What Is The Nexk Chant

How LSU’s notoriously profane ‘Neck’ chant happened at national title game — by accident

When it happened, social media was ablaze with excitement. The infamously vulgar chant about oral sex associated with the song “Neck,” which was sung by LSU football supporters after the team’s national championship victory over Clemson, resounded throughout the Superdome. ESPN’s microphones picked up on it. Even LSU quarterback Joe Burrow was seen dancing and raising his hand to the music.. Suck that Tiger d-, b-, as they say in the chorus. “Talkin’ Out Da Side Of Ya Neck” was originally a song by Cameo and Dem Franchize Boyz, and the band used it to introduce their performance of the song.

However, according to some members of the band, they did not play it in its entirety on Tuesday evening.

Another person yelled over their agreement.

‘Panic!

  1. The State also heard that many former LSU players who were in attendance and are now in the NFL had strolled past the band, pointing to their necks, seeking to persuade the band to perform a song they were singing.
  2. requested the band to play the song and paid the charge, although an LSU representative claimed he was unaware of any fine associated with the song’s performance.
  3. According to him, “when there’s a will, there’s always a way.” “And they absolutely came up with a tune to set it to,” says the author.
  4. Saahdiq Charles, an offensive lineman, said it just gave him the impression that the game was being played at his house.
  5. “The ‘Neck’ chant erupted just as we were ready to sprint down the field for kickoff, and it really pumped me up,” Carter explained.
  6. “It was fantastic.” It’s safe to say that I smacked someone on the kickoff.” The original version of this story was published on January 14, 2020 at 2:33 a.m.
  7. In 2015, I became a member of The State.
  8. At various periods in my career, I’ve received feature writing awards from the APSE, SCPA, and IAPME.
  9. Contribute to my work by purchasing a digital membership.

Why the LSU band play Neck at football games, explained

When the LSU marching band performs “Neck” during football games, it is usually a source of heated debate. Every now and again, the LSU marching band will swallow a heavy fine and perform “Neck” at a game against another school. To refresh the memory of those who are unfamiliar with the contentious song, let’s go through the basics. The song “Neck” is a rendition of the Cameo song “Talkin’ Out The Side Of Your Neck,” which was released in 1982. A wonderful song to cover because of the fast-paced horn part and great rhythm, especially when Dem Franchize Boyz released their own version of the song in 2008, titled “Talkin’ Out Da Side Of Ya Neck.” What exactly is the source of contention?

It was decided that instead of signing, “talking out the side of your neck,” they would use something NSFW and abbreviated to STTDB.

Once you realize why this music has been prohibited since 2010, you will understand why. Put on your earmuffs, kids! Every now and again, the LSU band will play the song during a game and the crowd will go absolutely insane (see video below).

LSU football: Why it is controversial when the band plays the banned song Neck

To avoid being associated with a filthy acronym, the band refrains from performing “Neck” at nearly every football game. But when the team is ridiculously excellent and the audience becomes a little too confident, the band will bite the bullet and turn up some “Neck.” On several times during LSU’s flawless season that culminated in a national title, the band would perform the hitherto unplayed prohibited song on the field. Who knows when the band will perform “Neck” again, but at least you’ll be prepared if and when they do.

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‘Neck,’ complete with vulgar LSU chant, turns up at Baton Rouge high school volleyball game

LSU students returned to campus last weekend with a filthy chant, and Baton Rouge high school students joined in from the stands of a volleyball game. During a version of “Neck,” a camera showed kids singing the five-word chorus as Parkview Baptist welcomed St. Michael, according to the video. It is suggested in the chant that the opposing team conduct oral sex on the LSU tiger mascot. When the two rival colleges squared off, a sizable audience was in attendance. As soon as the slightly muted chorus ended, oohs and laughing could be heard echoing around the gym.

Are you unable to view the video below?

A student section of the band’s rendition of Cameo’s and Dem Franchize Boyz’s “Talkin’ Out Da Side of Ya Neck” was once barred from performing by the LSU Athletic Department in 2010 after the original lyric, “Oh oh talking out the side of your neck,” was replaced with a sexually explicit line, according to the LSU Athletic Department.

  1. Twice a day, we’ll email you the most important news stories of the day.
  2. LSU coach Ed Orgeron stated earlier this season that he like the music, but not the lyrics that accompany it.
  3. I have to admit that some of the terms in it don’t sit well with me.
  4. The music is catchy.
  5. The band first performed the song in 2013 and has only performed it on a few occasions since then.
  6. The filthy, five-word chant could be heard over a different music during LSU’s game against Georgia at Tiger Stadium, where fans were chanting it out loud.

Call me a naive old fuddy-duddy, but there’s something really troubling about the filthy, disgusting, and crass slogan screamed out by the thugs on so many different levels…

Turns Out The LSU Band Didn’t Play ‘Neck’ At The Championship

I’m a little late to the party when it comes to a lot of LSU traditions. I grew up in Michigan, rooting for the University of Michigan athletic teams. However, because I am married to an LSU supporter, I have been highly invested in LSU football for over two decades. Even with that, I wasn’t really clear what all the fuss was about with the “Let the band play ‘Neck” thing until a few of years ago. But now that I’ve found out, I think it’s hilarious. So when I heard the LSU fans chanting the profanity-laced “Neck” cry during the College Football National Championship Game last night, I believed the band was finally playing “Neck” for the fans as LSU prepared to defeat Clemson.

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(WARNING: the NSFW chant can be heard in this audio clip as Burrow is seen on the jumbotron participating in the event.) It turns out that “Neck,” the tune that LSU supporters have come to associate with the school, is really a song by the band Cameo called “Talkin’ Out The Side Of Your Neck.” It has absolutely nothing to do with the chant that LSU supporters threw in there.

  1. As a result, it would be a huge deal if the LSU band decided to go all out during the National Championship game in front of the entire nation, and it seems like they did just that on Saturday.
  2. According to many band insiders who spoke to The Slate, the song that the band performed was Panic!
  3. Say Amen to At The Disco’s “Say Amen.” You may listen to the music by clicking on the link below: So, what exactly was it?
  4. Was it a deliberate attempt to gratify the fans, students, and past players, or did they find a sly way around it?

LSU’s band mighta played “Neck” at the behest of Odell Beckham

Following LSU’s victory against Texas A&M on Saturday night, The Golden Band From Tigerland played a familiar melody that has become somewhat of a rarity at Tigers games in recent years. That’s “Neck,” the Cameo and Dem Franchize Boyz song “Talkin’ Out Da Side of Ya Neck,” which means “Talkin’ Out Da Side of Ya Neck.” As a stand-alone piece, it’s a wonderful tune. You’ve almost certainly heard a different band’s version of this song at some point. LSU supporters, on the other hand, have added some intriguing voices to their band’s rendition of the song.

  1. This has gotten the band into a lot of problems over the years.
  2. A few years ago, LSU distributed information to students in an attempt to quell the chant.
  3. was in the stands on Saturday night, and he seems to have come with a modest request.
  4. Neck is what he wants.
  5. On November 26, 2017, Matthew Herrera (@mjherrera13) tweeted: Beckham, on the other hand, looks to wield considerable authority.
  6. pleads with them to perform Neck.
  7. Tyler Nunez (@TylerAmPress) is a social media influencer.
  8. This isn’t a joke.
  9. Earlier in the season, LSU’s marching band found itself in hot water when it performed during a Tom Petty memorial by Florida’s marching band, just days after the rock musician passed away.
  10. LSU’s “Neck” struck the Florida’s PA system, causing it to issue a reprimand before the game had begun.

Ha. Code Worsham (@CodyWorsham) on October 7, 2017 — Keep an ear out the next time you hear the LSU band play “Neck,” and if you’re feeling generous, pass the hat around to help offset any fines that may be imposed on the university. It’s the very minimum you can do.

Watch: LSU Fans’ Explicit ‘Neck’ Chant Captured on Live TV

Recent years have seen LSU Tigers fans draw attention for their celebrations of important victory and for an unique explicit chant that has become an institution at home games. Traditionally, this custom has been restricted to Tiger Stadium, however it was featured prominently during the National Championship game. A video taken by ESPN accidently recorded some of the spectators yelling “Suck that Tiger d—, b—.” The unbeaten streak of the LSU band performing “Neck” continues. ESPN broadcasted the event live.

  1. pic.twitter.com/QDPCEoTgve 14th of January, 2020, Pablo Escobarner (@PabloEscobarner) The band performed the song “Neck” when the team scored a touchdown in the fourth quarter, increasing the margin to 42-25.
  2. Joe Burrow, the quarterback, was seen raising his hands in the direction of the music.
  3. This is horrible.
  4. Others argued that this chant portrayed the institution in a negative light and that they should be ashamed of themselves for participating in it.
  5. According to The State, the song came about as a result of the LSU band performing a cover of Cameo’s “Talking Out Da Side of Ya Neck” on stage.
  6. Members of the band, on the other hand, have stated that they did not formally perform “Neck” during the game as previously stated.
  7. Despite this, the fans were able to make the chant effective.
  8. “And they absolutely came up with a tune to set it to,” says the author.
  9. In fact, they were ecstatic and believed that the experience had boosted their ability to perform at a far higher level.
  10. Every once in a while, something like this happens.
  11. On the kickoff, I probably struck someone in the face.” Todd Kirkland/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images is credited with this image.
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It’s Time For Neck To Adapt Or Die

Recent years have seen LSU Tigers fans draw attention for their celebrations after crucial victory and for an unique explicit chant that has been a fixture of home games in the past few years. Traditionally, this custom has been restricted to Tiger Stadium, but it was prominently shown during the National Championship game. The yelling of “Suck that Tiger d—, b—” was accidently recorded on tape by ESPN. Unbeaten is the LSU band, which performs “Neck.” ESPN broadcasted the game live. The best thing that has ever happened to a sports fan in the United States pic.twitter.com/QDPCEoTgve 14th of January, 2020, Pablo Escobarner(@PabloEscobarner) The band performed the song “Neck” after the team scored a touchdown in the fourth quarter to extend the advantage to 42-25.

It was seen that Joe Burrow, the quarterback, was gesticulating in time to the music.

It’s horrible.

“Responding to this, one user wrote: Others argued that this chant reflected poorly on the institution and that they should be embarrassed of their actions.

A rendition of Cameo’s “Talking Out Da Side of Ya Neck” was played by the LSU band, according to The State, and the song was born.

A spokesman for the band has, on the other hand, said that they did not perform “Neck” at the game.

Despite this, the supporters managed to make the chant effective.

In fact, they were ecstatic and believed that the experience had boosted their ability to perform at a greater level than before.

Every once in a while, something like this comes along. I enjoyed it tremendously. At some point during that kickoff sequence, I probably whacked someone in the head.” Todd Kirkland/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images is credited with this photograph.

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