What Is A Chant

Definition of CHANT

Verb Her name was being chanted by the throng. When she returned to the stage, the audience chanted “Sara, Sara.” Protesters were yelling in front of the governor’s residence. They were chanting in Arabic at the time. The Catholic Mass was chanted in Latin by the priests. Peace now, peace now!” was our rallying cry. Chantis are a type of meditation and prayer that is widely used. Recent Web-based examples include: Verb To get your name chanted at FirstEnergy Stadium, you must first inspire them.

28th of October, 2021, Jeff Mcdonald, San Antonio Express-News In addition to having the statement written on posters and banners, sports fans are increasingly chanting it.

On October 23, 2021, Bill Plaschke of the Los Angeles Times wrote: Sooners supporters chanted for true freshman backup quarterback Caleb Williams on Saturday after Heisman favorite Spencer Rattler faltered for the second time in as many games.

According to a video shared to Johnson’s Twitter account, he can be seen continuing to shout with demonstrators even after being hauled into prison and having his wrists tied with zip ties.

  1. 22 April 2021: ABC News’ Bill Hutchinson says Examples found recently on the internet include: noun The chant appeared to contain an obscenity intended towards members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
  2. The aggressive chant aimed towards BYU by our student section during yesterday night’s football game does not reflect the ideals of the Trojans, who are committed to excellence.
  3. Other recordings from the event reveal that people on the stage led the crowd in the chant, according to the footage.
  4. on 4 November 2021, according to Buddy Collings of the Orlando Sentinel.

—Sam Pilger, Forbes, November 12, 2021 The quasi-satellite, which was spotted in 2016 by astronomers using the Pan-STARRS telescope in Hawaii and given the name Kamo’oalewa, which comes from a Hawaiian creationchant that alludes to an offspring journeying on its own, was initially detected by researchers in 2016.

—Ashley Strickland, CNN, November 11, 2021 On the 5th of November, 2021, Tamar Hallerman, ajc wrote: These sample sentences were compiled automatically from multiple internet news sources to reflect current use of the word ‘chant.’ They are not all created equal.

It is not the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors that the viewpoints stated in the examples are correct. Please provide comments.

Chant – Wikipedia

Achant (from the French chanter, which comes from the Latin cantare, “to sing”) is the repeated speaking or singing of words or sounds, usually based on one or two basic pitches known as recitation tones. For example, the Significant Responsories and OffertoriesofGregorian chant have a considerable degree of repetitionof musical subphrases, whereas a basic melody with a restricted set of notes contains a complicated musical structure that contains a great deal of repetition of musical subphrases.

Some liturgical chants were transformed into songs in the later Middle Ages (forming one of the roots of later Western music).

Chant as a spiritual practice

Chanting (e.g., the recitation of a mantra, a holy text, the name of God/Spirit, etc.) is a widely practiced spiritual activity. Chanting, like prayer, can be a part of one’s personal or collective practice, depending on the context. Chanting is considered a path to spiritual development by a wide range of spiritual traditions. In 2013, monks sang at Drepung monastery in Tibet. African, Hawaiian, and Native American chants; Assyrian and Australian Aboriginal chants; Gregorian chant; Hindu chant; Qur’an reading; Bahá’ chants; various Buddhist chants; various mantras; Jewish cantillation; and the chanting ofpsalms and prayers in particular in Roman Catholic (seeGregorian chantorTaizé Community), Eastern Orthodox (seeByzantine chantorZnamenny (seeAnglican Chant).

Tibetan Buddhist chant is performed through the throat, with each performer producing a variety of different pitches.

India’s bhakti devotional tradition is based on kirtan, which has a large following in various nations and traditions, including the Ananda Marga school of meditation.

ChineseShijing(), often known as ‘chanted poetry,’ reflects Zen Buddhist concepts and is sung from theDan tien (or lower belly), which is considered the locus of power in many Eastern cultures.

See also

  • A prayer to the almighty
  • A fight song
  • A sea shanty–a rhyming work song performed on sailing vessels
  • A skipping-rope rhyme
  • A football chant, etc.

References

  • A site dedicated to Vedic chants
  • Traditional Buddhist Chants (Texts and Audio), such as those found in the Buddhist Encyclopedia
  • And other related topics.

Definition of chant

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This indicates the grade level depending on the complexity of the word./ tnt, tnt/ tnt, tnt This indicates the grade level of the word based on its difficulty. Psalms, canticles, and other religious songs are often sung to a short, basic melody, notably one characterized by single notes to which an indeterminate number of syllables are intoned, which is used in church services. a psalm, canticle, or other piece of music that is sung or intended for chanting the singing or intoning of a liturgical liturgy in its entirety or in segments any music that is repetitive.

When speaking, a monotone intonation of the voice is used.

to be able to sing to sing a song of celebration to repeatedly say (a phrase, slogan, etc.) in a rhythmic and emphatic manner to sing is a verb that is used without an object.

Despite the fact that we could chat about this quiz until we’re blue in the face about the color “blue,” we believe that you should take the quiz and find out whether or not you’re a wiz at these colorful terminology.

What one of the following adjectives best depicts the color “sky blue”? Also Chaunt/tnt, tnt/ is an obsolete pronoun.

Origin ofchant

Grade level is determined by the complexity of each word./tnt, tnt/ This displays the grade level depending on the word’s complexity. Based on the difficulty of the word, this indicates the appropriate grade level. Psalms, canticles, and other religious songs are often sung to a short, basic melody, especially one defined by single notes to which an indeterminate number of syllables are intoned. It can be either a psalm, canticle, or other similar piece that is sung or that is intended for chanting.

repeated regularly and insistently by a group of people, as in a slogan or catchphrase to sing in the style of a chant, or in the manner of a chant, especially in a religious ceremony the ability to sing the act of singing a happy birthday repetitively and insistently reiterating (a phrase, slogan, or other message) the act of singing (when it occurs without any object) It is customary for people to chant.

QUIZ Is it true that you are the true blue champion of these “blue” euphemisms and epithets?

What one of the following adjectives best depicts the color “sky blue?” Also Chaunt/tnt, tnt/ is an obsolete word.

OTHER WORDS FROM chant

Chant·a·ble,adjective chant·ing·ly,adverbhalf-chanted,adjective un·chant·ed,adjective

Words nearbychant

Chant·a·ble,adjective chant·ing·ly,adverbhalf-chanted,adjective un·chant·ed,adjective

Words related tochant

Hymn,mantra,melody,shout,singing,tune,intone,recite,carol,croon,incantation,intonation,lilt,psalm,song,trill,warble,cantillate,chorus,descant

How to usechantin a sentence

  • We witness the heaving bodies, the shattered glass, the chants, the rants when CNN reports on civic disturbance in Belarus, or, allegedly, in Washington
  • All of these are plainly recognized indicators of social unrest. He wouldn’t have made any sense if he’d been in the familiar, cozy confines of the American Airlines Center in downtown Dallas, but he would have made total sense if he’d been there. As chants of “M-V-P” rang out from the stands, Wall grinned and wiggled his shoulders in joy before walking to the free throw line and completing the four-point play. In response to a building manager’s effort to explain the restriction, the mob chanted “Let us in!” and booed him.
  • Similarly, in another video, the mothers sung a familiar protest slogan to the tune of an ancient lullaby while facing the riot police in riot gear
  • They crooned, “Hands up, please don’t shoot me,” when they were confronted by the officers. When I inquired about where the original video of the “death policemen” cry was shot, the owner informed me that it was filmed on 32nd Street between Fifth and Madison avenues. On the same night that the “death cops” shout was recorded, two police officers were attacked on the Brooklyn Bridge
  • Both policemen were killed. During the chants that were being passed in front of it, a car parked at a red light honked its horn in time with the beat of the music. As some of the marchers approached the anarchists, they began to chant at them, telling them that the movement was far larger than they were. Vocalizations: Ve-al kulam, Eloha selichot, selach lanu, mechal lanu, kaper lanu
  • The Occision of the Dogs is accosted by the Tabagie and by whatever it serves as a companion to the Tabagie, duchantet of the dances
  • As a result, the term was particularly associated with any complaint or regret, as well as with the achantat the funeral ritual. The leader pointed to an empty chair without halting in his chant — which happened to be a triumphant one — and without even looking her in the eyes. Hilda| Sarah Jeanette Duncan
  • Hilda| Sarah Jeanette Duncan He nearly made his listener shudder with the sadness of the chant, which was so urgent and penetrating
  • As for noises, the quiet was only broken by the chanting of the telegraph lines and the cries of the plovers on the waste
  • Otherwise, there was nothing to hear.
See also:  Kids Sci Fi Tv Series Where They Chant A Verse To Summon A Demon

British Dictionary definitions forchant

Psalms, for example, are often recited to the accompaniment of a simple song or melody. A psalm or canticle that is performed to the accompaniment of such a tune is also known as a psalm or canticle sung to the accompaniment of a simple song or melody. rhythmic or repetitive phrase that is generally uttered or sung, as by sports fans, or similar groups In speech, monotonous or singsong intonation is used as a verb to sing or recite (a psalm, prayer, or other religious text) like a chantto intone (a slogan) rhythmically or repetitivelyto talk or pronounce monotonously as if intoning a religious text

Derived forms of chant

Chanting,noun,adjectivechantingly,adverb

Word Origin forchant

Chanting,noun,adjectivechantingly,adverb

chant

In music, a chânt (pronounced chânt) is a string of syllables and phrases that are sung or intoned on the same note or a narrow range of pitches. Canticles or prayers performed in this manner are known as intoned canticles or prayers. In the context of a phrase, a repetitive, rhythmic yell or shout is used:the chant of the audience during the rally. v.chant·ed,chant·ing,chantsv.tr. to sing or intone in response to a chant: to pray aloud The act of reciting the acts of a hero is known as chanting.

v.intr.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition, chant′ing′lyadv. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company has copyright protection for the year 2016. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company is the publisher of this book. All intellectual property rights are retained.

chant

(tnt)n1. (Music, other) a straightforward tune or melody. A short simple melody in which multiple words or syllables are allocated to one note, as in the recital of psalms, or a short simple melody in which several words or syllables are assigned to one note 3.(Music, other) a psalm or canticle that is performed to the accompaniment of such a tune 4.a catchy, rhythmic, or repetitive phrase that is generally uttered or sung, as by sports fans, for example.

5.singsong or monotonous intonation in speechvb To sing or repeat (a psalm, prayer, or other religious text) as a chant (in music or otherwise).

to pronounce or say monotonously as if intoned as though intoned as if intoned as if intoned as if intoned as if intoned as if intoned Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 – HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014 – Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 – Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 – Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 – Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition

chant

1.a short, simple melody, especially in the monodic intonation of plainsong. 2.a short, simple melody, especially in the monodic intonation of plainsong. Chanted or written psalm, canticle, or the like, for the purpose of chanting. 3.a song or singing: a bird’s chanting chant. 4.a remark, slogan, or the like that is repeated in a rhythmic and relentless manner, as by a group of people sing in the style of a chant, or in the manner of a chant, especially in the context of a church service 6.to insistently and rhythmically repeat (a phrase, a slogan, or anything else).

chant′a ble,adj.Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd.

chant′a ble,adj.Random House Kernerman Webster’s College Dictionary, 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd.

has copyright protection for the years 2005, 1997, and 1991.

chant

chanted (past participle) chanting (gerund) chanting

Present
I chant
you chant
he/she/it chants
we chant
you chant
they chant
Preterite
I chanted
you chanted
he/she/it chanted
we chanted
you chanted
they chanted
Present Continuous
I am chanting
you are chanting
he/she/it is chanting
we are chanting
you are chanting
they are chanting
Present Perfect
I have chanted
you have chanted
he/she/it has chanted
we have chanted
you have chanted
they have chanted
Past Continuous
I was chanting
you were chanting
he/she/it was chanting
we were chanting
you were chanting
they were chanting
Past Perfect
I had chanted
you had chanted
he/she/it had chanted
we had chanted
you had chanted
they had chanted
Future
I will chant
you will chant
he/she/it will chant
we will chant
you will chant
they will chant
Future Perfect
I will have chanted
you will have chanted
he/she/it will have chanted
we will have chanted
you will have chanted
they will have chanted
Future Continuous
I will be chanting
you will be chanting
he/she/it will be chanting
we will be chanting
you will be chanting
they will be chanting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chanting
you have been chanting
he/she/it has been chanting
we have been chanting
you have been chanting
they have been chanting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chanting
you will have been chanting
he/she/it will have been chanting
we will have been chanting
you will have been chanting
they will have been chanting
See also:  How To Usr Deadbrige Chant
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chanting
you had been chanting
he/she/it had been chanting
we had been chanting
you had been chanting
they had been chanting
Conditional
I would chant
you would chant
he/she/it would chant
we would chant
you would chant
they would chant
Past Conditional
I would have chanted
you would have chanted
he/she/it would have chanted
we would have chanted
you would have chanted
they would have chanted

Tables of Collins English Verbs, published by HarperCollins Publishers in 2011. ThesaurusAntonyms Words that are related Synonyms Legend:

Noun 1. chant- a repetitive song in which as many syllables as necessary are assigned to a single tone
Verb 1. chant- recite with musical intonation; recite as a chant or a psalm; “The rabbi chanted a prayer”singsong- speak, chant, or declaim in a singsongsing- produce tones with the voice; “She was singing while she was cooking”; “My brother sings very well”
2. chant- utter monotonously and repetitively and rhythmically; “The students chanted the same slogan over and over again”

Tables of Collins English Verbs (Harper & Row) Publishers, 2011 ThesaurusAntonyms Words that are similar Synonyms Legend:

chant

Tables of Collins English Verbs, published by HarperCollins Publishers in 2011 ThesaurusAntonyms Words That Go Together Synonyms Legend:

chant

Verb The American Heritage® Roget’s Thesaurus defines musical tonality as the use of words or sounds in a musical manner. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company has copyright protection for the years 2013 and 2014. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company is the publisher of this book. All intellectual property rights are retained. Translations تَرْتيل، تَرْنيمَههُتاف، تَكْراريُرَتِّلُ، يُكَرِّرُ، يَهْتِفُيُرتـل، يُنشد chvalozpvskandovánskandovatzpvav odkávat chvalozpvskandovánskandovatzpvav messeslagordénekelszlogenbaráttufrasi, slagorîsálmasöngursöngla, staglast ásyngja, tónagiedotiskanduotikisdziedtdziesma, messeslagordénekelszlogenbaráttufrasi, messeslagordénekelszlogenbaráttuf the monotonous skandana psalmu dziedanaskandtmonotónne odriekaskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovanieskandovaniesk

chant

C.VI(Mus, Rel) cantar; (during demonstrations, etc.) gritar(ritmicamente) C.VI(Mus, Rel) gritar(ritmicamente) Collins Spanish Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, Eighth Edition (2005, Collins Publishing Company) William Collins Sons Co. Ltd. was established in 1971 and 1988. The HarperCollins Publishers, 1992-1993, 1996-1997, 2000-2003-2005,

chant

Vt→scander The crowds yelled their dissatisfaction, but the police did not intervene. The demonstrators expressed their dissatisfaction with the situation. Collins Electronic Resource in English and French. HarperCollins Publishers published this book in 2005. Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 7th Edition, 2005, by Collins Publishing Company. William Collins Sons Co. Ltd. was established in 1980. The HarperCollins Publishers (Harper & Row, 1991-1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, and 2007) 1st Edition of the Collins Italian Dictionary, published by HarperCollins Publishers in 1995.

chant

Vt→scander Demonstrators yelled their disgust, but it was a silent protest. The demonstrators vented their dissatisfaction. A bilingual electronic resource in English and French from Collins. HarperCollins Publishers first published this book in 2005. A complete and unabridged German dictionary, 7th edition, published by Collins in 2005. In 1980, William Collins Sons Company Limited (William Collins). HarperCollins Publishers (Harper & Row, 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, and 2007). 1st Edition of the Collins Italian Dictionary, published by HarperCollins in 1995.

What does chant mean?

  1. Vt→scander The crowds yelled their dissatisfaction, but the police did nothing. The demonstrators expressed their dissatisfaction. E-Resource in English and French from Collins. HarperCollins Publishers published the book in 2005. 2005 edition of the Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged (Seventh Edition). William Collins Sons Co. Ltd. was founded in 1980. HarperCollins Publishers (1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007) 1st Edition of the Collins Italian Dictionary, published by HarperCollins Publishers in 1995

Wiktionary(0.00 / 0 votes)Rate this definition:

  1. Chant nounA type of singing that is performed without the use of instruments or harmony. From the Latin chanter, which comes from the Italian canto
  2. Chant verbTo sing, especially without instruments, and as applied to monophonic and pre-modern music. Etymology: From the Latin chanter, which comes from the word canto.

Wikipedia(0.00 / 0 votes)Rate this definition:

  1. An iterative speaking or singing of words or sounds (from the French chanter, from the Latin cantare, “to sing”) is known as chanting. Chanting is usually based on one or two basic pitches, known as recitation tones, which are repeated over and over. Chants can range from a simple melody involving a limited set of notes to highly complex musical structures involving a great deal of repetition of musical subphrases, such as the Great Responsories and Offertories of Gregorian chant. Chants can also range from a simple melody involving a limited set of notes to highly complex musical structures involving a great deal of repetition of musical subphrases, such as the Great Responsories and Offertories of Gregori Chant is a type of speech that may be regarded either speech or music, or it can be considered a heightened or stylized form of speech. Some religious chants were transformed into songs in the later Middle Ages (creating one of the first sources of later Western music)

Webster Dictionary(0.00 / 0 votes)Rate this definition:

  1. Chant verbto utter in a melodious voice
  2. To singEtymology:
  3. Chant verbto celebrate in songEtymology:
  4. Chant verbto utter in a melodious voice
  5. To singEtymology: the act of singing or reciting in a chant-like fashion or to the accompaniment of music that is known as a “chant”Etymology:
  6. The verb to chant is to sing, as in repeating a chant. Chant verbto produce melody with the voice
  7. To singEtymology: Etymology:
  8. A chant is a verbsong that has a melody to it. Unmetrical psalms, hymns, and other religious texts are sung or read to the accompaniment of a short and simple tune separated into two sections by double measures. It is the oldest ancient kind of choral music, dating back thousands of years. Psalm, chant verba psalm, etc., that has been prepared for chantingEtymology: The chant verbtwang
  9. A canting tone
  10. A canting method of speech Etymology:

Freebase(4.00 / 2 votes)Rate this definition:

  1. Chant is the rhythmic speaking or singing of words or sounds, which is frequently based on one or two pitches, known as recitation tones, in a repetitive pattern. Chants can range from a simple melody involving a limited set of notes to highly complex musical structures involving a great deal of repetition of musical subphrases, such as the Great Responsories and Offertories of Gregorian chant. Chants can also range from a simple melody involving a limited set of notes to highly complex musical structures involving a great deal of repetition of musical subphrases, such as the Great Responsories and Offertories of Gregori Chant is a type of speech that may be regarded either speech or music, or it can be considered a heightened or stylized form of speech. Some liturgical chants were transformed into songs throughout the later Middle Ages.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary(0.00 / 0 votes)Rate this definition:

  1. In the form of singing, chantchant is to rejoice in song, recite anything in a singing style, or sell horses in a sham. — A type of holy music in which prose is sung is known as a song of melody (n.). — ns. precentor, chant′er, Chan′or, a singer: chant′er Chant′ress
  2. One who screams out horses
  3. One who plays a bagpipe with finger holes
  4. Chant′ry is an endowment or chapel dedicated to the chanting of the Mass. Singing in concert while lifting the anchor is chant′y, a nautical song with a drawling refrain that is traditionally performed by sailors.
See also:  What Chant Heals The Chakras

How to say chant in sign language?

  1. In the form of singing, chantchant means to rejoice in song, recount anything in a singing style, or sell horses in a fictitious fashion. — A type of holy music in which prose is sung is known as a melody in song (n.). — ns. precentor, chant′er, Chan′or, a singer: a precentor in a bagpipe, the pipe with finger-holes on which the melody is played: a person who cries out for horses
  2. Chant′ress In the singing of masses, a chant′ry is an endowment or chapel. Singing in concert while lifting the anchor is chant′y, a nautical song with a drawling refrain, which is frequently sung by sailors.

Examples of chant in a Sentence

  1. Singing chantchant, v.t.to sing: to celebrate in song: to repeat in a singing manner: to falsely sell horses. — A type of holy music in which text is sung is known as a melody. — ns. precentor, chant′er, Chan′or, a singer: the pipe with finger-holes on which the tune is played on a bagpipe: one who cries out horses
  2. Chant′ress
  3. Chant′ry is an endowment or chapel dedicated to the chanting of the Mass
  4. Singing in concert while lifting the anchor is chant′y, a nautical song with a drawling refrain that is typically performed by sailors.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

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Word of the Day

  • 1A repeated rhythmic phrase, usually one that is screamed or sung in unison by a large group of people. ‘a group of young people raised their voices in a cry of “Why are we waiting?”‘
  • “The rhythmic chant spread throughout the crowd of hundreds of thousands that gathered in Kiev’s Independence Square on the evening of November 22.”
  • “Shouts and chants went up from the crowd as the lights came closer.”
  • “And then they are off again, singing and repeating the chant over and over.”
  • “Brass bands playing patriotic and national folk songs, as well as Lebanon’s national anthem, were regularly drowned out by deafening chants from the crowd The 300 or so demonstrators were in good spirits, laughing, waving signs and banners, beating home-made drums, and, thank goodness, shouting some new chants.’
  • ‘He was forced to flee the meeting hall under police escort as angry teachers shouted him down with chants of ‘liar, liar, liar’ and flung empty drink bottles from the gallery.’
  • ‘I do not agree with what you’re saying

Shouting, cries, slogans, rallying calls, battle cries, choruses, and chanting are all examples of expression. View a list of synonyms

  1. 1.1A monotonous or repeated song, usually used as an incantation or as a component of a religious ceremony. Then he began to say something, repeating it over and over again, as if it were a chant or mantra
  • ‘An assembly of 90 monks conducted Buddhist ritual chants and prayers, sanctifying the ceremony.’
  • ‘Marshall also witnessed the Big Drum dance in Carriacou, a spiritual ritual that involves chants, fire, dancing, and song.’
  • ‘Because sickness is often seen as a problem of spiritual essence, the khwan, chants, and healing rituals are often used to cure illnesses.’
  • It is performed by groups of men in unison, with their feet stomping in unison while shouting rhythmic, traditional chants.’ She wanted to portray the rhythmic, temporal nature of the chants at the Ladakh monastery in these paintings. The chanting of the name of Allah and his attributes is meant to bring one into a state of union with the Divine.’
  • ‘He went on, his words a chant, and I closed my eyes and only listened.’
  • “Groups of men sing trance-like chants to accompany belly dance.”
  • “He gets louder and louder as he repeats the words of the chant.”
  1. Incantation, intonation, recitation, singing, song, recitative, mantra, recitative, mantra, recitative, mantra
  • 2Music A brief musical piece consisting of two or more phrases that is used to sing unmetrical words
  • A psalm or canticle that is sung to such music. Even though I adore chants and church music, I had not been compelled to attend a church service in quite some time.’
  • While in Milan, where he had originally intended to visit Ambrose’s cathedral to admire his oratory skills, he found himself not only astonished by the content of the talks, but also captivated by the psalm-chanting. “Contrast was provided by alternating choral chant with passages sung by soloists.”
  • “Perhaps as a moralizing subtext, Alexander piped in a recording of a monastic chant of Psalm 51, a prayer for the remission of sins.”
  • “The first part of the piece is an antiphonal chant from the Service for the Thursday preceding Good Friday.”
  • “The second part is an antiphonal chant from the Service for
  • While in Milan, where he had originally intended to visit Ambrose’s cathedral to admire his oratory skills, he found himself not only captivated by the content of the talks, but also enthralled by the chanting of the psalms
  • ‘Contrast was provided by alternating choral chant with passages sung by soloists.’
  • ‘Perhaps as a moralizing subtext, Alexander piped in a recording of a monastic chant of Psalm 51, a prayer for the remission of sins.’
  • ‘The first part is an antiphonal chant from the Service for the Thursday preceding Good Friday.’
  • ‘The second part is an antiphonal chant

Pronunciation

  • 1Say or exclaim in a singsong tone over and over again. ‘protesters were yelling slogans,’ says the author.
  • They are far better at wearing the ribbons and badges, chanting the slogans, and marching on the demonstrations than they are at wearing the ribbons and badges, chanting slogans, and marching on the demonstrations.’ The older, stronger, and more experienced man broke through the crowd’s chants, but Marty was unable to stop him.’
  • ‘Some brandished sticks, banners, and fists, while others chanted anti-government slogans.’
  • ‘Marty was clearly pleased when he was announced the winner, as were the protesting employees.’
  • ‘The crowd is still chanting his name, but he slips off an escalator.’
  1. 1.1Sing or intone (a psalm, canticle, or holy text)
  2. “priests and choir chant the narrative of the resurrection”
  3. “priests and choir sing the tale of the resurrection”
  • When a person dies for a long period of time, we like to chant certain texts so that the dying person hears the name of God recited constantly.’
  • ‘However, it is customary for newlyweds to attend a simple ceremony at a nearby monastery later on for a blessing and texts are chanted.’
  • ‘They sing devotional songs in praise of the lord, and holy texts are chanted throughout the night.’
  • ‘They include an introduction

Pronunciation

In the meaning of’singing,’ late Middle English chanter derives from the Old French chanter’sing,’ from Latin cantare, frequentative of canere’sing’.

chant

In the meaning of’singing,’ late Middle English chanter derives from the Old French chanter’sing,’ from Latin cantare, frequentative of canere’sing,’ which is itself derived from Latin cantare.

Gregorian chant

In the meaning of’singing,’ late Middle English chanter derives from the Old French chanter’sing,’ from Latin cantare, frequentative of canere’sing.’

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