What Should I Bring To The Gohonzon When I Chant

How to Enshrine the Gohonzon and Care for Your Buddhist Altar

Soka Gakkai is a Japanese Buddhist organization. As a result of Nichiren Daishonin’s teaching that “it is the heart that is important,” (“The Strategy of the Lotus Sutra,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol. 1, p. 1000), Nichiren Buddhism places primary emphasis on “the heart,” whereas some other forms of Buddhism place primary emphasis on rules regarding ceremonies and formalities. When it comes to enshrining the Gohonzon in our homes, the most essential thing is our earnest desire to protect and preserve the Gohonzon.

With that in mind, the following are some succinct responses to frequently asked concerns about the enshrinement and care of the Gohonzon.

Q:What are some basic points to keep in mind when enshrining the Gohonzon?

The Gohonzon is a devotional item that represents a person’s enlightened way of life. Therefore, it should be treated with the greatest of care throughout the enshrinement ceremony.

Level position

As soon as the enshrinement is complete, the Gohonzon should be hung so that it is horizontally level with the ground. As you would with a framed painting on a wall, lightly touch the dowel at the top to make any necessary adjustments.

Careful handling

Avoid touching the Gohonzon (which is composed of calligraphy on white paper) or the fabric backing as much as possible in order to prevent stains or soiling.

Proper height

When chanting, the Gohonzon should be enshrined at a height that prevents one from gazing down on it or straining one’s neck in order to look up at it. This momentous and happy occasion takes place with the assistance of your local SGI leaders and members and is a fitting tribute to the Gohonzon’s accomplishments. Please feel free to invite your family and friends if at all feasible to our event.

Q:What should I keep in mind when finding the best place to set up my Buddhist altar?

Location of the altar should be chosen such that it will be secure and sturdy, and there will be little chance of the Gohonzon being pushed over or harmed in any way. If at all possible, avoid setting the altar too close to doorways, open windows, fires, or heavily used passages.

Minimal distractions

Attempt to locate a spot with the least amount of distractions; for example, avoid placing yourself too near to a television or in places that are frequently used by other members of the household.

Ample light

Ensure that the setting has enough of natural light so that the Gohonzon may be clearly seen when the altar is open.

Q:What are some basic points to keep in mind related to the care of the altar?

The practice of chanting and reading the sutra is vital, but the practice of laying gifts like as candles, greens, fruit, and incense does not come under the category of formalities, and they are not necessary as part of the Buddhist tradition. SGI members, on the other hand, frequently opt to give such contributions as a show of sincerity, respect, and adoration for the Gohonzon and his teachings. As a result, the offerings help to enhance the beauty and dignity of the altar. Greens, incense, candles, and fresh water are traditionally presented as offerings.

Again, these contributions are intended to elevate the altar space and serve as a representation of our sincerity; thus, the particular shape and presentation of these offerings is a matter of personal preference.

It is our honest desire to preserve and safeguard the Gohonzon that is most significant.

Cleanliness

The practice of chanting and reading the sutra is vital, but the practice of placing gifts like as candles, greens, fruit, and incense does not come within the category of formalities, and they are not necessary as part of the Buddhist religion. The Gohonzon is revered by SGI members, and many of them give such presents as a show of their sincerity, respect, and adoration for him. As a result, the offerings are used to adorn and elevate the altar. It is customary to present greenery and incense as well as candles and fresh water.

The specific shape and presentation of these offerings is up to the individual, since they are intended to elevate the altar area as a symbol of our sincerity once again.

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(Photo courtesy of Tatiana / Pexels.com) In this video, Buddhist scholar Daisaku Ikeda discusses what to chant and how to maintain concentration during your daily chanting regimen. Despite your best efforts, it’s easy to become sidetracked, and that’s perfectly OK. Rather than being stiff and unpleasant, chantingNam-myoho-renge-kyois intended to be joyful. We wanted to give some useful hints as well as a different point of view that you might adopt when your mind starts to wander or you find it difficult to concentrate.

  1. 223–24) has the following passage.
  2. If he chanted about a single item at a time, waiting for that prayer to be answered before moving on to the next, or if he could pray for several things at the same time, he wanted to know what the proper procedure was.
  3. A person who has numerous wants and aspirations should pray diligently for each and every one of them to come true.
  4. You are the only one who has the ability to bring your aspirations to fruition; no one else’s faith or practice can help you achieve your goals.
  5. To purchase something that costs three hundred dollars, you must first have three hundred dollars in your bank account.
  6. If you intend to purchase something, you must ensure that you have sufficient funds on hand.
  7. You are the only one who has the ability to bring your aspirations to fruition; no one else’s faith or practice can help you achieve your goals.

When they chant, they become distracted and their thoughts begin to stray.

Given the fact that we are human, it is normal for our minds to wander and for all kind of ideas and memories to come to mind.

When it comes to praying, there is no particular format or plan to follow.

To put it another way, it highlights the importance of being natural.

With time, and as your faith grows, you’ll find it simpler to concentrate your thoughts when you’re chanting.

Yes, everything is fine.

There’s no need to pretend that you’re praying for anything important when you aren’t actually praying for anything.

Eventually, you will create a higher and more spacious life-condition as a result of chanting spontaneously, without affectation or reluctance, for whatever it is that you most desire in life.

With time, and as your faith grows, you’ll find it simpler to concentrate your thoughts when you’re chanting.

You have the freedom to chant for whatever you want to. It is all up to you. The recitation of the sutra in the morning and evening, as well as the chanting of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are not required. They are a wonderful privilege that you have.

What is the Gohonzon?

The author provided the photo for this article. Gohonzon is a Japanese word that means “thing of devotion.” Depending on the sect, there are many different types of gohonzonin Japanese Buddhism — some are statues, calligraphic writings, paintings, mandalas, and creative interpretations; others are calligraphic writings and paintings. In Nichiren Buddhism, the gohonzon depicts the Eternal Buddha, who imparted the Lotus Sutra to everyone, and is most usually portrayed as a calligraphic mandala in the tradition of Japanese calligraphy.

  1. Nichiren Shonin’s search for an object of devotion resulted in the discovery of a mandala that does represent the Eternal Buddha.
  2. Besides that, it symbolized each of the ten spiritual realms, which were as follows: Buddhahood, Bodhisattvahood, Pratyekabuddha(realization), Sravakas(learning), Heaven, humanity, asura(arrogance or rage), animality (brutality), hunger, and Hell.
  3. As humans, we have a difficult time concentrating owing to the numerous distractions that exist in our environment.
  4. It will not confer special abilities on us or give us all of our requests, and it is not a source of idol worship in the traditional sense.
The gohonzon is a tool to help us focus our minds on the realization that we are all buddhas.

Most individuals are unable to read what is written on the gohonzon unless they are familiar with kanji characters. There may be more comparable calligraphic mandalas with subtle variations, but below is a quick explanation of what is inscribed on the gohonzon of Nichiren Shu, which was created in 1280 and is one of the most important Buddhist institutions in the world. Theodaimoku, which is the sacred title of the Lotus Sutra (Namu Myoho Renge Kyo), is written in a stylised style down the center of the page.

  1. Nichiren’s signature may be seen beneath the image.
  2. A short distance away is a group of bodhisattvas known as the Four Bodhisattva Leaders from Underground, who are supposed to be an endless number of bodhisattvas who sprang from a fissure in the earth as described in Chapter 15 of The Lotus Sutra.
  3. Among those mentioned are Tendai Daishi, Nagarjuna, Myoraku Daishi, and Dengyo Daishi, all of whom were expounders of the Lotus Sutra in their respective eras.
  4. Surrounding the four corners of the scroll are four celestial gods, one symbolizing each of the four cardinal directions of the globe, who are said to be guardians of the scroll.

Finally, thevidyaraja(esoteric deities) complete the outer-middle half of the gohonzon with the Sanskrit sign for Ragaraja in the middle left and the Sanskrit symbol for Acalanatha Vidyaraja in the center right, respectively.

Anyone can sit to chant and focus on their inner buddha.

In a Nichiren Shu temple, you may not notice the usual calligraphic gohonzon that you are accustomed to seeing. Instead, sculptures of each of the Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, and deities will frequently be on exhibit, as will statues of each of the deities. In some situations, the sculptures are restricted to simply Sakyamuni Buddha and the Four Bodhisattvas from Underground, but in others, they are more diverse. Sakyamuni Buddha is seated on the left, with the odaimoku stupa running along the middle, while the Buddha of Many Treasures is seated on the right, both of which are found in temples.

  1. When it comes to Nichiren Shu practice, we don’t just hand out gohonzons to everybody and anything.
  2. The recipient of a gohonzon must commit to become a member of Nichiren Shu and take refuge in the three treasures of Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha in order to be eligible to receive one.
  3. If you want to show the gohonzon in your house, it is recommended to do so in an abutsudan (Buddhist altar), where you can also display smaller statues and ancestor tablets.
  4. Any acceptable spot in the home will suffice if a butsudan is not accessible; any place where people may sit to chant and meditate on their inner buddha will suffice.
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How chanting can transform your life for good

You will be guided through the process of obtaining the numerous advantages of chanting by Amrita Srivastava. In the midst of the tumult of 13th-century Japan, Nichiren Daishonin, a Japanese sage, embarked on a never-ending journey to restore Buddhism to its original form, which had been lost following Shakyamuni Buddha’s death. He wanted to accomplish this for the sake of a large number of people who were suffering, and his inexorable journey led him to become aware of the fundamental rule of life: Nam Myoho Renge Kyo.

In the sense that it allowed ordinary people who were overwhelmed by illusion and sorrow to bring forth their natural knowledge, compassion, bravery, and creative energy to address their own issues and assist others in doing so, this rule was referred to as mystic.

The Sanskrit letter ‘Nam,’ which denotes reverence or devotion, has its origins in this language.

Aspects of life that are concrete, observable, and visible are referred to as ‘Ho’ in the kanji.

Meanwhile, Myo is associated with the latent state that life goes through before birth and after death, and “Ho” is associated with the manifest aspect of life from its origin through birth, development and ripening before degeneration and death before life returns to the latent state and merges with all of creation.

In the same way, humans may bring forth the exquisiteness and dignity of their existence even in the middle of their daily struggles.

Kyo is a Japanese word that literally translates as “sutra,” and it signifies that all phenomena are signs of the Mystic Law. Gains in AbundanceChanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo provides a wide range of advantages…

  1. You will be guided by Amrita Srivastava through the process of obtaining the numerous advantages of chanting. After Shakyamuni Buddha’s death, a Japanese sage named Nichiren Daishonin embarked on an unwavering journey to restore Buddhism to its original form. This quest began in the middle of the tumult of thirteenth-century Japan. The fact that he wished to accomplish this for the sake of a large number of suffering people led to his being aware of the fundamental law of existence, Nam Myoho Renge Kyo, as a result of this unstoppable expedition. People’s pain would be alleviated and their ability to maneuver through the vicissitudes of life would be aided, he felt, by the transformational power of this phrase. In the sense that it allowed ordinary people who were overwhelmed by illusion and sorrow to bring forth their natural knowledge, compassion, bravery, and creative energy to address their own issues and assist others in doing the same, this rule was referred to as mystic. Chants are being sung in the background. As the sound and rhythm of the cosmos, Nam Myoho Renge Kyo helps us understand the workings of life, its beauty, wonder, and splendor. The Sanskrit alphabet has the letter ‘Nam,’ which denotes reverence or devotion. As the Greek word’myo’ literally translates as’mystic,’ it refers to the hidden, dormant, and unlimited potential that lies in each and every individual’s existence. Aspects of life that are palpable, observable, and visible are referred to be ‘Ho’ in the slang. A group of words that spell out the never-ending and everlasting cycle of life and death are known as’myoho.’ Meanwhile, Myo is associated with the latent state that life goes through before birth and after death, while “Ho” is associated with the manifest aspect of life from its origin through birth, development and ripening before degeneration and death before life returns to the latent state and merges with all of the other elements of existence. Renge is the name given to a lotus blossom that is pristine and sweet-scented, and which is untouched by the murky water in which it grows. In the same way, humans may bring forth the exquisiteness and dignity of their existence even in the midst of their daily struggles and difficulties. Lotus is also the only flower that blooms and develops seeds at the same time, demonstrating the idea of causality and effect occurring simultaneously. According to the Mystic Law, all occurrences are signs of the Mystic Law, which is referred to as Kyo. A plethora of advantages may be gained by practicing Chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo….

Every human being possesses nine distinct levels of consciousness: 1. Seeing, 2. Hearing, and 3. Smelling 4. Smell, 5. Feel, 6. 6. Consciousness of the Mind No. 7: The Subconscious 8. Karmic awareness (Alaya) and 9. Buddha Nature are the final two concepts (Amala). It is possible for those who do not chant to reach the eighth awareness at the very best, which is a collection of all the causes and effects of all their words, thoughts, and acts from all their previous lifetimes. This consciousness is the source of all of our fears, phobias, and bad thoughts, as well as their outlook on life as individuals.

Chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo is a kind of meditation that may be done anywhere.

  1. Everyone on the planet possesses nine different levels of consciousness: Sight, hearing, and smell are the first three senses to be discovered. 4. Smell, 5. Feel, 6. Listen 6. Awareness of One’s own thoughts and feelings 7. The Subconscious Thought Process Eighth, Karmic awareness (Alaya), and Nineth, Buddha Nature (Amala). When people stop chanting, they can only attain the eighth awareness, which is the sum of all of the causes and repercussions of their words, thoughts, and acts from their previous incarnations in the best case scenario. Fear, phobias, and negative attitudes are all determined by our awareness, as is our perspective of the world and ourselves in it. Chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo awakens the ninth Consciousness, which is clean and unadulterated and is a repository of characteristics like as courage, compassion, knowledge, and creative energy. Chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo is a kind of meditation that may be used to activate the ninth consciousness. We may eliminate our negative thinking and replace it with these good characteristics by repeating the NMHRK mantra.

This life-changing phrase possesses immense power, and it has the ability to transform any unfavorable scenario into a source of value creation, so propelling us in the path of our maximum pleasure. What to chant and how to do it

  1. Chant with a distinct focus on the object of devotion, with Gohonzon focusing on the character Myo as the object of devotion. If you don’t have access to Gohonzon, you can chant to a blank wall instead. Chant this mantra in the cadence and rhythm of a white horse racing across the cosmos
  2. It will help you to relax. Continue to chant while keeping your eyes open and your sight fixated on the Gohonzon/blank wall. Try to maintain a straight spine and a concentrated mind. Keep your five senses engaged and your eyes open as you chant, as this will aid in the cleansing of all six senses. Make your chants with an open heart and a lively mood. As soon as you are faced with a significant challenge, begin chanting with a determination to eliminate any bad functions in your life. Say the chant with a heartfelt sense of sincere thanks and deep admiration
  3. After making a mistake, repeat the mantra over and over again with determination to overcome the inclination that caused you to do the mistake. Whenever you are feeling down or sad, recite with the intention of drawing joy from the depths of your being

Amrita Srivastava has eight years of substantial experience working in the education field under her belt. During the last 12 years, she has been practicing Nichiren Daishonin’s Buddhism, as well as singing his mantras. (If you would like to receive our E-paper on WhatsApp every day, please click here.) Sharing the PDF of the document on WhatsApp and other social media sites is permitted.) Published at 4:45 a.m. on Sunday, July 29, 2018 in India.

Oh my my, where do I even begin with this one? Because of people’s unwillingness to see beyond their own personal beliefs, this issue has sparked a slew of internet flame wars. I believe the argument is complicated and is founded on a number of factors;

  • What exactly is the Gohonzon, and how does it work? What right do we have to be disrespectful of the Gohonzon? Who has the authority to reproduce Gohonzon’s work
  • Will a Gohonzon that has been duplicated work?

This is something I chanted about for quite some time. Nichiren Buddhism, as well as the nature of the Gohonzon, are examined in great depth in this book.

What is the Gohonzon

With this topic, I went on and on for a while. Nichiren Buddhism, as well as the nature of the Gohonzon, are examined in depth in this book.

How can we disrespect the Gohonzon?

I’m not sure how you could disrespect a piece of parchment or paper, but even if you did, is this the same as slandering someone’s reputation? A person who fails to have trust in this sutra and instead slanders it would immediately destroy all of the seeds that may lead to the birth of a Buddha in this world…. As soon as his life comes to a close, he will be sent into the Avichi Hell. These are Shakyamuni’s words from the Lotus Sutra, which may be found here. However, they only pertain to the Lotus Sutra and not to the Gohonzon, which elucidates our commitment to the Lotus Sutra and the Ceremony in the Air.

  1. These teachings and concepts (the Lotus Sutra and the Gohonzon) are not transitory objects to which we attach ourselves in the butsudan, but are fundamentally void and non-existent.
  2. Your actions have irritated the egos of many people by enabling them to see you desecrate a sacred thing, which is what youcando.
  3. I’m confident that openly desecrating a Gohonzon will result in a great deal of bad Karma, but I don’t believe you will irreparably harm your Buddhahood seeds in the process.
  4. Someone who had traveled to the United Kingdom in search of refuge (because his life was in danger in his native country) decided to pursue the practice while in the nation.
  5. During the time period leading up to his eventual deportation from the United Kingdom, he was forced to share a cramped room with another deportee.
  6. In other words, this person was unrolling his Gohonzon every day, chanting to it, and then rolling it back up again to go to bed.
  7. Incredulous, his commander reprimanded him for insulting his Gohonzon and asked him to pass over the Gohonzon to the Chapter leader for safekeeping.
  8. Honestly, I’m not sure what else could be done to exhibit a complete lack of compassion.
  9. Despite the dogmatic attitude of one SGI leader, I’m pleased to report that the guy requesting refuge has now been accepted as a permanent resident of the United Kingdom.
  10. If your group is having a discussion meeting, do you ever turn your back on the Gohonzon (which may be difficult in a tiny room!)?

This is just a bunch of superstitious baloney. A Gohonzon is a physical manifestation of impermanence! Show it the same reverence with which you would treat a photograph of a loved one, but refrain from imbuing it with juju abilities.

Who has the right to copy Gohonzon

In many respects, this is connected to whether or not you feel that the Heritage of the Law is personified in the High Priest of the Nichiren Shoshu priesthood, which is a matter of personal preference for some. I don’t believe it. For that matter, even if Nichiren himself had made this plain, I would not be following his Buddhism. Interposing a priestly elite between mankind and enlightenment is so fundamentally against the Dharma that it is considered non-Buddhist in nature. In such case, who should have the authority to reproduce and bestow Gohonzon?

  1. Is it the SGI?
  2. I believe they are all three.
  3. Nichiren would utilize whatever means at his disposal to assist the bodhisattva’s of the earth – he would not, under any circumstances, exclude individuals with a searching spirit from his help.
  4. There are now a plethora of historical Gohonzons available on the internet, making the decision difficult.
  5. It is my contention that the current situation is a direct result of the circumstances set in motion by a priesthood that elected to keep the Gohonzon hidden from the world.
  6. They did so with the sincere aim of informing others, generating interest, and assisting lay believers in Nichiren’s Buddhism in their daily lives and practices.
  7. What makes you think that a painstakingly crafted home-made Gohonzon would be any less effective than a more cost-effective scroll from the SGI?
  8. Despite the fact that online forums have essentially rendered that argument moot, there is still no substitute, in my opinion, for a well-run group discussion gathering.
  9. To think about it, the Lotus Sutra has been available in so many various versions for so many years, and yet I haven’t seen someone burn it in the street or otherwise attempt to degrade it in any way.
  10. The decision to film or record someone else’s personal Gohonzon is a more intimate one.
  11. Personaly, if someone in my family requested a photograph of me with my Gohonzon, I would not object because it is both respectful and rude to reject.

This isn’t because I’m fearful of any occult or juju vengeance; rather, it would make me feel as if I’m making a mockery of something I care about.

Will a copied Gohonzon work?

Whether you feel that the High Priest of the Nichiren Shoshu priesthood is an embodiment of the Law’s Heritage or not is closely related to your belief in the Law’s Heritage. My answer is “no.” For that matter, even if Nichiren himself had stated this clearly, I would not be following his Buddhism. Interposing a priestly elite between mankind and enlightenment is so fundamentally against the Dharma that it is considered non-Buddhist in its nature! In this case, who should have the authority to copy and confer Gohonzon?

  1. Is it the SGI or something else entirely?
  2. According to my understanding, all three.
  3. When it comes to assisting the bodhisattva’s of the earth, Nichiren would utilize whatever measures were at his disposal – and he would never turn away those who were seeking.
  4. – With so many historical Gohonzons available on the internet these days, it’s difficult to know where to begin looking for them.
  5. I would claim that the current scenario is a direct result of the decisions made by a priesthood to keep the Gohonzon hidden from the rest of the world’s inhabitants.
  6. They did so with the sincere aim of informing others, generating interest, and assisting lay believers in Nichiren’s Buddhism in their daily lives.
  7. A different Gohonzon may be present in the butsudan of another practitioner, and I would have no reason to dispute their selection!
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You will, arguably, get nothing by tackling it alone, save for the direction and support of others, which is a significant disadvantage.

No proof of desecration of the Gohonzons that can be found on the internet, though, that I’ve come across.

No, the entire purpose of discouraging individuals from emulating the Gohonzon is to maintain CONTROL over their actions.

The fact is that when you actively utilize a Gohonzon, it becomes a profoundly personal object, and I would respect that person’s wishes, just as I would want others to respect my wishes when it comes to photography.

In contrast, if we were holding a party, I wouldn’t want a picture taken of folks who were looking a little worse for wear, grinning inanely in front of an open butsudan.

The reason isn’t because I’m afraid I’ll be punished in some sort of occult way or by juju – rather, it would seem like I’m making a mockery of something I care about.

  1. It’s because the member believes Nikken is a slanderer that they don’t want to be reminded of him while chanting (the member’s wishes and ego are generating the distraction)
  2. According to the member, the Gohonzon will not function properly in some way since the nasty wicked Nikken designed it (the member is deceived by voodoo juju)
  3. According to the member, the Gohonzon will not function properly in some manner since Nikken committed technical faults (I’ll dismiss this one out because it’s very evident that the Nikken Gohonzon is not incompetent).

You have no way of knowing for a sure that the person who made your copy of the Gohonzon (regardless of whose flavor of Nichiren Buddhism you practice) did not have some deep dark secret tucked away somewhere. Perhaps he had just gotten off the toilet and hadn’t washed his hands yet. Perhaps the person who designed and built the guillotine to trim it is a homicidal maniac. Perhaps the iron from which the guillotine was forged was heated by coal dug by child slaves? What I’m saying is that as long as the Gohonzon’s pictograph is correct enough to allow the characters to be discerned, that is all that counts.

  1. Even your Gohonzon is in on it!
  2. Regardless of who wrote the sheet music, even the most wicked human being alive, when this music is performed in front of an orchestra, the ultimate result is the same: the music will still impact people’s emotions, regardless of who wrote it.
  3. It is the route to ignorance and profound darkness that one takes when one sets the doctrine of the priesthood, the SGI, or even the Lotus Sutra itself above compassion for all human beings and all of creation.
  4. I read Volume 1 of WND, as well as a slew of other materials, and I sang on a daily basis.
  5. If Nichiren had been able to witness the exquisite craftsmanship that went into the Gohonzon I crafted for myself, he would not have ripped it from my hands and torn it to pieces.
  6. It, to put it bluntly, I have first-hand knowledge and proof of Nichiren’s Buddhism, and I have done so without the assistance of the SGI or a priesthood.
  7. Nam Myoho Renge Kyo (Nam Myoho Renge Kyo) means “Nam Myoho Renge Kyo” in Japanese.

21 Things to NEVER DO when chanting – Part THREE

So, how do you feel now that you’ve incorporated the 14 suggestions (from Parts 1 and 2) into your daily activities? After completing Level One, I am certain that you are ready to move on to Level Two, which will introduce you to the final seven things that you must never do while chanting Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo. These will assist you in refining your chanting technique and attitude, therefore giving you the Good Fortune and Abundance to which you are entitled! We’ll talk about our natural tendencies and how they might become distractions, causing our minds to stray and constantly roam around the world while we chant Nam-Myoho-Renge Kyo!

So let’s have a look at the seventh and last installment of this three-part series. While chanting Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo, think on the following:

  1. NEVER SPEAK ON THE PHONE: If you want to communicate effectively with someone, you cannot talk to them and them and them at the same time. When you chant to the Gohonzon, you are conversing with the Buddhist Gods throughout the vastness of the universe. As a result, you should refrain from speaking to anyone on the phone at the same time. NOTHING ELSE BUT THE GOHONZON SHOULD BE SPOKE TO: It is prohibited to communicate with someone, either by hand/body signals or through words, in the same way as stated above. Concentrate solely on the Gohonzon, which is both within you and in front of your eyes, while you chant Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo with your voice, mind, body, and soul
  2. DO NOT READ OR WRITE: It is only necessary to chant Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo when doing so. There should be nothing else to do while you are chanting
  3. Do not check your emails or messages: When chanting Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo, you should refrain from engaging in any other activities. These merely serve to divert your attention away from your chanting. Everything else may be put on hold while you are attempting to polish the mirror of your life in order to make it reflect brightly with riches and good fortune
  4. Everything else can wait. DO NOT ENGAGE IN SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITY: There should be no obstacles in the way of your Gohonzon’s progress. You. Make certain that there is a continual communication between The GohonzonYou and no one else, through chanting. It is necessary for everyone and everyone else to wait until you have finished this discussion
  5. DO NOT LIE DOWNCHANT: Focused chanting requires you to be totally awake and serious while sitting erect in your chair and singing Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo in front of the Gohonzon (God’s throne). Avoid taking anything lightly, since having such an easy back attitude will reflect on your own life as well! It’s possible that your life may pass you by easily, casually, and mindlessly! Any of us who are unwell or have a backache that makes it impossible for us to sit erect and chant will be exceptions to this rule. If you are feeling sleepy, refrain from coughing: Chanting with intention may sometimes be so relaxing for the mind that you may find yourself falling asleep or feeling tired as a result of it! Stop chanting right there and right now! Take a break, either by falling asleep or drinking some water, then go for a stroll before continuing your chanting session. You should not sleep-chant because it is not a task that you are required to do. It is a purification of your personal surroundings carried out with the sole purpose of making it attractive and wealthy. Take control of your life RIGHT NOW
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You should use your chanting time to grow your life rather than thinking about your issues and/or tactics! The Gohonzon’s Daimoku interaction with you should be honest, concentrated, and entirely alert at this point, I hope. Maintain entire concentration on your Daimoku chants in order to assist in the transformation of all your Karma, bringing forth your intrinsic Buddhahood, which will allow you to demonstrate the genuine power and blessings of the Gohonzon in your life! Check out Part 1 and Part 2 of this three-part series for more information.

It is not a copy of any articles or similar material that can be found on the internet.

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Shiti Gautam

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Gongyo Practice — Myosetsuji Temple —- Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism

Please take a minute to acquaint yourself with the material provided below before you begin practicing the recitation of Gongyo. Thank you. This is a welcome letter to new members from Reverend Shinga Takikawa, Chief Priest of the Nichiren Shoshu Myosetsuji Temple in Tokyo, Japan. Greetings, New Member: When you begin your daily practice of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism and incorporate it into your everyday life, we extend our warmest greetings to you. You have made a significant step forward on your journey towards a lovely new life.

  • Furthermore, a life equipped with the wisdom and capacity to transform any poison into medicine.
  • Please keep in touch with your sponsor and make an effort to grow in your faith on a daily basis.
  • Apart from that, we have meetings and events all across the Northeastern United States, Trinidad & Tobago, and Eastern Canada.
  • Morning and evening performances are scheduled.
  • It is also required in order for us to receive the Gohonzon, which was delivered to us by High Priest Nichinyo Shonin for our daily practice.
  • Chanting to the Gohonzon allows us to unite our lives with the life of the Buddha via the power of chanting.
  • Gongyo practice is explained in detail in the next section, which also includes slow audio recordings of Gongyo performed by a Nichiren Shoshu priest.

By engaging in daily practice of reciting the Liturgy of Nichiren Shoshu (part of the 2nd and entire 16th chapters of the Lotus Sutra) and chanting Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo to the Gohonzon, attending the monthly Oko Ceremony where we repay our debt of gratitude to the Three Treasures of True Buddhism, and by sharing this Buddhism with your friends and family, you will unquestionably be able to create an indestructible life condition A practice like this, however, is difficult to keep up throughout our lives.

In his “Reply to Lord Ueno,” our founder, Nichiren Daishonin, writes: “Those with faith like flowing water always persevere in their practice of the Lotus Sutra, never abandoning their faith.” Because you continue to come to see me, regardless of your circumstances, it might be stated that your faith resembles flowing water in its simplicity and strength.

  • Allow me to express my heartfelt welcome and congratulations on your decision to become a member of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism once more.
  • Gongyo’s Importance in Japanese Culture The most essential importance of Gongyo in Nichiren Shoshu may be found in the names and meanings of the actual phrases of the Silent Prayers, which are the most important part of the Silent Prayers.
  • The Second Prayer is an offering to the Shoten Zenjin.
  • In order to make an offering to the Treasure of the Buddha, Nichiren Daishonin, and the Treasure of the Priest Nikko Shonin, Nichimoku Shonin, and all of the other consecutive High Priests of Nichiren Shoshu, we perform the Third Prayer.
  • When we pray the Fifth Prayer, we begin with prayers for our departed ancestors, working our way down the line to include our dads, mothers, brothers, and sisters, and ending with petitions for the salvation of all existence.
  • We give the Second and Third Prayers in order to express our thanks to the Three Treasures for all that they have done for us.
  • It is believed that the Fifth Prayer corresponds to our paying back our debt of gratitude to our parents, ancestors, and, again, to all of existence.

It serves as the foundation of faith for the one and only genuinely meaningful practice in the era of Mappo, according to the Buddha’s teachings.

Gongyo is the source and generating power that enables us to achieve Buddhahood via our efforts.

Gongyo is extremely significant in this regard.

During Gongyo, one’s attitude and posture are important.

Depending on your preference, you can sit in the traditional Japanese “seiza” manner, cross-legged in the western way, or in a chair.

As a result, one should maintain a straight posture when praying, placing the right and left hands together in the center of the chest and both elbows equally on the sides of the body.

It is not acceptable to sit in such unprofessional ways as sitting awry, with legs crossed, or the likes.

One should chant loudly and clearly, pronouncing each word syllable and letter with clarity and precision.

There are moments when one experiences strange or disturbed thoughts when doing Gongyo (meditation).

Instead, we should be filled with strong conviction that if we follow this Buddhist training to this magnificent Gohonzon with perfect trust, we will all be able to manifest the greatest of blessings in our lives.

The Gongyo ritual is performed twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening, as a common practice.

Guide to Proper Pronunciation Here is a guide on pronouncing Japanese words correctly.

as is indicated by the Spanish word Ricardo “h” is always pronounced—take notice of the distinction between yaku and hyaku.

The elision of two words or syllables is indicated by the symbol, e.g., on page 1, “butsu chi-e” is an elision of “butsu chi-e,” and so on.

In the rhythm of Gongyo, there will normally be one Chinese character each beat, with the following exceptions: shari – hotsu – shari (two beats) hara – mitsu is a Japanese expression that means “the hare and the mitsu” (two beats) shaka – muni – butsu (shaka – muni – butsu) (three beats) p.22 of shigi (one beat) Because each syllable or combination of syllables represents a word or phrase that has profound significance, mispronunciation of a word will cause the meaning of the sutra to be altered significantly.

  • As a result, each syllable should be uttered independently and clearly throughout the sentence.
  • These instructions are meant to serve as general suggestions.
  • How to perform Gongyo Gongyo is a set of prayers that are said in succession.
  • Only the second, third, and fifth prayers should be recited in the evening.
  • p.
  • 22-31, p.
  • Silent Prayers, pp.
  • The following is the sequence of recitation.
  • Face east, chant three times the Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo mantra, bow, and recite Part A.
  • After the third recitation, take a bow.

Repeat three times the extended Daimoku (Hiki-Daimoku, which is pronounced Namu-Myoho-Renge-Kyo, which means chant Namu, breath, chant Myoho-Renge-Kyo, Namu, breath, chant Myoho-Renge-Kyo, Namu, breath, chant Myoho-Renge-Kyo, Namu, breath, chant Myoho- Bow, recite three times the Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo mantra, and then give the first Silent Prayer while still bowed.

Second Psalm (Prayer No.

Part A is spoken, and the bell is rung three times.

After ringing the bell five times and chanting three times Nam-Myoho-Renge-­Kyo, bow and give the second Silent Prayer.

(The locations mentioned for bowing in the first prayer are the identical for the next four prayers as well.

To begin, ring the bell and repeat the first two lines of part B, omitting the remainder of part B and beginning with part C.

The Fourteenth Prayer Part A is spoken after the bell is rung.

Chant three lengthy Daimoku and then the bell three times.

The Fifth Invocation Part A is spoken after the bell is rung.

While commencing the recitation of the Daimoku, ring the bell seven times in succession (Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo).

Then, with your head down, say the fifth Silent Prayer, which is the mantra Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo three times. To complete Gongyo, ring the bell three times and bow three times before singing Nam Myoho-Renge-Kyo three times.

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