What Is The Neck Chant

How LSU’s notoriously profane ‘Neck’ chant happened at national title game — by accident

When it happened, social media was ablaze with excitement. The infamously vulgar chant about oral sex associated with the song “Neck,” which was sung by LSU football supporters after the team’s national championship victory over Clemson, resounded throughout the Superdome. ESPN’s microphones picked up on it. Even LSU quarterback Joe Burrow was seen dancing and raising his hand to the music.. Suck that Tiger d-, b-, as they say in the chorus. “Talkin’ Out Da Side Of Ya Neck” was originally a song by Cameo and Dem Franchize Boyz, and the band used it to introduce their performance of the song.

However, according to some members of the band, they did not play it in its entirety on Tuesday evening.

Another person yelled over their agreement.

‘Panic!

  1. The State also heard that many former LSU players who were in attendance and are now in the NFL had strolled past the band, pointing to their necks, seeking to persuade the band to perform a song they were singing.
  2. requested the band to play the song and paid the charge, although an LSU representative claimed he was unaware of any fine associated with the song’s performance.
  3. According to him, “when there’s a will, there’s always a way.” “And they absolutely came up with a tune to set it to,” says the author.
  4. Saahdiq Charles, an offensive lineman, said it just gave him the impression that the game was being played at his house.
  5. “The ‘Neck’ chant erupted just as we were ready to sprint down the field for kickoff, and it really pumped me up,” Carter explained.
  6. “It was fantastic.” It’s safe to say that I smacked someone on the kickoff.” The original version of this story was published on January 14, 2020 at 2:33 a.m.
  7. In 2015, I became a member of The State.
  8. At various periods in my career, I’ve received feature writing awards from the APSE, SCPA, and IAPME.
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Why the LSU band play Neck at football games, explained

When the LSU marching band performs “Neck” during football games, it is usually a source of heated debate. Every now and again, the LSU marching band will swallow a heavy fine and perform “Neck” at a game against another school. To refresh the memory of those who are unfamiliar with the contentious song, let’s go through the basics. The song “Neck” is a rendition of the Cameo song “Talkin’ Out The Side Of Your Neck,” which was released in 1982. A wonderful song to cover because of the fast-paced horn part and great rhythm, especially when Dem Franchize Boyz released their own version of the song in 2008, titled “Talkin’ Out Da Side Of Ya Neck.” What exactly is the source of contention?

It was decided that instead of signing, “talking out the side of your neck,” they would use something NSFW and abbreviated to STTDB.

Once you realize why this music has been prohibited since 2010, you will understand why. Put on your earmuffs, kids! Every now and again, the LSU band will play the song during a game and the crowd will go absolutely insane (see video below).

LSU football: Why it is controversial when the band plays the banned song Neck

To avoid being associated with a filthy acronym, the band refrains from performing “Neck” at nearly every football game. But when the team is ridiculously excellent and the audience becomes a little too confident, the band will bite the bullet and turn up some “Neck.” On several times during LSU’s flawless season that culminated in a national title, the band would perform the hitherto unplayed prohibited song on the field. Who knows when the band will perform “Neck” again, but at least you’ll be prepared if and when they do.

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‘Neck,’ complete with vulgar LSU chant, turns up at Baton Rouge high school volleyball game

LSU students returned to campus last weekend with a filthy chant, and Baton Rouge high school students joined in from the stands of a volleyball game. During a version of “Neck,” a camera showed kids singing the five-word chorus as Parkview Baptist welcomed St. Michael, according to the video. It is suggested in the chant that the opposing team conduct oral sex on the LSU tiger mascot. When the two rival colleges squared off, a sizable audience was in attendance. As soon as the slightly muted chorus ended, oohs and laughing could be heard echoing around the gym.

Are you unable to view the video below?

A student section of the band’s rendition of Cameo’s and Dem Franchize Boyz’s “Talkin’ Out Da Side of Ya Neck” was once barred from performing by the LSU Athletic Department in 2010 after the original lyric, “Oh oh talking out the side of your neck,” was replaced with a sexually explicit line, according to the LSU Athletic Department.

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  • LSU coach Ed Orgeron stated earlier this season that he like the music, but not the lyrics that accompany it.
  • I have to admit that some of the terms in it don’t sit well with me.
  • The music is catchy.
  • The band first performed the song in 2013 and has only performed it on a few occasions since then.
  • The filthy, five-word chant could be heard over a different music during LSU’s game against Georgia at Tiger Stadium, where fans were chanting it out loud.

Call me a naive old fuddy-duddy, but there’s something really troubling about the filthy, disgusting, and crass slogan screamed out by the thugs on so many different levels…

Turns Out The LSU Band Didn’t Play ‘Neck’ At The Championship

LSU students returned to campus last weekend with a filthy chant, and Baton Rouge high school students joined in from the stands of a volleyball match. When Parkview Baptist hosted St. Michael, a video showed children performing the five-word chorus during a version of “Neck.” LSU’s tiger mascot is the subject of an inciting chant that calls for his or her performance oral sex on him. When the two rival colleges squared off in front of a big audience, the atmosphere was electric. Oohs and laughs could be heard echoing around the gymnasium after the somewhat muted chorus.

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  • Besides being broadcast on nationally televised games, the phrase was audible across the stadium.
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  • Upon hearing this, the coach responded with “You know that’s not my business.” “However, the song isn’t bad at all.
  • My answer is “no.” The music is great.
  • This is the second time the band has performed the song, which was first performed in 2013.
  • The filthy, five-word slogan could be heard over a different music during LSU’s game against Georgia at Tiger Stadium, where fans were chanting it loudly.

LSU’s band mighta played “Neck” at the behest of Odell Beckham

Following a nasty chant from LSU students last weekend, Baton Rouge high school students joined in from the stands of a volleyball game. As Parkview Baptist hosted St. Michael, a video showed children singing the five-word chorus during a version of “Neck.” It is suggested that the opponent conduct oral sex on the LSU tiger mascot in response to the shout. The two rival colleges squared battle in front of a big crowd. As soon as the somewhat muted chant ended, oohs and laughing could be heard echoing throughout the gymnasium and hallway.

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Are you unable to watch the video below?

A student section of the band’s rendition of Cameo’s and Dem Franchize Boyz’s “Talkin’ Out Da Side of Ya Neck” was once barred from performing by the LSU Athletic Department in 2010 after the original lyric, “Oh oh talking out the side of your neck,” was replaced with a sexually explicit line by the athletic department.

  1. Twice a day, we’ll give you a digest of the day’s most important stories.
  2. LSU coach Ed Orgeron stated earlier this season that he like the music but does not care for the lyrics that accompany it.
  3. “However, I do enjoy the song.
  4. No, I don’t.
  5. I believe it captures everyone’s attention.” The LSU band no longer performs ‘Neck’ at Tigers home games, but the student section demonstrated on Saturday that this would not deter them from doing so.
  6. On Saturday, however, the student section demonstrated that the well-known chant will not be stopped.

During LSU’s game against Georgia at Tiger Stadium, fans could be heard chanting the filthy, five-word chant over a different tune. Call me a naive old fuddy-duddy, but there’s something really troubling about the filthy, disgusting, and crass slogan shouted out by the thugs on so many levels…

Watch: LSU Fans’ Explicit ‘Neck’ Chant Captured on Live TV

Last weekend, LSU students brought an obscene chant back to campus, and Baton Rouge high school students followed suit from the stands of a volleyball game. A video captured students singing the five-word chorus during a rendition of “Neck” as Parkview Baptist hosted St. Michael. The shout encourages the opposing team to conduct oral sex on the LSU tiger mascot. The two competing institutions squared off in front of a big audience. Following the slightly muted chorus, oohs and laughing could be heard echoing around the gymnasium.

  1. Can’t see the video below?
  2. The LSU Athletic Department once banned the band’s rendition of Cameo’s and Dem Franchize Boyz’s “Talkin’ Out Da Side of Ya Neck” in 2010 after the student section changed the original lyric, “Oh oh talking out the side of your neck,” with a sexually explicit line.
  3. Twice a day, we’ll email you the most important news stories from the previous day.
  4. LSU coach Ed Orgeron stated earlier in the season that he like the music, but not the lyrics that accompany it.
  5. “However, I am a fan of the music.
  6. I don’t think so.
  7. Everyone, I believe, is enthused by this.” The LSU band no longer plays ‘Neck’ at Tigers home games, but the student section demonstrated on Saturday that this would not deter them from doing so.
  8. On Saturday, however, the student section demonstrated that the well-known cry would not be silenced.
  9. Call me a naive old fuddy-duddy, but there’s something really unnerving about the filthy, disgusting, and obscene chorus screamed out by t…

It’s Time For Neck To Adapt Or Die

LSU’s upset of Georgia was merely the main narrative of Saturday’s episode of the LSU football soap opera, which featured a number of other stories as well. The B-plot was that Neck was being used as a pawn. The music was not performed by the band, but rather piped in over the speakers. It doesn’t really matter because the ultimate outcome was the same: Georgia fans were asked to express their affection for Mike The Tiger orally. This is not a surprise development. If you dump a steak in the water, a shark will consume it without a second thought.

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When you play Neck at LSU, you’ll be serenaded with five amazing words that will stay with you forever.

Chants and cheers that are clearly intended to insult rather than inspire do not reflect the values of Louisiana State University.

Make a lot of noise.

There are many different types of supporters at the stadium, and we represent the whole LSU family on national television every week.

** As far as I can tell, Alleva is hinting at another trial run with Neck, perhaps this Saturday against Mississippi State or two weeks later against Alabama.

**(** Note from the editor: according to official information from LSU, there are no plans to bring the music back.

It was initially played, as far as I can recollect, in 2007, and it was an instant smash.

It became LSU’s calling card when it came to big games.

And the student section is just as enthused as they were when the announcement was made over the loudspeakers on Saturday night.

However, after approximately three years, some mischievous students in the student section had the guts to sing their own lyrics — and they were rather wicked!

Nonetheless, life, uh, uh, finds a way, and ultimately the chant made its way into songs that had even a remotely similar BPM or structure, such as Right Above It, and became well-known.

As a result, the song has been effectively “banned” in the same manner that a fire extinguisher is prohibited: it is just stored behind a glass that says “in case of emergency.” The glass was shattered on Saturday.

Miss Terry, Greg Byrne, Damien Harris, and Bradley Uppercrust III had starred in a video imploring Alabama supporters (most of whom were students) to keep the equally troubled Dixieland Delight clean just a few days before the game.

This is something I’m sure LSU is looking at and thinking whether they can generate the same kind of push to get Neck back, but I’m here to tell you that’s not going to happen.

The STTDB chant doesn’t bother me at all.

I am not a hypocrite in any way.

When the actual music Neck is played, that’s when I start to care about it.

However, because STTDB is the primary reason Neck is prohibited, I’m fed up with it.

Even if LSU fans try to adapt STTDB to various music, they’ll always be on the lookout for the elusive dragon.

Take it down.

Based on the team’s recent performance, LSU supporters don’t deserve to be called “Neck.” The Georgia game was the first time in recent memory that students remained for the whole four quarters of a non-Bama game (oh, and east sideline ticket holders, you’re equally responsible for this).

This has to be the logical end to either the chant or the music, or both, in my opinion.

It is conceivable to have one without the other, but doing so would entail foregoing the five words that every lady desires to be heard. I can tell you right now which alternate lyrics LSU would be willing to accept, and it isn’t the one with the alternative lyrics.

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