What Was The Anti Semitic Chelsea Chant Reddit

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: Where Is the Outrage Over Anti-Semitism in Sports and Hollywood?

In addition to the recent influx of anti-Semitic tweets and postings from sports and entertainment personalities, the stunning lack of widespread outrage over these instances is a highly troubling sign for the movement’s long-term viability. As a result of the New Woke-ness that has swept Hollywood and the sports world, we anticipated even greater public indignation. In exchange, we get an indifferent shrug of meh-rage. The presence of meh-rage in the face of continuous bigotry is an undeniable symptom of the approaching Apatholypse, which is characterized by apathy toward all types of social justice.

Irrationality breeds more irrationality.

According to the New York Post, DeSean Jackson tweeted out a slew of anti-Semitic messages, including a quote he incorrectly believed came from Hitler (who isn’t exactly known as the source of “why can’t we all just get along” quotes) in which Jews claimed they had a plan to “extort America” and achieve “world dominance.” Isn’t that what SPECTRE does in the James Bond films?

His next remarks were about the Rothschilds owning all of the banks, as well as his support for the renowned homophobe and anti-Semite Louis Farrakhan, according to the transcript.

Despite the fact that Chelsea Handler is herself Jewish, anti-Semitism began to erupt all over the place in June when she shared footage of Farrakhan with her 3.9 million followers on Instagram.

During the same month, President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign was also criticized for allegedly exploiting anti-Jewish prejudices, despite the fact that Trump’s son-in-law and campaign chairman Jared Kushner is Jewish and his daughter Ivanka converted to Judaism before she and Trump were married.

Their scapegoat logic is identical to that used by all oppressive groups, from the Nazis to the KKK: all of our problems stem from bad-apple groups that worship the wrong gods, have the wrong complexion, come from the wrong country, are the wrong gender, or love the wrong gender (among other things).

  1. Yes, several of the people listed above have expressed regret, including DeSean Jackson, Stephen Jackson, and Chelsea Handler.
  2. Instead of dissuading us, their arrogant and unreasonable response to allegations of anti-Semitism really served to reaffirm the worst aspects of people’s beliefs.
  3. This is the reality, my brother.
  4. I didn’t indicate I was anti-anyone in particular.
  5. For the last few years, I’ve been telling the truth.” However, unlike Trump, he believes his “truth” resides outside of the realm of facts and is thus anti-Semitic in nature.
  6. ” Even the apologies were a disaster, with more efforts at spin than genuine repentance.
  7. There’s nothing in what I stated that suggests I despise anyone.

That brings things to a close.

While having good intentions is important, it is the actual acts — and words — that have the most significant influence on people’s perceptions.

Although there were 751 reports of anti-Semitic hate crimes against Jews in 2013, the number had nearly quadrupled to 2,107 by 2019.

In the battle against racism, Billie Holiday’s melancholy song “Strange Fruit,” which was initially released in 1939, has been hailed as one of the most striking songs ever written.

Black corpses swaying in the Southern air, blood on the leaves and blood at the root of the tree.

Despite the efforts of those who want to have the song banned, it went on to sell a million copies that year, making it Holiday’s best-selling record of all time.

Why is it so difficult for certain individuals to grasp the truth that never changes: No one is truly free until everyone is truly free.

put it this way: “Injustice everywhere is a danger to justice anywhere.” “We have become entangled in an inextricable web of mutuality.” So let’s act as though it’s the case.

If we’re going to be offended by injustice, we should be outraged by injustice against anybody and anything. Kareem Abdul Jabbar, a journalist for The Hollywood Reporter, is an NBA Hall of Famer and the author of several novels, including Mycroft and Sherlock: The Empty Birdcage.

How the oligarch owner of the U.K.’s Chelsea soccer club is fighting anti-Semitism

LONDON, United Kingdom — After a year in which anti-Semitism made headlines in the United Kingdom, Chelsea, one of the country’s most successful soccer clubs, is ramping up its efforts to combat the prejudice and bigotry. It has spent the weeks leading up to the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz by issuing two statements as part of its “Say No to Anti-Semitism” campaign. The club, which is based in London and owned by Russian Israeli billionaire Roman Abramovich, has issued two statements as part of its “Say No to Anti-Semitism” campaign.

  • The sculpture, which measures 40 by 23 feet and was created by British Israeli artist Solomon Souza, whose grandmother managed to flee the Nazis in 1939, will be shown at the stadium until the end of the soccer season in May.
  • Chelsea is a member of the Premier League.
  • Taking occurred so soon to International Holocaust Remembrance Day, which will be observed on Jan.
  • On January 15, 2020, in London, England, artist Solomon Souza will begin painting the Holocaust Commemorative Mural at Stamford Bridge.
  • Six Labour Party members were detained last week on suspicion of anti-Semitism, and prosecutors are now evaluating whether or not to prosecute them with the crime.
  • Death threats against Jews, desecration of graveyards, desecration of synagogues, stone-throwing at Jews, threat of school closures and kindergarten closures, involvement in terrorism, murder of Jews in synagogues as they pray,” Herzog continued.
  • This occurred during a deterioration in relations between London and Moscow following the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter in March 2018.

Just two months before, Abramovich was named to a list compiled by the United States Department of Treasury that featured a number of Russian businesspeople and politicians with strong links to President Vladimir Putin and who might be subject to future penalties.

He did not attend a single Chelsea home game last season or so far this season.

Roman Abramovich is a Russian billionaire and the owner of Chelsea Football Club.

Following his connection with New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft in the offseason, Chelsea was invited to play a friendly match against the Major League Soccer team New England Revolution in Boston in May.

Additionally, Abramovich gave $5 million to Kraft’s new endeavor, the Foundation for Social Media Messaging Against Anti-Semitism, which was launched last year.

Chelsea was punished by the Union of European Football Associations, the governing body of European football, last year following what the club characterized as anti-Semitic shouting during a match in Hungary.

In certain chants and songs by Chelsea supporters, the word is said repeatedly.

Photograph by Chris Lee / Chelsea FC courtesy of Getty Images When racist abuse was directed towards Manchester City and England player Raheem Sterling (who is black), the club banned six supporters from attending matches, including one who was banned for life, in July.

At the inauguration of the painting, César Azpilicueta, the captain of Chelsea’s men’s squad, stated that he believes soccer can be used to teach fans about the dangers of anti-Semitism and racism in general.

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“Fans are an integral component of our club and of football in general, and they serve as a tremendous example for everyone else as well.” People are heard and seen in the stands, especially children, and I believe it is a fantastic example if we convey the word not only on the field but also via our supporters, step by step.”

Chelsea condemns anti-Semitic song about Morata by own fans

  • WESTMINSTER, U.K. (Reuters) – A year after anti-Semitism made headlines in the United Kingdom, Chelsea Football Club (one of England’s premier soccer clubs) is ramping up its efforts to combat the prejudice. It has spent the weeks leading up to the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz by issuing two statements as part of its “Say No to Anti-Semitism” campaign. Chelsea Football Club, based in London and owned by Russian-Israeli billionaire Roman Abramovich, has spent the weeks leading up to the 75th anniversary by issuing two statements. Early this week, the club launched an art installation that pays honor to the memories of Julius Hirsch and rpád Weisz, two Jewish soccer players who perished at Auschwitz. Until the end of the soccer season in May, the 40by23-foot sculpture x British-Israeli artist Solomon Souza, whose grandmother managed to flee the Nazis in 1939, will be shown at the stadium. The Chelsea Football Club (Chelsea FC) stated on Friday that it will accept the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s working definition of anti-Semitism, claiming to be the world’s first professional sports team to do so. It will be discussed with the staff, and the definition will be included in the match-day programs. Ahead of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, which will be observed on Jan. 27, the two gestures come at a time when Jewish communities in the United States and Europe have been targeted by violence and abuse. On January 15, 2020, in London, England, artist Solomon Souza will create the Holocaust Commemorative Mural at Stamford Bridge. via Getty Images / Chris Lee / Chelsea FC Christmastime saw anti-Semitic slurs daubed over stores and cafés in north London, and December saw a general election in which the opposition Labour Party was accused of failing to counter anti-Jewish sentiments from some of its followers. Six Labour Party members were detained last week on suspicion of anti-Semitism, and prosecutors are now deciding whether or not to prosecute them with the crime. In a statement made during the presentation of the painting earlier this week, Isaac Herzog, head of the Israeli NGO Jewish Agency, stated, “We are seeing on our screens a rapid surge in anti-Semitism all over the world, a phenomenon we haven’t seen for years.” “Desecrations of graveyards, desecrations of synagogues, hurling stones at Jews, threatening schools, threatening kindergarten, indulging in terrorism, killing Jews in synagogues as they pray,” Herzog went on to say further. I have no idea what to make of this.” “In a contemporary world that strives to adhere to a set of laws governing human conduct, it suddenly bursts in the most repulsive manner.” Abramovich was conspicuously absent from the viewing party, which included visitors such as Herzog and members of London’s Jewish community. This occurred after a deterioration in relations between London and Moscow following the poisoning of former Russian agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter in March 2018. The 53-year-old, who built his wealth in Russia’s oil and gas industry, experienced visa difficulties. Just two months previously, Abramovich had been named to a list compiled by the United States Department of Treasury that featured a number of Russian businesspeople and politicians with strong links to President Vladimir Putin and who may be targeted for future penalties if they did not comply. Abramovich’s presence in the United Kingdom has been less frequent after he acquired Israeli citizenship in May 2018. He did not attend a single Chelsea home game last season or so far this season. However, he has continued to work against anti-Semitism in many countries. Romain Abramovich is a Russian business magnate who also happens to be the owner of Chelsea Football Club. AP file by Anthony Anex Following his connection with New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft in the spring of 2016, Chelsea was invited to play a friendly match against the Major League Soccer team New England Revolution in Boston. It collected more than $4 million for groups dedicated to combating anti-Semitism and prejudice in the workplace and community. Additionally, Abramovich gave $5 million to Kraft’s new endeavor, the Foundation for Social Media Messaging Against Anti-Semitism, which was launched in January of 2017. From the 1970s through the 1980s, Chelsea had its own anti-Semitism battles, which have continued to this day, with some of its followers expressing anti-Semitism. Following a match in Hungary, Chelsea was charged by the Union of European Football Associations, the regulatory body of European football, following what the club characterized as anti-Semitic chants. Although Jewish organizations have urged them to refrain from doing so, some Tottenham Hotspur supporters continue to refer to themselves as “Yids” or “Yiddos,” which is a disparaging slur for Jews. In various chants and songs by Chelsea supporters, the phrase is re-used. In the end, UEFA dismissed the allegation, although at the time, a spokeswoman for Chelsea denounced the song, saying that “anti-Semitism and any other type of race-related or religious hate is unacceptable to this club and the overwhelming majority of our fans.” On January 15, 2020, in London, England, artist Solomon Souza will create the Holocaust Commemorative Mural at Stamford Bridge. via Getty Images / Chris Lee / Chelsea FC When racist abuse was directed towards Manchester City and England player Raheem Sterling (who is black), the club banned six supporters from attending matches, including one who was banned for life. The problems of racism in European football are not limited to Chelsea and England, though. At the inauguration of the painting, César Azpilicueta, the captain of Chelsea’s men’s squad, stated that he believes soccer can be used to teach fans about the dangers of anti-Semitism and racism in society. The sport of football is “very strong,” he remarked, noting that it can reach millions of people. “Fans are an integral component of our club and of football in general, and they serve as an inspiration to everyone.” The message is being disseminated not just on the pitch, but also by our supporters, and I believe it is an excellent example if we spread it step by step, not only on the pitch.”
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Tottenham defends fans chanting an offensive term for Jews

  • LONDON, England (AP) – Tottenham Hotspur is standing by its fans, who shout a word for Jews that some may find offensive on a consistent basis. Tottenham released a statement of solidarity on Wednesday, after the chairman of Premier League opponent Chelsea’s appeal for the club to erase any ambiguity around the word by discontinuing its usage entirely. The “Yid Army” refers to the supporters of Tottenham Hotspur, a north London team that has always attracted a substantial number of supporters from Jewish communities. However, according to the World Jewish Congress, while it derives from a Yiddish name for Jews, it has come to convey a “distinctly derogatory and anti-Semitic meaning.” Tottenham, on the other hand, considers its use as a badge of pride for its supporters. In a statement to The Associated Press on Wednesday, Tottenham stated, “We have always been clear that our fans (both Jewish and gentile) have never used the phrase with any disrespect.” “A re-evaluation of its usage can only take place successfully in the context of a comprehensive crackdown on intolerable anti-Semitism,” says the report. Chelsea fans have used the phrase in obscene chants against Tottenham, according to the BBC. As a result, the team from west London is now subject to UEFA fines. When asked about the usage of the Y-word by Tottenham fans, or by anyone, Chelsea chairman Bruce Buck told the Associated Press that “it is terrible.” Buck was speaking about his club’s crusade against anti-Semitism. As a result, Chelsea has issued a second caution to its fans, this time urging them to refrain from using racist chants ahead of the team’s Premier League encounter against Tottenham on Wednesday. A Germanic language historically used by Ashkenazi Jews in central and eastern Europe, Yiddish incorporates Hebrew and borrows widely from the languages of the nations where Jews lived. More AP soccer: and
  • And

‘Chelsea rent boys’ fan chant reported to police

Rainbow Laces Campaign, a countrywide event aimed to reducing anti-LGBTQ bias in the athletic world, was supported by a number of British sports organizations, including the Premier League of the United Kingdom. A large number of players and managers from throughout the league expressed their appreciation, and there appeared to be a widespread sense of optimism in the air. The next week, the West Ham/Chelsea match made news for what Sky News described as “continuous” homophobic shouts thrown at Chelsea fans.

It served as a timely reminder that, even in the midst of one of the most festive occasions on the Premier League calendar, soccer fans were still going to be soccer fans no matter what.

Because it occurred during the Rainbow Laces campaign, the incident served as a vivid representation of the sort of fan culture that the campaign was intended to oppose.

Following this most recent outburst, the West Ham LGBTQ supporters group Pride of Irons issued the following statement: “When you use homophobic chants, you aren’t abusing most Chelsea fans who will be straight, but you are abusing all gay fans regardless of whether they support Chelsea or West Ham.” We’re better than that, and we can come up with chants that are lot more intelligent and do not insult our own followers.

  • Improve your performance.
  • as well as making a formal complaint with Kick It Out, the sport’s anti-discrimination organization.
  • Previous incidences occurred during a match against Liverpool in April and a match against Nottingham Forest in January, respectively.
  • Photograph courtesy of Avril Husband/West Ham United FC/Getty Images.
  • is a particular target for this type of homophobia, as is the club itself.
  • Hove Albion has also been the victim of anti-gay insults on several occasions as a result of its relationship with a city that has a significant LGBTQ community.
  • And that fan was a supporter of Chelsea.
  • In the same way that the “Chelsea rent boys” slogan is a throwback to the 1980s, it should have stayed in the past.
  • By now, you’re probably aware of the poor reputation that British soccer fans have.

(Think of it as an extreme, anti-LGBTQ version of the mob mentality that holds fans in the Bleacher Creatures section of Yankee Stadium or the Black Hole section of an Oakland Raiders game, as well as the occasional nasty conduct that results from this attitude.) Consider, for more explicit homophobia, how the same attitude contributes to the growth of “puto” shouts during Mexican soccer and wrestling bouts.) This individual is Exhibit A.

Photograph courtesy of Carl Court/Getty Images Mix a subset of true racists and homophobes with a bigger number of supporters who feel obligated to participate because it’s what they should do while attending a game, and you have an explanation for why the term “Chelsea rent boys” has endured for over 40 years in the English footballing world.

  • Consider how long supporters of other sports have adhered to the continuation of similarly horrible components of sports culture, such as the Tomahawk Chop and the Chief Wahoo, among other things: That’s the problem about sports fan traditions: they’re all over the place.
  • In the Premier League, a mix of mob mentality and a poisonous sense of tradition has contributed to the establishment of this type of homophobia in the fan culture of the team.
  • The struggle against these slogans and the attitude that encourages them is still in its early stages, as is the search for effective countermeasures.
  • Fighting back against the deeply established homophobia that permeates soccer fan culture will be a lengthy and difficult process.

Although there has now been some pushback against it, this should be viewed as only the beginning of what will be a protracted process if the Premier League is to fulfill its objective of actually making soccer hospitable for all players.

Hazard on anti-Semitic chants: ‘They’re not fans’

8th of January, 2019 Following reports of anti-Semitic rhetoric in chants from both sets of fans during the build-up to Tuesday’s first leg of the Carabao Cup semifinal, Eden Hazard has encouraged Chelsea and Tottenham supporters to concentrate on supporting their clubs rather than their opponents. Sources informed ESPN FC last month that Chelsea and Tottenham are set to meet ahead of the games, with anti-Semitic chanting being a major topic of discussion. However, Hazard wants football to take center stage on Tuesday night.

  1. “After the game, it is almost certain that one team will win and one team will lose.
  2. I enjoy all of the fans.
  3. I believe it is a fun game to play, and I hope that both fans will have a nice time with it.” Yes, without a doubt.
  4. They come to the stadium just to express themselves verbally.
  5. Just make sure you support their side and not the other.” Antoine Hazard believes that everyone in sport has a role to play in addressing the issue of racism in football, which was brought to light in December when Raheem Sterling was attacked by Chelsea supporters.
  6. “The fans are another good example.
  7. Of course, I don’t want the Chelsea supporters to have a negative view of themselves.” In football in general, and not just among Chelsea supporters, we witnessed a great deal in Italy.
  8. It’s difficult because football is such a large globe, but if we all work together, step by step, as players, managers, and journalists, we can accomplish something.
  9. Sarri earlier called the reported abuse directed towards Sterling “disgusting.” “Of course, we require the backing of our supporters, but we would like to have their support for us rather than against our opponents,” he explained.
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Chelsea soccer fans guilty of racist chants may soon receive an ultimatum: visit Auschwitz or get banned

The Chelsea Football Club and numerous Premier League fan organizations may begin providing fans found guilty of anti-Semitic or racist behavior an educational trip to Auschwitz as an alternative to an outright ban if they are found guilty of such behavior in future. According to theSunnewspaper, Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich, who is Jewish, and the soccer club’s chairman have stated that they want to provide fans a learning opportunity rather than simply expelling supporters who perpetrate anti-Semitic or racist actions from the stadium.

The Chelsea Supporters’ Trust and the Football Supporters’ Federation both expressed support for the idea to provide guilty supporters the choice of attending education classes in a World War II Nazi concentration camp or being barred from attending games for a period of time.

Getty Images |

Getty Images In an interview with theSun, Chelsea chairman Bruce Buck stated, “If you merely prohibit individuals, you will never improve their conduct.” “This policy provides them with the opportunity to recognize what they have done and to be motivated to act better in the future.” “In the past, we would remove them from the audience and ban them for a period of up to three years from returning.

‘Now we tell you that you done something wrong.

We can either ban you or you can spend some time with one of our diversity officials to figure out what you did incorrectly.'” In June, a group of around 150 individuals, including Chelsea employees, stewards, and fans, traveled to Auschwitz as part of a progressive education strategy to educate people about the more than 1 million fatalities that happened at the concentration camp.

  • In September 2017, Chelsea fans performed an anti-Semitic song including striker Alvaro Morata that was meant against their London rival Tottenham’s mostly Jewish crowd, according to reports.
  • Despite the fact that the club and Morata instantly condemned the song, Chelsea management knew that it would be difficult to prevent such a huge audience from joining in with the harsh shouts.
  • “It’s nearly hard to deal with them or to try to drag them out of the stadium in this situation.
  • The video asks fans to speak out and halt anti-Semitic activity among their fellow Chelsea supporters.
  • Anwar Uddin, a retired soccer player who now works as a diversity consultant, told the Sun that he supports the Auschwitz deterrence.
  • As Bruce Buck has stated, banning individuals does not improve their behavior or views.

West Ham fan arrested over anti-Semetic video on plane

Essex Police have detained a West Ham supporter in connection with a video showing supporters hurling anti-Semitic insults at a Jewish man on a flight from London to Brussels. When a Jewish guy came down the aisle of the plane carrying West Ham fans to see them play Genk in the Europa League on Thursday, a number of fans were caught on tape recording an ugly chant directed at him as he walked down the aisle. In the end, only one of the fans, a 55-year-old male, returned to London on Friday, and Essex Police apprehended him as soon as he stepped off of the plane.

  1. Upon learning of the event this morning, officers moved immediately to make an arrest as soon as possible.
  2. David Moyes, the manager of West Ham United, voiced his displeasure with the behavior of the club’s supporters ahead of Sunday’s visit from Liverpool.
  3. “I believe we are a football club with a diversified membership.” Regardless of where you live in the globe, there is no tolerance for prejudice.
  4. As a result, I’m quite unhappy to learn of this, but I’m confident that it was a small number of persons rather than a large number of supporters.

Football: Chelsea face partial stadium closure over alleged racist chanting by fans as Uefa opens case

Published at 5:55 p.m. on January 16, 2019 TELEGRAPH: LONDON (THE GUARDIAN/AFP) – Because of suspicions that Chelsea’s traveling fans indulged in racist shouting during the team’s tie with Vidi last month, Uefa has launched disciplinary procedures against the club, which might result in a partial shutdown of Stamford Bridge during the Europa League. The European Football Association (EFA) said on Tuesday (Jan 15) that, after the submission of a report by its ethics and disciplinary inspector who had reviewed occurrences during the group-stage match in Budapest, proceedings against Chelsea had been initiated.

A minimum punishment of partial stadium closure for their home stadium during a subsequent match is stipulated in the regulations if supporters are found guilty of behavior “that insults the human dignity of a person or group of persons on whatever grounds, including skin color, race or religion or ethnic origin.” On February 21, Chelsea will host the second leg of their round-of-32 encounter against Malmo, ensuring that any sanctions would be applied either in the last 16 or, if they have already been eliminated, when the London club next competes in the tournament.

A second offense would result in Chelsea being compelled to play a match behind closed doors.

In the immediate aftermath of the 2-2 draw at the Groupama Arena, the club issued a public condemnation of the chants, which included an anti-Tottenham Hotspur (who have a substantial Jewish fan base) song that could be heard in the first three minutes of the game.

They have also offered anyone found guilty the opportunity to participate in an educational program in an attempt to learn why the chant is so offensive to begin with.

According to the chairman, Bruce Buck, an open letter to supporters has been published in response to the actions of a “mindless” minority, vowing that “we will not rest until we have eliminated all forms of discrimination from our club.” He also states that “if you do not share these values, this is not the club for you.” As a result of the allegations of fan racism leveled against Chelsea in recent weeks, four Chelsea fans have been barred from the stadium while an investigation into alleged racist insults directed at Raheem Sterling during the Blues’ 2-0 win over English Premier League champions Manchester City is conducted.

The club’s coach, Maurizio Sarri, declared that the club was engaged in a “war against dumb people” after more claims of racism were leveled against the club by supporters in the away end during their 2-1 win against Watford on Boxing Day.

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