What Is The Homophomic Chant At Soccer Games

Explaining the homophobic chant that has Mexico’s soccer federation in hot water with FIFA

Gregorian chant melodies have a tendency to travel in leaps and bounds across a wide range of pitches.

What is the homophobic chant?

When an opponent goalkeeper puts the ball into play on a goal kick, Mexican national team fans gather together in unison to yell a homophobic slur (“p—,” which roughly translates to “gay prostitute”) in Spanish, a tradition that is thought to have developed among fans in the early 2000s. The shout is intended to terrify both the goalkeeper and the opposition team, according to legend. When used by supporters at a sports stadium, the argument has been that the phrase has numerous cultural meanings in Mexico and other Spanish-speaking countries, and that it is not intended to be homophobic slur.

The fact that it is a disparaging phrase that is insulting to the LGBT community cannot be ignored.

“It is not the intention with which you yell or chant that is important.

“If somebody believes that it is a discriminating conduct, then it is not something that should be brought up in a discussion.

If anything is discriminatory, it should be avoided.” MORE:Mexican soccer authorities fear that they may face harsher penalties in the future.

The world body has made it clear that it will be cracking down on racism and homophobia in the game around the world — Hungary was fined in 2017 for a homophobic chant directed at Cristiano Ronaldo — and that the teams whose supporters engage in discriminatory behavior will bear the consequences of their actions.

What is Mexico doing about the homophobic chant?

When an opponent goalkeeper puts the ball into play on a goal kick, Mexican national team fans gather together in unison to yell a homophobic slur (“p—,” which roughly translates to “gay prostitute”) in Spanish, a behavior that is thought to have begun among fans in the early 2000s. The cry is intended to scare both the goalkeeper and the opposition team, according to the rules of the game. For years, the argument went like this: the phrase has numerous cultural meanings in Mexico and other Spanish-speaking nations, and when used by supporters in a stadium, it is not intended to be a homophobic slur.

  • That has been made very obvious by FIFA and anti-discrimination organizations, and the Mexican soccer federation (FMF) has also acknowledged it and is taking appropriate measures.
  • How the other person perceives it is important “Yon de Luisa, the president of the Mexican federation, spoke to the media in 2021 about the organization’s goals.
  • The issue is no longer up for discussion.
  • READ MORE: It is the FMF’s intention to work in collaboration with soccer authorities and match organizers to eliminate the chant from its matches, with the understanding that failing to do so might result in an escalation of sanctions from FIFA.
  • Step 1: Match cancellation with a warning to spectators
  • Step 2: The contest is suspended, and the players are moved to the locker room. Step 3: The match is abandoned.

In the short period of time since the new restrictions were implemented, they have begun to have some effect, but in some towns and stadiums, supporters have continued to defy the new rules. It will most likely take more time for the chant to be completely eliminated, but the Mexican football federation will hope that this does not come at the expense of competitive point deductions or even expulsion from official tournaments such as the World Cup, which Mexican officials believe is a real possibility if the problem continues.

FIFA sanctions for homophobic chants

The slogan has been used by Mexican fans at club and national team games since the early 2000s, but it garnered international attention during the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. Despite mounting disapproval, it made a triumphant reappearance four years later at the 2018 FIFA World Cup, with Mexico’s unexpected victory over Germany in the final. Since 2015, the Mexican football federation has been penalized by FIFA on a number of occasions, with the number of instances becoming impossible to keep track of.

  1. However, the severity of the consequences is increasing.
  2. The sentence included a $65,000 fine and two official home matches played behind closed doors in the following months.
  3. Also in connection with homophobic chanting by Mexican supporters at a friendly against Iceland in Arlington, Texas, in May 2021, the FIFA Disciplinary Committee started a second investigation against the country.
  4. It is also unclear whether any disciplinary punishment would be taken in response to the shouts during Mexico’s participation in the CONCACAF Nations League semifinals and final in June 2021, which will be broadcast live on ESPN.
  5. “Fining players, playing one or two games behind closed doors — which is what we’re concerned about today, along with the fine — deducting points, losing matches, and being barred from participating in a competition or tournament are all possibilities.
  6. That is the current state of affairs.” The chant resurfaced during Mexico’s opening 2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup group match against Trinidad and Tobago in Dallas, resulting in a stoppage in play as per protocol, as well as a stern warning from CONCACAF to fans.

There were indications that the severe FIFA punishment may have helped change fan behavior when exhibition matches played by Mexico’s senior national team on June 12, June 30 and July 3 unfolded without incident.

‘Homophobic and not very clever’: why puto chants haunt Mexican football

The slogan has been used by Mexican fans at club and national team games since the early 2000s, but it garnered international attention during the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.. Despite mounting disapproval, it made a triumphant comeback four years later at the 2018 FIFA World Cup, with Mexico’s unexpected victory over Germany in the final. There have been several FIFA sanctions against the Mexican football federation since 2015, so many that it’s tough to keep track of them all. According to the Los Angeles Times, the Mexican football federation was penalized nine times in the run-up to the 2018 World Cup, and 15 other national football federations were also sanctioned for similar fan conduct over the same period.

  1. During an Olympic qualifier in Guadalajara, Mexico, in March 2021, homophobic shouts by Mexican supporters were heard, and FIFA punished the Mexican federation with a $65,000 fine and two official home matches played behind closed doors in June 2021 as punishment.
  2. Also in connection with homophobic chanting by Mexican supporters at a friendly against Iceland in Arlington, Texas, in May 2021, the FIFA Disciplinary Committee filed a second case against the country.
  3. It is also unclear whether any disciplinary punishment will be imposed in response to the chanting during Mexico’s participation in the CONCACAF Nations League semifinals and final in June of next year.
  4. “Fining players, playing one or two games behind closed doors — which is what we’re concerned about today, along with the punishment — deducting points, losing matches, and being barred from participating in a competition or tournament are all possible outcomes in this situation.
  5. As of right now, this is the state of affairs.” The chant resurfaced during Mexico’s opening 2021 CONCACAF Gold Cup group match against Trinidad and Tobago in Dallas, resulting in a stoppage in play as per protocol, as well as a stern warning from CONCACAF to fans.
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Mexican soccer fan: ‘Puto’ is a gay slur

However, it received widespread attention during the 2014 World Cup, when it was chanted by supporters at Mexican club and national team games. Despite mounting outrage, it resurfaced four years later during the 2018 FIFA World Cup during Mexico’s unexpected victory over Germany. Since 2015, the Mexican football federation has been sanctioned by FIFA on several occasions, with the number of instances becoming impossible to keep track of. According to the Los Angeles Times, the Mexican football federation was penalized nine times in the run-up to the 2018 World Cup, and 15 other national football federations were also sanctioned for similar fan conduct.

  • FIFA sanctioned the Mexican federation in June 2021 for homophobic chanting by Mexican supporters during Olympic qualifiers played in Guadalajara, Mexico, in March 2021.
  • FIFA informed ESPN that the penalty will apply to all official Mexican national team matches, regardless of the team or age category involved.
  • Punishment for the incident is still on the way.
  • “I’d like to remind you of the disciplinary sanctions that FIFA is considering,” de Luisa said in a statement to the media following FIFA’s announcement of the two-match suspension for fans.
  • In the case of clubs, there is also relegation.

What Mexican Fans Really Mean When They Chant Puto at the World Cup

After the Mexico vs. Croatia FIFA World Cup match, Mexican supporters erupted in applause. Pedro PARDO/AFP/Getty Images contributed to this image. If you paid careful attention during Mexico’s play against Croatia on Monday, you could have heard fans of El Tri chanting the Spanish wordputo during goal kicks during the game. Contrary to popular belief, the term puto does not refer to a point or a punt. It is true that the phrase is an obvious anti-gay slur, albeit one that is fairly grammatically clever, which is why its usage by Mexican supporters has been so contentious during this World Cup in Russia.

Despite promises to the contrary, ESPN did not tone down the slur during their broadcast on Monday night.

To divert the opposition team’s goalkeeper’s attention away from his duties, fans yellputo, which loosely translates as “gay prostitute,” at him.

A very particular homophobic double-entendre is being used in this instance, playing on the notion of allowing someone to “score a goal on you.” To score a goal in Spanish is referred to as “meter un gol.” That literally translates as “to put a goal in,” therefore when a goaltender fails to do his or her duty properly, hedejó que se la metieran, or “allowed someone to stick it in,” is used.

  1. FIFA is shrugging its shoulders in this issue since, while the Mexican cry is plainly insulting, it is not an explicitfaggot (or maricón in this instance).
  2. According to others, faggot and homosexual whore are not nearly the same thing, despite the fact that the venom of their intentions is difficult to distinguish.
  3. The most straightforward answer would be to outlaw all versions of the p-word.
  4. The English equivalent forputais alsofuck, since it may be conjugated in a variety of ways that are comparable to the Spanish.
  5. “This fucking cold”:este puto fro (this fucking cold).
  6. Forbiddingputa, like forbiddingfuck, is a complete and utter moron.
  7. We are not, of course, going to eliminate the terms eitherputaorputofrom everyday speech.
  8. A part of me wants to think that something was lost in translation and that, if FIFA truly understood and felt the insult, it would respond differently than it has thus far.
  9. The Mexican team’s officials, on the other hand, are well-versed in the language of putomeans.
  10. When it comes to societal dialogues that lead to change, sports can be a powerful tool, as we’ve seen with the way the NBA handled the Donald Sterling situation with the Clippers or the rising outrage over the name of a particular Washington NFL club.

But they chose not to. Instead, they decided to accept the term as a part of their cultural heritage. We shouldn’t have to rely on a FIFA judgment to tell us that something is wrong, but it would have been a step in the right way if it had happened.

El Tri aims to show Mexicans are better than ‘Puto’ chant

After the Mexico vs. Croatia FIFA World Cup match, Mexican supporters erupted in celebration. AFP/Getty Images photo by Pedro PARDO Fans of El Tri chanted the Spanish wordputo before goal kicks during Mexico’s match against Croatia on Monday. If you paid attention, you could have heard them. Contrary to popular belief, the term puto does not refer to a punt or a kick. It is true that the word is an obvious anti-gay slur, albeit one that is fairly grammatically clever, which is why its usage by Mexican supporters during this World Cup has been so problematic.

Despite promises to the contrary, ESPN did not tone down the slur during their coverage on Monday night football.

To divert the opposition team’s goalkeeper’s attention away from his duty, fans chant puto, which loosely translates as “gay prostitute,” at him.

When it comes to homophobia, the phrase is a very specific double-entendre that plays on the idea of allowing someone to “score a goal on you.” An example of this would be the phrasemeter un gol, which means “to score a goal.” Because it directly translates as “to put a goal in,” it means that when a goaltender fails to do his or her duties, hedejó que se la metieran, or orallowed someone to stick it in, is used.

  • Hopefully, you can see where this is headed: When you allow a goal to go in, it’s like being on the receiving end of anal sex—you know, like a homosexual person.
  • “FIFA should be concerned about more important problems,” Mexican coach Miguel Herrera, I am confident, would not be able to get away with stating if supporters were screaming that.
  • In addition, it’s important to note that puto is the male version ofputa, which is an obvious sexist insult.
  • Language restrictions, on the other hand, are rarely so straightforward.
  • To put it simply, it was a freaking challenge.
  • Forbiddingputa is the same as forbiddingfuck.
  • There is no way we will eliminate the terms eitherputa or puto from everyday speech.
  • A part of me wants to think that something was lost in translation and that, if FIFA truly understood and felt the insult, it would respond differently.
  • However, they are incapable of comprehending the visceral gut punch that you receive when you hear a slur in your home language since they do not speak the language.
  • When it comes to societal dialogues that lead to change, sports can be a powerful tool, as we’ve seen with the way the NBA handled the Donald Sterling scandal with the Clippers or the rising outrage over the name of a particular Washington NFL club.

As a result, they have chosen to accept the insult as a part of their cultural heritage. Even if we shouldn’t have had to wait for a FIFA decision to find out that anything is wrong, doing so would have been a positive step in the right path nonetheless.

“Don’t forget who we are”

Referees have the option of pausing the game after the first incident to have the public address announcer notify the crowd of the potential ramifications of the event. The campaign’s message is straightforward: “Don’t forget who we actually are as Mexicans, and support us without alienating those around us.” Immediately after that message are emojis depicting the Mexican flag, muscular contraction, and flames. It also includes an emoji of a shouting fan, which is followed by the symbol for “no entry.” The hashtag for the campaign is #SupportWithoutOffending.

  • It doesn’t make a difference.
  • Mexico’s football federation is ready to inform its supporters that FIFA would punish the organization if the chanting continue.
  • Mexico might lose games and money as a result of the remarks.
  • That is, of course, an extreme scenario, but it is a possibility.
  • A passion for El Tri was inherited by many of us who were born in the United States, thanks to the influence of our parents.
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Puto chant tradition not worth passing along

The Los Angeles Tribe’s home games in the Los Angeles Coliseum and Rose Bowl were a highlight of my childhood. Every single one of El Tri’s World Cup matches was shown live on television. That affection has been handed down to my children. I’ve always felt secure watching El Tri, whether it was in NRG Stadium in Houston, AT T Stadium in Dallas, Azteca Stadium in Mexico City, or the Rose Bowl or Coliseum in Los Angeles. I’m curious whether homosexual supporters got the same sense of security every time the majority of the audience chanted “Ehhhhhhhhh…

  1. As a result, it is frequently used in public to frighten and harass homosexual males.
  2. We should be able to do better than this.
  3. De Luisa wants Mexican fans to be aware of the stakes in this match.
  4. In Mexico, they are regarded as national heroes.
  5. Kids pay attention to them, for better or ill.

El Tri stars pivotal to campaign

El Tri played at the Los Angeles Coliseum or the Rose Bowl, and I grew up going to see them play. We were able to see all of El Tri’s World Cup games on TV. These feelings of affection have been passed down to me by my children. Every time I’ve seen El Tri, whether it was at NRG Stadium in Houston, AT T Stadium in Dallas, Aztec Stadium, or the Rose Bowl or Coliseum in Los Angeles, I’ve felt completely secure. “Ehhhhhhhhh… Puto!” chanted by the majority of the crowd, I wonder whether homosexual supporters felt the same sense of relief.

Also, it’s used to intimidate and harass homosexual males on the streets.

Better than that, I think we should be.

Mexico’s de Luisa wants its followers to be aware of what is at stake.

Mexicans consider them to be national heroes. They are the ones with the biggest stages. Children pay attention to them, for better or ill. These young adults are respected, and de Luisa is well aware that sending the correct message without their participation would be difficult.

Mexico to play two World Cup qualifiers without fans due to use of homophobic chant

El Tri played at the Los Angeles Coliseum and the Rose Bowl, and I grew up going to see them play. We were able to see all of El Tri’s World Cup matches on TV. I’ve been able to pass on that love to my children. I’ve always felt secure watching El Tri, whether it was in NRG Stadium in Houston, AT T Stadium in Dallas, Azteca Stadium, or the Rose Bowl or Coliseum in Los Angeles. I’m curious whether homosexual supporters got the same sense of security each time the majority of the audience chanted “Ehhhhhhhhh…

  • It is also used to frighten and harass homosexual guys on the streets.
  • We should be able to do better.
  • De Luisa wants Mexican fans to be aware of the situation.
  • They are revered as national heroes in their home country.
  • For better or worse, youngsters pay attention to what they have to say.

Perspective

DENVER — The city of Denver is home to the Colorado Rockies. The stadium’s public address announcer tested pronunciations of player names and other routine statements that will be used before and during the Concacaf Nations League semifinals on Thursday, only a few hours before the event. It was anticipated that frequent statements in the stadium, which took place on Thursday at Empower Field at Mile High, would urge supporters to avoid from using such profanity, organizers said. In an effort to eliminate it from stadiums, regional and international regulatory organizations have increased their efforts, including on social media campaigns and threats of expulsion and game forfeiture.

  1. At many points throughout the game, spectators chanted a homophobic Spanish term whenever the Costa Rican goalie attempted to punch the ball up the field.
  2. Another incident caused referee Bryan Lopez Castellanos to temporarily pause play during second-half stoppage time.
  3. The words “Concacaf Anti-Discrimination Protocol Step 1” flashed over the big screen board in black and white.
  4. Eventually, the chaos subsided enough for the scoreless 90 minutes to come to a conclusion, and a penalty kick tiebreaker to be played.
  5. The chant during Mexican soccer games has been around for a long time.
  6. “Paying for a ticket does not give you the right to discriminate against someone,” Yon De Luisa, the president of the Mexican Football Federation, spoke to Yahoo Sports earlier this month.
  7. It further stated that penalties as a result of the incident might cost Mexico a World Cup berth.
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Two years ago, the group urged all governing bodies to follow its example and put in place the same regulations as it.

The second option, if it becomes necessary, is to send the players to the locker rooms and, if all else fails, to call the game off.

When the cry was used before Mexico’s opening encounter at the 2018 World Cup in Russia, FIFA did not follow its three-step procedure, as it has done in previous tournaments.

Over the years, racist abuse from soccer supporters has been the sport’s most serious problem.

However, in recent years, the sport has begun to fight back.

Despite the fact that they were winning the match 3-1 at the time of the event, the San Diego players walked off the field in protest and declared a forfeit.

“Cease a chant that is insulting, has no place in football, and may cause members of the LGBT+ community to feel excluded from the sport,” the Concacaf said in a statement.

During the opening match of the day, between the United States and Honduras, there were no reports of any disturbances.

With time running out, Lopez Castellanos called a three-minute break in the game, during which the public address announcer described what was going on.

Despite the fact that it appeared as though the referee was about to remove the players from the field, the official decided to conclude regulation and begin the tiebreaker.

Before Sunday’s championship game, organizers are hopeful that the message has been received by the crowd. A new set of problems might arise, though, with Mexico and the United States reigniting their old rivalry and a championship trophy on the line once again.

FIFA sanctions Mexico to 2 games behind closed doors for fans’ homophobic chant

FIFA has ordered Mexico to play its next two World Cup qualifying home games behind closed doors as a result of the continued usage of a homophobic chant by its fans, as sanctioned by the organization. In addition, El Tri has been fined 100,000 Swiss francs, which is the equivalent of approximately $109,771 in U.S. dollars. Mexico’s next three World Cup qualifying matches — on November 12 against the United States Men’s National Team, on November 16 against Canada, and on January 27 against Jamaica — will not be played at home.

  1. Following the use of the homophobic slur during a CONCACAF Olympic qualification match earlier this year, the Mexican national team was punished by FIFA with a two-game ban, which was announced in June.
  2. The squad was given permission to bring fans to their next World Cup qualifying encounter against Canada on October 7.
  3. As a result of FIFA’s first punishment, Yon de Luisa, the president of the Mexican soccer federation, stated that the country’s participation in the 2026 World Cup — which will be held by the United States, Canada, and Mexico — may be jeopardized if the chanting continued.
  4. Getty Images (Photo courtesy of Jared C.

How will this affect Mexico’s qualification process?

Several Everton soccer supporters, including their own, have been condemned for yelling an anti-gay slur at an opposing player during a match. It was deemed “inappropriate” by the team’s management. During Everton’s Premier League match versus Chelsea at Stamford Bridge in the United Kingdom on Thursday, the derogatory slogan “Chelsea Rent Boy” was yelled. For the record, “rent boy” is slang for young male prostitutes who have sex with other men in the United Kingdom. The Everton F.C. was promptly called out by the Rainbow Toffees, an LGBT+ support organization that claims to have communicated with the soccer club about their ill-behaved fans on multiple previous occasions.

“Everton condemns the homophobic chants aimed at a Chelsea player this evening at Stamford Bridge,” read a statement from the Liverpool-based club.

“Through our ‘All Together Now’ campaign, we aim to promote and celebrate the diversity and inclusion that exists within our club, our game, and our community,” Everton continued.

Many clubs chastised their fans for directing homophobic slurs at visiting players earlier this year, and numerous teams did so again this year.

Mexico’s “Puto” Chant Won’t Ever Go Away, No Matter What FIFA Does

In response to a group of Everton supporters yelling an anti-gay slur at one of their own players, the club has condemned the supporters. It was deemed “inappropriate” by the team’s leadership. “Chelsea Rent Boy,” an obscene slogan, was yelled during Everton’s Premier League match versus Chelsea at Stamford Bridge in the United Kingdom on Thursday afternoon. If you’re not familiar with the term, “rent boy” refers to a young male prostitute who has sex with other males in the United Kingdom. As a result, an LGBT+ support organization, Rainbow Toffees, promptly called out the Everton F.C., claiming that they had communicated with the club about their ill-behaved fans on previous occasions.

It has already been discussed with the club and will be discussed again in the future.

It is inappropriate and does not reflect the ideals of our club or the greater fans,” said the club’s president.

” It is our expectation that supporters would represent those ideals in the future by abstaining from using discriminatory chants.” When it comes to Premier League games, unpleasant chants have been heard on several occasions.

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