When Did Wwe What Chant Start

‘What’ chants are the worst thing about WWE and they need to stop

Stone Cold Steve Austin, then-WWE World Champion, made a statement in August 2001. On SmackDown, Steve Austin made his now-famous “What” chanting début during a promotional segment. It immediately rose to become the most cherished cry in the WWE, and it was actually amusing at the time it was introduced. 15 years later, “What” shouts are still the most annoying portion of WWE programming, and they are particularly detrimental to the company’s up-and-coming talents. Carmella has been the newest victim of the “What” chant, as she performed a fantastic job of roasting Nikki Bella on Tuesday night while the fans in Stone Cold’s home state chanted “What!” at every single pause.

During a 2015 episode of his podcast, Austin discussed the history of the “What” chant, and he stated that he had no regrets for initiating it.

The truth is, when someone is cutting a commercial and the audience begins yelling ‘WHAT, WHAT, WHAT’ every time they take a break, the best way to avoid this is to just don’t give them a pause in the first place.

Do I have any regrets?

  • People used to have a lot of fun doing that back in the day, and guess what?
  • We printed the words “what” and a question mark on the front of a t-shirt, and it resulted in a significant increase in sales.
  • Instead, they may exploit that to their advantage by employing the skill.” Austin is correct about a couple of things here – it was entertaining back in the day, and he did sell a significant number of t-shirts at the time.
  • When a crowd derails a nascent star’s (otherwise excellent) promotional campaign when they have done nothing to deserve it, it is not amusing.
  • In spite of the fact that Carmella had the crowd enthralled with a wonderful “shut up, I’m talking” performed with a heavy New York accent, members of the audience attempted to hijack the promo.
  • Some celebrities may be more adept at dealing with boisterous audiences, but attempting to make a point and advance your own personal plot while navigating a “What” chant shouldn’t be a weekly expectation for the majority of them.
  • At the very least, the idea of fans harassing Chris Jericho with “sparklecrotch” chants is timely.
  • It’s not even a chant that’s specifically intended against heels.

It’s insane, and it has to come to an end. In the case that you’re at a WWE live event and someone close to you joins in on the what chant, it is your responsibility as a fan to label them a dumb fool. The artists are deserving of a better deal.

WWE News: Stone Cold Steve Austin Details Inventing The ‘What?’ Chant

It’s ice cold. ‘What?’ shouts, popularized by Steve Austin in 2001, have been explained in depth for the first time. Since his appearance as the Alliance’s shining light in the summer of 2001, Austin’s persona has morphed into an increasingly paranoid leader. Stone Cold would use the one-word slogan ad naseum throughout interviews in an attempt to encourage his warriors in their struggle against the then-World Wrestling Federation. Austin recounted where the inspiration for ‘What?’ came from during a talk with Randy Orton on the WWE Network’s The Broken Skull Sessions.

Stone Cold recounted:

Cold as ice. Steve Austin has revealed the origins of the infamous ‘What?’ chants that swept the wrestling world by storm in 2001. Austin’s persona had changed from being the brightest light in the Alliance during the summer of 2001 to being a paranoid leader. Stone Cold would repeat the one-word mantra ad nauseam during interviews in an attempt to encourage his followers in their fight against the then-WWF. Austin recounted the inspiration for ‘What?’ during a talk with Randy Orton on the WWE Network’s The Broken Skull Sessions show.

Christian recalls a funny voicemail from Steve Austin that helped create the ‘What?’ chant

The ‘What?’ cry is one of the most well-known in wrestling history, and Stone Cold Steve Austin is the wrestler who is most closely connected with it than anybody else. Stone Cold was able to control the reaction of the audience so well during the peak of the Attitude Era in the WWE that he was able to get them to chant a simple four-letter phrase. Christian explained how he played a role in Steve Austin’s notorious cry and the history behind it in a recent interview with Wrestling Travel from the For The Love of Wrestling conference in Liverpool, which was published by Wrestling Inc.

He left a rambling voicemail on my answering machine, which I received.

I mentioned that I was passing a tree.

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“When I arrived, I inquired as to the nature of the voicemail you had left for me. And he says, “I don’t know, I was just bored and started babbling.” “I really wish I had saved it.” In the next week or so, I was watching Raw from the back row and I could hear the audio of him promoting himself in the ring, and I heard him say, “What?!?” And I thought to myself, “How is he going to accomplish this, and how is he going to get this over with?” Sure enough, he was able to complete the chorus.

That was far back in the early 2000s, to be precise.

There have been several memorable incidents associated with the phrase throughout WWE history.

These include Stone Cold repeating it again in a backstage sequence behind Stephanie McMahon and a crowd taunting Vince McMahon by chanting “What?” One simple voicemail Austin left for Christian on one particular day is likely to remain in perpetuity, and it’s all because to that one simple message.

“When I arrived, I inquired as to the nature of the voicemail you had left for me.” And he’s like, “I don’t know, I was just bored and rambling around.” “I wish I had kept it,” I confess. In the next week or so, I was watching Raw from the back row and I could hear the audio of him promoting himself in the ring, during which I heard him say “What?!?” He had me convinced he was going to do it and that he would get away with it. “I couldn’t believe it.” As it turned out, he was successful in getting the chant to stop.

However, it is still utilized by WWE fans to make fun of particular superstars when they are doing a promo in the center of the ring, and this practice has continued to this day.

One simple voicemail Austin left for Christian on one particular day is likely to remain in perpetuity, and it’s all because of it.

WWE Hall of Famer ‘Stone Cold’ Steve Austin Reveals the Origin of His Notorious ‘What?’ Chants

When a WWE Superstar is in the ring, one of the most irritating things for him or her is when the fans start chanting “What?” The infamous cry is well-known for its ability to interrupt promotional events and is frequently used by fans to disparage a heel or a despised Superstar. Contrary to popular belief, “Stone Cold” Steve Austin was responsible for coining this phrase. ADVERTISEMENT The rest of the article is located below this advertisement. This catchphrase was used by ‘The Rattlesnake’ to anger a speaking opponent, much like The Rock’s catchphrase ‘It doesn’t matter!’ was used by The Rock.

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  2. In addition, I recall contacting Cristian on the phone one day while driving, but he didn’t pick up the phone.
  3. And then I’d say something and think, ‘What?’ can I say anything else?
  4. And I was like, ‘Wait, what?’ And I thought to myself, ‘Oh man, I think I’ve found something here.’ Now I have to put things into context.”

Steve Austin used the ‘What?’ chants throughout his career

This’something’ went on to become a recurring theme in Austin’s character’s development during the Attitude Era. It worked well in every situation, as Stone Cold employed it as a heel as well as a babyface in different matches. In the ring, I’d be dressing somebody down or something, ask them a question, and I’d say ‘What?’ like you’re really f***ing with somebody,” Austin recounted. “And then, as a babyface, you know, with the crowd, with generating a cadence and that pause- it just grew into a thing, and then we put it into a T-shirt!” says the singer.

GO EVEN FURTHER DOWN In the movie “Stone Cold,” the protagonist says, “I was trying to knock his a** out.” Steve Austin Recalls a Real-Life Fight With Booker T. Washington, Jr. 11 months have elapsed since

‘Stone Cold’ Steve Austin explained how to beat the ‘What?’ chants

Many Superstars have suffered as a result of the chanting, while some have managed to maintain their composure in the face of the strain. Even with the shouts, Alexa Bliss, The Undertaker, Vince McMahon, and The Miz have all managed to get through their promos effectively. ADVERTISEMENT The rest of the article is located below this advertisement. Stone Cold says that anyone with a rudimentary understanding of how to provide promotional material may get out of the bind. For those who say, “Hey dude, stop, the ‘What?” stuff is the worst thing that has ever happened because it’s f***ing up promotions,” I say, “here’s what you should do: stop saying what you’re thinking.” If you aren’t clever enough to leave out the pause, you aren’t capable of doing a promotion properly.

The cry now belongs to the people, and it serves as a reminder of the defiant attitude that characterized the Attitude Era.

GO EVEN FURTHER DOWN “Stone Cold” Steve Austin reveals his pick for the ‘Coolest WWE Walkout Ever,’ which he calls “Stone Cold.” 11 months have elapsed since

WWE Twitter Account Asks Fans To Stop Doing The “WHAT” Chant

“Stone Cold”Steve Austin, future WWE Hall of Famer and future wrestling icon, found upon the world’s most convenient way to be irritating back in 2001. “What?” is a single, monosyllabic word that may be given in the middle of an adversary’s statement, and it can be used to be douchey, dismissive, and rude by everyone’s favorite heel in the game. It is that final one, some twenty years later, that is attracting the most attention. Fans, on the other hand, seized on the straightforward reaction and have been employing it ever since to express their dissatisfaction or discontent with a character or their current plot line.

  • Of course, when Austin pulled the stunt, he had every intention of making a fool of himself.
  • WWE executives, on the other hand, believe it is disrespectful to their talent since fans continue to use it to reject what they don’t like.
  • (They have since been removed, so feel free to interpret that anyway you wish.) This was the first message, which was posted during a RAW segment in which Jerry Lawler was interviewing Rusev, and it read: “Can we put an end to the shouts of ‘WHAT?'” It is no longer the year 2001.
  • The chant was directed towards @AngeloDawkins as he bid farewell to @WWENXT, then it was directed at a “Hall Of Famer” on RAW.
  • “And now we’re back to RAW.” Despite the fact that the brass made their opinions known, it is unlikely that it will have much of an impact on the audience.
  • When it comes to live crowds, it’s like a sea of marks and smarks, and they take pleasure in their collective trolling.
  • Recently, he told Busted Open Radio, “I did it as a running heel at the time, you know, I was wearing heels at the time, and I left that message on Christian’s voicemail.” It seemed like every time I said something, I’d pause and think, ‘what?
  • You’re right, aren’t you?
  • Isn’t it true that I’m jabbing you?
  • So that was my first attempt at putting it to good use.
  • A huge part of being in WWE or in the wrestling business is that the audience wants to be involved, whether they are rooting for you or against you, applauding for you or booing you, or whatever.
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As a part of the show, it provided an opportunity for them to become involved and contribute.” In the meantime, they’re still taking part and saying things like ‘Austin, why in the heck did you invent that, I wish you hadn’t done that’.” I would have never imagined it in a million years that…

“I wouldn’t have predicted…” Do you believe that the chanting are insulting to the wrestlers and their efforts? Or is it merely a harmless show of support from the crowd? Please share your opinions in the comments section!

How did the Kurt Angle ”You Suck!” chant start?

Future WWE Hall of Famer “Stone Cold”Steve Austin discovered the world’s most convenient method to be obnoxious in 2001 while surfing the internet. Everyone’s favorite heel has the ability to be douchey, dismissive, and contemptuous with a single, monosyllabic word — “What?” – delivered in the middle of an adversary’s speech. It is that final one, some twenty years later, that is attracting the most interest. It’s true that the simple reaction was a hit with fans, who have been using it ever since to express their disinterest or dissatisfaction with a character or the current storyline.

  • Without a doubt, when Austin pulled the stunt, it was done with the intent of being amusing.
  • In spite of this, WWE executives believe it is disrespectful to their performers since fans continue to use it to trash what they don’t like.
  • It’s your choice how you choose to interpret their deletion.) This was the first message, which was posted during a RAW segment in which Jerry Lawler was interviewing Rusev, and it read: “Can we put an end to the shouts of ‘WHAT?’?” After all, it’s not the year 2001 anymore.
  • The chant was directed towards @AngeloDawkins when he bid farewell to @WWENXT, and now it’s directed at a WWE Hall of Famer on RAW.” If anything, it is an indication of disdain for the authority figure.
  • Despite the fact that the brass expressed their displeasure, it is unlikely to have much of an impact on the spectators on Saturday.
  • When it comes to live crowds, it’s like a sea of marks and smarks, and they take joy in their collective trolling.
  • “I did it as a, you know, I was running heel at the time, and I left that message on Christian’s voicemail,” he explained to Busted Open Radio earlier this year.

Man, there’s something here, I thought after receiving a lengthy voicemail.

Isn’t that right?

Right, you realize I’m poking fun at you.

It was a novel concept for the time period.

All of a sudden, when I switched back babyface and people began grabbing onto it, man, it just developed into something where you just had to put that pause in your cadence and they would come with the ‘what’ and it just sorta conditioned ’em to do it, and they were feeding off of it.

Whether they are just immersed in the sport or listening to a promotional message, they desire engagement and participation.

I wish you hadn’t done that.” Never in a million years would I have imagined…

“I would have never imagined it would be that successful.” Does it appear to you that the chanting are disrespectful towards the wrestlers? Maybe it’s simply a harmless gathering of people? Comment here and share your ideas with us.

WWE: How & When Did the Kurt Angle ‘You Suck’ Chant Get Started?

  • WWE.com Kurt Angle appeared on NBC’s ‘Monday Night Raw.’ When Kurt Angle enters the ring on Monday Night Raw, he is met by a throng of fans chanting “You stink!” to the beat of his theme song. This is done affectionately, though, and WWE fans have been screaming this slogan at Angle for more for 15 years now. So, how did the Kurt Angle “You stink” chant come to be a thing in the first place? Well, the chant can be traced back to at least February 2001, when Angle was embroiled in a legal battle with The Rock. While his theme song was playing on an episode of SmackDown that month, Angle showed a video montage of himself beating up The Rock, which prompted the audience to chant “You suck!” But it wasn’t until the end of the song that the chant began to gain traction, and the WWE commentators finally took notice, stating, “Hey, hold on a sec…people are attempting to add their own phrases! “
  • Video The origins of the kurt angle shout “you stink” are discussed in this video connected to WWE. 2017-07-24T18:45:58-04:00
  • Some think that the “You suck!” chant heard on SmackDown was first heard on this show in February 2001, and it appears that it was just a case of someone in the audience coming up with the concept and it spreading like wildfire from there on out. This chant would be heard every now and again over the following year and a half or more, depending on the circumstances. However, it wasn’t until Kurt Angle’s feud with Edge in 2002 that it truly started to take off as a phenomenon. On the November 4th, 2002 broadcast of SmackDown, after Angle’s entrance, a large portion of the audience began to sing “You stink!” in the same manner that they do nowadays, and several fans even had placards with the slogan on them. Aside from yelling it in time with his theme tune, they also screamed “You stink!” at random intervals during his promotional video. However, a few minutes later, Edge solidified the meme by going on a rambling rant about how many wrestlers have chants linked with them and that Kurt Angle’s chant should be “You suckers.” The incident occurred when Angle complained about people chanting “What” at him, and Edge agreed that they should chant something else instead. “After you say anything, these folks should shout something else,” Edge said to me. “There’s something incredibly extraordinary going on. Something that is uniquely you. Kurt Angle should be applauded after every speech he gives, and I believe everyone should join in by yelling “You stink.” The fact that he wasn’t explicitly encouraging them to sing along with the theme song didn’t matter since people were already calling Kurt Angle “a jerk” before he ever said it. However, following Edge’s promo, when Kurt Angle’s music came back on, the whole audience exploded in the musical “You stink” shouts, which were now much louder than they had been previously, and the chanting continued throughout the show. Practically every time Kurt Angle entered the ring after that, these shouts could be heard
  • They were heard almost all of the time. Video The origins of the kurt angle shout “you stink” are discussed in this video connected to WWE. 2017-07-24T18:45:58-04:00
  • As a result, it is widely believed that Edge was the one who came up with the “You stink” chants for Kurt Angle. However, while he did publicize them, they had been around for at least a year before to that, with the first documented incidence being in February 2001, according to the CIA. However, it wasn’t until November 2002 that this became firmly entrenched as a meme on the internet. Fans were encouraged to yell “You suckers” at Angle over the course of the following few years by Angle’s character becoming highly irritated when they did so over the course of the next few years. Angle reprimanded the audience on one occasion in 2005, ordering them to stop screaming that he stinks and even forcing them to redo his entrance. Obviously, this just served to increase the volume of the chanting, which was the desired result. The more Kurt Angle railed against the cries, the more the audience joined in on the chorus. Despite the fact that Kurt Angle was promoted to the role of “face,” fans were not having it and booed him on a regular basis, much to the dismay of WWE management. As a result, he eventually turned heel, and the WWE loved the animosity. While Angle was on his heels, the “You stink” chants became such a joyful tradition that they persisted even after Angle turned back around to face the audience. Angle stated in an interview earlier this year that he and Vince McMahon tried their best for a period of time to persuade the fans to stop shouting “You stink” at him when he was a face, but were ultimately unsuccessful. In Angle’s opinion, “it’s one of those things that no matter how hard Vince and I worked, nothing was going to alter,” he added. In this day and age, it’s one of those things that fans do out of respect for the artist, and it works well with my song.” Angle, on the other hand, has stated that he has always appreciated the shouts, even when he was a face in the game. “Of course! That’s what I mean!” “I’ve been enjoying them since the beginning,” Angle remarked in a Facebook Q&A in February. “Do you really think I’d be upset if people started shouting that I’m a sucka, especially considering that I was a heel for five of the seven years I was in WWE?” Every time I enter the ring to wrestle, I have earned the right to hear this chant spoken. It’s meant as a complement.” “You stink,” shouted the whole audience as Kurt Angle made his triumphant comeback to the WWE Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony earlier this year. However, despite the fact that this cry began as a valid expression of disdain for Kurt Angle’s persona, it had clearly evolved into a show of appreciation by this time. Kurt Angle is not the only WWE wrestler whose entrances are followed by fans yelling trash at him throughout his matches. The majority of the WWE audience has been singing “John Cena stinks” to the tune of his entrance music for the past few years practically every time he enters a WWE ring. As with the Kurt Angle chant, there wasn’t exactly a specific time when this originated
  • Some fans simply began singing “John Cena stinks” along with his theme music, and the chant spread from that point. Like Kurt Angle, there are truly huge portions of the WWE audience that despise John Cena, but there are also those who sing “John Cena stinks” just because it is amusing and has become a meme, as was the case with Kurt Angle.
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Steve Austin On The Problem With The ‘What' Chant Being Used Today

WWE.com “Monday Night Raw” featured Kurt Angle. To the tune of Kurt Angle’s theme song, every week on Monday Night Raw, an adoring audience greets him with the chant, “You stink!” However, they do so with fondness, and WWE fans have been screaming this line at Angle for more for 15 years now. As a result, it’s important to understand how the Kurt Angle “You suckers” slogan came to be. The cry has been around since at least February 2001, when Angle was embroiled in a fight with The Rock. This month, on a special broadcast of SmackDown Live, Angle used his theme song to play over a video montage of himself beating up The Rock, prompting the audience to shout “You suck!” That didn’t happen right away; it wasn’t until the conclusion of the song that the chant began to gain traction, and the WWE commentators eventually took notice, stating, “Hey, hold on a sec…people are attempting to add their own phrases!” ; Video The origins of the kurt angle shout “you stink” are discussed in this video connected to WWE: 2017-07-24T18:45:58-04:00; In this February 2001 episode of SmackDown, the cry “You stink!” was sung to the rhythm of Kurt Angle’s theme music, and it appears that it was just a case of someone in the audience coming up with the idea and it spreading like wildfire from there.

  1. For the following year and a half, this chant would be heard every now and again.
  2. Along with singing along to his theme music, they also screamed “You stink!” at different points throughout his promotional video.
  3. ‘After you say anything, these folks should shout something different,’ Edge said.
  4. When Kurt Angle talks, I believe that everyone should express their gratitude by yelling, “You suck,” after each and every word.
  5. However, following Edge’s promo, when Kurt Angle’s music came back on, the whole audience exploded in the musical “You stink” shouts, which were suddenly much louder than they had been previously, as if they had heard something special.
  6. Video The origins of the kurt angle shout “you stink” are discussed in this video connected to WWE: 2017-07-24T18:45:58-04:00; According to legend, Edge was the one who devised Kurt Angle’s “You stink” chants in the first place.
  7. The first time this became widely recognized as a meme was in November 2002.

When the audience chanted “he sucks,” Angle yelled at them, ordering them to stop and even re-starting his entrance.

Obviously, this just served to increase the volume of the chanting, which was exactly what the organizers were aiming for.

Despite the fact that Kurt Angle was promoted to the role of “face,” fans were not having it and booed him on a regular basis, much to the dismay of WWE management and staff.

In this heel time, the shouts of “You suckers!” were such a popular tradition that they remained even when Angle turned face again.

In Angle’s opinion, “it’s one of those things that no matter how hard Vince and I worked, nothing was going to alter,” he added.

But Angle has stated that the shouts were always enjoyable to him, even when he was a mask.

Angle stated in a Facebook Q&A in February that he had “enjoyed them from the beginning.” For the record, I was a heel for 5 of my 7 years in WWE, so do you really think I’d get riled up if people started yelling that I sucked?

A complement has been extended to you.'” “You stink,” shouted the whole audience as Kurt Angle made his triumphant comeback at the WWE Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony earlier this year.

WWE wrestler Kurt Angle isn’t the only one whose entrances are met with abuse from the audience.

Unlike with the Kurt Angle chant, there wasn’t exactly a specific time when this started; some fans simply began singing “John Cena fucks” along with his theme music, and the chant quickly swept across the arena.

While there are definitely substantial portions of the WWE audience that despise John Cena, there are surely many more that sing “John Cena stinks” purely for the sake of fun and to make a meme out of it; similarly to Kurt Angle.

Reliving the Evolution of Daniel Bryan’s Iconic ‘Yes!’ Chant 8 Years After Debut

  1. Image courtesy of WWE.com The fact that one simple statement drove Daniel Bryan to the top of the professional wrestling world more than eight years after it initially aired on WWE TV is astonishing to contemplate. “Yes!” A chant that acquired popularity as a result of WWE’s bad scheduling has turned out to be one of the company’s most fortunate accidents in recent history. Since its inception, the chant (as well as the person who delivers it) has developed greatly, to the point where it is still as memorable on-screen as it has always been. This is how the “Yes!” cry has evolved over the past decade, leading up to the Royal Rumble on January 26th, which will mark the culmination of Bryan’s professional wrestling career.
  1. Yes! as a chant has a long and illustrious history that can be traced back more than a decade to a life outside of professional wrestling. Bryan has previously stated that the origins of the chant in his own career can be traced back to mixed martial arts, especially to Diego Sanchez. Sanchez used to walk to the Octagon yelling the catchphrase Yes! long before Daniel Bryan popularized the phrase in the WWE, as the video above reveals. Furthermore, Sanchez was significantly more scary in his usage of the slogan, and while it wasn’t precisely duplicated by the audience, the manner in which Sanchez yelled it had a significant influence on the atmosphere. It was here that the Yes! chant got its start, and as Bryan’s career in the WWE’s main event scene grew in prominence, it wasn’t long before he found the right chance to incorporate it into his own persona on screen
  2. This was in the form of his character, Daniel Bryan.
  1. Image courtesy of WWE.com Yes! as a chant has a long and illustrious history that can be traced back more than a decade to a life outside of professional wrestling. Bryan has previously stated that the origins of the chant in his own career can be traced back to mixed martial arts, especially to Diego Sanchez. Sanchez used to walk to the Octagon yelling the catchphrase Yes! long before Daniel Bryan popularized the phrase in the WWE, as the video above reveals. Furthermore, Sanchez was significantly more scary in his usage of the slogan, and while it wasn’t precisely duplicated by the audience, the manner in which Sanchez yelled it had a significant influence on the atmosphere. It was here that the Yes! chant got its start, and as Bryan’s career in the WWE’s main event scene grew in prominence, it wasn’t long before he found the right chance to incorporate it into his own persona on screen
  2. This was in the form of his character, Daniel Bryan.
  1. Yes! as a chant has a long and illustrious history that can be traced back more than a decade to a life outside of professional wrestling. Bryan has previously stated that the origins of the chant in his own career can be traced back to mixed martial arts, especially to Diego Sanchez. Sanchez used to walk to the Octagon yelling the catchphrase Yes! long before Daniel Bryan popularized the phrase in the WWE, as the video above reveals. Furthermore, Sanchez was significantly more scary in his usage of the slogan, and while it wasn’t precisely duplicated by the audience, the manner in which Sanchez yelled it had a significant influence on the atmosphere. It was here that the Yes! chant got its start, and as Bryan’s career in the WWE’s main event scene grew in prominence, it wasn’t long before he found the right chance to incorporate it into his own persona on screen
  2. This was in the form of his character, Daniel Bryan.
  1. When Triple H stripped Bryan of the WWE Championship at SummerSlam 2013, it was a prelude to Randy Orton cashing in his Money in the Bank briefcase at WrestleMania 30. The storyline that culminated with Bryan winning the WWE Championship at WrestleMania 30 began in essence at SummerSlam 2013, when Triple H screwed Bryan out of the title to allow Randy Orton to cash in his Money in the Bank briefcase. That was a watershed event in D-professional Bry’s life as well as the history of the Yes! chant itself. However, later that year, another watershed moment in the formation of the Yes! chant occurred. While The Authority was holding court in the center of the ring to discuss the company’s future goals and the debut of a new title, the audience decided to take control of the proceedings. They had a clear vision of who they intended to meet at the summit of the mountain. They were clamoring for Daniel Bryan, chanting his name non-stop. The choice of Mark Henry to raise his hand elicited even greater applause and prompted the entire audience to join in with the cry “Yes!” You can image how excited WWE was when they realized they had a celebrity on their hands backstage. It was occasions like these that demonstrated the importance of a large audience and the momentum that they can provide for a wrestler. It aided in elevating him and the chorus to a higher level of performance
  1. Image courtesy of WWE.com Despite the fact that the Yes! chant is clearly manufactured and intended for crowd interaction, there have been several points along the chant’s journey where it has organically grown to an extent that is beyond comprehension. One of these defining moments occurred during the 2014 Royal Rumble. By this point, Bryan was embroiled in a conflict with The Authority, who was systematically undermining him at every turn. Despite the fact that Bryan actually opened the show that night, fighting against Bray Wyatt, many fans were expecting him to pull double duty and win the Royal Rumble match itself. Not only did this not occur, but Bryan did not even make an appearance during the match. That particular moment compelled fans to turn even more hostile toward the company, pelting Bryan with chants and repeated calls of “Yes!” during the match’s waning moments. When it became clear that Batista would be victorious in the Rumble match, and thus set up a main event with Randy Orton at WrestleMania, the boos became even louder. And as everyone knows, Bryan managed to bully his way into that match and end up taking the entire show with him. He received a barrage of boos when he arrived at the arena last, which was probably unwarranted given his position in the match. As a result of this, the Yes! chant reached new heights in terms of popularity as almost everyone rallied around the sport’s unlikely hero.
  1. As WrestleMania XXX neared, and Bryan’s tremendous popularity became a target for Triple H and Stephanie McMahon, it was virtually impossible to predict what would transpire on the other side of the ring. In the realm of professional wrestling, Bryan was the most over-the-top act. He had once again embraced the Yes! chants, had put the No! campaign behind him, and had risen to become the most popular babyface in WWE history. There were numerous pivotal moments on the road to his night of success at WrestleMania. The angle in which he appeared to become a part of The Wyatt Family before turning on Bray was really effective. It further cemented his position as a must-see performance in the WWE. The night before Mania, when the Yes! movement overtook Raw, was equally pivotal in the buildup to the event. It was unlike anything WWE had ever done with a chant before, and it provided Bryan with an opportunity to capitalize on his fervent fan base. Randy Orton was also a fantastic foil for Bryan during the course of the narrative as well. Orton was a superb evil champion, and in order for the Yes! chants to become even more popular, it was necessary to have a heel who would try to reject them at every chance. Orton performed admirably in this regard, but Bryan’s contribution was critical.
  1. As the Yes! shout spread across the realm of professional wrestling, it was likely inevitable that it would ultimately spread to other types of sports outside of the squared circle as well. As WrestleMania 30 approached, and Bryan’s popularity was at an all-time high, the Yes! chant made its way to another location. Despite the fact that Mania is just a few weeks away, Michigan State football fans have embraced the song, which was started by Travis Jackson, a junior center for the Spartans. In that moment, Bryan and the Yes! cry cemented their position in sporting culture, and he demonstrated how he had helped bring WWE into the mainstream, and into the homes of millions of people who would otherwise have been ignorant of pro wrestling’s existence. It didn’t end there, either. When the Seattle Seahawks won Super Bowl XLVIII in 2014, they celebrated by tweeting an image with the words Yes! Yes! Yes! Though Mania 30 may have been the apex of Bryan’s narrative, it continued to be successful for some years afterward.
  1. Yes! chants continued even after Bryan was pushed into early retirement and assumed the role of on-screen authority figure, albeit at a more reduced volume. However, after he was allowed by doctors to return to in-ring action in March 2018, the Yes! shouts changed once more. It was a crescendo of applause as fans were treated to yet another opportunity to witness one of the most adored artists in recent memory go between the ropes and battle once again. On the dramatic night that Bryan was cleared and announced his comeback, the cries of “Yes!” rang out louder than they had ever sounded. Since then, Bryan has rejected the Yes! movement on many occasions, most recently with a heel turn in November 2018, but as he prepares to face Bray Wyatt at the Royal Rumble, he appears to have embraced the fans once more. It is the ongoing growth of both Bryan’s persona and his approach to the chant that has made it one of the WWE’s most enduring movements in recent years, according to the organization. Expect it to continue to grow in the near future as well.
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Jim Ross Reveals The Origin Of Steve Austin’s ‘What?’ Chant

It’s ice cold. Steve Austin’s notorious “What?” chant is one of the most divisive chants in the history of professional wrestling. Many a commercial has been disrupted by a large group of people chanting the program’s catchphrase during the broadcast. Fox has taken a firm stance against the anti-gay slogans. On the most recent episode of the Grilling JRpodcast, Jim Ross revealed the origins of the chant. Ross claims that the whole incident started as a rib on Christian’s rib cage. Austin took it and put it into his character as a result.

  • The question “what?” came into play at this point.” Crowd shouts are one of the most bizarre parts of wrestling, since they have the ability to completely affect the course of a session.
  • Through their WWE on Fox Twitter account, even Fox, which broadcasts WWE SmackDown, expressed displeasure with the chant.
  • The chant was directed towards @AngeloDawkins as he bid farewell to @WWENXT, then it was directed at a “Hall Of Famer” on RAW.
  • “And now we’re back to RAW.” Austin himself made light of the issue, tweeting his own “What?” in response to the scenario.
  • A skillful talker can easily skirt around them, or even flip them around on the audience, if the situation calls for them.
  • In your perspective, what should be done about the “What?” chant?
  • Please share your thoughts in the comments section.
  • for providing the transcript!
  • on November 30, 2021

Stone Cold Steve Austin Has Issues With ‘What’ Chants

‘Stone Cold’ is a euphemism for “stone cold.” Steve Austin is credited with inventing the notorious ‘What’ chant, but the WWE Hall of Famer is dissatisfied with how frequently it is utilized. courtesy of WWE.com ‘What’ is by far the most often heard WWE chant from live audiences – a slogan that was originated by’Stone Cold’ Steve Austinon an episode ofSmackDown in 2001 and hasn’t gone away since then. The Texas Rattlesnake was well aware that he was embarking on a work of art at the time, but the word ‘what’ has been misused for far too long now – especially considering that Austin has been out of the game for more than a decade.

It’s been a long time since I realized the chanting of ‘What?’ would last for as long as it has, he added.

They can become agitated from time to time.” Further, Austin expressed his gratitude that fans have continued to use the phrase all these years after it was first introduced, but he also believes that “the audience is losing out on what the wrestler is saying,” and that it “interrupts a superstar’s flow.” Indeed, the ‘What’ chant is used far too frequently during celebrity advertisements, even when it is apparent what they are saying is being referred to.

  1. What was meant to be a thing for Austin and his promotions has somehow made its way into The PG Era, some two decades after it was first introduced.
  2. Few WWE superstars have generated as spectacular promos and audience roars as Austin, who has come up with an impressive number of memorable catchphrases.
  3. Austin has made it plain that it can be too much at times and interferes with the flow of the commercials.
  4. The following: GOLDBERG responds to allegations that he copied the work of Stone Cold Steve Austin.
  5. Scarlett Bordeaux, a former NXT star and recently released WWE talent, has started her OnlyFans account today, with a photoshoot for the holidays as the first upload.

He previously worked as an intern at the BCHL office and served as the main site specialist for The Canuck Way from 2017 to 2020, among other positions. Alex also serves as the primary screenplay writer for the TPS YouTube channel, which he founded. Alex Hoegler has more to say.

Jim Ross’s chant reveals the origin of Steve Austin’s “What?” – WWE Sports

the name ‘Stone Cold’ means “stone cold” in the original English language. However, Steve Austin, WWE Hall of Famer, has expressed dissatisfaction with the way the chant has become overused. Wrestling Observer Newsletter via WWE When it comes to live WWE audience chants, ‘What’ is by far the most popular. It was launched by’Stone Cold’ Steve Austin on an episode of SmackDown in 2001 and hasn’t stopped since. Even though the Texas Rattlesnake was well aware that he was about to embark on a piece of artistic expression, it has been much too long since the word ‘what’ has been abused – especially given that Austin has been out of the game for more than a half-decade.

As he put it, “I had no idea that the chanting of ‘What?’ would last for as long as it has.” “A guy’s or girl’s rhythm, as well as their ability to communicate effectively, might be severely disrupted by this.

While watching celebrities promote their careers, the shout “What?” is all too often – even when it’s obvious what they’re talking about.

Steve Austin, one of WWE’s most legendary wrestlers, explains what is wrong with three major superstars.

On the whole, though, it seems that this “what” has been going on for far too long, and there isn’t any end in sight to it.

There’s no way he’ll be able to persuade the throngs of admirers who will be in attendance to refrain from saying it.

NEXT: Scarlett Bordeaux, a former NXT star, is praising a fan-only account on Twitter.

Continue ReadingAlex Hoegler’s BiographyNext (6234 Articles Published) Alex has been a lifetime sports lover and graduated with a certificate in journalism from Langara College in June of 2016.

From 2017 until 2020, he served as the main site specialist for The Canuck Way, having previously interned at the BCHL office. Alex also serves as the primary script writer for the TPS YouTube channel, which he founded in 2011. Alex Hoegler has more to say about this.

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