What Does It Mean When Students Chant 6666666

Music as a Teaching Tool

Many instructors are hesitant to include music in their classrooms because they believe they must have formal musical training in order to utilize music as a teaching tool. However, this is not true. There are, however, a variety of techniques to include music into the classroom that do not need any special expertise.

Classroom Strategies

Transitions are a little more difficult to set up in the early grades since the pupils are still learning what the notion of a minute is and what it feels like. A song can help with transitions since it serves as a trigger for the appropriate behavior: Students become acclimated to the duration of the song or portion of a song and internalize the amount of time they have to complete the assignment before moving on to the next activity, which assists them in beginning to take responsibility for their own learning and development.

Students, especially those in the younger grades, benefit greatly from movement-based songs as a way to take a break from their studies.

Those who have physical disabilities might benefit from listening to music since it can help them concentrate and/or impact how they move about.

Students gain new social and emotional abilities on a daily basis when they encounter new situations and situations.

Taking the famous music of “Hokey Pokey,” which is well-known among young people, and modifying it such that the lyrics discuss how to calm down after being in a stressful situation, like in this version derived from Margie La Bella’s Music Therapy Education: You take a deep breath in, you exhale fully, you take another deep breath in, and you exhale fully once again.

  • You may learn to be more relaxed.
  • To be successful as educators, we must appropriately challenge each kid while still satisfying statutory requirements and fostering higher-order thinking.
  • Songs are basically poetry, with a great deal of meaning crammed into a small number of words.
  • This results in a personal need to conduct study in order to determine what the songwriter is alluding to in the song’s lyrics.
  • Examples of how to teach about the Dust Bowl include using songs by Woody Guthrie and/or Benny Goodman, and having students analyze how people lived in their respective communities throughout history.
  • This is one of the primary reasons why it is vital to give visuals and manipulatives to students when initially introducing a topic in the subject of mathematics.
  • Songs that educate about the skeletal system or that use mnemonics to assist students recall the food chain can be beneficial in the science classroom.
  • When a learner is able to recognize patterns in the structure of language and distinguish between pitches in words that sound similar but have distinct meanings, his or her literacy skills will improve.

To convey tale components such as character, place, conflict, and resolution, musical metaphors may be used to illustrate them through the lens of the melodies and instruments used in the compositions, as well as the tempos and dynamics of the music.

Working With Limited Resources

Students in the early grades have a more difficult time setting transitions since they are still learning what the notion of a minute is and how it feels to be inside one. Due to the fact that it serves as a behavior cue, music can help with transitions. Students become acclimated to the duration of the song or portion of a song and internalize the amount of time they have to complete the work before moving on to the next activity, which assists them in beginning to take responsibility for their own learning and understanding.

  • Students, especially those in the younger grades, benefit greatly from movement-based tunes that serve as a mental respite.
  • Students with physical disabilities can benefit from listening to music because it helps them concentrate and/or has an impact on their movement patterns.
  • Each day, kids develop new social and emotional skills when they encounter different settings in the classroom.
  • For example, you may take the music of “Hokey Pokey,” which is known to most youngsters, and alter the words to talk about how to calm down after being in a stressful situation, like in this version taken from Margie La Bella’s Music Therapy book.
  • The ability to concentrate on one’s breathing is available.
  • What it all boils down to is this: As instructors, we want to adequately challenge each kid while still satisfying statutory requirements and developing higher-order thinking.
  • A song is fundamentally a poetry, and it contains a great deal of meaning in a limited number of words.

A personal motivation to conduct study in order to determine what the author is alluding to in the lyrics develops from this point on.

Using music to educate about cultural practices and historical events is an excellent way to enhance the learning experience in history.

Due to the abstract nature of mathematics concepts, children might find it difficult to grasp them at first.

Changes in musical instruments while still performing the same song can aid in the teaching of patterns, and the use of pitch can aid in the teaching of frequencies and ratios.

In order to teach youngsters about sound waves and give them an understanding of the relationship between frequency and pitch, music may be used as a learning tool.

To describe tale components such as character, setting, conflict, and resolution, musical metaphors may be used to illustrate them through the lens of the melodies and instruments used in the compositions, as well as pace and dynamics.

  • Preparing a music CD or playlist of songs for motor skills, academics, or leisure time is a good idea. Use repurposed materials to create musical instruments. A guitar may be constructed from a cereal box, and drums can be constructed from cans and plastic bottles. KinderArt teaches children how to construct instruments that are both simple and imaginative, and that can also be used to examine different cultures. Moreover, Music in Motionprovides a fantastic selection of instruments that you can either construct yourself from repurposed materials or purchase from the internet
  • Making music with your hands is easy. Clapping, snapping, tapping, whistling, humming, and stomping are all good options. Check out the musical.ly website for inspiration on how to start music just by moving your body. Stomp —for example, the section of the act in which clapping serves as the primary musical instrument
  • Put up anchor charts so that people may refer to them when they’re dancing or doing yoga poses.

7 Creative Ways to Use Music in Your K-6 Classroom

Learning our “ABCs” in music is one of our very first exposures to music as children in the classroom. Teachers have been setting teachings to music for years in order to assist their pupils learn and remember important facts and information. I’ve been teaching third grade for ten years, and over that time, I’ve made it a point to include music into both my teachings and classroom routines on a daily basis. These seven simple ideas to bring music and technology into your classroom to help make your teachings more interesting and meaningful are provided for your consideration.

1. Use Theme Songs for Transitions

Popular theme music might help students move swiftly and effectively toward your meeting location or through the stations during their training sessions. The theme from “Mission Impossible” or “The Magnificent Seven” are two of my favorite movies. My pupils are aware that when the music begins to play, they are expected to bring their white boards and silently enter the room to the carpet. Otherwise, I shall “self-destruct in 10 seconds!” if they don’t cooperate.

2. Use Music in the Classroom as a Timer

While students are working on the puzzle of the day, play the theme tune from the game show “Jeopardy.” Within one minute, students are able to complete their task and present their answer to the class. Make it more interesting by asking them to respond in the form of a question!

3. Teach Multiplication Facts

For my class website, I filmed myself singing multiplication facts set to well-known songs such asJingle Bells and made them accessible for download. Students may practice at home while singing along, which is more enjoyable than using flashcards. I’ll also utilize videos from time to time. This is the song (below) that we think is perfect for the nineties. At 2 a.m., I guarantee you will be cursing my name because it will get stuck in your brain!

4. Hook Students on New Content with Tunes

Music is frequently used to aid in the teaching of new math topics, particularly more complex concepts such as quadrilaterals and fractions. One of our favorites is Number Rock, which you can see on YouTube. They offer an excellent variety of songs for every unit topic, including a song about the months of the year calendar (below).

5. Take 5: Use Music for Brain Breaks

Students frequently require mental breaks to dance, sing, and otherwise get their wiggles out of their system. Taking a five-minute break can help them regain and maintain their concentration, which is especially important when they are working alone. I utilize Go Noodle for my brain breaks in the classroom. We provide a variety of shake, wiggle, and sing options that are all completely free. Fans will recognize characters from famous films such as “Frozen,” “Minions,” and “The Lego Movie” in their collection.

6. Use Calm Music During Writing Time

In the backdrop of our solo writing block, I play a choice of calm music for the students to listen to. Students are well aware that when the music is playing, they are thinking, brainstorming, and writing in their notebooks.

This is also an opportunity for me to indulge in my favorite musicians, notably Norah Jones and Diana Krall, without feeling guilty about it! “Ahhhhh……” is how my day begins when I listen to George Winston and Jim Brickman music.

7. Teach Poetry? Use Flocking

I put on a selection of calm music in the background for our individual writing block. It is understood by students that when the music is playing, they are engaged in critical thinking, brainstorming, and writing activities. Also, here is my chance to indulge in my favorite musicians, notably Norah Jones and Diana Krall, without feeling guilty about it! My day begins with “Ahhhhh……” as I listen to George Winston and Jim Brickman.

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2-4-6-HATE

Consider a school instructor who instructs her kids on how to harass and name-call while also teaching them chants that are intended to embarrass another set of students. Who in their right mind would anticipate something like that to happen? Such behavior, which is often labeled as amusement rather than humiliation, is, nonetheless, all too common at school gyms and stadiums, where it is considered normal. Teams’ intolerance is typically exacerbated by disparities in race, religion, ethnicity, or financial status, and boosters who are focused on winning at all costs may choose to overlook or even promote such verbal abuse.

To bring it back to the classroom, Josephson asserts, “You don’t have a right to hurl insults (at a school athletic event) any more than I have a right to hang over your shoulder in class and boo and hiss every time you made a mistake.” What level of depravity has been reached by high school supporters who trash-talk?

  1. Do you pay your taxes?
  2. Native Americans were treated as second-class citizens by white spectators at a Show Low, Ariz., high school in 2003 when they were heckled by this class- and race-based slogan, which was directed at the visiting Apache basketball team.
  3. According to Harold Slemmer, executive director of the Arizona Interscholastic Association, there were more adults participating in the jeers than there were pupils.
  4. Since then, according to Slemmer, there have been no recorded incidents involving fans.
  5. Students at Douglas Freeman High School in Richmond, Virginia, were barred from attending the quarterfinal basketball game in the district tournament that took place at their school in February 2006.
  6. Edward Pruden Jr., the principal at Freeman, decided on the one-game suspension in reaction to how his pupils had singled out a standout player on the other team a week before.
  7. Godwin High School, supporters of the Freeman Rebels continuously heckled a player on the Godwin squad, using chants that alluded to the gay-themed filmBrokeback Mountain.

Cheering against opponents is expressly forbidden at the school, particularly when the yells are intended to insult a single player.

Fail to communicate in English!

These disparaging remarks were made during a March 2005 game between Lake Oswego High School and Portland’s Lincoln High School.

The student body president at Lake Oswego University was mentioned in the local media as declaring that her community was not a shelter for racists.

A method of drawing out the stereotype is sought after by them.

Parents and students at Lake Oswego High School have expressed dissatisfaction with their team’s away games, which have been accompanied by chants like as “Daddy’s money!” aimed at the school’s wealthy image.

As reported by a blogger, Chris Snethen, in February 2005, yells of “white trash,” “food stamps,” and “trailer trash” were heard.

Oregon City’s shouts are prevalent when the team is on the road, according to Snethen.

“Earlier this season, I was in attendance at a game in inner-city Portland, where the home fans began yelling about trailer trash. The youngsters from Oregon City aren’t bothered by it. They take pride in their redneck/country roots and wear it as a badge of honor.”

Finding a ‘soft spot’

Provincetown High School teams in Massachusetts have successfully retaliated against offensive chants and jeers. Because the town is well-known for having a large percentage of openly homosexual citizens, the teams have been subjected to anti-gay chants from rival fans during their games. A delegation of Provincetown softball and baseball players visited Nantucket in the summer of 2003. A barrage of anti-gay slurs was hurled at both of the visiting squads. Because of this, the principle and athletic director of Provincetown High School sent a letter to their counterparts on Nantucket, describing the fan conduct as “an assault on the students of Provincetown High School (and) an assault on the whole Provincetown community.” The principal of Nantucket replied by threatening to remove all Nantucket kids from the stands in order to put an end to the slurs.

  1. Any personal information can be used to fuel a taunt.
  2. The terms “Daddy’s boy” and “Average Joe” were chanted against a coach’s son and against a player with light hair and a fair complexion, respectively.
  3. They look for “whatever is a conspicuous vulnerability, a vulnerable place,” according to James Staunton, commissioner of the California Interscholastic Federation’s southern area.
  4. The football player who is noticeably smaller than the norm.
  5. “I do not believe that teasing is based on race.
  6. It’s a communal activity, after all “he explained.
  7. According to him, “Our pupils learn through television.” “All of the college games are shown on television.
  8. Is it too much to ask that Duke University fans do the same thing here?”

2, 4, 6, 8 – A fun chant for spring

You all know how much I enjoy music that can serve several purposes, but chants can accomplish the same thing! The chant 2, 4, 6, 8 is a pleasant springtime chant that also happens to be a….quintuple…duty chant! If you are unfamiliar with the chant… 2, 4, 6, and 8 are prime numbers. Meet me at the gate of the garden. If I’m running late, please don’t hold your breath. 2, 4, 6, and 8 are prime numbers.

1. Steady Beat and Rhythm

You all know how much I enjoy music that can be used for several purposes, but chants may serve the same purpose as well. Chanting the numbers 2, 4, 6, and 8 is an upbeat spring chant…and it also has a….quintuple…purpose!

If you don’t know what the chant is, you can look it up on Google. 4, 6, and eight are the numbers 2, 4, and 6. Gather by the garden entrance if you want to talk. Don’t hold your breath if I’m late. 4, 6, and eight are the numbers 2, 4, and 6.

2. Ta TiTi (Or whatever rhythm notation you use)

Teaching steady beat and rhythm is similar to teaching steady beat and rhythm since the preparation appears very same, but without the added step of identifying. A lot of the same elements are included in the preparation for Ta and TiTi. Prep using visual, auditory, and kinesthetic aspects, and only name when the children are ready, as evidenced by their ability to distinguish between the three.

3. Part work

Make use of instruments or your own voice. Separate the children into two groups, and instruct one to play a steady beat while the other plays a rhythm. If your children are truly champions, have them attempt it with four sections, with each line serving as a new entrance point, and then try it in canon mode.

4. Composition

Put on some music and sing a song. Divvy up the children into two groups, with one playing a steady beat and the other playing a rhythmic beat. You can even attempt it with four sections, using each line as a new entrance point, and try it in canon if your kids are very good at it!

5. Decode

Take the four phrases from the chant and write them on four index cards to keep track of them. Students take the well-known beats from the chant to create their own…

  • Decipher the chanting
  • Construct a new pattern based on the beats
  • Recognize the appropriate form for this chant
  • Patterns should be written in accordance with a new form. Identify the chant that was clapped by another person. Make a list of the rhythms

Decipher the chanting pattern. Pattern-making: make a new pattern using the beats; Recognize the chant’s structure; Patterns should be written in accordance with a new structure. Figure out who was the one who started the chant. Make a list of the tempos;

25 Or 6 To 4 by Chicago – Songfacts

  • This song was composed by Robert Lamm, who is a keyboard player and singer with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. It’s about attempting to create a song, and the title refers to the time of day: either 3:35 a.m. (25 to 4) or 3:34 a.m. (25 to 4) in the morning (26 to 4). On The Chris Isaak Hour, Lamm provided the following explanation: “I was living with a group of hippies in an apartment building above Sunset Strip. One of the benefits of living in this specific property was that it was located in the Hollywood Hills, which allowed me to enjoy views of the city at night. I wanted to make an attempt to convey the process of creating the song that I was currently working on at the time. This was the message shown on a neon sign around the city: “Waiting for the break of day, seeking for something to say, flashing lights against the sky.” The inspiration for the song came from the fact that it was 25 or 6 to 4 a.m. when I looked at my watch and realized I needed a line to conclude the chorus. Most of the songs that I wrote, especially in the early days, gained shape when I handed them over to the band and we started practicing them. Once these guys got their hands on them, the songs began to take shape on their own. The raw material was definitely there
  • I thought it was a song when I wrote the lyrics down, I thought it was a song when I wrote the changes down, and I thought it was a song when I brought the charts to rehearsal, but it wasn’t really a song until they all played it “in addition to this, if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me at [email protected] This rapidly became a showcase piece for Chicago’s horn section, which was used on a number of the band’s classics from the 1960s and 1970s, as well as on many of their later singles. Three of the band’s founding members, trumpeter Lee Loughnane, saxophonist Walter Parazaider, and trombonist James Pankow, have been with the group since its inception. There have been a lot of unsubstantiated rumors about the meaning of the lyrics to this song
  • However, the band has never confirmed any of them. A widespread story holds that LSD was given the term “6 to 4” because if you took the drug at 6 p.m., the effects would wear off by 4 a.m., ten hours later
  • This is still a popular song in college pep bands today. With its horns and upbeat tempo, it’s an excellent choice for athletic events
  • Peter Cetera sang lead on this tune despite the fact that his jaw was wired shut. A few months before the recording session, the band attended a baseball game at Dodger Stadium, where their hometown team, the Chicago Cubs, defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers, leaving four marines enraged and ready to take their rage out on someone. The band decided to record a song about the experience. Cetera was the individual in question, who was distinguished not just by his long hair but also by his dedication to the squad. The subsequent altercation left him in serious care with his jaw fractured in three places as a result of his injuries. Even when it was time to record the song, his jaw remained wired shut for the whole session. “He had to learn to sing in a different way,” producer James Guercio said in an interview with Mixmagazine. “I told him, ‘I can’t wait,’ and that we were going to do it. Cetera sang his vocals with his teeth clinched, which he later adopted as his signature singing technique. This song was written after he left the band in 1985, and it features his successor, Jason Scheff, who took over the vocal duties. The band was originally known as Chicago Transit Authority, which was also the name of their debut album. As a result of opposition from the actual Chicago transportation authority, they shortened their name and began issuing albums that had their name followed by a roman numeral (Chicago II, Chicago III, Chicago IV, etc.). In fact, they continued to do so throughout their career, even as they transitioned from horn-driven rock to adult contemporary ballads (“Hard For Me To Say I’m Sorry,” “Baby What a Big Surprise”) in the 1980s
  • This is often the last song Chicago performs at their performances. At a later point in their career, Chicago would frequently tour with other well-known performers who would join them on stage when they played the song. These were excellent showcases for the horn sections of both bands, as well as a good match for Philip Bailey’s vocals when they toured with Earth, Wind, and Fire in recent years. Among the other acts who have joined them for this grand finale are The Doobie Brothers and REO Speedwagon
  • Guitar World ranked this song as number 22 on their 2015 list of the best wah solos of all time in recognition of Terry Kath’s use of a distorted, wah-driven guitar line during the second half of his guitar solo
  • Although Lamm told Chris Isaak that he glanced at his watch while writing the song, he later revealed to Mixmagazine in 2019 that he “I couldn’t determine where the hands of the clock were pointing since the light was obscuring my vision. It was around 25 or 26 minutes before 4 a.m. at the time. I didn’t expect to be able to hold onto those words. I was expecting to be able to change them with genuine lyrics. However, everything turned out well in the end “Kath performed the song’s trademark guitar riff with a customized Fender performance amplifier, according to him. Guercio remembered Terry as “always toying with s-t” throughout the filming of the film. “I remember him going through this crazy 1950s hi-fi preamp or something, like from a McIntosh, before playing anything. I’m not sure how he achieved that sound, but whatever it was, it was nothing short of miraculous. That’s exactly what I was looking for.”
  • Cetera is used to playing bass with his finger, but when Guercio insisted on his using a pick for a more defined sound, Cetera was irritated. Cetera compromised by playing with the back of his fingernail, according to Tim Jessup, the band’s engineer.
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West African Song and Chants: Children’s Music from Ghana

This song was written by Robert Lamm, who is a keyboardist and singer for the band Chicago. Basically, it’s about attempting to create a song, and the title refers to the time of day, which is either 3:35 a.m. (25 to 4) or 3:34 a.m. (25 to 4) (26 to 4). Chris Isaak Hour host Lamm explains why: “In the hills above Sunset Strip, I was residing with a group of hippies. This particular property had the advantage of being located in the Hollywood Hills, which allowed me to enjoy a late-night view of the city.

This was the message shown on a neon sign around the city: “Waiting for the dawn, seeking for something to say, flashing lights against the sky.” That song was inspired by the fact that it was 25 or 6 to 4 a.m.

Most of the songs that I wrote, especially in the early days, gained shape once they were given to the band and we began practicing them.

In terms of raw material, there was a lot, and while I thought it was a song when I wrote the lyrics down, I thought it was a song even more when I wrote down the changes and brought the charts to rehearsal, it wasn’t really a song until they all played it together “in addition to this, if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us at [email protected] When it was released in 1964, it soon established itself as a showcase song for Chicago’s horn section, which appeared on a slew of their major singles through the 1960s and 1970s.

  1. Three of the band’s founding members, trumpeter Lee Loughnane, saxophonist Walter Parazaider, and trombonist James Pankow, have remained with the group from its start.
  2. It’s a well-known urban legend that LSD was given the term “6 to 4” because if you took it at 6 p.m., the effects would wear off by 4 a.m., 10 hours later; this is still sung about by college pep bands to this day.
  3. A few months before the recording session, the band attended a baseball game at Dodger Stadium, where their hometown club, the Chicago Cubs, defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers, leaving four marines enraged and ready to take their rage out on someone or anything.
  4. A fight ensued, and he was taken to the hospital, where he was found to have had his jaw fractured three times.
  5. The producer James Guercio said to Mixmagazine that he had to learn to sing differently.
  6. Clenched teeth were used to deliver Cetera’s vocals, which became his signature singing technique.
  7. The band was originally known as Chicago Transit Authority, which was also the name of their debut album.
  8. They continued to do so throughout their career, even as they transitioned from horn-driven rock to adult contemporary ballads (“Hard For Me To Say I’m Sorry,” “Baby What A Big Surprise”) in the 1980s; this is often the final song Chicago performs at their performances.
  9. The band’s horn sections were given a tremendous opportunity to shine on tour with Earth, Wind, and Fire.

Other acts that have joined them for this grand finale include The Doobie Brothers and REO Speedwagon; Guitar World ranked this as number 22 on their 2015 list of the best wah solos of all time in recognition of Terry Kath’s use of a distorted, wah-driven guitar line during the second half of his guitar solo; Although Lamm told Chris Isaak that he looked at his watch for the time while writing the song, he told Mixmagazine in 2019 that he looked at an antique “Because the hands of the clock were pointed in different directions, I couldn’t fully identify where they were.

  • It was around 25 or 26 minutes before 4 a.m.
  • The fact that I was able to preserve those words was a complete surprise to me.
  • However, everything turned out well in the end “”Kat performed the characteristic guitar riff from the song via a custom-made Fender performance amplifier,” he explained.
  • “I remember him going through this crazy 1950s hi-fi preamp or something, like from a McIntosh, first.
  • Just what I had hoped would happen.” ; It was a source of contention for Cetera when Guercio urged that he use a pick for a more defined sound, instead of his finger, on the bass guitar.

In the words of the band’s engineer, Tim Jessup: “Cetera compromised by playing with the back of his fingernail.”

  • To a recording of a traditional Ghanaian folk song (National Standard 2), students will perform a steady beat and rhythmic ostinato. National Standard 1 songs will be sung and chanted by the students, as well as traditional songs from Ghana. Students will learn to read and clap/play rhythms derived from Ghanaian traditional tunes/chants (National Standards 1, 2, and 5) and then perform them. In this lesson, students will read and perform melody fragments derived from traditional Ghanaian folk songs (National Standards 1,5)
  • Firikiwa, tokee, and gankogui are real instruments from Southern Ghana that students will learn about and perform (National Standards 2, 6, 7, 8, 9)
  • To play sound recordings, audio technology is used
  • The firikiwa (little iron castanet) and tokee (banana shape bell) are small drums
  • Video technology is used to present the Por Por Music video
  • And small drums are used. “Gome,” Folk Music of Ghana, Folkways Records Album No. FW8859, recorded about 1964 by Folkways Records
  • “Gome,” Folk Music of Ghana, Folkways Records Album No. FW8859, recorded circa 1964 by Folkways Records
  • SFW45011, c.1990 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings
  • “Tuu! Tuu! Gbovi”, “Kaa Fo”, “Mede brebre masi ta,” African Songs and Rhythms For Children – Recorded and Annotated by Dr. W.K. Amoaku, SFW45011, c.1990 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings
  • “Tuu! Tuu! Gbovi”, “K Companion book for “African Songs and Rhythms for Children”: Amoaku, W.U., “In the African Tradition – African Songs and Rhythms for Children, A Selection from Ghana, c. 1971 Schott, Germany
  • Amoaku, W.U., “African Songs and Rhythms for Children, A Selection from Ghana, c. 1971 Schott, Germany
  • Amoaku, W.U., “African Songs and Rhythms for Children, A Video from the La Drivers Union Por Por Group
  • Map of Ghana
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Each lesson segment should include a brief review of the information covered in the preceding lesson segment, as recommended. By the fourth part of the session, there would be three familiar options and one new selection to choose from. Until all of the content has been mastered, this unit would continue through lesson segment four.

  1. Claps and movement in “Gome” rhythmic ostinato (National Standards 5, 6, 7, 9)
  2. “Kaa Fo” singing with instrument accompaniment (National Standards 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9)
  3. “Mede Brebre Masi Ta” speech choir with drum (National Standards 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
  4. And “Tuu! Tuu!” gbovi (National Standards 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
  5. “Mede Brebre Masi Ta” speech choir with drum (National Standards 1, 2, 5,

“Gome” Rhythmic Ostinato with Claps and Movement (Lesson Segment1) 1. Begin by listening to the song “Gome.”

  1. Walk with your heart in your chest
  2. Count the beats in groups of four
  3. Clap on the first beat
  4. Clap on the first and fourth beats
  5. Add a scooping hand motion on the 23rd beat

2. Questions: Where may the music have come from? (Ghana – see the location on the map) What type of voiceover do you want? (two parts, two male voices, call and response, two sections) What are the instruments that can be heard? a set of sticks on the side of the drum, an iron bell, drums

  1. Make it clear to the pupils that each of the more than 100 ethnic groups has its own distinct musical expressions, as well as others that are shared among them
  2. Fontomfrom is descended from the Akan people who live in Ghana’s Central Region. Exhibit page 16 of the same liner notes and describe the notes on the ensemble that appeared on page 12

3. Discuss the importance of music in Ghanaian daily life. To demonstrate how music is infused into various kinds of expression, consider the Por Por music video, which depicts how taxi drivers have banded together and utilized song to represent themselves in a positive way. Video: The “Por Por Group” of the La Drivers Union is featured in this video. Student demonstration of maintaining the rhythm and clapping on the right beats while not looking at the teacher, as well as execution of the Question and Answer components of the song.

  1. While playing the audio of “Kaa Fo,” show the phonetic pronunciation of the text.
  2. Explain the significance of music in Ghanaian society.
  3. Video: Por Por Group” is a video produced by the La Drivers’ Union.
  4. Note: For rythm patterns for accompaniment, please see the companion book.
  1. Discuss the subject of translation. Another section of the chorus has been extracted (nyi ni nyi ni). Write the two removed pieces down on a piece of paper in the rhythm of the music above. While the teacher shouts the solo portion, students should gesture to one of the chorus sections. Alternate whenever you want
  2. While listening to the tape, alternate between the removed bits. Inquire as to what they have heard. (male narrators)
  3. Instruct students on a simple drum ostinato. Rotate among pupils in small groups or solos – one group on drum ostinato and chorus parts while the instructor sings solo
  4. Another group on drum ostinato , chorus parts while the teacher chants solo

Student display of having learnt the song in a small group performance as part of the evaluation. “Tuu! Tuu! Gbovi” is the fourth segment of the lesson. Procedure: 1. Prepare three rhythm patterns on flash cards or on a whiteboard for the class. Practice reading aloud and then clapping your hands. 2. Divide the class into three equal groups. Each group should be assigned one of the rhythm patterns. Practice and rotate your positions. 3. Clap patterns should be recorded at the same time. Note: For a pronunciation guide and rhythms, please refer to the accompanying book.

Inquire as to what they have heard.

Adapt clapping patterns to the firikiwa, tokee, and gankogui instruments.

The song might be taught in the following or subsequent lesson/s. The following criteria will be used in the assessment: student demonstration of song performance, including singing and clapping patterns, and evidence of comprehension of rhythm patterns as represented by their sound and notation.

Important Benefits of Music In Our Schools

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This article is originally appeared on theBachelors Degreewebsite (2014)and has been updated by NAfME (2021).

Today is the day to become a member of the National Association for Music Education. Music is something that almost everyone appreciates, whether they are listening to it, singing along to it, or playing an instrument. However, despite the virtually universal love in music, many schools are opting to discontinue their music education programs altogether. That would be a mistake, since schools would lose not just a fun subject, but also one that has the potential to improve students’ lives and education.

1: Early musical instruction aids in the development of language and reasoning skills: Students who get early musical training will develop the parts of the brain that are associated with language and reasoning capabilities.

2) Mastery of memorization: Even while playing using sheet music, student musicians are continuously relying on their ability to recall information as they perform their pieces.

4.Learning music encourages craftsmanship, and students learn to desire to generate excellent work rather than substandard work as a result of their experience.

Improvement in hand-eye coordination: Students who practice with musical instruments have a better grasp of the movements of their hands and arms.

5.A sense of accomplishment: Learning to play pieces of music on a new instrument can be a difficult, but attainable objective for anybody who is motivated.

Sixth, children remain motivated and involved in school when they are studying a fun topic such as music.

7.Success in society: Music is the very fabric of our society, and it has the ability to mold talents and character in people.

In addition, musical instruction may make a significant contribution to children’s intellectual growth.

They also have stronger self-esteem and are better at dealing with worry than the general population.

Playing music provides repetition in a pleasurable setting.

Students who regularly practice music can improve their aural attention and be more adept at identifying predictable patterns in a noisy environment.

The development of the complete brain and the development of a child’s imagination are two important outcomes of artistic education.

Relaxing music is very beneficial when it comes to helping children relax.

Children who learn to play an instrument can learn valuable lessons in discipline.

14.Preparation for the creative economy: Investing in creative education can help students prepare for the workforce of the twenty-first century.

The development of creative thinking skills in children who study the arts can be a valuable life skill.

Student’s who study music have a better chance of developing spatial intelligence, which helps them to interpret the environment properly and construct mental representations of what they are seeing.

17.Kids can learn collaboration: Many musical education programs, such as those that demand participation in a band or symphony, need teamwork.

18.Taking risks in a responsible manner: Performing a musical piece might cause worry and anxiety.

19.More self-confidence: Students who participate in musical activities might gain pride and confidence as a result of the support and encouragement of teachers and parents. Students’ communication skills are likely to improve as a result of their musical instruction.

Teachers, Music Parents, Students, and Advocates: looking for more information on music’s benefits? Check out these other resources:

  • Participate in the nationwide Arts ARE Education initiative
  • The National Association for Music Education’s Advocacy Resource Center
  • Arts education is essential, according to a declaration signed by more than 100 groups. What role may public policy play in promoting music education and Social Emotional Learning (SEL) in children? (brochure)
  • (brochure) Music Education and Social Emotional Learning: An Advocacy Tool for Music Educators On the Everything ESSA resource page, you may find out more about music’s place in federal education legislation. a flyer promoting music advocacy
  • Encourage all pupils to participate in music education. Learn about the work that the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) is doing to support music education and how you may become involved. Read the most recent news on music education advocacy. Music Advocates: Join the National Association of Music Merchants (NAfME) now to make a difference for music. Find out more
  • The following are five ways to support your music program: The National Association for Music Education’s Music in a Minute Blog– search by category on this page

Have you gotten any new ideas for your music program as a result of this blog? Amplify your thoughts by sharing them! Interested in reproducing this article? Please contact us. Please have a look at the reprinting guidelines. For the exchange of information and opinions, the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) provides a variety of platforms, including blogs and postings on our website, articles and columns in our periodicals and journals, and postings to our Amplify member portal.

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