” was one of the most popular. This slogan, which reflects the alt-neo-Confederate right’s sympathies, dates back to the post-Civil War era, when the apologist”Lost Cause”revision of the war’s history was in full swing, leading to the widespread (and incorrect) belief that the war was primarily about “states rights” rather than slavery
  • The same movement, which was primarily active around the turn of the 19 thcentury, was also responsible for the construction of many The “Lost Cause” philosophy continues to be popular among neo-Confederates
  • “Harry Potter Isn’t Real!” is a common refrain. This seemingly strange chant, which in many ways reflects the alt-mastery right’s of popular culture, is directed at white nationalists’ hostility towards multiculturalism, as the underlying thesis of J.K. Rowling’s massively popular youth-fantasy series is about combating prejudice, both racial and otherwise, as the underlying thesis of the series is about combating prejudice, both racial and otherwise. In alt-right internet communities, the Potter novels are routinely criticized for allegedly brainwashing youngsters, and the books themselves are frequently assaulted. Furthermore, Rowling herself has been especially active on social media, denouncing both the alt-right and politicians affiliated with it, including Donald Trump
  • “We Will Be Back!” she has said on her Twitter account. Another chant that is fairly self-explanatory — and maybe the most terrifying of them

Deconstructing the symbols and slogans spotted in Charlottesville

Navigation is not available. With them, when white nationalists arrived on Charlottesville to hold their annual demonstration, they carried with them shouts, banners, derogatory epithets, shields, and other symbols of white supremacy.

In addition to anti-fascist organizations and local citizens, religious and civil rights organizations and leaders also participated in the demonstrations with their own emblems and chants. Each of the icons seen has its own political background and history, which you can read about here.

Symbols

Symbols on exhibit varied from precise reproductions of the Confederate flag to altered versions of the logos of several National Hockey League teams and organizations. Some have been around since the Crusades, while others were created in the wake of President Trump’s inauguration in January 2017. Far-right organizations were typically highly organized, with many marching in group uniforms and carrying shields, as was the case for others marching alongside them. Those who protested in opposition were less consistent in their branding than those who supported them.

Far-right white nationalists

It is believed that the National Socialist Movement has its origins in the American Nazi Party, which was created in 1959 and is affiliated with the Southern Poverty Law Center. As the most active neo-Nazi group in America, the National Socialist Movement publicly reveres Adolf Hitler and its members frequently demonstrate in Nazi uniforms, complete with swastika armbands, on the streets of major cities. More information may be found here.

Detroit Red Wings logo

A 1959 founding member of the American Nazi Party is credited with establishing the National Socialist Movement, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. As the most active neo-Nazi group in America, the National Socialist Movement publicly reveres Adolf Hitler and its members frequently demonstrate in Nazi uniforms, complete with swastika armbands, in support of the Nazi Party. More information may be found at.

Valknot

It is believed that this “knot of the slain” is a “Old Norse emblem that frequently depicted the afterlife in carvings and decorations,” as stated by the Anti-Defamation League. White nationalists that use the emblem for racial purposes also use it to symbolize that they are prepared to offer their lives to the Norse deity Odin, generally in combat, as part of their commitment to the cause. In other instances, the emblem is also employed by pagans who are not racists. More information may be found here.

Kekistan

In the words of the Anti-Defamation League, this “knot of the slain” is “an Old Norse emblem that was frequently used to depict the afterlife in carvings and decorations.” White nationalists that use the emblem for racial purposes also use it to symbolize that they are prepared to offer their lives to the Norse deity Odin, generally in combat, as part of their commitment to the religion. Others, nonracist pagans, have also made use of the emblem in different circumstances. More information may be found at.

Vanguard America logo

According to the Anti-Defamation League, Vanguard America utilizes the right-wing nationalist phrase “blood and soil,” which promotes the belief that individuals who have “white blood” are particularly related to “American land,” as opposed to persons who have “colored blood.” Hitler’s Nazis adopted the term, which originated in Germany and was known as “blut and boden,” to describe blood and soil.

Originally, Vanguard America adhered to a rigid alt-right worldview, yet the group has since deepened its relationships with neo-Nazis and other far-right groups. More information may be found here.

Confederate flag

According to the American Defense League, a number of banners were flown by the South and its armies throughout the Civil War, but the battle flag was the one most closely identified with the Confederacy. Historically, the flag has been used as a representation of Southern history, slavery, and white supremacy. It has survived as a symbol of white supremacy that is recognized around the world. More information may be found here.

Deus Vult

According to the American Defense League, a number of flags were flown by the South and its armies throughout the Civil War, with the battle flag being the one best identified with the Confederacy. Slavery, racial supremacy, and the history of the South were all represented by the flag. Despite this, white racists all around the world use it as a rallying emblem. More information may be found at.

Southern nationalist flag

A former member of the Neo-Confederate League of the South, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, was responsible for the design. In rare occasions, it is flown in conjunction with the Confederate battle banner. More information may be found here.

Identity Evropa flag

In addition, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, Identity Evropa is modeled after European Identitarian groups and focuses on recruiting white, college-aged students to argue “race realism” and concerns that are exclusive to white interests, among other things. As part of its recruitment strategies, the organization also promotes itself as a fraternity and social club. More information may be found here.

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Iron Cross

In accordance with the American Defense League, the Iron Cross is a well-known German military award that initially debuted in the 19th century. A swastika was overlaid on the metal in the 1930s by the Nazi dictatorship in Germany, turning it become an emblem of the regime. Although the medal’s use was mostly ended after World War II, it continues to be popular with neo-Nazis and other white supremacists in the United States. More information may be found here.

Sonnenrad

It was initially awarded in the 19th century, according to the ADL, and is a well-known German military medal today. A swastika was overlaid on the metal in the 1930s by the Nazi dictatorship in Germany, making it an emblem of the regime. It is still in use by neo-Nazis and other white supremacists today, despite the fact that it was mostly phased out after World War II. More information may be found at.

Traditionalist Worker Party

The Traditionalist Worker Party (TWP) was created in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 2015. As expressed in their tagline, “local solutions to the globalized dilemma,” the organization contends that the blending together of countries and their economy is damaging to ethnically homogeneous societies. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the group is also a supporter of “identitarianism,” which pushes for “culturally and racially homogeneous communities.” In addition, the organization is overtly anti-Semitic.

Bonnie Blue flag

According to the Republic of West Florida Historical Museum, the Bonnie Blue flag was initially flown in Baton Rouge in 1810 as a show of defiance against Spanish control and was never formally accepted by the Confederate government during the American Civil War. However, it became identified with the Confederacy as a result of the popular Confederate song “The Bonnie Blue Flag,” which was written by an Irish-born actor after witnessing the flag being hoisted outside Mississippi’s capital building when the state announced its independence from the Union in 1861.

The Punisher

Researchers at the ADL were unable to determine exactly what this skull emblem represented, although it appears to be a variant on the insignia of this Marvel Comics superhero. Defense and law enforcement agencies, as well as anti-government militia organizations such as the Three Percenters, regularly employ the Punisher emblem.

Counterprotestors

Refuse Immediately following Trump’s election, the fascist movement gathered together under the cry “No! In the name of humanity, we refuse to accept a fascist America!” The word “No!” that appears on posters – which was initially printed in black and white – is a reduced form of the original sentence. According to the group, more than 140,000 posters have been printed to this date. More information may be found here.

Pan-African flag

The Universal Negro Improvement Association, which held its inaugural convention in New York City in 1920, was the organization that officially approved the Pan-African flag. According to NPR, Marcus Garvey, the chairman of the United Nations Interim Authority on Human Rights, had long advocated for the adoption of a black liberation flag, which he saw as a symbol of political maturity. The color red on the flag depicts the blood poured by Africans who died in the struggle for their freedom, while the color black represents the color of skin and the color green represents the development and natural fertility of Africa.

NO H8 sign

A convention held in New York City in 1920 was the first time that the Pan-African flag was accepted by the Universal Negro Improvement Association. According to NPR, Marcus Garvey, the chairman of the United Nations Interim Authority on Human Rights, had long advocated for the adoption of a black liberation flag, which he saw as a symbol of progressive political maturity. Black denotes the color of skin, while crimson depicts the blood spilt by Africans who died in the struggle for their emancipation, and green represents Africa’s inherent fertility and development.

Slogans

The far-right organizations who marched on Friday and Saturday sang chants that have been around for a long time. Here’s what they had to say in greater detail:

Far-right white nationalists

Marching on Friday and Saturday, far-right organizations used chants that have been around for decades. What they had to say was as follows:

Far-right white nationalists

The far-right organizations marching on Friday and Saturday sang slogans that have been around for a long time. Here’s what they had to say in further detail:

Far-right white nationalists

In his analysis of the “white lives matter” movement, Keegan Hankes of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project described it as a “full response” to the “Black Lives Matter” campaign. According to him, “It’s a casual manner, a rhetorical style that they employ in an attempt to convey the argument that we don’t hate other people, we just love our own people.” “It’s like an old white nationalist tactic, isn’t it?” says the author. “We’re just sticking up for our people,” they’re attempting to explain.

In addition, “a lot of stuff was done to attract attention,” he added.

In addition, they are aware that, given the heated atmosphere around those rallies, their actions would be contentious, which is kind of at the core of what these groups do, which is to stir up controversy in order to get an outsized presence in the media.” Hankes said that there is also an organization called “White Lives Matter.” White Lives Matter, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center’s website, is a “racist response” to the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as a “neo-Nazi group that is expanding into a national movement.” According to the company’s website, it was established in 2015.

Black Lives Matter movement

In his analysis of the “white lives matter” campaign, Keegan Hankes of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project said it was a “total response” to the Black Lives Matter movement. According to him, “It’s a casual manner, a rhetorical style that they employ in an attempt to convey the argument that we don’t hate other people, we simply love our own,” This is a classic white nationalist ruse, isn’t it?” says the author. “We’re just sticking up for our people,” they’re attempting to explain their actions.

His motivation for doing so, he explained, was “to get noticed.” “They were well aware that it would garner attention and provide them with some optics or a hook to get people to attend their rallies.

A organization called “White Lives Matter” is also active, according to Hankes, who added that White Lives Matter, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center’s website, is a “racist response” to the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as a “neo-Nazi organization that is expanding into a movement.

All the Chants I Heard at Saturday’s Anti-Trump Protest in NYC, Ranked

On November 12, 2016, anti-Trump demonstrators marched along Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. Photograph courtesy of L.V. Anderson/Slate The perfect protest chant is succinct, percussive, and conveys a strong message. I was at the anti-Trump demonstration in New York City on Saturday afternoon, which marched between Union Square and Trump Tower, and many of the slogans I heard did not fulfill those requirements. When a huge number of individuals come together to express their displeasure with a single individual, it is natural that their interests will differ.

  • However, when individuals with a variety of interests get together to achieve a common purpose, they must first choose what they want to express with their combined voices.
  • On the other hand, there are certain tried-and-true phrases that, with a little tweaking, can be made to work in our contemporary political environment.
  • “Secure him up!” says number twenty-five.
  • At the very least, anti-Trump demonstrators should agree on one point: we do not advocate imprisoning our political adversaries for political reasons.
  • Maybe.
  • “You’ve been fired, Donald!” says number 24.
  • In order to maintain meter, the speaker must emphasize “–ald,” which is odd.
  • Pussies are unable to grasp.
  • However, even if they were able to do so, they would be foolish to “grab back,” since we should not descend to Trump’s level.

If that’s the case, I’d like not to be reduced to my genitals.) “My hands are too little!” “It’s impossible to construct a wall!” I’ve also heard a variation of this song in which the word “hands” was substituted with the word “dick.” Let’s stop from making fun of people’s physical qualities for the time being, shall we?

  • A call-and-response chant that lacks a clear antecedent requires improvement.
  • Okay, I get what you’re attempting to do here!
  • Perhaps if you put it in a whole statement, such as “We!
  • A Popular Vote,” it might be a bit higher on this list of the most ridiculous phrases.
  • Eh.
  • “Donald Trump!” exclaims the audience.
  • “You’re racist, sexist, and anti-gay!” Is anyone seriously believing that yelling a chant that closely resembles a nursery rhyme about the weather would cause Donald Trump to “go away”?

Protestors should stand up on behalf of those who have no voice, rather than berating them for being silent.

To be quite honest, I’m divided about the whole “not my president” thing.

On the other hand, he will truly be your president in the near future.

“I’m in love!” No, not hatred!

14.

Ho, ho, ho!

Even if you despise the chant formula, it will never go out of style.

Reject!

“We have a new president!” Compared to “Not my president!” this is a major improvement.

12.

Possibly a touch too succinct—the wait between the call and a response causes this chant to drag on quite a bit on occasion.

“There will be no fascist USA!” With an irrefutable message and a catchy beat that has built-in momentum, this song is a surefire hit.

10.

It is impossible for us to be beaten!” The above statement may be a tad overly optimistic.

“Make sure you pay your taxes!” This one speaks for itself.

And in terms of cadence, you can’t do much better than three words with only one syllable each.

This tagline does an excellent job of accomplishing that goal.

Perhaps the most effective three-word policy suggestion available.

“Black lives are important!” A simple phrase that is powerful and uplifting, as well as becoming increasingly relevant in a society where hate speech and hate crimes are on the rise.

“Muslim rights are human rights!” says the author.

The third option is “My body, my choice!” vs “Her body, her decision!” With Trump threatening to pick Supreme Court judges who would overturn Roe v.

I also enjoy the fact that ladies shout the call and men chant the response, which gives the impression that a protest is a large musical number, which is something I appreciate.

“There is no justice!” / “There is no peace!” Another important goal of a demonstration in this post-election, pre-inauguration period should be to send a message to Trump and his cronies that we will not simply sit back and allow them to violate our civil freedoms.

The following sentences are examples of “Show me what democracy looks like!” and “This is what democracy looks like!” Through the use of a syncopated rhythm, the meta-chant draws attention to the essentially patriotic character of protesting and serves as a reminder to onlookers that democracy is nothing without the freedom to peaceful assembly.

Some racist, homophobic chants in Charlottesville may not be protected under 1st Amendment

According to the First Amendment, it is unquestionably legal for Americans to express racist, offensive, and unpopular viewpoints; this is a privilege that has been maintained on several occasions by the United States Supreme Court. Nonetheless, when right-wing marchers in Charlottesville, Virginia, began yelling racist and gay epithets at particular individuals last weekend, they may have crossed a line. Although it is a hazy area of constitutional law, numerous legal experts have suggested that the white nationalists may have over the line into what is known as unprotected speech this week.

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Fighting words, according to the Court, are “those that, by their very utterance, cause damage or seek to instigate an instant breach of the peace.” Given that Saturday’s demonstration descended into violence, including in the murder of one counterprotester, it’s critical to examine the role that rhetoric may have had in igniting the violence and whether it was allowed by the First Amendment in the first place.

While the general anti-Semitic and anti-immigrant rants did not escalate to fighting words, free speech experts feel right-wing protestors may have gone too far when they named individual people “ni**ers” or “faggots” during the demonstration.

A reasonable person would be justified in retaliating.

According to Robert O’Neill, a well-known First Amendment scholar and former director of the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression at the University of Virginia, “the most extreme of last weekend’s outrageous utterances in Charlottesville would be easy to deem unprotected.” O’Neill is a former director of the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression at the University of Virginia (the campus where demonstrators rallied Friday night).

When demonstrators went too far

According to the First Amendment, it is unquestionably legal for Americans to express racist, offensive, and unpopular viewpoints; this is a privilege that has been maintained on several occasions by the United States Supreme court. In Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend, right-wing protestors took things too far when they began yelling racist and homophobic obscenities directed at specific individuals. Although it is a hazy area of constitutional law, some legal experts have stated this week that the white nationalists may have over the line into what is known as unprotected expression.

Fighting words, according to the Court, are “those that, by their very utterance, inflict damage or seek to instigate an imminent breach of peace.” Given that Saturday’s gathering devolved into violence, including in the murder of one counterprotester, it’s critical to examine the role that language may have had in igniting the violence and if it was protected under the Constitution.

Due to the fact that the protestors’ slogans were part of a political event, some experts believe it will be difficult to determine who was targeted by the slurs.

What the lower courts think

While the Supreme Court frequently rules in favor of free speech claims in such situations, lower courts have sustained a slew of findings that particular language is not protected by the First Amendment in such circumstances. And some of those rulings involved the use of racist slurs that were similar to those in this case. As an illustration, Hudson cites the following instances in which state courts have determined that specific language is not protected under the fighting words doctrine: It was determined in 1999 by an appeals court in Minnesota that calling a police officer a white, racist “motherfucker” and wishing his mother would die was not protected by the First Amendment.

  • Hubbard) affirmed by the Minnesota Court of Appeals in 2001, a man who frequently flashed vulgar hand gestures to a young female driver was not engaging in protected speech.
  • Using derogatory terms like “whore,” “harlot,” and “Jezebel” to describe a naked lady on the beach was not protected speech in Wisconsin, according to an appeals court ruling in 2003.
  • According to the defendant’s counsel, using the n-word is not a criminal offense.
  • There is no sign that demonstrators in Charlottesville would take the free speech problems to court, but the legal precedent exists to argue that some racial and homophobic slurs are not protected by the First Amendment under specific circumstances.

‘Blood and soil’: Protesters chant Nazi slogan in Charlottesville

  • While the Supreme Court frequently rules in favor of free speech claims in such instances, lower courts have supported a slew of findings that specific language is not protected by the First Amendment in such situations. In addition to using racist slurs, some of those rulings did as well. As examples of when state courts have determined that specific language is not protected under the fighting words concept, Hudson provides the following: It was determined in 1999 by an appeals court in Minnesota that calling a police officer a white, racist “motherfucker” and wishing his mother would die were not protected by the First Amendment. According to a judgement (State v. Hubbard) affirmed by an appeals court in Minnesota in 2001, a man who frequently flashed vulgar hand gestures at a young female driver was not engaging in protected speech. In the same year, an appeals court in Arizona ruled that a man’s use of the n-word and throwing an empty Mountain Dew can at a black woman on the street did not constitute free speech. When a naked lady was called a “whore,” “harlot,” and “Jezebel” on the beach, a Wisconsin appeals court found that the words were not protected speech under the First Amendment. Earlier this year, a North Dakota court affirmed an earlier decision against a youngster who used the n-word against a black female at a teen dance and then again at a restaurant in 2009. An counsel for the defendant asserted that using the n-word is not illegal. According to the court, while the use of the slur is protected under the First Amendment, “an objectively reasonable person would conclude that the totality of statements constituted explicit and implicit threats that were likely to incite a breach of the peace or violent reaction and alarm the listener,” the court stated. There is no sign that demonstrators in Charlottesville would take the free speech problems to court, but the legal precedent exists to argue that some racial and homophobic comments were not protected by the First Amendment in specific circumstances.

(CNN) A rallying cry from the Nazi movement has been used by certain white supremacists and right-wing protestors in Charlottesville, Virginia, according to reports. Some of the demonstrators may be seen on video yelling “blood and dirt,” which is a slogan that refers to the Nazi doctrine of “Blut und Boden.” As part of its emphasis on ethnic identity being only based on blood ancestry and the place in which a person resides, the ideology also lauded German rural farmers and peasants as virtuous citizens of Germany.

  1. Robert E.
  2. The “blood and soil” chanting began Friday night as torch-bearing protestors marched through Charlottesville and battled with counter-protesters at the University of Virginia.
  3. The expression may be traced back to the early days of Nazi propagandists.
  4. They were extolled for their contribution to German society: those with a long family history in Germany (blood), as well as those who cared for their land (soil), played an important part in sustaining the state.

“That should not only imply that agricultural romanticism should be encouraged, but that the laws of blood and soil should be given high importance in order to establish their point of reference.” It was the Nazis’ blood and soil ideology that many rural farmers associated with, and it fostered a great feeling of national pride in poorer and agricultural groups.

“In Germany, there are no Jewish construction workers, no Jewish smiths, no Jewish miners, and no Jewish seafarers.

On the basis of this piece of propaganda, German farmers were forced into “poor and despair” as a result of Jewish merchants taking their land. Both the phrases “blood and dirt” and “Blut und Boden” are now considered hate slogans by the Anti-Defamation League.

Trump rally crowd chants ‘send her back’ after president attacks Ilhan Omar

(CNN) In Charlottesville, Virginia, some white nationalists and right-wing protesters have used a Nazi rallying cry to rally their supporters. Demonstrators are heard yelling “blood and dirt,” which refers to the Nazi doctrine of “Blut und Boden.” Video footage shows some of the demonstrators chanting the slogan. Rural farmers and peasants were exalted as good Germans, according to the ideology, which underlined that ethnic identification was based only on blood ancestry and the place in which an individual lived.

  • Robert E.
  • Friday night, protesters carrying torches marched through Charlottesville and clashed with counterprotestors, prompting the start of the “blood and soil” chants.
  • In Nazi propaganda, the slogan may be traced back to the very beginnings.
  • They were extolled for their contribution to German society: those with a long family history in Germany (blood), as well as those who cared for their land (soil), played an important part in the state’s support.

“That should not just imply that agricultural romanticism should be encouraged, but that the laws of blood and soil should be given high attention in order to provide a reference point.” It was the Nazis’ blood and soil rhetoric that many rural farmers identified with, and it instilled a strong sense of national pride in poorer and agricultural communities.

“It is impossible to find Jewish construction workers or smiths in Germany, and there are no Jewish miners or mariners in Germany.

On the basis of this piece of propaganda, German farmers were forced into “poor and despair” by Jewish businessmen who had taken their land.

What did Trump say in his racist ‘go back’ tweets?

Show In a series of tweets on July 14, Trump said, “It is fascinating to see ‘Progressive’ Democratic Congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world (if they even have a functioning government at all), now loudly and viciously telling the people of the United States, the greatest and most powerful Nation on earth, how our government is to be run.” Why don’t they return to their own countries and assist in repairing the completely damaged and crime-infested environments from which they came?

Then come back and demonstrate how it’s done for us.

I’m confident that Nancy Pelosi would be delighted to work out complimentary travel arrangements as soon as possible!” Even though the president of the United States did not identify his targets, the assault was aimed at Democratic representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota.

As a result, Trump has launched a series of further assaults on the congresswoman, accusing her of employing “offensive language, racism, and bigotry.” On the 16th of July, he tweeted that they had been arrested “The Democratic Party gives them a free pass and a warm welcome despite their uttering some of the most horrible, hatred-filled, and repulsive statements ever made by a legislator in either the House or the Senate.

The F-word was screamed incessantly, among other things, by anti-Israel, anti-USA, and pro-terrorist protesters.” As part of his “go home” message, Trump tweeted, “IF YOU ARE NOT HAPPY HERE, YOU CAN LEAVE!” Trump’s “go home” tweets were prompted by testimony from two Democratic congresswomen who testified before a House committee about inhumane conditions they witnessed while touring migrant detention facilities in Texas.

  1. The House of Representatives passed a resolution condemning Trump’s statements.
  2. “Let them go,” Trump remarked in reference to the members of Congress.
  3. What’s more, you know what?
  4. He closed with a “leave it” chant from the audience, which joined in.
  5. The “lock her up” shout was led by Trump’s then campaign adviser Michael Flynn at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, in 2016.
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Since the 2016 campaign, at least three former Trump aides have been imprisoned, including Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, his former adviser Michael Cohen, and his former adviser George Papadopoulos, while others, including Flynn and Trump’s former adviser Rick Gates, have pleaded guilty to federal felonies in federal court.

Donald Trump refused to use three separate names, saying, “I don’t have time.” “We’re going to call her Cortez.” There is an excessive amount of time. “It takes an excessive amount of time.” a Quick Reference Guide

Who are the four congresswomen known as “The Squad”?

Show Ayanna Pressley is a resident of Massachusetts. While a firebrand, Pressley is also considered to be the most moderate member of “The Squad.” Pressley became the first black congresswoman to represent Massachusetts when she defeated a 20-year incumbent (and fellow progressive) to win a seat in a district that had previously been represented by President John F. Kennedy. Pressley has made the humanitarian situation on the southern border, as well as the severe conditions in which migrants are imprisoned, his primary concerns.

  • An oft-repeated phrase is that “the people closest to the suffering should be the ones closest to the power.” It was Pressley who said that they would “not be silenced.” Ilhan Omar is a Minnesota congresswoman.
  • She wears a hijab, which has prompted a modification in the regulations regarding headgear in Congress.
  • She became a citizen of the United States in 2000, when she was seventeen years old.
  • His criticism of Israel’s treatment of Palestinians has been outspoken, with Omar referring to its leadership as a “apartheid Israeli dictatorship”.
  • In her family of 14 children, Tlaib is the first to graduate from high school and college.
  • She was a member of the Michigan state legislature, where she was well-known for stirring up a storm of controversy.
  • “We’re going to go in there and we’re going to impeach the motherfucker,” Tlaib said to a group of progressives shortly after being elected to Congress.
  • With her victory over a 10-term Democratic incumbent in New York’s 14th congressional district last November, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez became the youngest woman ever elected to Congress and the most well-known of the four candidates.
  • Her first legislative initiative, the Green New Deal resolution to tackle global warming and poverty, prompted 2020 presidential hopefuls to prioritize the climate catastrophe as one of their top priorities.
  • Helmore is a fictional character created by author Edward Helmore in the 1960s.
  • New York is the capital of the United States.

In a tweet, former head of the United States Office of Government Ethics under President Barack Obama Walter Shaub said, “The racist crowd chanting’send her back’ tonight is noteworthy.” In the words of pundit David Gergen on CNN, a former member of the Nixon and previous Republican administrations, “when you outdo Nixon in repulsiveness, you’ve come a long way.” “‘SEND HER BACK, SEND HER BACK,’ is an obnoxious phrase.

  1. It’s a misunderstanding.
  2. “On top of that, it’s un-American.
  3. And every Republican should reject this racism as soon as it is brought to light.
  4. On Wednesday night, a number of Democratic leaders, including Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, and Elizabeth Warren, rushed to Omar’s defense.

Beto O’Rourkes, a fellow Democratic presidential candidate, said the chanting were “the consequence of a president who views our diversity not as a strength, but as a vulnerability.”

We Shall Overcome

On September 2, 1957, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. paid a visit to Highlander Folk School in Tennessee, where he was the keynote speaker. In order to assist civil rights activists in challenging unfair laws and racial practices that discriminated against African Americans, the school’s objective included assisting in the preparation of such workers. Blacks and whites were brought together at the school to exchange their experiences and learn from one another, which was a priority for the administration.

  1. A time when southern laws kept blacks and whites segregated or separated, some white racists attacked African Americans with lethal violence throughout the Reconstruction era.
  2. King gave the major address that day, which commemorated the school’s 25th anniversary and was presented in English and Spanish.
  3. He pulled out a song that he had learnt at Highlander and led the audience in singing it as a result.
  4. King found himself singing the song in his head.

The Civil Rights Movement

The song in question was “We Shall Overcome.” It quickly rose to prominence as the Civil Rights Movement’s song during the 1950s and 1960s. In the face of bigotry and hatred in the struggle for equal rights for African Americans, it provided bravery, comfort, and hope to those who participated. Pete Seeger is a folk singer from the United States. “We Shall Overcome” has a long and illustrious history, with contributions from a wide range of individuals and locations. It appears that a portion of the tune is derived from two European hymns from the 1700s, “Prayer of the Sicilian Mariners” and “O Sanctissima,” respectively.

  • In around 1900, it appears that the lyrics of another gospel hymn, “I’ll Overcome Someday,” written by the Methodist clergyman and musician Reverend Dr.
  • Atron Twigg and Kenneth Morris, two gospel arrangers, are credited with putting together the foundational elements of the now-famous words and tune sometime about 1945.
  • While picketing, African American women striking for a salary rise to 30 cents an hour sang to draw attention to their cause.
  • However, she instilled a tremendous sense of togetherness into the song by replacing the pronoun “I” to “We” as they sang together.
  • Simmons carried the song to Highlander Folk School in 1947, where he shared it with other labor activists who were also present.
  • The lines “We will” were changed to “We shall” at some time in the career of the nationally renowned folk singer.
  • According to Seeger, who spoke about the song in a subsequent interview, “It’s the brilliance of simplicity.” “Any…
  • Protesters sung it while they marched for the right to vote in the United States.
  • People all around the United States and the rest of the globe were outraged by the news and images of savagery.
  • Slowly and steadily, more and more Americans of all races came to acknowledge the legitimacy of the civil rights movement.
  • The new rule prohibited racial discrimination in public places such as schools, restaurants, theaters, and hotels.

President Lyndon B. Johnson, a southerner from Texas, signed the monumental legislation into law on August 6, 1964, marking the beginning of the modern era. The following is an excerpt from his special speech before Congress, in which he utilized the title of the song to express his beliefs:

“This great, rich, restless country can offer opportunity and education and hope to all: black and white, North and South, sharecropper and city dweller. These are the enemies: poverty, ignorance, disease. They are the enemies and not our fellow man, not our neighbor. And these enemies too, poverty, disease and ignorance, we shall overcome.”

“We Shall Overcome,” as the song was titled. Later, it became the Civil Rights Movement’s national song during the 1950s and 1960s. In the face of bigotry and hatred in the struggle for equal rights for African Americans, it provided bravery, solace, and hope to the protestors. The folk singer Pete Seeger was born on this day in 1927 in New York City and raised in the Bronx, New York, United States. It has been a long time since the song “We Shall Overcome” was written, and it has received contributions from many different individuals and locations.

  • In around 1900, it appears that the lyrics of another gospel hymn, “I’ll Overcome Someday,” written by the Methodist pastor and musician Reverend Dr.
  • Atron Twigg and Kenneth Morris, two gospel arrangers, are credited with putting together the foundational elements of the song’s lyrics and melody, which became renowned in 1945.
  • During their picket line, African American women striking for a salary rise of 30 cents an hour sung songs in support of their campaign.
  • They sang as a group, and she gave the song a tremendous feeling of togetherness by transforming the word “I” into the word “We.” Some other lyrics were improvised for pro-union objectives, such as “We will organize,” “We will win our rights,” and “We will win this war,” among others.
  • Zilphia Horton, the leader of the school’s cultural program, had learnt it and then passed it on to Pete Seeger, who had later learned it from her.
  • At many civil rights demonstrations, including sit-ins, marching demonstrations, and large-scale rallies, “We Shall Overcome” proven to be a simple song to learn and sing.
  • idiot has the potential to become complex.” As the Civil Rights Movement gathered steam, the song spread like wildfire around the globe.
  • When they were beaten up, attacked by police dogs, and carried off to jail for violating segregation laws, they sang it while they were beaten and taken off.
  • The year was 1964, and Martin Luther King Jr.
  • It took almost a century after the American Civil War forced the abolition of slavery before Congress finally passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
  • A southerner from Texas, President Lyndon B.

Johnson, signed the momentous legislation into law on August 6, 1964, marking the beginning of the civil rights movement. The following is an excerpt from his special speech before Congress, in which he utilized the title of the song to clarify his beliefs:

Polish anti-vaccine protesters chant Jews are to blame for the COVID-19 pandemic

WARSAW, Poland (JTA) — Several rallygoers in Glogow, Poland, screamed that Jews are to accountable for the COVID-19 epidemic and agreed that Jews “control the globe,” according to the Associated Press. On Sunday, over 100 protesters marched through the streets of the city in western Poland, expressing their opposition to vaccination and “sanitary segregation,” which refers to restrictions on unvaccinated individuals. “We know who is behind this entire ‘plandemic,'” one of the march’s leaders stated, hinting that he believes the pandemic is a hoax and that it is part of a “plan” to destroy Poland’s economy.

“Do you know who has a grudge towards Poles?

Another marcher responded with the word “Jews.” Sign up for The Times of Israel’s Daily Edition by email and you’ll never miss out on any of our top news.

An anonymous source stated that Jews will “request for our properties,” referring to the ongoing dispute over Holocaust property restitution, which Poland’s right-wing government is striving to keep under control.

This month, the All-Polish Youth organization, which includes people from all around Poland, left trash outside Israel’s embassy in Warsaw.

Prof.

The author stated on Twitter that “we live in times when such individuals don’t even bother to hide themselves.” “This is a textbook kind of antisemitism,” said the Central Europe Office of the American Jewish Committee in a Twitter post.

In their demonstration, they demonstrated that police did not respond to anti-Semitic chants, but did respond when some of the people began kicking a police car.

A total of two of them were under the influence of alcoholic beverages.

Last week, the right-wing nationalist Konfederacja Party, which has 11 seats in Poland’s lower house of parliament, aired a video of Polish model Samuela Górska on its official social media sites, in which she expresses her dissatisfaction with Jews as being a part of the country.

According to a survey conducted in 2018, 85 percent of Polish Jews think that antisemitism is a big problem in their country.. This article was written with the assistance of Times of Israel employees.

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