What Is The Gregorian Chant The Monks Song In Monty Python Andthe Holy Grail

5 Things That Actually Make Sense About Monty Python & The Holy Grail (& 5 That Don’t)

On Christmas Eve, many youngsters, particularly males, take to the streets to sing ‘kalanda’ (carols). They sing while beating on drums and using triangles. They may also have model boats that are ornamented with nuts that have been painted gold on them at times. The practice of transporting a boat in the Greek Islands dates back thousands of years. If the youngsters sing effectively, they may be rewarded with money as well as food items such as almonds, candy, and dried figs. A small wooden bowl with a piece of wire suspended over the rim is an ancient and extremely traditional ornament.

A small amount of water is kept in the bowl to keep the basil alive and fresh.

This is thought to keep the ‘kallikantzaroi’ (evil spirits) at bay.

They are thought to come from the center of the ground and enter people’s homes through the chimney!

  1. Keeping a fire going for the entire twelve days of Christmas is also intended to keep the kallikantzaroi at bay (burning old shoes is meant to be a very good way of scaring off the kallikantzaroi).
  2. It is a well-known tourist destination.
  3. Decorated ships are an ancient practice in Greece, where tiny ships were displayed in homes when sailors returned from sea expeditions.
  4. The first documented Christmas tree in Greece was set up by King Otto in 1833, close to a big decked boat.
  5. However, having a boat as well as a tree is getting increasingly trendy!
  6. After the ceremony, folks can return home and complete their Advent fast.
  7. It’s frequently served with a spinach and cheese pie, as well as a variety of salads and vegetables.

The pastries are either served for breakfast or as an appetizer.

Another popular biscuit in Greece is kourabiedes, which is a butter and almond cookie that is similar to shortbread in texture.

It’s a circular sweet bread that’s spiced with cinnamon, citrus, and cloves.

The bread is prepared on Christmas Eve and is ready to be served on Christmas Day.

Happy/Merry Christmas in a variety of other languages.

On New Year’s Eve, many families will gather for a large feast and to play games.

Kalanda songs/carols for the New Year may also be sung.

The adults in the family offer money and gifts to the youngsters as a way of wishing them a happy new year.

This is a custom that states that a youngster who is considered to be ‘fortunate,’ the first-born of a family, or occasionally the man of the house, must be the first person to enter a house that year – and that they must do it with their right foot.

In certain parts of Greece, the individual enters the house while holding a pomegranate, which they smash at the front door before entering the house.

There is also an unique St Basil’s Day cake called ‘Vasilopita’ that is served on this day (vasi-LO-pita).

In certain places of Greece, the cake is sweet, and in others, it is more like a loaf of bread.

In some households, the Vasilopita is sliced and the pieces are distributed by the father of the family.

The remainder of the slices are distributed among members of the family/household in order of age, with the oldest individual receiving the first slice.

The feast of the Epiphany is celebrated in the Greek Orthodox Church to commemorate Jesus’ baptism as a man when he was twelve years old.

There are several competitions held around the nation where young men dive into freezing lakes, rivers, and the sea in an attempt to be the first to retrieve a cross that has been blessed by a priest and tossed into the water.

Whoever receives the cross first is expected to have good fortune in the upcoming year. Boat blessings, ship blessings, music, dancing, and plenty of food are all part of the Epiphany celebrations.

10Makes No Sense: Horseless Horses

One of the film’s more apparent jokes centres around King Arthur and his Knights traveling the land without the aid of their faithful steeds, which is one of the film’s more blatant jokes. Keeping up appearances, the squire trails after, knocking two coconut shells together to replicate the sound of horseback riding (an old foley sound effects trick). Within the first five minutes of the film, the story premise is parodied, but what about poor old Patsy, the man who has to do all the heavy lifting?

Patsy’s arms would have been sore and fatigued after all of that repetitive clapping of coconuts, wouldn’t they?

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9Makes Sense: Flying Cows

The French catapulting a live cow and numerous other animals/food items at King Arthur from the walls of the castle caused a commotion among the crowd, but it’s actually a lot closer to truth than many people believe. In the olden days, the French would frequently employ a similar strategy whenever an invading force attempted to lay siege to their strongholds. In order to demoralize the opposing army, the French would hurl their last scraps of food at them, creating the false impression that they had more than enough food to endure the siege for an extended amount of time.

8Makes No Sense: Frank The Famous Historian

The French catapulting a live cow and numerous other animals/food items at King Arthur from the walls of the castle caused a commotion among the crowd, but the scene is much more realistic than many people know. When a foreign army laid siege to one of the French castles in the olden days, the French utilized a strategy quite similar to this one. For the purpose of demoralizing the opposing army, the French would hurl their last scraps of food at them, creating the false impression that they had more than enough food to endure the siege for an extended amount of time.

7Makes Sense: The Monks Chanting

It’s ironic that one of the most comedic episodes in the film is actually one that is more low key than the majority of the rest of the film – the appearance by the monks who pray “Pie Jesu domine, dona eis requiem” before beating themselves with pieces of wood. This translates as “Merciful Lord Jesus, grant them rest,” which is a classic Latin burial liturgy that means “Merciful Jesus, grant them rest.” Although it is not wholly out of place throughout the events of the film, it is nevertheless amusing to see the Monty Pythoncrew parody it in such a silly manner.

6Makes No Sense: Tim’s Powers

It appeared as if Tim the Enchanter was greatly afraid of the giant beast that guarded the cave that hid the secret location of the Holy Grail; however, it is unclear why. Indeed, Tim’s abilities were nothing short of remarkable, consisting of magical missiles, fireballs, explosions, and a flamethrower coming from his own cane, among other things. With or without the help of the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch, it’s safe to say Tim would have had no issue destroying the enormous beast.

It is not made apparent what particular abilities the Grenade possesses in addition to its typical explosive charge, although they appear to be insignificant in compared to the type of sorcery Tim is capable of conjuring.

5Makes Sense: Class Arguments

When Tim the Enchanter encountered the giant beast protecting the cave containing the Holy Grail’s hidden location, he appeared to be terrified of it. But why? Indeed, Tim’s abilities were nothing short of astounding, consisting of magical missiles, fireballs, explosions, and a flamethrower coming from his own cane, amongst other things. With or without the assistance of the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch, it’s safe to say Tim would have had no issue destroying the enormous beast. Beyond its regular explosive charge, it is not stated what additional abilities the Grenade possesses, although they appear to be insignificant compared to the sort of magic Tim is capable.

4Makes No Sense: The Dead Animator

As soon as Arthur and his Knights had defeated the killer beast that had been guarding the cave, another, far more powerful monster appears and pursues them down the tunnel in the manner of classic animated films. Just as it appeared that all hope had been lost, the animator in charge of drawing the monster succumbs to a heart attack at his desk and keels over backwards in his chair. One of two options appears to be more plausible. For starters, only the animator in question have the creative ability to sketch out the thing that was chasing after him.

Three cheers for story devices that are both convenient and effective!

3Makes Sense: The Bridge Of Death

“Rules for thee, but not for me,” as stated in the film’s final act, did not apply to the bridge keeper’s actions in the last act. In order to cross the bridge of death, Arthur and his Knights must first answer “these questions three,” which are posed to them. Lancelot gets it over without incident, but Robin and Galahad are unsuccessful in their endeavors and are hurled into a canyon by a supernatural power. In the following episode, Arthur is confronted with a query concerning the air speed velocity of an unladen swallow, and he requests explanation on the differences between African and European species varieties.

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Furthermore, no one has to put up with a hypocrite!

2Makes No Sense: Arthur’s Army

When Arthur and Bedevere arrive to Castle Aarrgh, they discover that the French have beaten them to the punch and are refusing to relinquish control of the castle. Disgusted at having traveled so far just to be denied their treasure, Arthur prepares for one more fight to capture the castle by force and reclaim the Grail for the United Kingdom. The fact that Arthur and the Knights spent such a long time searching for the Grail (and devouring their minstrels in the process) makes it difficult to fathom where his massive army came from at the film’s concluding sequence.

At the very least, they were not accompanied by horses!

1Makes Sense: Lack Of End Credits

When Arthur and Bedevere arrive to Castle Aarrgh, they discover that the French have arrived first and are refusing to relinquish control of the castle. Astonished that they’ve gone this far only to be denied their treasure, Arthur prepares for one more fight to capture the castle by force and regain control of the Grail for the United Kingdom. The fact that Arthur and the Knights spent such a long time searching for the Grail (and devouring their minstrels in the process) makes it difficult to fathom where his massive army came from at the film’s climactic sequence.

A mobile weapons refinery appears to be on hand to assist them with their preparations. If nothing else, they were lacking in horse power! Would have been awkward had it happened like that!

Monty Python and the Holy Grail — Gregorian Chant

When Arthur and Bedevere arrive to Castle Aarrgh, they discover that the French have beaten them to the punch and are refusing to relinquish control. Afraid that they have gone this far just to be denied their treasure, Arthur prepares for one more fight to capture the castle by force and regain control of the Grail for the United Kingdom. After spending so much time searching for the Grail (and devouring their minstrels in the process), it’s a mystery where Arthur’s massive army appeared in the last scene of the film.

At the very least, they were not accompanied by horses.

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Classical Western plainchant, which includes Gregorian Chant and other forms of monophonic liturgical chant, is the core tradition in Western culture. It is used to accompany the celebration of Mass and other religious ceremonies. This large repertoire of chants is the oldest known music since it is the first repertory to have been adequately notated in the 10th century, making it the oldest known music. For the most part, the chants were learned orally, following the model set forth by the Schola Cantorum, which required several years of experience in the Schola Cantorum.

click here to find out more It is the core lineage of Western plainchant, a style of monophonic liturgical chant that was used to accompany the singing of Mass and other ceremonial services in Western Christianity….

It is used to accompany the celebration of Mass and other religious ceremonies.

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Hallelujah Humor!

You haven’t watched this yet, but it’s a good time to see it now! So, music nerds, please explain me what it is about this that is amusing. While you’re watching, give it some thought, and then click Mr. Readmore for this music nerd’s perspective on it. First and foremost, there’s the contrast between the “monks,” who are all motionless and somber, their faces hidden, and the way they flip those placards exactly in time with the upbeat music that plays in the background. In addition, many people (depending, presumably, on a mix of age bracket and geek factor) will be instantly reminded of the following information: The monks are singing a true Latin liturgy text to authentic-sounding music, which I believe is one of the reasons this clip is amusing.

King Arthur is thought to have lived a few hundred years after this medieval type of singing was first documented, but that’s getting a little nitpicky right there.) Aside from the inherent hilarity in the notion itself, there are other adorable unique tweaks to the implementation, including the following:

  • I appreciate how they raise the cards to a higher position when the feminine vocals sing and lower them when the male voices sing
  • They lift the cards in a leisurely, sweeping manner that corresponds to the transition in the music in the middle part that begins, “The dominion of this world.” I really appreciate how they handled the alternation of “King of Kings” and “Lord of Lords,” which included the multitasking conjunction! Finally, shaking the cards to symbolize the extended final “Hallelujah” completed the picture by tying everything together.
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This group of individuals should have been my pupils, so I could have given them an A+!

Polyphonie Aquitaine of th 12th Century

On August 25, 2008, a review was published in the United States. My questions are not about your CD player and speakers, nor do I want to know whether you have the opportunity to hear chanting in person. My curiosity is regarding your state of mind and level of concentration when you hear chant, whether it is live or on recording. The way you listen will have a significant impact on what you hear. They claimed that their ceaseless daily chanting served as both an act of repentance and a prayer for the salvation of the whole human society, for which they were the chosen intercessors, during the 12th Century chanting monasteries.

However, one has to believe that some of them, if not the majority of them, were aware of the physical attraction and worldly beauty that music possessed.

They are credited with inventing the concept of “music for music’s sake.” Such artistic singing was never welcomed by the Catholic Church, which tried repeatedly over the centuries from the 12th to the twentieth centuries, to limit music to its bare religious function, stripping it of its human ostentation and artistic aspiration.

“Music,” I’m pleased to report, has always endured.

Is it referred to as plainchant or Gregorian chant?

What did they listen for?

Is there a spiritual aura?

Me?

Despite the fact that I am not a spiritual seeker, I find myself envious of both the monks and the spiritually driven listeners who may feel exaltation while listening to chant.

In 1984, when this CD of Aquitanian chant was issued, the chanters of Ensemble Organum were aspiring musicians who had had no formal training in music.

Since 1984, Ensemble Organum has released more than two dozen more recordings of chant and other Medieval genres of music, some of which have been released for secular purposes.

Everything that Ensemble Organum attempted was met with immediate opposition.

Those who perceive chant primarily as music were less than enthusiastic in their response to it.

He’s a risk taker and a trailblazer in his field.

So, what really is his objective?

A total of five chanters plus Pérès himself on organ make up the Ensemble Organum from 1984.

Gérard Lesne, a male alto who rose to prominence as one of the best performers of Italina and French Baroque music, as well as the director of the excellent group Il Seminario Musicale, achieved international acclaim.

Josep Benet and Josep Cabre went on to have distinguished careers as late Renaissance polyphonists, specializing in the music of the Spanish Golden Age, notably the polyphony of the late Renaissance.

The singing on this CD, which is available in a variety of forms and is an important addition to any collection of chant recordings, is very beautiful.

It is entirely up to you how you choose to listen to this chant, and no one else.

Nothing matters what is on this tiny donkey since it is so pricey.

Do you believe that this was the Divine Christ’s objective, since he more than properly and plainly stated it in the Sermon on the Mount?

Is it not this emotion that is articulated in as many lovely harmonies, nay, polyphonies, as are sung here that the message is conveying?

What are we like as newborns, babble-babbling and hearing nothing but babble?

Take your money and use it to repair and succor the suffering of war zones and the awful spreading slums of this uncaring planet, rather of spending it on this guilded donkey, so that you will not be ashamed when your time comes.

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