What Was The Carter High Chant In The Locker Room

Obscenity-laced chant about coach ends season / Football players won’t say who led incident — Woodside cancels 2 games, including homecoming

The principal of Woodside High School is upset after several players on the school’s football team screamed obscenities at their coach as he entered the locker room following yet another loss. As a result, the school’s already bleak football season has been terminated for the balance of the season. After a team meeting on Monday, school authorities decided to call off the season because the players refused to identify the teammates who had led a locker-room chant earlier that day. In the locker room on Friday evening following Woodside’s 30-12 home loss to Terra Nova High School in Pacifica, Woodside head coach Packy Moss was joined by the father of one of his players, according to Woodside sources.

In the locker room, Moss was unable to see who was yelling at him, so he withdrew into his neighboring office.

Common instructed the players to either write down what they knew about the event or face having the remainder of the season canceled – as of this week, Woodside had won two games and lost six – as a result of the incident.

According to the administrators of the school in San Mateo County, this did not set well with them.

“Sportmanship, decency, and character are all on the line in this situation.

In his own words, “This was a consensus decision and one that we did not take lightly.” “This isn’t about winning games; it’s about earning people’s respect.

There are no justifications for abusing another human being in this manner.” The forfeiture of Woodside’s last two games had a sobering impact on the team’s players, who were looking forward to their last game, a homecoming match versus archrival Menlo-Atherton, even more than they were to their previous two games.

  • The senior linebacker and defensive captain, Jon Blekis, 17, believes the school overreacted and that it now demonstrates that the institution has given up.
  • Even though both players acknowledged that the yelling was wrong, they claimed that it was the result of a developing sense of rage within the team.
  • Blekis and Thompson stated that the team attempted to work with the coaching staff, but that they gave up halfway through the season.
  • Prior to Moss taking over as coach, the squad were unbeaten for three years.
  • Moss stated that the squad was devastated by the loss, but that the disciplinary issues had existed throughout the season.
  • Although the coaching staff attempted to forcefully reign in the players, including forcing some of them to sit out games, according to Moss, it was ultimately futile.
  • However, he feels it was required in order to restore order at the institution.

“I believe they are affected by the defiance they witness on the professional level, as well as the open criticism of coaches and general managers, and although that may work on the professional level, a system like that cannot be implemented in the amateur levels,” Young explained.

Mr.

However, it was a huge disappointment for his squad and a complete surprise to them.

“I was a little shocked that this wasn’t taken care of without the involvement of higher ups in the organization.

A parent whose kid was banned from school for one day and never returned following disciplinary action claims that the problem stems from Moss’s inability to gain the respect of his players as a result of his conduct.

“He didn’t win their admiration or respect.

However, he claims that many members of the squad did not reciprocate in kind.

If you have any issues, we encourage you to come and chat to us about them.” Moss compared his actions to those of Richmond High Schoolbasketball coach Ken Carter, who benched his team for a week in January 1999 to encourage them to improve their academic performance.

For the time being, it appears that the message is not getting through.

Thompson stated that several of the players were still in disbelief that their season had come to a close. “It’s a little uncomfortable,” he said. “I had two touchdowns in my last game, so it was a successful conclusion to the season. However, I’d want to be playing for the remainder of the season.”

ESPN​’s film on Carter High football fiasco doesn’t pay tribute to ​real watchdog hero

In response to some Woodside High School football players chanting obscenities at their coach as the coach entered the locker room following yet another loss, the school’s administration has decided to terminate the remainder of the school’s already disappointing football season. In response to the players’ refusal to identify their fellow students who had led a locker-room chant, school administrators called the season off during a team meeting on Monday. In the locker room on Friday evening following Woodside’s 30-12 home defeat to Terra Nova High School in Pacifica, Woodside head coach Packy Moss was joined by the father of one of his players, according to a source.

  1. He did nothing about the situation until the following Monday morning, when he and Principal Linda Common organized a team meeting and gave the players an opportunity to express themselves.
  2. None of his associates, on the other hand, came forward with information.
  3. According to Moss, who is in his third season as head coach, “There was no respect, no remorse.” It was considered as a joke by them (the players).
  4. These children are being taught that this type of conduct is not acceptable by the adults in their lives.” Moss, athletic directorSteve Nicolopulos, and other officials were involved in the unprecedented decision, which was taken by Common.
  5. It is possible to express dissatisfaction with your coach in different ways.
  6. There have been complaints from a number of players who believe the hasty decision was unjust.
  7. They acknowledged that the yelling was wrong, but they said that it sprang from a rising sense of frustration among the players.
  8. After trying to work with the coaching staff, Blekis and Thompson said that they had given up halfway through the year.
  9. But after that, the coaches began to disparage the players, and the situation exploded.
  10. Since then, the club has gone on a five-game losing skid.
  11. He said that players were frequently fighting with one another, stealing from one another, and missing practice.
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Some weeks, he added, “we didn’t even have time to talk about Xs and Os because we were dealing with players fighting, cutting class, and plagiarizing.” It didn’t matter what type of discipline we had in place; nothing appeared to bother them.” The commissioner of the Peninsula Athletic League, Gordon Young, stated that he had never heard of a forfeiture of this sort until this one occurred.

  • In his opinion, many young players grow up copying today’s professional athletes, who make a spectacle out of berating their coaches and the team’s leadership.
  • “While this is a serious penalty, it is not excessive.
  • It was a huge disappointment for his squad, but it was still a huge shock to them.
  • “I was a little astonished that this wasn’t resolved without the involvement of the administration.

A parent whose kid was suspended from school for one day and never returned following disciplinary action claims that the problem stems from Moss’s inability to gain the respect of his players as a result of his leadership style As a middle school football coach, Vaught understands the importance of earning the respect of his or her students.

  1. The fact that no one looked up to him was a source of frustration.” Ralph Cramedi, an assistant coach, concurred, saying that the coaching staff had gone out of its way to build a connection with the players.
  2. According to Crame, “We had an open-door policy, and we visited with each child personally to ask them about their ambitions.” If you have any issues, we encourage you to come and chat to us about them.
  3. I’m sure they’re unhappy about this, and I’m sure they’ll be for a long time, but maybe they’ll realize how much we’re doing for them,” Moss added.
  4. Several of the players, according to Thompson, were still in disbelief as their season came to a close.

According to him, the situation is “very uncomfortable.” “My previous game finished with two touchdowns, so it was a successful conclusion. My preference is to continue playing football for the rest of the year.”

Football vs. academics in Texas schools

For those of us who are concerned about how Texas powerhouse football frequently takes the place of underperforming public-school academics, this topic is still relevant, which is why it is commendable that ESPN is taking a historical look at the situation. Teachers’ perspectives are now being challenged by revisionist viewpoints: teacher Bates is no longer regarded as a beacon of educational purity in the eyes of the public. He is instead portrayed as an eccentric out-of-touch math instructor who has failed far too many of his pupils and has bragging rights about it, according to the documentary.

But what does it matter?

Friday Night Lights tells the story

To begin, the story gained national attention because it was included in author H.G. “Buzz” Bissinger’s famous 1990 bookFriday Night Lights, which included a comprehensive chapter titled “The Algebraic Equation.” Bates is described by Bissinger as having a “name-like appearance.” “He was rotund and sallow-looking, and he had the precise mannerisms that one might anticipate from a guy who had committed his life to teaching mathematics and industrial arts,” says the author. It was decided that Bates’ character would not appear in the film Friday Night Lights, which was released in 2004.

Thousands of instructors all across the world do the same thing.

What the teacher told me

In 2004, I had a conversation with Bates. The instructor stated, “I was attempting to be the greatest teacher I could be.” “I did what I thought was right. I took a stand for what was right.” Wilfred Bates is a high school algebra instructor. It came at a cost to him. Aside from the threats directed at his family members, he also experienced difficulties in his work life. He was reassigned to a middle school and was never permitted to return to the classroom as a math teacher again. Edwards, the student who caused the difficulties, didn’t show up for Bates’ class very often, refused to complete homework, and, as depicted in the ESPN video, enjoyed spending his free time shooting dice with his friends in the girls’ bathroom.

  • “No one would ever be able to get close to them,” Bissinger writes.
  • Edwards’ grades in Bates’ class, on the other hand, were 40, 60, 60, and 35.
  • “He, on the other hand, did not do it.
  • When Bates first refused to bend on the grade, Edwards was sent to another math class to continue his education.
  • As a result of the controversy surrounding Bates’ unusual and enigmatic grading symbols in his log book, Edwards was granted permission to pass and participate.
  • The markings made by student Gary Edwards are presented at the bottom of the page.
  • Bates informed me that “I was on trial” in a future hearing in Austin, Texas.
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His harrowing encounter was something he said he would never be able to shake from.

After a playoff game in 1988, Gary Edwards is praised by a cheerleader on his accomplishment.

(Photo courtesy of Evans Cagelage / File Photo) During a discussion of the ESPN documentary What Carter Lost, which is about the 1988 Carter football squad, former Carter High football player Gary Edwards (center) was joined by Jessie Armstead (left) and Derric Evans (second from left).

Following the screening, Adam Hootnick, the filmmaker, and Jean-Jacques Taylor, the moderator, will participate in a conversation (right).

In retrospect, Edwards noted that “he was a Plano resident and a Plano booster.” “A lot of people aren’t aware of this,” Edwards added.

So everything was intertwined with that.

They claim that dead men don’t tell tales.

Footnote: After Carter High School defeated Converse Judson High School to win the state championship, a court decided that Carter was ineligible for the state championship due of Edwards’ math grade.

Carter was compelled to hand over the prize. Judson defeated Carter in a forfeit with the unusual score of 1-0, according to today’s records. In addition to Marina Trahan Martinez, who worked as an intern on this story,

More DallasNews.com stories about the 1988 Carter Cowboys

In ‘What Carter Lost,’ an ESPN documentary produced by 30 for 30, Brad Townsend tells a well-told narrative about a well-known drama. Townsend: The scandal taints the memory of the 1988 Dallas Carter football team, which was possibly the most talented in the history of the state of Texas. Sarah Mervosh: In actual life, the Carter High robberies ‘lit up the entire city,’ as she put it. “30 for 30” on the Carter High School football team, says Chris Vognar, puts the story to a close. AT&T, which has struggled to satisfy customers, now has to impress President Trump.

  1. You might be a participant in a medical experiment that nearly no one is aware of – including yourself.
  2. In what way a school district utilizes its influence to influence the outcome of a tax-increase election in its favor What you need to know about preventing robocalls in 2017 is outlined below.
  3. Follow our most recent reporting at the Watchdog page all of the time.
  4. The Dallas Morning News is the founder and leader of Watchdog Nation, which teaches Americans how to advocate for themselves and become super consumers through educational programs.

‘What Carter Lost’ Tells The True Story Of ‘Friday Night Lights’ Football Rivals

This page contains information on the Carter High School football team that won the Texas state title in 1988. In the words of filmmaker Adam Hootnick, “For a lot of folks, that’s the pinnacle.” ESPN Films provided the image. Several people are already familiar with the narrative of Friday Night Lights, in which a West Texas high school competes for the state football championship. It began as a nonfiction book, then morphed into a movie (featuring Billy Bob Thornton in the role of the coach), and eventually became a television series.

  • When it comes to Friday Night Lights, Carter High School is really just an afterthought – the wicked, thug-like squad who stole a title from their rivals.
  • “By any metric, this was one of the best,” Hootnick recalls of the school’s reputation.
  • In the opinion of Hootnick, it was “The majority of the families are two-parent households, and the majority of the professionals.
  • Carter was kicked out of the playoffs after a court struggle with the other colleges, who were predominantly white.” Unquestionably, everything would have turned out differently if Carter had been one of the primarily white schools that had always been at the time “Hootnick expresses himself.
  • Carter was victorious in the state championship, but the narrative does not end there.
  • However, I believe they were not prepared for the trip to be over.
  • The elevation of the pedestal, Hootnick believes, is “nearly as large as it gets” for a Texas high school football hero.

Hootnick conducts interviews with former Texas high school football players who went on to play professionally in the film.

As a result, for many people, the degree of attention, devotion, and intensity surrounding that encounter is the pinnacle of their lives.

The documentary features several of them discussing how much they have lost and their efforts to reconstruct their lives since then.

According to Hootnick, among of the story’s unsung heroes are the parents who pushed to keep their son’s baseball team in the postseason.

Correction: August 23, 2017, 12 a.m.

— It was previously reported that the last name of director Adam Hootnick was spelt incorrectly as Hootnik in a prior photo caption.

In addition, the audio report, as well as a prior Web version, said that six Carter High School football players were sentenced to jail during their junior year. In reality, five players were sentenced to prison and one was placed on probation. NPR 2021 has copyright protection.

Friday Night Lights Chapter 16 Summary

Mike had always dreamt of the day when he would be able to compete in the semifinals. Previously, his brother had taken him to Memorial Stadium at Texas A&M University, where he was permitted to go on the field and inside the locker room. They had returned to the university several times after that, and Mike couldn’t get the institution out of his head. Now he’s back at the field house, but this time not as some naive youngster, but as a serious player. The Ivory Christian basketball team has piqued the curiosity of college recruiters, and Gaines feels that Mike Winchell has promise as well, because schools have never seen a player who is more focused and disciplined.

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He doesn’t have a particularly strong arm, and no amount of hard effort will be able to compensate for that.

Later, the morning of the game, he is plagued by a persistent sense that the ground is too wet and that he would never be able to toss the ball, that he will never be able to get a hold of the ball.

It’s going to be a nightmare-inducing environment.

II. Summary

The following night, Jerrod McDougal walks into the locker room and notices everything is perfectly organized. He exclaims, “Damn!” in a low voice. “It’s finally arrived.” Everything then proceeds in the same manner as before: the same music, the same talks, and the same noises of Ivory puking in the same place as before. It helps the players to feel more comfortable. Outside, the Carter squad is warming up, and it is clear from the way they are dressed that Permian is up against a team unlike any other they have played so far this season.

  1. MOJO!” The Carter players go over to the Permian sides and begin making low guttural sounds that are evocative of dogs, followed by a clapping pattern that is nearly unbreakable.
  2. In response to a black Permian instructor, they yell “Oreo!” and scream other expletives in an attempt to terrify everyone from Permian even more.
  3. However, in order to avoid violence, the decision is taken to keep them on their own side this time.
  4. Anyone who has ever played high school football recalls that moment with amazing clarity, that moment of emotional zenith, which, no matter what happens after it – win or lose – will remain etched in their memory forevermore.

There isn’t a single person in the locker room who feels they have a chance to lose. That is what gives them an advantage — their confidence in themselves.

III. Summary

The next night, Jerrod McDougal walks into the locker room and notices everything is perfectly lined out, prompting him to remark, “Damn! I have it in my possession. All of this then occurs in the same order as it has done so in the past: same music, same talks, same sounds of Ivory vomiting up. As a result, the players are more comfortable. Outside, the Carter squad is warming up, and it is clear from their demeanor that Permian is about to meet a team unlike any other they have encountered so far this season.

  1. MOJO!” The Carter players go over to the Permian sides and begin making low guttural sounds that are suggestive of dogs, followed by a clapping pattern that is nearly unbroken.
  2. In response to a black Permian instructor, they yell “Oreo!” and scream other expletives in order to terrify everyone from Permian even more.
  3. It is decided to keep them on their own side this time around in order to avoid bloodshed.
  4. That moment, that emotional zenith, will be remembered vividly by anybody who has ever participated in high school football.
  5. In the locker room, no one has the illusion that they are going to lose.
Notes

When Jerrod McDougal walks into the locker room that night, he notices that everything is perfectly lined out, and he comments in a whisper, “Damn! “It has arrived.” Everything subsequently proceeds in the same manner as before: the same music, the same talks, and the same noises of Ivory puking in the same place. It helps the athletes to feel more at ease on the field. Outside, the Carter team is warming up, and it is clear from their demeanor that Permian is about to meet a squad unlike any other they have encountered so far this season.

  • MOJO!” With that, the Carter players cross over to the Permian sides and begin making low guttural sounds that sound like dogs, followed by a chorus of applauding.
  • They yell “Oreo!” at a black Permian instructor who is black, and they use obscene language to further scare everyone from Permian.
  • However, in order to avoid conflict, it is decided to keep them on their own side this time.
  • That moment, that emotional zenith, will be remembered vividly by anybody who has ever participated in high school football.

It is a moment that will never be forgotten, regardless of whether the team wins or loses. There isn’t a single person in the locker room who feels they are going to lose. That is what gives them an edge — their confidence in themselves.

Andre Carter’s rise continues with academy sack record

When Jerrod McDougal walks into the locker room that night, he notices that everything is set up perfectly, and he comments in a whisper, “Damn! “It’s right here.” Everything then proceeds in the same manner as before: the same music, the same talks, the same noises of Ivory vomiting up. It helps the players feel more at ease. Outside, the Carter squad is warming up, and it is clear from the way they are dressed that Permian is up against a team unlike any other they have played this season. The Permian Pepettes enter and immediately begin yelling, “MOJO!

It appears to be an attempt to frighten the crowd.

When the Permian band initially arrived on the field, they would often march all around the field.

The dressing room, on the other hand, has an atmosphere unlike any other.

There isn’t a single person in the locker room who believes they can lose.

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