What Was The Chant About Jews At Charlottesville

“You will not replace us”: a French philosopher explains the Charlottesville chant

“You will not replace us,” and “Jews will not replace us,” sang white nationalists holding tiki torches as they marched through Charlottesville, Virginia, on Friday night. This came as a surprise to a lot of people in the United States. However, for Europeans, the notion that white Christian identity is under threat from ethnic variety and multiculturalism has become a recurrent theme on the extreme right of political parties in recent years. Indeed, Geert Wilders, the head of the far-right Freedom Party in the Netherlands, wrote on Twitter on Sunday, “Our people is being displaced.” “There will be no more.” As for Generation Identity, the threat of “replacement” has been a rallying cry for the Europeanyouth alt-right movement for many years.

In his book The Great Replacement, Camus contends that European civilisation and identity are in danger of being swallowed by mass migration, particularly from Muslim nations – a notion he refers to as “the Great Replacement.” On Sunday, I decided to contact Camus to ask him what he felt about the fact that neo-Nazis and white supremacists in the United States were screaming chants that looked to have been influenced by his beliefs.

I received a response on Monday (whether they knew it or not).

In a statement, he decried the violence and emphasized that he had no link to Nazism: “If the marchers are Nazis and/or anti-Semites, or if they launch assaults – I am, of course, very opposed to all of this, and I cannot claim that they are inspired by me.” Nevertheless, he stated, “I can very well see why people in America would shout, ‘We will not be replaced,’ and I support them in their decision.” The following is a partial transcript of our conversation, which has been gently modified for clarity and conciseness.

Sarah Wildman

Could you tell me a little bit about your philosophy and whether or not you believe it pertains to the setting of the United States?

Renaud Camus

What is your philosophy, and do you believe it pertains to the current situation in the United States of America?

Sarah Wildman

Could you tell me a little bit about your philosophy and if you believe it pertains to the setting of the United States?

Renaud Camus

No, it doesn’t work like that.

Sarah Wildman

In general, I believe that replacement is a common occurrence. In Occidental Europe, specifically, and maybe most notably in France, Islam is only manifested in the shape it takes. And it just serves to aggravate the situation because it is quite powerful; it is a very powerful culture and civilization with its own language and religious beliefs.

However, it is not necessary to the fundamental concept of replacement. And, for example, in Western Europe, black Africa is replacing Northern Islamic Africans just as much as Northern Islamic Africans are replacing black Africa.

Sarah Wildman

Generally speaking, I believe that the replacement is a common occurrence. In Occidental Europe, specifically, and maybe most notably in France, Islam is only manifested in its many forms. In addition, because it is so powerful, it is a highly powerful culture and civilization with its own language, as well as its own religion, making the situation worse. However, it is not necessary to the concept of replacement in and of themselves. Also consider that the replacement of black Africans in Western Europe is equal to that of Northern Islamic Africans in terms of numbers.

Renaud Camus

Yes, it is about Western civilisation as a whole, with Christianity serving as a fundamental composing element of that culture. But it’s not just that. It may also be Jewish civilisation in Europe, or free-thinking civilization in Europe, or any type of European heritage, that is being gradually supplanted by another people in the European Union. Of course, if you alter the people, you can’t expect the same civilisation to survive indefinitely.

Sarah Wildman

And your point of view is that this is, in essence, a risk? If this “replacement” is not a positive, does that mean it is a negative in your mind?

Renaud Camus

Yes, it’s a pretty awful situation. I believe that the entire notion of replacing everything with something else is abhorrent. I believe it is a catastrophe. I believe it is the worst form of totalitarianism now in operation anywhere in the globe. As a result, I believe it is absolutely terrible for the planet to become, for example, a tourist destination rather than a place where people live. In the same way that Las Vegas is a successor for Venice. Alternatively, amusement parks serve as substitutes for natural areas or natural monuments.

Yes, I believe that is very abhorrent, because I believe that the dignity of man is that he cannot be substituted.

That, in my opinion, is just unacceptable.

Sarah Wildman

You indicated in a YouTube video you posted in July 2016 that Donald Trump’s candidacy and campaign were tied in some ways to this concept and to the dread of being replaced. Describe how or if Trump’s support from white supremacists may be a component of this same debate or cause the same level of concern.

Renaud Camus

Trump, of course, is a complicated figure since he appears to be a part of the great replacement, as seen by his cultural background. For example, his approach on environmental issues, in my opinion, is utterly disastrous. His residence, for example, where everything is awful and false, did not leave a lasting impression on me.. He is a participant in a completely fictitious universe. In contrast, he appears to be opposed to large immigration to the United States, which is something that is anti-replacist in character.

As a result, my sentiments regarding Mr. Trump are quite conflicted. I can’t claim that I am a fervent supporter of Donald Trump. However, I agree with his opposition to large immigration, and this is something I support.

Sarah Wildman

They were yelling, “You will not replace us,” and “Jews will not replace us,” as the white nationalists marched through Charlottesville. Do you believe that your feelings of dread about being replaced are a result of the concepts you’ve been articulating?

Renaud Camus

The inability to accept being replaced is a very strong emotion in a man. It is not necessary to instill fear and apprehension in people’s hearts and thoughts. It was the will not to be replaced that was at the heart of colonial resistance. The unwillingness to accept the status of a colony in India or Africa is a significant component of anti-replacism. Foreigners who come into a country and influence the customs and religions of the people who live there, their style of eating and clothing, are seen negatively by the majority of the population.

Being human means that you are irreplaceable.

Sarah Wildman

A very powerful emotion exists in man when it comes to refusing to be replaced. It is not necessary to instill fear and apprehension in others. At the heart of colonialism’s resistance was a determination not to be supplanted. In many ways, anti-replacism is characterized by the resistance to accept the status of a colony in India or Africa. Foreigners who come into a country and modify the customs and religions of the people who live there, their style of eating and clothing, are seen negatively by the majority of people.

Being human means that you are irreplaceable in the world.

Renaud Camus

They’re marching against Jews, aren’t they? They’re Nazis, aren’t they? Then they will be unable to be inspired by me, who is the polar opposite of all of that. As a result, if the marchers turn out to be Nazis and/or anti-Semites, or if they engage in violence, I will, of course, denounce them and refuse to claim that they were inspired by me. Attacks, regardless of their source, are categorically not acceptable in my opinion. I belong to a very small political party called “Innocence,” and I am a staunch supporter of nonviolence.

Sarah Wildman

Consequently, you are condemning the violence that took place in Charlottesville? Is this what you’re trying to say?

Renaud Camus

Oh, without a doubt, completely, and without the least semblance of hesitation.

Sarah Wildman

Of course, without a doubt, completely, and without the least semblance of hesitance

Renaud Camus

Oh, definitely, without a doubt, completely, and without the least semblance of hesitation.

Sarah Wildman

No. That is not what I am saying. I can’t speak for all of them, of course, but I believe that in the United States there has been a rebirth of a form of white nationalism, as well as some pro-Nazi attitude that has become more vocal in recent months.

Renaud Camus

White nationalism and Nazism are diametrically opposed to one another.

Sarah Wildman

Please accept my apologies.

Say it one more time. Essentially, you’re stating that you believe white nationalism and Nazis are two entirely distinct things?

Renaud Camus

Yes. I definitely hope so, because it’s a really different experience. Despite the fact that I would not classify myself as a white nationalist, since it is not my way of thinking or speaking, I do recognize that white people, wherever they are in the globe and particularly in South Africa, are generally concerned about their future. In South Africa, there is now a horrific scenario unfolding that revolves around the fact that one is white.

Sarah Wildman

Do you believe your political ideology or philosophical perspective to be racist? Do you consider racism to be a negative concept?

Renaud Camus

I am unable to label my overall picture of the universe or myself as “racist” since the term has already been appropriated by something quite else. Although races exist, I believe they are infinitely valuable, just as everything else — sexes, cultures, civilizations, private property and nations — and that this is what allows men and women to resist universal interchangeability while still making each human being distinct and priceless. It is, I believe, one of the great tragedies of modernity, that anti-racism has appropriated the term “race” in precisely the same ridiculous pseudoscientific and very limiting manner that “racists” did before them.

Sarah Wildman

Who are the individuals who are most at risk?

Renaud Camus

It’s most likely the white one, which is by far the least common of the old main classical “races,” according to statistics. Because of the benefits it has had for so long, it has been referred to as “the aristocracy of the globe.” According to my assessment, the French race — or, if you prefer, the French people — in all of its dimensions — ethnic, cultural, and civilizational — is particularly vulnerable. It is swiftly losing its own area, in which its own culture and civilization are soon becoming just one among many, and not the most vibrant, and in which it is rapidly being colonized by other peoples.

Sarah Wildman

Is it possible to live in harmony with one another? Is multiculturalism a viable concept that can be implemented?

Renaud Camus

What are the chances of successful coexistence? Whether or if multiculturalism is a viable concept to pursue, the question remains.

Sarah Wildman

However, the white nationalists who are screaming against being replaced are anti-African Americans, anti-Jews, and anti-academics, among other groups in America. However, both of these groups are already established in the United States. What role does this play in the concept of replacism?

Renaud Camus

In contrast, the white nationalists screaming against being replaced are hostile to African Americans as well as Jews and other minorities in the United States of America. They are already present in the United States, nevertheless. Can you tell me how this relates to the concept of replacementism?

Why the Charlottesville Marchers Were Obsessed With Jews

It was reportedly about defending a statue of Robert E. Lee during the “Unite the Right” demonstration in Charlottesville. It was all about affirming the legitimacy of “white culture” and white supremacy, as well as safeguarding the history of the Confederacy, throughout the Civil War. So why were anti-Semitic chants such as “Jews will not replace us” heard from the crowd of demonstrators? The rally was not only tinged with anti-black bigotry, but it was also tinged with anti-Semitic sentiment.

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During the march, one participant told Vice News’ Elspeth Reeve, “This city is ruled by Jewish communists and criminal niggers,” referring to the city’s leadership.

Nazi websites issued a call to action, urging people to demolish their building.

Jonathan Greenblatt, the president of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), said the agenda was about “celebrating the enslavement of Africans and their descendants, and celebrating those who then fought to preserve that terrible machine of white supremacy and human enslavement.” Greenblatt was speaking on behalf of the ADL.

  1. The connection between anti-blackness and anti-Judaism, in the imaginations of white supremacists such as David Duke, is a straight one.
  2. A disturbing reminder that the hatreds of our day are rooted in history and may be readily channeled through time-tested anti-Semitic tropes is provided by the persistence of anti-Semitic tropes and the ease with which they are incorporated into all manifestations of hate.
  3. He recently talked to a group of college students on anti-Semitism on college campuses, and he was well received.
  4. lecture, I remarked, ‘I wouldn’t jump to the conclusion that modern anti-Semitism is as harmful as its early 20th-century antecedent,'” because of all the information he had presented.

It definitely gave me the impression that books and ideas that I had previously considered to be quite peripheral in our culture are not as marginal as I had anticipated.” It is very uncommon for anti-Semitism to serve as a universal language for prejudice of all kinds, serving as a sort of Rosetta Stone that may transform animus toward one group into a universal hatred for many others.

Paul, Christianity and all of its offspring—Islam, secular ideologies of Europe, and so on—have learnt to think about their world in terms of conquering the perils of Judaism,’ Nirenberg explained.

for thinking about the world and what’s wrong with it.” In the universe imagined by white supremacists, Jews are an evil presence lurking in the shadows, pulling strings, directing events, and functioning as an all-powerful force that supports and empowers the other targets of their hatred and bigotry.

  1. He protested to a gathered throng that Jewish Zionists had power over the media and the American political system.
  2. “However, it always, always, always comes back to the Jews,” says the narrator.
  3. When Jewish factory worker Leo Frank was falsely accused of murder and killed in 1915, two new organizations started at the same time: the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), which works against prejudice and anti-Semitism, and the second Ku Klux Klan, which began by celebrating Frank’s death.
  4. A similar reasoning might be found in white supremacy: hatreds become universalized via the use of shared archetypes.
  5. Black Americans escaping the South as part of the Great Migration were viewed as a threat to the nation’s vital labor supply.
  6. Following the Holocaust, neo-Nazi movements were mainly relegated to the political periphery of the country, yet they never completely disappeared from the American scene.
  7. It was a global outcry when the scheduled march was announced, and the American Civil Liberties Union was notable for successfully defending the group’s First Amendment rights in court.
  8. He noted that the Charlottesville event was distinct from the scheduled Skokie march in two significant ways, as explained by Nirenberg.
  9. In the context of free speech issues and college campuses serving as front lines in the cultural fight, he believes it is appropriate.
  10. As Nirenberg put it: “That strong, obvious commitment to specific ideals of inclusiveness from our political leaders does not exist in the same manner.” A news conference was conducted on Monday by President Donald Trump in response to the violence in Charlottesville.

“Those who incite violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including members of the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repulsive to all we hold dear as citizens of the United States.” ” This remark occurred two days after his original statements on the demonstrations, in which he decried the “hate, racism, and violence on many sides” that he had witnessed during the demonstration.

President Donald Trump’s suggestion that white supremacist protestors and their counter-protesters were on a same footing stunned legislators and public figures in both parties, who immediately attacked Trump’s reluctance to condemn white nationalists and the KKK.

Tuesday, the president conducted another news conference in which he repeated his prior statements, saying: “What about the alt-left that charged…

” Is there an issue with them?

A few examples include: the Holocaust Remembrance Day statement that did not mention Jews; the conspiratorial meme of Hillary Clinton and a Star of David, which Trump shared on Twitter while running for president; the infamous Nazi salute and cries of “Hail Trump!” at an alt-right conference following the election.

  • All of this, according to those like Greenblatt, is a hint that at the very least, the White House is not taking anti-Semitism seriously enough.
  • According to Greenblatt, “there are Jewish grandchildren roaming about the White House.” “But make no mistake: the extreme right views a wide range of individuals as a threat, but it always, always, always returns to the Jews,” says the author.
  • “There’s a want for individuals, even minorities like Jews and blacks, to “know their place,” according to Feld, who claims that the extreme right is reacting to other political movements with nostalgia.
  • In spite of this, they are in a relationship: universalized movements that seek to combat injustice against all peoples in all of their identities often elicit opposition from those who believe they are losing their place in society.
  • “It’s all of those things,” Nirenberg explained.
  • There will always be individuals who despise Jews, no matter when they appear.
  • For a historian, it’s difficult to express such a sentiment, but Feld believes that the world has arrived at a “critical crossroads.” “I don’t believe that Jews are under danger anywhere in the globe.
  • Nevertheless, I believe that all social groupings must pay close attention and speak out against what is taking place,” I said.

Feld, like Nirenberg, was taught to look at the photos coming out of Charlottesville and perceive not a freak incident, but rather the echoes of history, rather than the images coming out of Charlottesville being a freak occurrence. “It’s God,” she explained. “It’s freaking terrifying.”

Conspiracies about a ‘catastrophic takeover’ by Jews have long been an American problem

It was reportedly about defending a statue of Robert E. Lee during the “Unite the Right” protest in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was all about affirming the legitimacy of “white culture” and white supremacy, as well as safeguarding the history of the Confederacy, throughout this time period. So why were anti-Semitic chants such as “Jews will not replace us” heard from the crowd during the demonstration? There was anti-black racism in the air, as well as anti-Semitism, at the protest. A statement like “blood and soil,” which is derived from Nazi philosophy, was yelled by marchers, who carried swastikas on their banners.

An appeal for people to destroy their building was issued on Nazi websites.

Jonathan Greenblatt, the president of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), stated that the agenda was about “glorifying the slavery of Africans and their descendants, and celebrating those who battled to perpetuate that horrible machine of white supremacy and human servitude.” They are all wearing shirts that have Adolf Hitler’s face on them, and I don’t understand why.” The relationship between African Americans and Jews, on the other hand, is very evident for these protesters.

The connection between anti-blackness and anti-Judaism, in the opinion of white supremacists such as David Duke, is unambiguous.

A disturbing reminder that the hatreds of our day are rooted in history and may be readily channeled through time-tested anti-Semitic tropes is provided by the persistence of anti-Semitic tropes, as well as the simplicity with which they can be incorporated into all forms of hate His career has been devoted to the study of anti-Jewish activities and ideologies, which has taken him to the University of Chicago.

Anti-Semitism on college campuses was the subject of a recent speech he gave to a group of students.

conversation, I remarked, ‘I wouldn’t jump to the conclusion that modern anti-Semitism is as harmful as its early 20th-century antecedent,'” because of all the information he had learned.

The experience certainly gave me the impression that books and ideas that I had previously considered to be quite peripheral in our culture are not nearly so marginal as I had anticipated.” It is very uncommon for anti-Semitism to serve as a global language for prejudice of all kinds, serving as a sort of Rosetta Stone that may transform animus toward one group into a universal hatred for many other groups.

  • ‘Ever since St.
  • As a result of thinking about Judaism, we have these really fundamental building pieces…
  • They pull strings, influence events, and operate as an all-powerful force that supports and empowers the other targets of their hatred.
  • “Jewish Zionists dominate the media and the political establishment in America,” he lamented to a gathering throng.
  • ” The Jews, on the other hand, are the ones who always, always, always come back.” Anger towards black people and hatred of Jews have always been linked in the United States.
  • The Nazis, according to Marjorie Feld, a professor of history at Babson College, were a natural model for white nationalist movements in the United States later in the twentieth century.
  • White nationalists viewed Jews as capitalists who were damaging the local economy.

In the eyes of many, Catholics were illegal aliens attempting to take employment from Americans.

During a Nazi demonstration in Skokie, Illinois, in 1978, for example, the group purposely chose an area that was thickly populated by Holocaust survivors in order to maximize their visibility and impact.

In the end, they decided to hold a demonstration in the Chicago area.

As a starting point, the “Unite the Right” rally is taking place in a political environment.

In addition, political figures from around the country spoke out strongly against the Skokie march.

Rascism, he asserted, was “evil.” “Those who incite violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including members of the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups that are repulsive to everything we hold dear as citizens of the United States.” This remark occurred two days after his original comments on the protests, in which he decried the “hate, racism, and violence on many sides” that he had encountered during them.

White nationalist protestors and counter-protesters were compared in a way that surprised lawmakers and public people in both parties, who soon attacked Trump’s reluctance to condemn neo-Nazis and members of the KKK for their actions.

On Tuesday, the president gave another news conference, during which he confirmed his prior accusations, stating, “What about the alt-left who came storming…

That’s what I believe they do.” Greenblatt said that the pushback to Trump’s statements is not about politics, but rather about identifying a trend of anti-Semitism in the United States of America.

Many groups have repeated their calls for Trump to replace Steve Bannon, his top strategist, in recent days, in part because of Bannon’s involvement in establishing Breitbart News, which he has described as a “platform for the far right.” All of this, according to folks like Greenblatt, is a clear indication that the White House does not take anti-Semitism seriously enough, at the very least.

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As Greenblatt pointed out, “there are Jewish grandchildren roaming around the White House.” “But make no mistake: the extreme right views a wide range of individuals as a threat, but it always, always, always returns to the Jews,” said the author of the article.

A larger political backdrop, as Nirenberg noted, had a role in the violence that took place during the Charlottesville rally.

During a time when “people of all backgrounds are being bold enough to urge that these monuments to slavery” are destroyed, Feld said, “it makes sense to me that these individuals would come out and say we would like things back to the way they were.” Far from the widespread prejudice of the far-right fever swamps, the intersectional left’s identity politics are markedly distinct from it.

In my opinion, seeing this example as exclusively an anti-Jewish protest…as solely an anti-African American march would significantly diminish and devalue the discussion.” According to Nirenberg, “it’s all of that.” To the extent that we separate things and assert, ‘No, it’s simply about my identity,’ we fail to comprehend fundamental components of identity politics in the present.’ Neo-Nazis are, of course, still a presence today.

Every generation has its share of anti-Semites.

According to Feld, “as a historian, you just can’t say this, but I feel like we’re at a watershed moment.” “I do not believe that Jews are under danger throughout the globe.

Nonetheless, I believe that all social groupings must pay close attention and speak out against what is taking place,” I said.

When Feld looked at the photos pouring out of Charlottesville, he saw not a freak incident, but rather the echo of events from decades before. Nirenberg was also trained to perceive the echoes of events from decades ago. He called out to her, “God.” “It’s just terrifying.”

White nationalists’ fears

In an expert report presented to the court concerning the history, ideology, symbolism, and rhetoric of antisemitism – which was later summarized in her personal testimony – Deborah Lipstadt, a historian of Jewish origins who has been nominated by President Joe Biden to serve as Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Antisemitism, claimed that the Charlottesville chant had multiple meanings. The chant, she noted, “may be read to mean that Jews will not replace ‘us,’ i.e., white Christians, in our jobs or our dominating position in society,” in its most basic and clear meaning.

In addition to other offenses, white supremacist David Lane was convicted of conspiring in the 1984 machine-gun death of Jewish talk-radio personality Alan Berg in Denver, among other things.

His writings said that “the Western nations were dominated by a Zionist conspiracy…which, above all else, seeks to eliminate the White Aryan race.” ‘We must safeguard the life of our people and the future for white offspring,’ states his 14-word objective, which has become a major plank of white nationalist ideology today.

The slogan “Jews will not replace us,” as Lipstadt stated to the court, is a white supremacist response to these anxieties of being replaced by Jews.

As stated in the protocols, Jews have no intention of settling for anything less than universal dominion.

Lipstadt writes that the scream “Jews will not replace us” reflected this concern and acted as “one of the animating foundations of the Unite the Right march” in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Antisemitic cartoons

However, as a researcher of American Jewish history, I am well aware that the fear of “replacement” extends back far further than Lipstadt’s argument. Similar anxieties arose in 1882, when thousands of Jews flocked to New York in the aftermath of Russian pogroms and anti-Jewish legislation known as the May Laws, despite the fact that Jews constituted fewer than one percent of the country’s population at the time. In cartoons published in the satirical monthly The New Yorker, the well-known American-born cartoonist James Albert Wales, who died in 1886, fueled anxieties about how Jewish immigration might affect the character of the city.

  1. The “New Jerusalem” depicted by Wales would be established by 1900, with Canal Street being renamed “Levi Street,” Jewish-owned companies replacing Christian-owned enterprises, and a Jewish feather dealer serving as the city’s mayor.
  2. According to popular belief, they were displacing the so-called bluebloods of the illustrious 7th Regiment of the New York Militia, the city’s elite national guard that was created in 1806 and enlisted into federal service during the Civil War.
  3. 2, No.
  4. The cartoon, which appeared in The Judge on July 22, 1882, as a vibrant two-page chromolithograph (a colored picture created by lithography), was part of a series that cautioned readers to be on the lookout for Jews who were rumored to be attempting to replace them in the country.
  5. Instead, a sign with the Jewish name “Moses Eichstein” was installed in its place.
  6. The cry “Jews will not replace us,” which was heard in Charlottesville in 2017, expresses the same types of worries.

In light of the approaching end of the trial in Charlottesville, it is worth noting that the myth that Jews are attempting to remake America in their own image, to the detriment of white Americans, has been around almost as long as major Jewish immigration to the United States’ borders.

Perspective

When it comes to the question of whether Jews are white, both Jews and non-Jews get interested. It’s the kind of subject that captures the attention of academics and activists alike, drawing in everyone from Israeli actress Gal Gadotto to environmentalists. James Baldwin is a literary giant of African American descent. Jewish people have been discriminated against for generations, and this has included white civilizations ranging from Nazi Germany to the United States. When it comes to Jewish acceptability, on the other hand, many have achieved a substantial level of acceptance, and many can often “pass” as white when they are not wearing traditional Jewish insignia.

Personally, I’ve considered this discussion to be completely irrelevant, and the horrible actions that occurred in Charlottesville over the weekend vividly explain why: White racists have already made up their minds about what they will do.

Lee from the historic Virginia city, white nationalists staged a “Unite the Right” rally that attracted a veritable who’s who of top neo-Nazis in the United States, including Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke and alt-right leader Richard Spencer, among others.

One person was killed and 19 others were injured when a vehicle ploughed into a gathering.

The white nationalists demonstrated at the University of Virginia on Friday night, waving torches and chanting anti-Semitic and Nazi slogans such as “blood and soil” (an English translation of the Nazi “blut und boden”) and “Jews will not replace us,” which were all designed to portray Jews as foreign intruders who must be expelled.

  • “Jews are Satan’s offspring,” read one of the banners.
  • “Little Mayor Signer — ‘See-ner’ — how do you pronounce the name of this little creep?” “How do you pronounce the name of this little creep?” Spencer was the one who inquired.
  • Attendees were not bashful in expressing their anti-Semitism in television interviews.
  • During a protest against a white supremacist event in Charlottesville, James Alex Fields Jr., 20, is accused of driving his vehicle into a throng of people protesting.
  • None of this should come as a surprise.
  • With inspiration from Donald Trump, Duke himself campaigned for the Senate in Louisiana, where he spent much of his time on the primary debate stage raving about the Jewish community.
  • Throughout the presidential campaign, Trump’s alt-right fans bombarded Jewish journalists with online abuse, including CNN’s Jake Tapper, the Atlantic’s Julia Ioffe, and me, photoshopping us into gas chambers and concentration camps, and threatening us with physical violence.

As Eric Ward of the Southern Poverty Law Center, an African American academic and activist who has studied the civil rights movement for years, recently stated: “The accomplishments of the civil rights movement created a severe challenge for white supremacist ideology, which is still being felt today.” White supremacism had been the rule of the land for decades, inscribed de jure by the Jim Crow administration and enforced de facto beyond the South, until a black-led social movement overthrew the political regime that supported it.

  • How could a race of inferiors have unseated this power structure only via the power of collective action?….
  • Television, finance, entertainment, education, and even the government of the United States must be under the influence of this wicked force of evil!
  • What exactly is this white race’s arch-nemesis, whose efforts have stopped the natural and inevitable imposition of white supremacy from taking place?
  • Jews serve the same purpose for white nationalists now as they did for anti-Semites throughout history: as devils boiling a pot of lesser evils that is always changing and diverse.” Thus, Jews are the only “white people” who are specifically targeted by white nationalists as a result of this.
  • Following the events in Charlottesville, it is evident that we no longer have the luxury of arguing the finer issues of this issue.
  • As a matter of fact, racism is mostly the outcome of socially created categories imposed by bigots in order to distinguish out-groups from an in-group: white people are distinguished from non-white people, Germans are distinguished from Jews, and so on.
  • When white supremacists aggressively assault Jews as nonwhite impostors, any anti-racists deserving of the label must be present to protect them against their detractors.

Aside from that, they are essentially handing over Jews to their assailants and aiding and abetting their persecution.

As a result, Israel’s legislation of return, which guarantees citizenship to any Jew who has one Jewish grandmother, utilizes the Nazi concept of “one Jewish grandparent,” despite the fact that there is a heated discussion within the Jewish community about exactly what constitutes a Jew.

In light of the current situation, we in the United States must do the same thing.

However, in order to argue the junction of Jewish identity and whiteness in the future, we must first safeguard that Jewish identity in the present.

Until then, however, the question is at best a diversion from the struggle against racism and at worst a means of furthering its perpetuation.

Yair Rosenberg is a senior writer for Tablet Magazine, where he writes about politics, religion, and culture. He lives in New York. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook to keep up with his latest projects.

When white nationalists chant their weird slogans, what do they mean?

‘You Will Not Be Able to Replace Us,’ says the author. Marchers carrying torches in Charlottesville chanted slogans such as “Blood and Soil,” “Russia is Our Friend,” and other catchphrases. White nationalists chanting in Charlottesville, Virginia, again: video 039;You Will Not Be Able to Take Our Place. 039;This video was taken by rally attendees. White nationalists wielding torches under the leadership of a Nazi “alt-right” figure In a repeat of their appearance on August 11, when a similar polo-shirt-bedecked crowd carried tiki torches to the University of Virginia, chanting a variety of slogans and far-right catchphrases, Richard Spencer and his supporters marched in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend.

  • A rendition of the adopted Confederate hymn, “Dixie,” was afterwards sung, as well as the cries of, “Russia is Our Friend!” and “The South Will Rise Again!” were also heard.
  • The rally took place eight weeks after the “Unite the Right” rally, which turned into a murderous melee the following day when an alt-right protester rammed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one and injuring a slew of others.
  • The marching white nationalists, like they had done at the last demonstration, yelled a variety of slogans, each with a very specific meaning to their cause, as they had done at the previous event.
  • Take, for example, the chants from the August 11th march on the University of Virginia campus, which are as follows: Alt-Right Demonstration Blood and Soil!039; and 039;Hail Trump!039; are chanted by marchers in Charlottesville, Virginia, in this video taken from social media sources.
  • “You will not be able to take our position!” According to Nathan Damigo, founder of the white-nationalist campus group Identity Evropa, who responded to an anti-Donald Trump “He will not divide us” campaign by actor Shia LeBeouf on social media with the following: “Shia LeBeouf, you will not replace us with your globalism,” the slogan was born. As with the white-nationalist “White Genocide” meme, the cry is a reflection of white nationalists’ beliefs that white people and white culture are under threat from multiculturalism and nonwhite races. As reported by the Anti-Defamation League, the slogan first appeared on white supremacist fliers and banners in May and has since gained widespread popularity. (At times during the first Charlottesville march, the chorus changed to “Jews Will Not Replace Us!”)
  • “Blood and Soil!” (At times during the first Charlottesville march, the chant changed to “Jews Will Not Replace Us!”)
  • This is the English translation of Nazi Germany’s most ardent song, “Blut und Boden!” It is perhaps the most distressing of all the chants heard in Charlottesville. A slogan developed by German nationalists in the nineteenth century and popularized by Nazi thinker Richard Walter Darre, the term is meant to elicit patriotic connection with one’s original national identity and is founded on anti-Semitism and racism on an extreme scale. Following World War II, it became a vital component of Adolf Hitler’s “Lebensraum”program, which sought to expand German-occupied lands and was a major element in the Holocaust. The alt-right, particularly its overtly neo-Nazi portion, has appropriated the phrase “White Lives Matter!” to stress its own nativist and eliminationist objective
  • “White Lives Matter!” Supposedly intended as a retaliation to the anti-police brutality movement This catchphrase quickly became both a slogan and the name of an outright white-supremacist movement aimed at undermining black civil rights. The movement is ostensibly “dedicated to the promotion of the white race and taking positive action as a united voice against issues facing our race,” according to its supporters. There are other neo-Nazi groups around the nation that have reformed themselves under the banner of the “WLM,” and the movement was labeled as a hate group in 2017. “Hail Trump!” they chant. It is unnecessary to explain why this slogan is used as a marching cry, but its inclusion is crucial. Donald Trump is regarded as a hero by the alt-right, with some leading figures referring to him as “Glorious Leader” and other such epithets. This is largely due to the fact that he follows their agenda and talking points, and has on numerous occasions shied away from denouncing white nationalists, most recently after the events in Charlottesville. In addition to Trump’s signature “Make America Great Again” ball hats, many of the demonstrators in Charlottesville were wearing them.
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You will not be able to take our spot! According to Nathan Damigo, founder of the white-nationalist campus group Identity Evropa, who responded to an anti-Donald Trump “He will not divide us” campaign by actor Shia LeBeouf on social media with the following: “Shia LeBeouf, you will not replace us with your globalism,” the slogan was created. As with the white-nationalist “White Genocide” meme, the cry is a reflection of white nationalists’ anxieties that white people and white culture are under attack by multiculturalism and nonwhite races.

(At times during the first Charlottesville march, the chorus changed to “Jews Will Not Replace Us!”); “Blood and Soil!” (At times during the first Charlottesville march, the cry changed to “Jews Will Not Replace Us!” “Blut und Boden!” is the English adaptation of Nazi Germany’s most impassioned shout, “Blut und Boden!” It is perhaps the most distressing of all the chants heard in Charlottesville.

Following World War II, it was a crucial component of Adolf Hitler’s “Lebensraum”program, which sought to expand German-occupied lands, and was a major element in the Holocaust.

This catchphrase quickly became both a slogan and the name of an outright white supremacist movement aimed at undermining black civil rights.

WLM is the umbrella organization for several neo-Nazi groups around the country, and it was labeled as a hate group in 2017.

A hero to the alt-right, where some leading figures refer to him as “Glorious Leader” and other such epithets, in large part because he largely follows their agenda and talking points, and has on numerous occasions refrained from denouncing white nationalists, most recently after the events in Charlottesville, is Donald Trump.

In addition to Trump’s signature “Make America Great Again” ball hats, many of the demonstrators in Charlottesville were dressed in the same way.

  • “Russia is one of our closest allies!” With open adoration for Russia’s authoritarian strongman ruler, Vladimir Putin, and the nationalist agenda he has supported both in Europe and the United States, the alt-right has been shameless in its open admiration for him. The Russian dictatorship, which has also played a significant role in funding far-right movements in Europe, has well-documented relationships with a number of alt-right individuals, including Spencer, according to the Washington Post. According to subsequent revelations following the 2016 election, Russia’s propaganda machine worked in close collaboration with the alt-right in disseminating its ideas and memes through social media during the campaign
  • “The South Will Rise Again!” was one of the most popular. This slogan, which reflects the alt-neo-Confederate right’s sympathies, dates back to the post-Civil War era, when the apologist”Lost Cause”revision of the war’s history was in full swing, leading to the widespread (and incorrect) belief that the war was primarily about “states rights” rather than slavery
  • The same movement, which was primarily active around the turn of the 19 thcentury, was also responsible for the construction of many The “Lost Cause” philosophy continues to be popular among neo-Confederates
  • “Harry Potter Isn’t Real!” is a common refrain. This seemingly strange chant, which in many ways reflects the alt-mastery right’s of popular culture, is directed at white nationalists’ hostility towards multiculturalism, as the underlying thesis of J.K. Rowling’s massively popular youth-fantasy series is about combating prejudice, both racial and otherwise, as the underlying thesis of the series is about combating prejudice, both racial and otherwise. In alt-right internet communities, the Potter novels are routinely criticized for allegedly brainwashing youngsters, and the books themselves are frequently assaulted. Furthermore, Rowling herself has been especially active on social media, denouncing both the alt-right and politicians affiliated with it, including Donald Trump
  • “We Will Be Back!” she has said on her Twitter account. Another chant that is fairly self-explanatory — and maybe the most terrifying of them

‘Jews will not replace us’: Vice film lays bare horror of neo-Nazis in America

White nationalists were at the forefront of deadly conflicts in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend, and a stunning Vice News documentary released on Tuesday shed light on their objectives. A Vice crew is embedded with Christopher Cantwell, a speaker at the “Unite the Right” demonstration that took place on Friday and Saturday, and the film depicts their interactions. The event resulted in the death of Heather Heyer, 32, who was killed when a vehicle crashed into a crowd of demonstrators.

  1. Those chants are quickly replaced by cries of “Jews will not replace us,” and several of the right-wing characters continue to spew racial slurs against Jews and African Americans throughout the course of the movie.
  2. “I’m attempting to increase my ability to use violence.” Basically, I’m here to promote ideas and communicate in the hopes that someone would come along and do the same thing for me.
  3. He then agrees with the Vice News presenter, stating that he is searching for a leader that is “a lot more racist than Donald Trump” in order to achieve success.
  4. “They maced me,” he confesses to the journalist.
  5. “I don’t know what to say.
  6. Cantwell later reveals to the video team that he had been carrying three firearms and a knife while on the run.

‘Blood and soil’: Protesters chant Nazi slogan in Charlottesville

  • It is the Nazi mentality that is invoked by the cry “blood and soil.” It extolled the virtues of persons of German descent who worked the land

(CNN) A rallying cry from the Nazi movement has been used by certain white supremacists and right-wing protestors in Charlottesville, Virginia, according to reports. Some of the demonstrators may be seen on video yelling “blood and dirt,” which is a slogan that refers to the Nazi doctrine of “Blut und Boden.” As part of its emphasis on ethnic identity being only based on blood ancestry and the place in which a person resides, the ideology also lauded German rural farmers and peasants as virtuous citizens of Germany.

  • Robert E.
  • The “blood and soil” chanting began Friday night as torch-bearing protestors marched through Charlottesville and battled with counter-protesters at the University of Virginia.
  • The expression may be traced back to the early days of Nazi propagandists.
  • They were extolled for their contribution to German society: those with a long family history in Germany (blood), as well as those who cared for their land (soil), played an important part in sustaining the state.

“That should not only imply that agricultural romanticism should be encouraged, but that the laws of blood and soil should be given high importance in order to establish their point of reference.” It was the Nazis’ blood and soil ideology that many rural farmers associated with, and it fostered a great feeling of national pride in poorer and agricultural groups.

“In Germany, there are no Jewish construction workers, no Jewish smiths, no Jewish miners, and no Jewish seafarers.

On the basis of this piece of propaganda, German farmers were forced into “poor and despair” as a result of Jewish merchants taking their land. Both the phrases “blood and dirt” and “Blut und Boden” are now considered hate slogans by the Anti-Defamation League.

How Charlottesville defendants made the judge say ‘gas the kikes’ and why it matters

(CNN) In Charlottesville, Virginia, some white supremacists and right-wing protestors have used a Nazi rallying call to motivate their supporters. Demonstrators are heard yelling “blood and dirt,” which refers to the Nazi doctrine of “Blut und Boden.” Video footage shows some of the demonstrators chanting the slogan. Rural farmers and peasants were exalted as good Germans, according to the ideology, which underlined that ethnic identification was based only on blood ancestry and the place in which an individual lived.

  1. Robert E.
  2. Friday night, marchers carrying torches marched through Charlottesville and battled with counterprotestors, prompting the start of the “blood and soil” chanting.
  3. In Nazi propaganda, the slogan may be traced back to the very beginnings.
  4. They were extolled for their contribution to German society: those with a long family history in Germany (blood), as well as those who cared for their land (soil), played an important part in the state’s support.

“That should not just imply that agricultural romanticism should be encouraged, but that the laws of blood and soil should be given high attention in order to provide a reference point.” It was the Nazis’ blood and soil slogan that many rural farmers associated with, and it generated a strong feeling of national pride in poorer and agricultural communities.

“It is impossible to find Jewish construction workers or smiths in Germany, and there are no Jewish miners or mariners in Germany.

On the basis of this piece of propaganda, German farmers were forced into “poor and despair” by Jewish businessmen who had taken their land.

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