What Should I Chant At Women’s March

Demonstrators Chant ‘Rise and Roar’ at 2020 Women’s March

MADELINE SANDHOLM IS THE OBSERVER IN THIS CASE. Protesters march around Columbus Circle, waving homemade placards and holding up homemade posters. For the annual Women’s March in New York City on Saturday, January 18, hundreds of people turned out despite frigid conditions in the early morning. demonstrators congregated in Columbus Circle, only steps from from Fordham Lincoln Center (FLC), and at Foley Square in the heart of downtown New York City to demonstrate their support for women’s rights.

The demonstration began with marchers chanting “No justice, no peace!” as they marched toward the Trump Hotel down Central Park South toward the Trump Hotel.

Fordham College at Lincoln Center (FCLC) alumna Maya Nayman, who attended the event in Columbus Circle, said why she went: “I wanted to be a part of this amazing group of strong and powerful women that are not scared to fight for their rights.” WMA Co-Chairwoman Arzu Brown noted that the march’s theme for 2020 was “Rise and Roar,” and that “we have to roar,” “we have to be heard,” and that “it resounds” to ensure that it has an impact.

A number of topics were highlighted by the march’s organizers.

“A Woman’s Place in the White House” and “Impeach, Remove, Imprison” were some of the slogans carried by marchers of all ages as they marched alongside one another.

As Jayda Jones, FCLC ’23, described it, “it was encouraging to see someone so young out there in the cold battling alongside the rest of us.” The experience of strolling through Radio City and shouting in the snowfall will be etched in the minds of many Fordham students, including Isabella Gonzalez, FCLC ’23.

  1. all the way to New Zealand.
  2. Following claims of anti-Semitism and financial mismanagement in 2019, as well as the resignations of founding Co-Chairs Bob Bland, Tamika Mallory, and Linda Sarsour, the Women’s March on Washington chose to cut connections with the organization.
  3. Their purpose was based on eight core guiding principles, which included eradicating violence, LGBTQ rights, workers’ rights, and disability rights, among other things.
  4. Her reasoning for participating in the march was that “strength in feminine, no matter what you believe in, is everywhere and will continue to be everywhere.

“We saw young girls and boys, adults and grandparents from all walks of life striving to take control of this power on our terms, rather than terms imposed on us.” Despite the fact that there were two different marches, organizers highlighted the need of togetherness and camaraderie among the participants, regardless of which organization they marched with.

While the inaugural Women’s March on Washington, D.C., in 2017 is widely regarded as the greatest single-day protest in American history, attendance at this year’s march was much lower than in previous years.

Protest Chants From The Women’s March On Washington & From Sister Marches (January 21, 2017)

Azizi Powell was in charge of editing. Here is a collection of protest chants that were heard during the Women’s March on Washington, as well as at sister marches and rallies that took place on the same day. This is part of a series of pancocojams posts on women’s rights (January 21, 2017). Add your comments to this collection if you were a participant in one of these marches or demonstrations, read about them, or saw videos or news broadcasts about them. Your contributions will be preserved for future generations.

  • Several additional footage of the Women’s March on Washington and its sister marches from across the world are included in the Addendum to this post.
  • All copyrights remain in the possession of their respective owners.
  • Thank you to everyone who has been quoted in this piece, as well as the publishers of the videos that have been included.
  • Click on “Examples Of Black Civil Rights ChantsBlack Power Chants” to see a pancocojams page on the subject.
  • Please keep in mind that I used the term “African American protest chants” to allude to the 1960s civil rights demonstrations and did not intend to suggest that only African Americans utilized the chants at the time or now.
  • 2017) There is no specific sequence in which these news stories and videos are presented.

According to Amemona Hartcollis and Yamiche Alcindor’s article March Highlights as Huge Crowds Protest Trump: ‘We’re Not Going Away’ published on January 21, 2017, the following is an excerpt: “The singer and actress Janelle Monae brought attention to the topic of police brutality by leading the audience in a chorus of “Sandra Bland!

  • Afterward, she passed the microphone around to each of the ladies who had joined her onstage as part of “Mothers of the Movement.” They joined in the chorus one by one, each adding the name of a youngster who had died as a result of the police’s actions.
  • *.
  • *.
  • A sampling of scenes from throughout the country is provided here.
  • The location is Washington, D.C.
  • As hundreds went by the White House, they were heard chanting, “Yes we can.” Phoenix is the location.
  • “Tell me what America looks like!” is a well-known chant.

The time is 3:10 p.m.

1 p.m.

“Don’t take away our ACA,” and “Who’s the boss?” are some of the chants.

Denver is the location.

“March!

March!” goes the popular chant.

The time is 10:30 a.m.

As the march’s organizers began up the day’s activities, women sang this to them.

“Whose house?

**”We, the people, are the popular vote.” **** Storms in March were the source of this information.

” Following a brief performance of her classic song “This Girl Is On Fire,” Keys pumped up the audience soon before 2 p.m., leading marchers in a chorus of “feet on the ground, not backing down.” Later, Madonna addressed the throng with enthusiasm, proclaiming, “welcome to the revolution of love!

  1. “In response to our collective unwillingness as women to accept this new century of tyranny,” “This is the beginning of the revolution,” she added.
  2. “I said, ‘Are you prepared?’ Say, “Yes, we’re all set!” .
  3. In this case, “the wall” refers to a proposed border wall between the United States and Mexico, which Trump has committed to have built and – eventually – paid for by the government of Mexico.
  4. When the throng sang “We Shall Overcome,” organizer and retired pastor Donna Martin spoke through a megaphone, straining to be heard over the din of the song.
  5. * The purpose of our visit is to express our determination not to return.
  6. “Don’t be afraid.”.
  7. t=9094s An altered version of that song that was performed by some protestors at the Women’s March on Washington 2017 (FULL EVENT) |

The transcription of the song can be found in the pancocojams companion article on the Women’s Marches, which can be accessed via the link provided in the previous sentence.

** I’m curious if the “No hatred.

It is more likely that those words that begin the chant will suit the protest chant pattern than the lengthy words at the start of chant.

**** Women’s marches attract more than two million participants in the United States, according to source 5.

The article was published on January 22, 2017.

The protest was repeated in sister demonstrations across the world.

“Immigrants are welcome in this country.” -snip- Unfortunately, I was unable to comprehend the first half of the second line, and the video cut off before the complete chant could be heard again.

“No hatred.

**Call for demonstrations: “Show us what democracy looks like.” **”This is what democracy looks like”** “Our bodies, our choices”** “This is what democracy looks like”** On January 21, 2017, ReasonTV published an article titled “What We Saw During the Women’s March on Washington.” Women’s March in Washington, D.C.

  1. -snip Exemplifications from the video: “Hey HeyHo HoDonald Trump has got to go” and “Hey HeyHo HoDonald Trump has got to go” This is what democracy looks like, in my opinion.” Source7 The Women’s March on Washington draws hundreds of thousands of participants.
  2. As protestors went to the streets in cities throughout the world, organizers were forced to reroute their intended march toward the White House due to the large number of participants.
  3. “I’m ablaze!
  4. Evening News on CBS Originally published on January 21, 2017.
  5. Organizers predicted that three million people will take part in the march throughout the world.
  6. Exemplifications from this video include: “Love triumphs over hate”** “We’re here to fight, so please don’t take away our rights”**** According to Erik Ortiz and Daniella Silva, “Women’s Marches Held Throughout the World in Solidarity with the D.C.” demonstration.
  7. Welcome to your first day, and we will not leave you!” yelled demonstrators in Washington.”.Denver”Larry Ryckman @larryryckman is a Denver-based journalist.

**** Source10 From the Women’s March on America – My Washington, D.C.

“We took a stroll around the perimeter and had a good time looking at placards and partaking in cheers.

We sat on the other side of the fence and watched the marchers come in, while yelling some more.

We stepped inside the fence and made the decision to move up closer to the White House before it became too crowded there.

However, it’s possible that leaving the march was the most enjoyable aspect.

It was a moving experience.

-snip- A photo from the march is also included in this article, which according to the author may be “a strong candidate for finest sign” at the time.

Seuss’ cat in the hat and phrases written in the manner of Dr.

I don’t want you anywhere near my rump.

**** ADDENDUM – Additional Videos are now available.

According to the Wall Street Journal The article was published on January 22, 2017.

On President Trump’s first full day in office, hundreds of thousands of protestors flocked to the streets to express their displeasure with him.

21, demonstrators from all over the world took to the streets in favor of women’s rights, minority rights, and opposition to President Donald Trump’s speech and policies.

If you marched, please leave a comment below to tell us about your experience and what it means to you.

01/22/2017 7:36 p.m.

Hundreds of thousands of people gathered in hundreds of locations across the world on Saturday in support of the Women’s March on Washington. UPDATED ON JANUARY 22nd, 2017 **** Thank you for stopping by pancocojams. Comments from visitors are encouraged.

Women’s March 2018: Protesters Take to the Streets for the Second Straight Year (Published 2018)

Demonstrators gathered on Saturday in cities around the United States, driven by their disgust for President Trump and his administration’s policies, one year after millions of people turned out for the Women’s March and took to the streets in protest of the president’s inauguration. It has taken a torrent of disclosures about prominent men harming women to bring about the #MeToo movement, which has prompted campaigners to call for more radical social and political reform. In this year’s midterm elections, progressive women are eager to capitalize on the momentum of the movement and see their excitement translated into political victory.

Mayor Eric Garcetti of Los Angeles said that 600,000 people participated in the march there, while organizers of the Chicago march estimated that 300,000 people attended the event there.

In a number of speeches, women were encouraged to focus their passion towards helping Democrats win contests in the 2018 midterm elections.

Asked about the Women’s March, President Trump said it was a “great day for all Women to March,” while also praising his administration’s “record economic achievement and wealth creation.” Read our analysis of how activists have attempted to maintain the momentum generated by last year’s marches — as well as the hurdles they will confront in the future.

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New York marchers said they felt empowered: ‘I feel like the revolution is now.’

That’s what Vanessa Medina, a 32-year-old nurse, said was the driving force behind her decision to march this year, despite the fact that she didn’t march in January. Ms. Medina, of Clifton, New Jersey, said she was demonstrating because of the Time’s Up movement against sexual harassment and Republican efforts to defund Planned Parenthood. “I want equal pay,” her 11-year-old daughter, Xenaya, expressed her desire for equal compensation. “As well as equal rights.” Photograph courtesy of Andrew Kelly/Reuters In front of a vendor stand on 60th Street and Broadway, Ann Dee Allen of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, stood with her T-shirt and a handful of buttons she had just purchased for the protest.

Allen, who works in communications for a health-care group, had a different perspective on the issue this year.

The feeling I’m getting this year is that I’m in it for the long haul.” As far as the eye could reach, women crowded Central Park West, stretching from 61st Street north to 59th Street.

The wind began to pick more speed.

Mrs. Frias, a recent law school graduate who claims to be a member of an activist group known as the “Handmaid Coalition,” explained that she and her friend both watch the show. “We are a group of men and women who think that fiction should not be allowed to become fact.”

Los Angeles women chanted, ‘¡Sí, se puede!’

Hundreds of thousands of people had gathered in the center of a park surrounded by dazzling downtown skyscrapers to demonstrate their support. Some people embraced complete strangers. Others were still working on their signs, coloring them in. ‘I’m fed up with men believing that they have some sort of power over women, and I’m especially fed up with a president who believes that he has the authority to take things away from them, to take things that are provided — like Planned Parenthood — away from women, when they deserve the same sort of health care as anyone else,’ said Amanda Kowalski, a 28-year-old financial services professional.

ImageCredit.

Hong Claudia Grubbs, a 42-year-old high school teacher, returned to the march after participating in it the previous year, which she said inspired her to donate to groups that assist women in political leadership positions.

In addition to helping me achieve a feeling of balance and purpose, I believe it will also enable me to pursue the things I am passionate about.

Speakers urged women to run for office.

Ashley Bennett, a Democrat from Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, was successful in her maiden bid for public office in November, unseating a long-serving Republican official in the community. Following this year’s Women’s March, she campaigned for Atlantic County freeholder against John L. Carman, who had posted a meme on Facebook asking, “Will the women’s protest be ended in time for them to make dinner?” She addressed the crowd at Saturday’s march in New York that she was nervous about running at first and said she wondered herself, “Am I the proper person?

But then I learned that if you wait until you feel ready to act, you might never get around to it.” At a press conference in Washington, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, appeared on stage with other politicians who had arrived from the Capitol.

Her words: “They marched, and now they’ve ran for office, and some of them have already won their seats.” “We want women to understand their power in so many ways – by turning up not just on the day of the march, but also at airports and in town halls,” said the march’s organizers.

President Trump commented on the marches.

On the social media platform Twitter Saturday afternoon, the president appeared to be celebrating the women’s demonstrations, despite the fact that the gatherings around the country were clearly anti-Trump in nature. Image courtesy of Andrea Bruce for The New York Times (CC BY 2.0). According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the jobless rate for women aged 20 and over has been consistently declining since 2012, many years before Mr. Trump was elected president. In a speech on Friday, President Donald Trump addressed the thousands of anti-abortion protestors who had assembled in Washington, DC, for the March for Life.

In spite of the fact that the president formerly defined himself as “extremely pro-choice,” he has used his administrative authority to restrict access to abortion. ImageCredit. The New York Times’ Damon Winter contributed to this report.

The government shutdown became a rallying cry.

The federal government shutdown, which went into effect early Saturday morning, did not deter demonstrators from going to the streets. One of the stumbling blocks that contributed to the closure — debate over whether to offer legal status to immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children — has become a rallying cry for protest organizers.

The pink hats came back out in Washington.

Participants on their way to the Lincoln Memorial sported the iconic pink hats that were popular during last year’s march as they rode the Metro to the Smithsonian Institution. Using duct tape, Michelle Bloom, a 52-year-old Washington teacher, held up a sign as her daughter, Jenna, 14, fixed her own with tape. The day before, she had spent the day in her mother’s classroom, tracing the handprints of her classmates who couldn’t make it to the march. “It’s heartwarming to see people of all ages come together in this way,” Michelle Bloom expressed her delight.

  • A year ago, when the number of marchers was greater, individuals were able to jog and ride their bicycles around the Mall.
  • In order to put up an event in Las Vegas on Sunday, the organizers of last year’s march in Washington concentrated their efforts this year on organizing a march in Washington.
  • The Mall was nevertheless packed with people, despite the fact that the crowds were not quite as enormous as they had been in 2017.
  • “A lot was accomplished in the first year to mitigate the potential harm that may have been done,” he stated.

Chicago marchers were urged to ‘go to the polls and flip those seats.’

Participants on their way to the Lincoln Memorial sported the symbolic pink hats that were popular during the previous year’s march as they rode the Metro to the Smithsonian Institution. As her daughter Jenna, 14, mended her mother’s sign with duct tape, Michelle Bloom, a Washington teacher, stood by holding a sign of her own. She had crafted it in her mother’s classroom on Friday, tracing the handprints of her students who were unable to attend the march. According to Michelle Bloom, “It’s encouraging to see people of all ages come together in this way.” Nonetheless, “I expected there to be more,” she stated.

Also on the Mall, individuals were jogging and bicycling about, which would have been unthinkable a year earlier, when the number of marchers was greater.

An inaugural rally for a national voter registration effort, dubbed “Power to the Polls,” will be held in conjunction with the event.

Activist Garrett Regunberg, 32, cited the demonstrations against President Trump’s visa ban as an example of persistent activity that has made an impact.

“A lot was accomplished in the first year to mitigate the potential harm that may have been done.” Resistance is still alive, according to the author.

Some activists decided to sit this one out.

Participants on their way to the Lincoln Memorial sported the iconic pink hats that became popular during last year’s march while riding the Metro to the Smithsonian Institution. Using duct tape, Michelle Bloom, a 52-year-old Washington teacher, held up a sign while her daughter, Jenna, 14, mended hers. In her mother’s classroom on Friday, she had traced the handprints of her classmates who were unable to attend the march. “It’s uplifting to see people of all ages come together in this way,” Michelle Bloom remarked.

  • Also on the Mall, individuals were jogging and biking about, which would have been unthinkable a year earlier, when the number of marchers was greater.
  • The demonstration, dubbed “Power to the Polls,” will serve as the kickoff rally for a nationwide voter registration drive.
  • As an example of continued activity that has made an impact, Garrett Regunberg, 32, cited the marches against President Trump’s visa restriction.
  • “The resistance is still very much alive.”

The president didn’t make it to Palm Beach — but protesters did.

Participants on their way to the Lincoln Memorial sported the iconic pink hats that were popular during last year’s march as they rode the Metro to the Smithsonian. Michelle Bloom, a 52-year-old Washington teacher, held a sign as her 14-year-old daughter, Jenna, fixed hers with duct tape. She’d crafted it in her mother’s classroom Friday, tracing the handprints of her students who couldn’t make it to the march. “It’s encouraging to see people of all ages getting together in this way,” Michelle Bloom remarked.

Women surrounded the ice reflecting pool and progressively filled the grassy areas, but there was still plenty of room for kickball games near the Washington Monument.

The organizers of last year’s march in Washington have concentrated their efforts this year on putting up an event scheduled for Sunday in Las Vegas.

While the crowds in Washington were not quite as enormous as they had been in 2017, the Mall was nevertheless thronging with people.

Garrett Regunberg, 32, cited the marches against President Trump’s visa ban as an example of continued activity that has made an impact. “A lot was accomplished in the first year to mitigate the potential harm,” he added. “The resistance is still alive.”

For a Canadian politician, speaking out was empowering.

The focus of the second Women’s March in Ottawa was switched to problems that directly impact Canadian women, according to the organizers. There were many red scarves worn by protesters as a show of solidarity for the vast number of indigenous women who have been murdered or disappeared and whose cases have gotten little attention from law enforcement. The march, which began at the Parliament buildings, was one of around three dozen that took place across the country that day. There were several speakers at the event, including Environment Minister Catherine McKenna, who has been one of the main worldwide voices opposing President Trump’s climate policy.

  • Recently, Ms.
  • Earlier, a Conservative member of Parliament expressed regret for referring to her in such a manner on Twitter.
  • McKenna said she recognized that when she spoke up in her minor example of being referred to as Climate Barbie, she not only felt better, but she also saw that so many other people stood up for her and felt empowered.
  • According to her, “I really think that we would not have reached the ambitious Paris climate accord if we hadn’t had strong female negotiators on our side.” “That’s one of the unsung stories,” says the author.

In Rome, a Harvey Weinstein accuser received a hero’s welcome.

Asia Argento, an actress and director who was one of the first women to publicly accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault, has been roundly condemned by Italian pundits in recent weeks. However, the several hundred women who gathered on a plaza in the heart of Rome on Saturday morning greeted her with a thunderous reception. Photograph by Filippo Monteforte courtesy of Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Then I’d want to see how many of you today recognize that you’ve endured abuse by raising your hands.

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Power is being abused.

Argento added, as a smattering of hands tentatively raised from the audience.

Women also gathered in other parts of the world, including Frankfurt, Germany; Kampala, Uganda; and Osaka, Japan, where a tiny group screamed “Time’s up!” in both English and Japanese, as well as in other parts of the world.

‘A rapist in your path’ anthem sets defiant tone at Women’s March

DC – The District of Columbia “The repressive state is a rapist,” women and their allies screamed on Saturday as they pointed their fingers towards the White House in Washington, DC. “The rapist is you,” says the narrator. The words are part of a Chilean performance piece that has become an anthem for the feminist movement all around the world as a result of its popularity. In unison, the group, headed by members of Chile’s La Tesis feminist collective, chanted, “Patriarchy is judge, and our penalty is the violence you don’t see.” The group, which almost circled the White House, came to a halt along a path that nearly circled the White House.

  1. for the fourth annual Women’s March, which was held in Washington, D.C.
  2. Thousands more people took part in demonstrations in cities and countries throughout the world.
  3. “I want the world to know that women deserve rights as well,” she said.
  4. We are not being compensated on an equitable basis.
  5. “We have earned the right to be heard.” While outside the White House, our Chilean sisters, known as @lastesisoficial, lead us in a stunning and emotive rendition of the chant “El Violador En Tu Camino.” Putting a name to the predator.
  6. Season the ground with salt.
  7. The 18th of January, 2020 Protesters hoisted placards with a range of requests on them, ranging from climate action to reproductive rights to equal pay.
  8. “They don’t seem to care about the life of the world or the survival of the people,” the 67-year-old from Pennsylvania told Al Jazeera in an interview.
  9. Demonstrators hoist banners and placards as they march in Washington, DC, for the 2020 Women’s March on January 21, 2020.

In the words of Nickoloff, who is originally from Montana, “I’m here for a variety of reasons.” In an interview with Al Jazeera, she said why she was doing it: “to raise awareness and remind myself that we’re not alone in this.” “And I’m here to see that Trump is removed from office.” “We’re all here to help you achieve your goals.” Several demonstrators carried placards that said, “Trump out immediately” and “throw them out when they abuse our trust,” which expressed their displeasure with Trump and the upcoming presidential election in November.

The first voting of the primary and caucus season will be held on February 3 in Iowa, according to the Associated Press.

The march took place at the same time as the United States Senate is preparing to hear opening arguments in Trump’s impeachment trial.

Trump has categorically rejected any wrongdoing and called the impeachment process a “hoax.” “I really hope that everyone here ends up voting and that the people in power change,” said Taylor Wells-Tucker, a 21-year-old North Carolina native who grew up in Charlotte.

‘Unspoken problems we need to face’

The Women’s March in Washington, DC, this year was tiny in comparison to the inaugural Women’s March, which drew hundreds of thousands of people to the nation’s capital in January of last year. The problems the movement has encountered over the previous three years, including charges of exclusivity and anti-Semitism, as well as internal concerns that resulted in a change in the march’s leadership last year, were cited by several participants. “I believe that this movement has to be more inclusive of people of color,” added Andrea, who only supplied her first name in the interview.

  1. “There are unspoken problems and issues that we all need to face and talk about and try to reach out to more communities that aren’t as represented here,” the young woman said.
  2. The activist life, according to Stephens, may become exhausting.
  3. The thing that keeps Stephens going on the streets, though, is her faith in God’s providence.
  4. “You have to maintain your optimism and persevere.”

Thousands gather at Women’s March rallies in D.C., across U.S. to protect Roe v. Wade

Alexis McGill Johnson, the president of Planned Parenthood, addressed the audience during the “Rally for Abortion Justice” in Washington, D.C. “No matter where you live, no matter where you are, this time is dark — it is terrible — but that’s why we’re here,” McGill Johnson said. According to Johnson, “it is our responsibility to conceive the light, even when we are unable to see it.” “It is our responsibility to transform suffering into meaning.” It is our responsibility to transform grief into strength.” Thousands of people poured onto the streets on either side of Freedom Plaza as the event neared its conclusion at 1 p.m., congregating in patches of shade and keeping their eyes fixed on the stage as the music began to play.

  • “Abortion is not only health care, but at my organization, we believe it is also self-care,” Marsha Jones, executive director of the Afiya Center, a Texas-based abortion rights organization, told the throng.
  • “You no longer have the authority to tell us what to do with our bodies.” The demonstrators erupted in applause, many waving homemade placards and yelling, “Abortion is health care!” as they did so.
  • President Donald Trump’s election in 2016 sparked the group’s first nationwide demonstration, which drew hundreds of thousands of protesters to Washington, D.C., and marches like it across the country.
  • The number of people who attended successive marches has decreased.
  • Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that guarantees a woman’s right to an abortion.
  • Wade may be in risk.
  • (Source: The Washington Post.

Kathy Flora, 50, of Chicago, where several thousand people gathered downtown, said the Texas ban prompted her to drive from the suburbs to the city to attend her first demonstration against the ban.

“I was under the impression that that was established law.” Women in their 60s expressed concern that younger women would not fully comprehend the implications of the Roe v.

Lisa White, 65, of Bay St.

“I had to battle for all I had.” says the author.

‘It was at that point that I realized I needed to follow Jesus,’ she added.

A large crowd gathered in Freedom Plaza as the day’s events began to unfold in downtown D.C., with individuals traveling from around the area and beyond, many of them moms and daughters arriving together for what many described as their very first protest.

Her mother, Katrina Marianacci, 48, who stood nearby with her other daughter, the two of them both wearing the same tank top, said she wanted her daughters to “see what happens when women come together to fight for their rights,” and that she hoped they would “see what happens when women come together to fight for their rights.” Men joined in the demonstration as well, including David Barrows, 74, who held a placard that said, “If men could become pregnant, abortion would be a sacrament,” and said, “If men could get pregnant, abortion would be a sacrament.” He declared that he had no sympathy for guys who feel they have the right to dictate what women should do with their bodies.

  1. “Women should have the choice to choose when they want to have a child,” said Barrows, who lives in Washington, D.C.
  2. There were also hundreds of anti-abortion protestors there, including a few dozen who attempted to disrupt a morning prayer service held by abortion campaigners at Freedom Plaza, which was also disrupted.
  3. “The blood of innocent infants is on your hands!” cried another.
  4. Following the speeches in Freedom Plaza, hundreds of demonstrators marched east along Pennsylvania Avenue, headed by an all-female drum line, chanting, “My body!

When they arrived to the Supreme Court, they were welcomed by a group of counterprotesters with a banner that said, “We are the pro-life generation.” During a live performance by a Christian rock band, the counterprotesters shouted, “Abortion is harmful to women!” ‘We’re spearheading what should be the actual message of a women’s march,” said Michele Hendrickson, director of strategic initiatives for Students for Life of America, who is 35 and has been with the organization for three years.

  1. When we talk about women’s empowerment, we shouldn’t be spreading the myth that they require abortions in order to be successful.
  2. “We are crying out for the babies,” King expressed concern for the infants.
  3. Pro-life!” “Feminists for the win!” When one side yelled, “My body!
  4. My choice!” until U.S.
  5. On Sept.
  6. In accordance with the legislation, everyone who assists in the facilitation of an illegal abortion in Texas may be sued, even the doctor who conducts the procedure and an Uber driver who transports a patient to a clinic.
  7. 1, according to court documents.
  8. Wade safeguards the right to an abortion before the embryonic viability stage.
  9. Recent surveys suggest that the majority of Americans reject reversing the Roe v.
  10. Furthermore, a huge majority of Americans favor the right to an abortion in the instance of rape or serious health risks to the mother or child’s health.
  11. “Abortion has a stigma attached to it, even among those who favor abortion access,” she stated.

In a statement, Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of Women’s March, described the movement as a coalition of more than 120 organizations, including Planned Parenthood and Black Feminist Future, dedicated to ensuring that people are able to access abortion and medical care for themselves and their families in a safe and legal manner.

Thomas stated that her mother instilled in her the value of having the freedom to chose when she was a child.

In Thomas’ opinion, “abortion rights are still white power if they are not extended to Black people as well.” This report was written with assistance from Sarah Fowler, Erin Chan Ding, Kayla Ruble, Carly Stern, Ellie Silverman, and Scott Clement.

Hear Fiona Apple’s Scathing Anti-Trump Chant for Women’s March

Alexis McGill Johnson, the president of Planned Parenthood, addressed the audience during the “Rally for Abortion Justice” in Washington, D.C. “No matter where you live, no matter where you are, this time is dark — it is terrible — but that’s why we’re here,” she said. In the absence of light, Johnson says, “it is our responsibility to envision the light.” We have the responsibility to transform suffering into meaning. To transform suffering into power is our responsibility.” Thousands of people poured onto the streets on either side of Freedom Plaza as the event neared its conclusion at 1 p.m., congregating in patches of shade and keeping their eyes fixed on the stage while the music played on the speakers.

  1. “You have no authority over our bodies.” “Abortion is health care!” the demonstrators chanted as they erupted in applause, with many waving homemade banners and yelling.
  2. President Donald Trump’s election in 2016 sparked the group’s first nationwide demonstration, which drew hundreds of thousands of protesters to Washington, D.C., and marches like it across the country.
  3. In following marches, the number of people who showed up has dropped significantly.
  4. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that preserves a woman’s right to an abortion.
  5. Wade may be in risk presently.
  6. (Source: The Washington Post)…
  7. Kathy Flora, 50, of Chicago, where several thousand people gathered downtown, said the Texas ban prompted her to drive from the suburbs to the city to attend her first protest against the policy.
  8. It “seemed to me to be a well-established legal principle.” Women in their 60s expressed concern that younger women would not completely comprehend the implications of the Roe v.
  9. Lisa White, 65, of Bay St.
  10. For example, Jessie Reynolds, a 20-year-old student from San Francisco who claimed she just recently became interested in politics after becoming aware of the Black Lives Matter movement, was one of the hundreds marching along Market Street.
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Concerning the abortion rights movement, she expressed optimism that the march will “rekindle the flame in the hearts of women.” Before this year, I was not a part of the struggle, and I’m hopeful that a lot more people have switched on the light as well.” The beginning of the day’s festivities drew a steady stream of people into Freedom Plaza from around the area and beyond, many of them mothers and daughters who had come together for what they described as their first demonstration.

  1. It was Katie Donovan, 18, who arrived from Maine wearing a red tank top with the words “Keep Your Laws Off My Body.” “I’m hoping my kids won’t have to protest for their bodies,” she said of her children.
  2. “I wanted them to see what happens when women band together to fight for their rights,” she added.
  3. According to him, males who feel it is their right to dictate what women should or should not do with their bodies are not to be tolerated.
  4. A kid is an enormous burden, and no one should be pushed to have a child that they are unable to provide for.
  5. The blood of innocent infants is on your hands, shouted one of the pro-abortion demonstrators.
  6. Following the speeches in Freedom Plaza, hundreds of demonstrators marched east along Pennsylvania Avenue, headed by an all-female drum line, chanting, “My body!

After arriving to the Supreme Court, they were joined by another group of counterprotesters holding a sign that said, “We are the pro-life generation.” During a live performance by a Christian rock band, the counterprotesters shouted, “Abortion hurts women!” ‘We’re spearheading what should be the actual message of a women’s march,” said Michele Hendrickson, director of strategic initiatives for Students for Life of America, who is 35 and has been with the organization for five years.

  • In order to talk about women’s empowerment, we should stop telling women that they need abortions in order to be successful.
  • In his words, “we are pleading for the infants.” It is imperative that you replicate your success in Texas in other states.
  • Pro-life!” “Feminists for the win!
  • Capitol Police officers separated them, one side chanted, “My body!
  • My choice!” As of Sept.
  • In accordance with the legislation, everyone who assists in the facilitation of an illegal abortion in Texas may be sued, from the doctor who conducts the surgery to an Uber driver who transports a patient to a facility.
  • 1.

The Supreme Court decision Roe v.

If the law is upheld, it will provide other states the authority to enact legislation with comparable limits as the California statute.

Wade decision by a nearly 2-1 ratio.

As Aimee Arrambide, executive director of Avow, an abortion rights organization based in Texas explained, abortion activists were pleased to see the words “abortion” included in the March’s name.

A homage to the reproductive justice movement, which was started by women of color and pushes not only for abortion to be legalized, but also for it to be available to everyone, was included in the march’s title.

According to Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March, the movement is comprised of a coalition of more than 120 organizations, including Planned Parenthood and Black Feminist Future, who are all committed to ensuring that people can access abortion and health care for their families in a safe and legal manner.

They cannot be separated from themselves.” “Communities of color have been the most adversely affected by all of these factors.

The value of the right to choose, Thomas’ mother instilled in her, she added.

In Thomas’ opinion, “abortion rights remain white privilege as long as they are not extended to Black people as well.” Contributors to this study were Sarah Fowler, Erin Chan Ding, Kayla Ruble, Carly Stern, Ellie Silverman, and Scott Clement.

I felt the love – finally – at the Women’s March, but what do we do tomorrow?

McKetta, my closest friend and I were lying on the floor in our living room waiting for the baby to kick. She had her hand tucked under the waist of my pregnancy pants, and I had my hand tucked under the waist of my maternity jeans. Having planned my pregnancy for five months, I was experiencing sickness throughout my first trimester at the same time that the election was taking place. After learning that we were expecting a girl just in time to watch Hillary lose, the standard pregnancy anxieties (“Will she survive gestation?”) morphed into more generalized, abstract worry about the new global order (“If she does survive, then what?”) for my husband and me.

  • Various listicles appeared, offering a mix of caustic and enlightened advise on how to best use one’s energy in the aftermath of Trump’s victory, with one advising people to participate in the Women’s March on Washington.
  • “I don’t have any feelings,” she said.
  • “Neither do I.” I waited for something to happen the next day at the Women’s March demonstration.
  • McKetta and I were both perplexed as to what was wrong with us.
  • There were so many things to be thankful for: we were here, other people were here, the venue was crowded, and the weather was just beautiful.
  • Despite this, we were paralyzed.
  • McKetta and I were told earlier that morning by our hosts (who work in government and asked to remain nameless) to mark our blood types and medicine allergies on our arms with a Sharpie.

Pregnancy was written on my wrist along with everything else with a pen that I grabbed from my bag.

There have been no truly bizarre occurrences.

A clothing store display window in which mannequins had been clothed and staged as demonstrators, waving banners to sell men’s wrinkle-free dress shirts had caught our attention as we made our way to the March for Jobs and Freedom.

I had hoped to see more wrath, more action, and more chanting on the streets.

“I personally feel dead on the inside,” McKetta expressed his disappointment.

“But maybe part of the reason I’m so closed off is because this feels very nice, and I’m not allowed to feel good since nothing is perfect,” says the author.

“Do you have any idea what it’s like?” As if you’ve seen those heartwarming photographs of veterans returning home with brand new golden retrievers, and you’ve been affected by their joy at having this new companion – but then you stop yourself and think, wait.

One of the men tugged on the sleeve of my coat.

McKitta murmured, “I feel like this is a particularly difficult incident of sexual harassment.” Women of all ages, colors, and shapes were waving their signs and cheering for one another as they drove forward side by side in electric wheelchairs, strollers, or rollerskates – and we marched with our sisters straight past a begging homeless woman who was hungry and who was completely ignored by everyone else in the crowd.

In Washington, Kathleen Hale and McKetta were in attendance for the Women’s March on Washington.

Almost everyone in our immediate vicinity, including me, was sporting pink handknit hats with little ears, often known as “pussyhats.” Someone had given me a pussyhat for the march, along with a little leaflet explaining how the caps would be used to reappropriate the terminology Trump had used to disgrace us while simultaneously visually unifying the crowd at the event.

  • So far, the most common complaint leveled at the march has been that it conveyed no clear message or demanded no specific actions.
  • This is due to the fact that Trump has injured us in so many different ways that we are reacting in diverse ways.” “The Republicans have done a better job of bringing topics together,” she went on to explain.
  • This is something that works against us.” She jutted out her chin, indicating in the direction of an obnoxious Trump effigy that someone was waving around.
  • We would not contribute to unfavorable stereotypes about us by diverting attention away from our cause with violence.
  • However, it is also a contributing factor to the problem because it is what makes being around them seem so comfortable.
  • Something inside of me had moved.
  • “I sobbed, too, when I saw everyone here like this, united, all of us, and looking so, so strong,” a girl murmured, her eyes gleaming with glitter, as she turned to face me.
  • A small group of individuals took note of the act and began to applaud, waving rainbow flags in delight.
  • It wasn’t simply the pressure of my daughter’s feet on my bladder that I felt, but a sense of re-engagement with my surroundings.
  • I had a genuine concern for these individuals.

Moreover, even if some of their current enthusiasm for McKetta and me stemmed from their belief that we were lesbians, I felt that they cared about us as well, and that we were better together, and that the world, or at the very least our communities, might become better as a result of our efforts to bring about change.

The police allowed our people to walk right down the center of Pennsylvania Avenue, which is known as “America’s Main Street,” despite the fact that it had not been approved for our march by the city.

“Welcome to Trump Land!” cried the sole Trump fan I’d seen all day from the top of a flight of stone steps, which led to the ground.

One of our audience members came out from among us and assaulted him in reaction.

And all of us, all of the ladies, joined together in yelling at them, saying, “Stop, stop, stop!” They were aware of our presence.

We put them on the defensive and forced them to halt.

Thousands of us had turned there, both for our personal benefit and the benefit of one another.

We were all in agreement.

“And we’d figure out the world,” one of our hosts told us during dinner, which made me go back to their youth.

“When we were young, we used to gather with our buddies around this enormous, spool table, high on acid,” he said. We’d figure out everything about the cosmos! ‘Wait, folks, what are we going to do in the morning?’ I was usually the one who interrupted.

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