What Do People Chant Before People Fight Movie

The Lyrics to “Stand Up” from the Harriet Tubman Movie Feature Her Very Last Words

  • In cinemas now is the Harriet Tubman movie, starring Cynthia Erivo and Leslie Odom Jr.
  • The film follows Tubman throughout her escape from slavery, as she leads the Underground Railroad and eventually becomes, well, an American icon
  • Data-vars-ga-product-id=”ddab04e7-44bf-408c-badf-26dbf98b4edd” data-vars-ga-product-price=”0.00″ data-vars-ga-product-sem3-brand=”” data-vars-ga-product-sem3-category=”” data-vars-ga-product-id=””> Raise Your Hands, “a song that plays at the end credits of a film The following is the meaning behind the words of the song. ” data-vars-ga-product-id=”ddab04e7-44bf-408c-badf-26dbf98b4edd” data-vars-ga-product-price=”0.00″ data-vars-ga-product-sem3-brand=”” data-vars-ga-product-sem3-category=”” data-vars-ga-product-sem3-id “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized It’s also included in the film’s soundtrack, which is now available for purchase.

” data-vars-ga-product-id=”ddab04e7-408c-badf-26dbf98b4edf” data-vars-ga-product-price=”0.00″ data-vars-ga-product-sem3-brand=”” data vars-ga product price=”0.00″ data vars-ga product-price=”0.00″ data vars ga price=” What’s the harm in trying? The 32-year-old actress and singer began her professional career on Broadway, where she won a Tony Award for Best Lead Actress in a Musical for her role as Celie in The Color Purple, a production that also garnered a Grammy nomination for its cast. Additionally, Erivo collaborated with Joshuah Brian Campbell to create “Stand Up,” a song that plays over the film’s credits in addition to portraying Harriet Tubman, who is the film’s title character.

So, what is the connection between the music and her story?

During a chorus, Erivo sings, “While the clouds roll back, and the stars fill the night / that’s when I’m going to stand up, take my people with me / together we are going to a brand new home, far across the river /Can you hear freedom calling?

With every fiber of her being, she manages to do it with the same amount of passion and conviction that she takes to her performance as Harriet Tubman.

According to Erivo’s interview with OprahMag.com, music played a significant role in her preparation for the role, and the songs that inspired her surely influenced “Stand Up.” “I would look for portions of music by various performers to help me get through any melancholy.” To be more specific, Erivo stated that the song “Good Goodbye” by Lianne La Havas (with the lyrics, “Everybody raise a glass, oh, here’s to a good goodbye”) assisted her in preparation for a scene in which Tubman’s sister dies.

  • That song has a certain quality to it that speaks to grief, and it was able to transport me straight to where I needed to be.” This material has been downloaded from YouTube.
  • ” Johnny and Donna,” by Mali Music, was another song she utilized, particularly the chorus: “How, how, how, how, how, how, how, how.” When and where should I do it?
  • Life is full of unexpected turns.
  • Twirls are the way of the world, and they will turn your world upside down.
  • It starts to spiral out of control.
  • Because you never know what’s going to happen.
  • Erivo opted to collaborate with Campbell on “Stand Up” after witnessing his 2018 performance of his original song ” Sing Out, March On ” at the Harvard Commencement ceremony commemorating congressman John Lewis, which inspired him to do so.

Throughout the film, Harriet’s top concern is to win freedom for herself and everyone around her, and the song “Stand Up” conveys the idea that you should never give up, even if you are alone in your struggle.

Fill in the blanks with your response.

Visiting their website may allow you to access the same stuff in a different format, or it may provide you with even more information than you could get elsewhere.

This material has been downloaded from YouTube.

And here are the lyrics to the song, courtesy of the website genius.com.

I have a burden on my shoulders and a bullet in my rifle.

I do what I can for my people when I can and for as long as I can.

I’m bringing my entourage with me.

Is it possible to heed the cry of freedom?

I can feel it in my bones that I have to keep on truckin’.

As you can see, I’m wading through murky waters, but I’ve made up my mind about it.

So I’m going to stand up and fight.

We are all moving together to a fresh new home across the river.

I’m getting a call and I have to answer it.

And I’m well aware of what’s around the corner.

As the night sky fills with stars, you can be sure that Take a step forward I’m bringing my entourage with me.

Is it possible to heed the cry of freedom?

Continue on with your life; I’m going to stand up.

We are all moving together to a fresh new home across the river.

I’m getting a call and I have to answer it.

I’m bringing my entourage with me.

Can you hear freedom beckoning from across the river?

I can feel it in my bones that I have to keep on truckin’.

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Fight the Power: The most provocative song ever

It’s not unexpected thatCynthia Erivocontributed a song to” data-vars-ga-product-id=”ddab04e7-44bf-408c-badf-26dbf98b4edd” data-vars-ga-product-price=”0.00″ data-vars-ga-product-sem3-brand=”” data-vars-ga-product-sem3-cate What’s the harm in experimenting? For her portrayal as Celie in The Color Purple, in which she won a Tony Award for Best Lead Actress in a Musical, the 32-year-old actress launched her professional career on Broadway. The show, which garnered a Grammy for its ensemble cast, launched her career.

  1. The cast of the new film features Leslie Odom Jr., Janelle Monáe, Joe Alwyn, and Jennifer Nettles, who together recount the narrative of Tubman’s emancipation from slavery and her years spent rescuing others on the Underground Railroad in the years afterwards.
  2. Examine the lyrics to get a more realistic picture of what’s going on.
  3. /Calling me to answer, going to keep on keeping on / I can feel it in my bones,” Erivo sings in the chorus, alluding to Tubman’s struggles and unwavering determination.
  4. Focus Features / Glen Wilson / According to Erivo’s interview with OprahMag.com, music had a significant role in her preparation for the role, and the songs that inspired her had a significant impact on “Stand Up,” which was released in 2008.
  5. In particular, Erivo stated that the song “Nice Goodbye” by Lianne La Havas (and the line “Everybody raise a glass, oh, here’s to a good goodbye”) helped her prepare for a moment in which Tubman’s sister dies.
  6. That song has a certain quality to it that speaks to loss, and it was able to transport me straight to where I was supposed to be.” Content from YouTube has been used in this presentation.
  7. ” Johnny and Donna,” by Mali Music, was another song she utilized, particularly the chorus: “How, how, how, how, how, how, how.” Where, when, and how do I go about doing it?

The road to success is paved with turns and turns.

When the world turns you upside down, it’s called “twirling.” When you’re young, it’s easy to lose control; when you’re old, it’s difficult to keep control.

So please bear with me.

“It speaks to the way things change and how things move, but to hear it clearly expressed in music and to immerse you into it, you can sort of live in the feeling,” Erivo explained.

When the film is in progress, Harriet’s first objective is to obtain independence for herself and others around her, and the song “Stand Up” conveys the idea that you should never give up, even if you are on your own.

Fill in the blanks with your thoughts.

If you go to their website, you may be able to access the same content in a different format, as well as more information.

Content from YouTube has been used in this presentation.

In addition, courtesy of Genius.com, here are the song’s lyrics.

With my back to the sun, I’ve been strolling around.

My eyes are trained on the back of my head in case I have to flee.

I’m going to get up when the clouds begin to clear and the stars begin to fill the sky.

We’re all moving to a nice new house across the river from each other.

It is you who is calling and I must respond.

Early in the morning, before the sun has risen to its full potential.

Regardless of the murky waters in which I find myself, I’ve made up my mind to fight to the end.

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So I’m going to rise up and fight till the end.” I’m bringing my entourage.

Is it possible to hear the call for freedom?

Continually striving to improve.

Due to the fact that I am alone, it may be difficult to confront the situation.

As the night sky fills with stars, it is certain that Take a step forward.

We’re all moving to a nice new house across the river from each other.

It is you who is calling and I must respond.

I’m bringing my entourage.

What do you think you hear?

It is you who is calling and I must respond.

I’m bringing my entourage.

Can you sense freedom calling to you?

I can feel it in my bones that I have to keep going.

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There’s A New TikTok Trend Where People Change The Music In Iconic Movie And TV Scenes And It’s Absolutely Hilarious

Please accept my apologies in advance for the overload of Marvel.

One of the newest trends on TikTok is adding new music to a movie or television scene. [email protected] started it,adding “Cotton Eye Joe”to this scene fromIt.

Warner Bros. Pictures is a motion picture production company.

People have since stitched the first part of the video to share their own versions of movie and TV scenes with new music, and the results are inspired, hilarious, and sometimes heartbreaking. Here are some of the best!

TikTok | Viatiktok.com / Jbuckstudios / TikTok In order to avoid having to screencap videos from TikTok on other platforms, I’ve included them below – be sure to click on the link either above or below the photographs to view the video and to give the user a follow!

1.”Scream and Shout”by will.i.am., and the fake battle scene fromTwilight: Breaking Dawn — Part 2:

Summit Entertainment is a production company that specializes in live entertainment.

2.”London Bridge”by Fergie, and the scene fromGame of Throneswhere Jaime sees Bran in his wheelchair:

Disney Channel is a television network owned by Disney.

4.”Let It Go”by Idina Menzel fromFrozen, and the “Bet on It” scene fromHigh School Musical 2:

Disney Channel is a cable television network owned by Disney and distributed by Disney.

5.”To Build a Home”by the Cinematic Orchestra, and the scene where Wanda creates her and Vision’s dream home inWandaVision:

Warner Bros. Pictures is a motion picture production company.

14.”London Bridge”by Fergie (again, but the clean version) and the snap scene fromAvengers: Endgame:

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A Comeback Chant: ‘Ali, Bomaye’ (Published 2016)

This piece first ran in The New York Times on October 31, 1974. It is reprinted with permission. KINSHASA, Zaire — KINSHASA, Zaire — In today’s fight, Muhammad Ali became only the second man in boxing history to reclaim the world heavyweight championship, by knocking out George Foreman in the eighth round. With a left and a right chop, Ali, 32, brought down his 25-year-old opponent and sent him tumbling to the floor under the light of an African moon only hours before morning. This particular bee was tormenting a bear, stinging him repeatedly until his arm-weary foe surrendered to the insect’s unwavering determination.

  • With Foreman laying siege to him throughout the fight, Ali, eschewing his normal butterfly tactics, absorbed Foreman’s most powerful blows without flinching or wobbling, with the exception of a brief minute in the second round.
  • Foreman landed on his back on the canvas after spinning backward.
  • With his hands reaching for his feet, he was ruled out by referee Zack Clayton at the 2 minute 58 second mark of the first round.
  • “I managed to pull it off.
  • In my last post, I stated that I intended to poke him in the corners and that I would take all of his blows.

It’s no secret that he doesn’t appreciate being hit.” Similarly to his attitude in 1964, when he won the heavyweight title and Sonny Liston refused to come out for the seventh round of their Miami Beach fight, Ali’s response was similar to his attitude in 1964, when he won the heavyweight title.

He went into the fight as a 4-1 underdog against Foreman, who had been unbeaten in his previous 40 fights.

“He must be treated with decency.” Ali had previously stated that this would be his “final fight,” but he evaded questions about whether or not he would be retiring after this fight.

“Foreman was terrified,” Ali explained, adding, “and who would want to fight him again?” My first priority is to obtain $10 million before considering a fight.” Joe Frazier, who defeated Ali in a 15-round decision in 1971 but was defeated by him in a 12-round decision earlier this year, was at ringside and expressed optimism that a title fight with Ali would be scheduled for next year.

  • “I’ve figured out how to combat him now.” Ali joined Floyd Patterson as the only heavyweight champions to successfully reclaim their titles in the same year.
  • Patterson also defeated Johansson in a 1962 fight, which ended in a knockout.
  • His only defeats were at the hands of Frazier and Ken Norton, a California heavyweight who won a 12-round decision over Ali earlier this year after breaking Ali’s jaw.
  • Ali subsequently defeated Norton in a rematch, and then defeated Frazier to earn the title of Foreman’s most serious rival in the world.
  • Instead, he smashed Ali into submission in the soccer stadium in the Zaire capital, which was covered by a canopy.
  • During Saturday’s weigh-in, Ali weighed 216 12 pounds, while Foreman weighted 220.
  • Then Foreman came, wearing a crimson velvet robe with a blue belt, after over 10 minutes of dancing and shuffling in the background.

Later, when Foreman sat on his stool, getting his gloves tied, Ali swooped close to him and mocked him with a mimic look, much to the amusement of the audience in the audience.

With a big left hook to the body at the conclusion of the first round, he looked to put Ali on the defensive.

Ali did an excellent job at covering up.

The shout “Ali, bomaye” arose as the players awaited the start of the second round.

Ali, on the other hand, reacted with a barrage of punches.

But he swung a right cross and unleashed six punches in short succession.

However, every now and again, the old bee would strike the young bear with jabs that caused Foreman’s head to jerk back.

In the fourth round, Ali started with a flurry of punches that caused Foreman’s head to bounce about.

Foreman’s legs were tired as he marched after Ali, and he lunged ineffectively on many occasions.

Other fighters had been knocked out in a matter of seconds by Foreman’s sledgehammer blows, but Ali had clearly prepared himself well for this challenge.

While Ali’s trainer, Angelo Dundee, was rushing over the ring apron to where a Zairian boxing official was trying to tighten the turnbuckle to control the top rope that Ali had been lying against during the interval before the sixth round, Ali was knocked out.

The rope began to droop.

If he hadn’t done so, he may have fallen backward out of the ring.

As Foreman stumbled along, he pursued Ali into the seventh round, but his face had swelled up, particularly around his right eye, which had been cut during training, resulting in a six-week postponement.

In a split second, Ali delivered the knockout blow with the left-right combo.

After many minutes of chaos, the Zairian police and paratroopers were able to bring order back to the scene.

But soon after, a torrential downpour descended on the stadium.

Underneath the stadium, in the boxers’ carpeted changing rooms, the clocks in each room were set to 3 o’clock, the original time for their fight here before Daylight Saving Time ended in the United States the previous weekend.

In the afternoon, Foreman entered his room about 2:30, but Ali did not appear until after 3:00. It was discovered that someone had forgotten to bring Ali’s robe, and they were forced to send back to retrieve it.

Fact-checking ‘Respect’: Aretha Franklin’s clashes, stage mishaps, song choices and more

In its original publication on October 31, 1974, this piece ran in The New York Times. Zaire’s Kinshasa province is home to a number of international organizations. The eighth-round knockout of George Foreman made Muhammad Ali only the second man in boxing history to successfully defend his world heavyweight championship. With a left and a right chop, Ali, 32, brought down his 25-year-old opponent to the ground under the light of an African moon just hours before morning. This particular bee was tormenting a bear, stinging him repeatedly until his arm-weary foe surrendered to the insect’s unrelenting vigor.

  1. After being under attack for almost two hours, Ali, who had abandoned his typical butterfly strategy, took Foreman’s most powerful blows without flinching or wobbling, with the exception of a brief period in the second round.
  2. Foreman landed on his back on the canvas after spinning around.
  3. At 2 minutes 58 seconds into the round, while stumbling to his feet, he was ruled out by the referee, Zack Clayton.
  4. We both knew it was a waste of time, but did you hear me?
  5. In my previous statement, I stated that he was uneducated.
  6. In 1964, when Sonny Liston refused to come out for the seventh round of their Miami Beach fight, Ali reacted in a manner similar to his attitude after winning the heavyweight championship.
  7. The underdog against Foreman, who had been unbeaten in his previous 40 fights, was 4-1 at the time.
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He has now ascended to the top of the leaderboards.

Credit: Ed Kolenovsky/Associated Press for the image.

While watching from the stands, Joe Frazier expressed his desire to fight Ali for the heavyweight championship next year.

‘I’m prepared to take on him,’ Frazier, who is also a former champion, said of the opponent.

Patterson was deposed by Swedish boxer Ingemar Johansson in 1959, but he returned the favor the following year by knocking out Johansson in the first round.

At this point, Ali has won 45 out of 47 fights, including 32 knockouts.

Ali’s professional life looked to be slipping away at a quick pace at that point.

After taking out Frazier in only 11 minutes 35 seconds and successfully defending his title against Joe (King) Roman and Norton, Foreman was unable to put Ali down with the same punches that had knocked out the other three opponents.

Already before to Foreman entering the ring, Ali had taken control of the show.

Ali came in a white satin robe with an African blanket adorned with what seemed to be a tassle.

The playing of the national anthems, “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Le Zarois,” while two American and two Zaire flags were in the ring, Ali insulted Foreman, who appeared to be unaware of what he was saying.

Foreman moved clumsily but swiftly when the bell rang.

His other tactics included pining Ali to the ropes and slamming blows into Ali’s rib cage from behind.

The round concluded with Ali sitting on his stool and giving a wink to the audience.

Immediately after the round began, Foreman pursued Ali down the ropes and pinned him against the wall.

Ali looked to stumble midway through the round, and he briefly grasped Foreman’s shoulder.

Throughout the third round, Ali was willing to lay on the top rope and allow Foreman to bash him nearly at whim, as he had done during the previous two.

Rather of returning to his stool after the third round, Ali sauntered up to the ringside cameras and made a funny face at them.

Ali, on the other hand, was willing to once again lie on the ropes.

When Ali entered the fifth round, he continued to employ his unusual strategies.

Although he was punched in the face, there was no evident trace of punishment despite the fact that he would be hurting the next day.

Rather of strengthening it, the Zairian official was allowing it to become more lax instead.

Were it not for his quick thinking and quick action, he may have fallen backward out of the ring.

Foreman followed Ali into the seventh round, but his face had swelled, particularly around his right eye, which had been cut during training, resulting in a six-week postponement of the fight.

In an instant, Ali delivered the knockout with a left-right combination.

After several minutes of chaos, the Zairian police and paratroopers were able to bring order back to the city.

However, a torrential downpour descended on the stadium shortly thereafter.

Fighting on carpeted floors underneath the stadium’s grandstands, each fighter’s clock was set to 3 o’clock, which was the original start time for the fight here before Daylight Saving Time in the United States ended last weekend.

Ali didn’t come until until 3 o’clock, after Foreman had entered his room at 2:30. It was discovered that someone had forgotten to bring Ali’s robe, and they were forced to send back to fetch it.

Did Dinah Washington furiously curse and turn over a nightclub table when Franklin performed one of Washington’s songs?

When the little-known Franklin begins to perform “Unforgettable,” one of the jazz great’s hallmark pieces, Washington (Mary J. Blige) becomes enraged. The action takes place at New York’s Village Vanguard club in 1964, and Washington is played by Mary J. Blige. Washington yells “Bitch!” at Franklin as she flips her table in displeasure at her for daring to cover one of her songs in her presence. That is highly improbable to have occurred, at least in the case of Franklin. Instead, the episode appears to be based on an occurrence involving Etta James, who allegedly told writer David Ritz about a glass-shattering response by President George H.W.

James said that she went to her dressing room in tears, only to be consoled by some words of wisdom from Washington herself — exactly as the movie “Respect” depicts Aretha Franklin’s scenario in real life.

Was Franklin raped as a young girl at her father’s home?

In the film “Respect,” Aretha is seen as a 10-year-old in her Detroit bedroom when an older, unknown male house guest sneaks in and offers to be her “lover,” prompting Aretha to cry. The scene ends there, however it is hinted in a subsequent flashback that this was the point at which she was molested and impregnated. The identity of Franklin’s oldest son’s father has long been a source of conjecture. Clarence was born when she was 12 years old, and some sources through the years have speculated that the father was a schoolmate called Donald Burke, who died in a car accident.

However, in a will reportedly penned by Franklin and discovered after her death in 2018, she claims a man called Edward Jordan Sr.

Despite the fact that only a few information about him have been revealed, Jordan was previously widely acknowledged as the father of her son Edward, who was born when Franklin was 15 years old.

Did the Beatles really offer Aretha an exclusive song — which she turned down?

Both yes and no. “Respect” opens with producer Jerry Wexler (Marc Maron) informing Franklin that she has been offered a song to record, and that if she declines, the Beatles would take it for themselves. “Let It Be” is the title of the composition in question. Franklin seemed to be dismissive of the notion. “It’s a Catholic hymn,” she explains, adding that she is a Baptist. Although the song’s “Mother Mary” line is really a reference to Paul McCartney’s late mother, if Aretha Franklin truly did see “Let It Be” in this manner, she is surely not alone in her perception.

Despite her initial reluctance to release the song, it eventually emerged on her sixth Atlantic Records album, along with another Beatles cover, “Eleanor Rigby,” on which she also appeared.

To be precise, Franklin’s release in January 1970 came two months before the Beatles’ own version of “Let It Be,” which didn’t come out until February of the following year.

Did Franklin really fall off the stage in a drunken stupor during a Georgia concert?

During a concert in Columbus, Georgia, in the spring of 1967, the singer undoubtedly suffered an onstage tragedy, fracturing her arm. During the month of May, Jet magazine released a photograph of Franklin dressed in his hospital sling at Detroit’s Henry Ford Hospital. The exact reason of the catastrophe remains a mystery. Officially, Franklin had been rendered blind by stage lights, according to the official explanation at the time. However, her agent Ruth Bowen, speaking with author Ritz years later and relating what she had been told by one of Franklin’s helpers, said that the singer may have been “tipsy” at the time of the incident.

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During her performance of “I Say a Little Prayer,” a chart-topping single for her in the fall of 1968, she slaps the deck while muttering her way through the song.

Did Jerry Wexler name Franklin the Queen of Soul?

Maron’s Wexler, shown here speaking to cameras for a promotional film, recognizes Franklin’s reputation as the “Queen of Soul,” but the definition of “respect” seems a little hazy. Although the film does not expressly credit the producer with the coronation, some viewers may be left with the sense that this is the case. Despite the fact that it is not featured in the film, Franklin was awarded the title in early 1967 by Chicago disc jockeys Pervis Spann and E. Rodney Jones, who were also in the film.

Did everybody really call her ‘Ree’?

Maron’s Wexler, shown here speaking to cameras for a promotional film, recognizes Franklin’s title as “Queen of Soul,” but the definition of “respect” seems a little hazy. Although the film does not expressly credit the producer with the coronation, some viewers may be left with the feeling that this is the case if they watch the film again. Pervis Spann and E. Rodney Jones, two Chicago disc jockeys, bestowed the honor to Franklin in early 1967, though it is not featured in the film. She was recognized at a Regal Theater function that day, with Spann laying a crown on her head as a symbol of their recognition.

Did C.L. Franklin offer words of encouragement to a nervous Aretha just before she stepped out to record the album ‘Amazing Grace’?

  • In 1972, she sang “Amazing Grace” at a Los Angeles church, where her pastor father was present, but he wouldn’t have given her a pre-performance pep talk in the stairs, as he would have done for a bestselling gospel record and documentary. This is due to the fact that C.L. Franklin did not arrive until day two. C.L. Franklin came to the pulpit on the second night to address the audience, just before Aretha sang “Never Grow Old,” the song that had served as her debut professional recording and which had been written by C.L. Franklin. C.L. Franklin explains how he squeezed clothing into a bag and got on a last-minute airplane from Detroit to make it to the final day of the “Amazing Grace” sessions in previously unseen video from Sydney Pollack’s documentary shot. Brian McCollum, music reporter for the Detroit Free Press, may be reached at 313-223-4450 or [email protected]

Column: Gale Sayers and ‘Brian’s Song’ changed sports movies, and male friendship, forever

There are certain films that have a profound impact on the world, and then the world moves on. Change may or may not be permanent. It all depends on how you look at it. No matter what happens, people ultimately forget about the movie itself until something happens to bring it back to their memory. The passing on Wednesday of Chicago Bears Hall of Fame running back Gale Sayers serves as a poignant reminder to those of us who are old enough to recall the magic that was, and continues to be, “Brian’s Song” for those of us who grew up listening to it.

  1. When it was first broadcast as an ABC Movie of the Week in 1971, or when it was re-broadcast several times during the 1970s, or even when it was first published as a paperback novel in 1971, the tears should be almost quick for those who remember it.
  2. The guys met as rookies with the Chicago Bears and went on to become the NFL’s first interracial roommates, becoming the first of their kind.
  3. After being diagnosed with a particularly severe type of testicular cancer in 1969, Piccolo passed away in 1970 at the age of 26.
  4. Halas Courage Award a month before his teammate’s death; in accepting the award, he stated that the judges had made the wrong choice and delivered an impassioned statement about his feelings for and appreciation for Piccolo.
  5. The film is set in 1971, with all that entails, and there is a moment in which Piccolo uses the N-word to force Sayers to train harder, which devolves into laughing in a way that appears to be foolishly hopeful about the term’s eventual demise, as if it were still relevant.

This straightforward story, written by William Blinn, is laid out in the opening minutes by Jack Warden (who also appears as Chicago Bears head coach George Halas), in what may be the best use of narration in the history of film: “This is the story of two men, one named Gale Sayers and the other named Brian Piccolo.

  • One was white, while the other was black.
  • According to Ernest Hemingway, every genuine narrative concludes with death.
  • Yes, I am.
  • After being broadcast in cinemas for a short period of time, it quickly became the most viewed and most emotional television movie of the year.
  • It was a picture so outstanding that the 2001 effort to replicate it was seen as an insult by many, in part because the original had accomplished what no other film had before: it educated American males that it was OK to grieve over a non-canine death in a movie.
  • It has since become one of the most frequently adapted and instantly recognizable songs in the country.
  • It was performed by musical legends such as Perry Como and Johnny Mathis, and it became a hymn of desire and sorrow for many people.

It was used by young gymnasts, figure skaters, and school orchestras, and it captured the heart and pathos of the film in a few deceptively simple series of notes; several girls of my acquaintance took piano lessons solely to learn how to play the music from “Brian’s Song,” and they were very good at it.

Following more than a decade of righteous racial protest, Caan and Williams brought Piccolo and Sayers to life instantly and intensely (Caan accomplished this while wearing white socks and penny loafers, and uttering words like “golly” with apparent sincerity), and their bond, built on competition and mutual respect, was a hopeful sign after a decade of righteous racial protest.

A revolution occurred in their relationship because of the depth of their connection.

This was an injustice that went on for far too long.

They were the epitome of bromance.

And homosexual men were only seldom allowed to exist in cinema and television; those who did were not allowed to express any affection for any guy except in subtext — or, infrequently, humbly on their deathbeds — and were not allowed to express any emotion toward any man except in subtext.

Unless, of course, you’re Gale Sayers.

If I retell the full speech, I will weep, and you should watch the film “Brian’s Song,” which incorporates the real-life speech precisely, you will not be disappointed.

In 1970, during a meeting of football players, a Black man said something about a white man, and he said it out loud as well.

When those words were spoken in “Brian’s Song,” walls rocked, ceilings crumbled, and men were suddenly given the opportunity to express the profound feelings they had for other guys using the term that homophobia had kept out of their mouths for so long, and they did it with gusto.

In spite of this, the liters of sea water that were cried over “Brian’s Song” were not just tears of pain, but also tears of recognition and relief.

“Brian’s Song” ushered forth a whole new subgenre of sports film, one in which enlightenment was achieved by death or severe bodily harm.

Every one of them was a worthwhile story in and of itself, but they were also part of a larger canon in which sports personalities allow us to study the numerous forms of human love.

Sports have also historically been one of the most apparent indicators of societal change, which may help to put these events into a larger context as well.

Not only in the literal sense, but also emotionally.

Sayers was not just an outstanding football player, but he was also a fearless individual on and off the field.

In 1970, he allowed his heart to be opened and he told the truth. A few familiar notes from a very basic song may still move us to tears of appreciation, even fifty years after it was first played for us.

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