What Is The Chant On Hmong Public Radio

Radio station’s Hmong parody sparks backlash

KDWB radio in the Twin Cities has issued an apology for a song that was played on the station’s morning broadcast last week by one of its staffers. Those lines were performed to the tune of the song “Tears in Heaven” by the morning show sidekick — Steve-O. (Listen to the audio version here) We don’t have space for a couch since we sleep on the floor. One large group of VangsHmong children from a family of twenty-four children works in St. Paul. I suggest you hang out in the mall because I know where they live quite well.

The first child is born at 16 years old.

By 30 minutes, we’ll be over the hill.

You’re crammed into a two-room house with the kids, but you know they’ll be OK when they get older.

Popular radio personality Dave Ryan laughs and then appears to anticipate the criticism by saying, “I amnotlaughing at your song,” in the recording.

He did not say that the line was incorrect, but he did express regret to those who believed it was: It is with great pride that KDWB-FM and the Dave Ryan in the Morning Show can boast that members of the Hmong community are among our most devoted listeners and admirers.

Even though we’ve gotten overwhelmingly positive response from Hmong listeners who have told us that they considered the song in question to be really hilarious, we sincerely regret to anyone who we may have unwittingly hurt, as this was never our intention.

Morris said the ensuing conversation on the Facebook page regarding the event is “healthy.” The following statement was published this afternoon by the Asian American Journalists Association’s Twin Cities chapter: KDWB-FM 101.3, one of the top-rated radio stations in the Twin Cities, broadcasted a parody song on its morning show last week that was deemed offensive by certain members of the Asian-American community.

  1. Hmong radio personality Steve-O wrote a two-minute song that made fun of housing troubles and teen pregnancies in the Hmong community.
  2. While the Minnesota chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association respects the function of parody, we’ve heard from members of the community who found these statements insulting and in poor taste.
  3. We strongly advise the station to exercise caution when presenting content that stereotypes and marginalizes a significant portion of its audience.
  4. We applaud KDWB for taking action to resolve the matter.
  5. The station has also encouraged constructive debate on its Facebook page, where a large number of Hmong listeners have expressed their opinions.
  6. In the Twin Cities, there has been a long history of incidences of racial and cultural insensitivity on morning radio.

An early-’90s television show host was fired after making jokes about drunken Native Americans with a sidekick, according to KSTP. Some Native Americans demonstrated outside KQRS in 2007 after morning broadcasters made jokes about incest and suicide on Native American reservations.

About the blogger

[email protected]@newscut Having written NewsCut for Minnesota Public Radio for 12 years and pointing out to complainants that the posts were not news items, Bob Collins departed from the station in 2019. An American journalist born in Massachusetts, he worked as a news editor from 1992 to 1998. He founded the MPR News regional website in 1999, invented the popular Select A Candidate game, launched several blogs, and lamented on a daily basis that his Minnesota Fantasy Legislature project failed to gain traction.

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Ua Dab, the Hmong religion

Most areas of Hmong life, according to traditionalists, are regarded to be intertwined with supernatural creatures in some way. Comprehending the co-existence of a spirit realm and a physical world is essential to understanding Hmong rites and sacrifices, which are performed in both worlds. The spirit world is thought to be home to a variety of spirits that can have an impact on a person’s everyday life, including ancestor spirits, house spirits, nature spirits, and malevolent spirits, amongst other things.

Many ritual rituals are done in order to carry out the wishes of one’s ancestors as well as the wishes of the spirits.

Mountains, trees, streams, ponds, and valleys are all regarded to be representations of them in nature, and they are all present in the world.

“When things are going well, you give it praise,” explains Ilean Her, Executive Director of the Council of Asian Pacific Minnesotans, of the spirits, “and when things are going badly, you offer money.” A portion of this tribute might be made in the form of an animal sacrifice, the value of which is determined by the size of the animal sacrificed.

  1. Cows, pigs, and chickens are considered to be the least valuable of the sacrificed animals, in that order.
  2. However, for people suffering from more serious conditions such as epilepsy and mental disease, the greatest level of sacrifice is necessary.
  3. A shaman is capable of engaging in combat with malevolent spirits as well as negotiating with spirits in order to restore order to the physical world.
  4. A shaman will chant and converse with the spirit realm in order to get insight.
  5. Healing can occur instantly, but it is more common for it to take many days or even months.
  6. Today, shamans are frequently compensated in cash, usually in increments of $50, $100, $200, or $300 every session.
  7. Ilean Her claims that if a ceremony is not effective, the shaman is not to responsible for it.

“It will be necessary to hold another, stronger, and more spectacular ceremony,” she says.

In Minnesota, according to the most recent U.S.

According to Va-Leng Cha of the Hmong National Organization, as many as half of the Hmong have now converted to Christianity, despite the fact that many of them continue to practice shamanic rites and practices.

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Clan and lineage variations are also taken into consideration.

People can reincarnate as other humans, animals, rocks, trees, and flowers, among other things.

They believe that the spirits of the departed will be reincarnated into new members of Hmong families after they have passed away. Safety on the road, successful lives, and excellent health are just a few of the benefits that may be obtained from working with an experienced shaman.

Sunisa Lee Is A Beacon Of Hmong American Pride

Most areas of Hmong life, according to traditionalists, are believed to be intertwined with supernatural creatures. For Hmong ritualists and sacrificers, knowing the coexistence of a spirit realm and a physical world is critical to their understanding of their traditions. Many different types of spirits are thought to be present in the spirit world, some of which are beneficial and others which are detrimental to one’s everyday life. Examples of these include ancestors, home spirits, nature spirits, and malevolent spirits.

In order to satisfy the wishes of one’s ancestors as well as the wishes of the spirits, several ceremonial rites are carried out.

Mountains, trees, streams, ponds, and valleys are all regarded to be representations of them in nature, and they are all found throughout the world.

It is the spirits that Ilean Her, Executive Director of the Council of Asian Pacific Minnesotans, describes as “giving it praise when things are well and offering money when things are not.” This payment may include the sacrifice of an animal, the value of which is dependent on the size of the animal sacrificed, as part of the overall payment.

  • According to popular belief, the sacrifice value of a cow, a pig, and chicks diminishes in ascending order.
  • Those with more serious conditions, such as epilepsy and mental disease, will need to make the most extreme of sacrifices, though.
  • When it comes to restoring order to the physical world, a shaman can fight malevolent spirits and bargain with them.
  • Chanting and conversing with the spirit realm will be performed by a shaman.
  • The healing process can be completed instantly, but it is more common for it to take several days or even weeks.
  • These days, shamans are frequently compensated in cash, usually in increments of $50, $100, $200, or $300 every session.
  • It is not the shaman’s fault if a ceremony does not go as planned, according to Ilean Her.
  • A total of 42,000 Hmong people live in Minnesota, according to the most recent U.S.
  • A representative of the Hmong National Organization, Va-Leng Cha, claims that as many as half of the Hmong have now converted to Christianity, however many of them continue to perform shamanistic ceremonies.
  • Additionally, differences in clan and lineage are considered.
  • Other humans, animals, rocks, trees, and flowers are all possible incarnations for people who die and return.

They believe that the spirits of the departed will be reincarnated into new members of Hmong families after they have passed on. Safety on the road, successful lives, and excellent health are just a few of the benefits that may be obtained from working with an experienced shaman..

HealthPartners, AT&T Boycott KDWB over Hmong Parody

Following the airing of a musical parody titled “Thirty Hmongs in a House,” HealthPartners dropped their advertisement from KDWB radio station on Friday. AT T also pulled their commercial from the airwaves, claiming that the music was “extremely insulting.” On Tuesday morning, Jeff Shelman, a spokesperson for the Bloomington-based health care organization, confirmed that the group had ended its advertising arrangement with the prominent Twin Cities radio station. He continued, “We simply didn’t feel that it was consistent with what we stand for,” Shelman said, adding that the company’s “leadership” found it to be insulting.

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It was reported by Minnesota Public Radio, which released the lyrics of the contentious parody, that the song’s tune was a ripoff of Eric Clapton’s “Tears in Heaven” by the same name.

It also depicts Hmong girls who become pregnant at the age of 16 and have seven children by the time they are 23 years old.

Following some negative feedback following the broadcast of the song, the station made the following statement on its Facebook page: “KDWB-FM and theDave Ryan in the Morning Show are extremely delighted that members of the Hmong community are among our most dedicated listeners and fans.” Most of our listeners are aware that theDave Ryan in the Morning Showis a comedy program intended to entertain them, and that most of the content is parodic in nature.

Despite the fact that we’ve gotten overwhelmingly positive response from Hmong listeners who have told us that they considered the song in issue to be really hilarious, we sincerely regret to anyone we may have unwittingly hurt, as this was never our intention.” The Facebook page was inundated with comments from listeners, many of whom claim that the crisis is being exaggerated beyond any reasonable comprehension.

AT T, located in Dallas, which has a large presence in Minnesota, has also dropped its advertising from KDWB, according to the station.

Because of this, we have terminated our advertising relationship with KDWB.” He declined to disclose on the extent of HealthPartners’ advertising business with KDWB, citing confidentiality agreements.

According to sales, the firm is the third-largest health insurer in Minnesota, with $3.4 billion in revenue in 2009. In 2010, the corporation generated sales of $3.6 billion dollars.

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