When Is The Gregorian Chant At Sant’antimo

Gregorian chant at the Abbey of Sant’Antimo – now part of the past

Many tourists to theVal d’Orciaand the surrounding region ofMontalcino, as well as people from even further away in Tuscany, have come to theAbbazia di Sant’Antimonot not only for the gorgeous building, but also to listen to the monks chanting. Unfortunately, it appears that the practice of Gregorian chant in the Abbey of Sant’Antimo came to an end at the end of 2015. The French White Friars, who follow the rule of St. Augustine in the Norbertine order and have resided in the Monastery of Sant’Antimo for 36 years, will leave the monastery before the end of the year and return to their home country of France.

The Abbey of Sant’Antimo near Montalcino in Tuscany, Italy

Numerous tourists to theVal d’Orcia and the surrounding region ofMontalcino, as well as those from even further away in Tuscany, have come to theAbbazia di Sant’Antimonot not only for the stunning architecture, but also to hear the monks’ chanting. At the Abbey of Sant’Antimo, it appears almost probable that the practice of Gregorian chant will cease at the end of this year. Earlier this year, the French White Friars, who follow St. Augustine’s rule in the Norbertine order and had been residing at the Monastery of Sant’Antimo for 36 years, returned to their home country.

Aside from that, it is quite doubtful that the new community will become known for its Gregorian chant.

More about the Abbey of Sant’Antimo .

Don’t forget to visit my Tuscany Travel Guide!Up-to-date news on what to see and where to stay in Chianti and all of Tuscany.

Anna Maria Baldini is the author of this piece.

Sant’Antimo Abbey and the Gregorian Chants

The impressiveSant’Antimo Abbey, located in the center of the beautifulTuscan region, not far from Siena and only 9 kilometers fromMontalcino, is a must-see for anybody visiting the area. According to tradition, Charles the Great constructed the monastery in 781 AD after becoming ill nearby and praying for deliverance. Despite the fact that there is no evidence to support this famous legend, it is quite likely that he did make a stop that year (obviously in good health!) and put his stamp on the foundation.

  1. However, this majestic Romanesque abbey, in addition to being a part of the region’s historic inheritance, is also the setting for one of the most genuine Gregorian choruses in all of Europe, which performs in its surroundings.
  2. Augustine live, protecting the building and leading daily services with Gregorian chantas, in addition to organizing singing courses.
  3. But for those who enjoy this religious kind of singing, St.
  4. It is held every year in Florence at the beginning of September, during the ” InCANTO GREGORIANO International Festival “, a one-of-a-kind festival entirely dedicated to Gregorian chanting.

Abbazia di Sant’Antimo, Abbey of Sant’Antimo

The Abbey of Sant’Antimo, one of Italy’s most stunning Romanesque cathedrals, is only 9 kilometers away from Montalcino and is a must-see. According to legend, Charlemagne traveled the Via Francigena on his way back to Germany from Rome in the year 781. Many members of his court and army died when they tented at Monte Amiata as a result of the disease. The Emperor had a dream during which an angel appeared to him and suggested that he choose a special grass, dry it, and then brew an infusion with some wine, which he should serve to the warriors.

  • To this day, the grass is referred to as “Carolina.” The Emperor agreed to establish the abbey in exchange for putting a stop to this plague.
  • Savior (Salvatoris) at Monte Amiata were responsible for the establishment of the foundation.
  • The monastery of Sant’Antimo was founded in 814, according to a letter from a man named Ludovico the Pious, which bestows gifts and privileges on the abbey in recognition of its achievements.
  • As early as the tenth century, the abbot of the monastery was also known as Count Palatino, a public post of considerable significance bestowed by the Emperor on him.
  • Following a document issued by Pope John XV (985-996), the monastery came under the direct administration of the Apostolic See in 992 (see below).
  • Count Bernard degli Ardengheschi transferred his complete patrimony in goods and property, including the Abbey, “in toto I reign Italic et in tota Tuscie marks” to Hildebrand, son of Rustic, stating that he had “intoto I reign Italic et in tota Tuscie marks” in his possession.
  • The bequest was accepted by the Abbot Guidone (1108-1128), who immediately began the great age of construction of the new church, known as the Abbey of Sant’Antimo.
  • The Abbey rose to become the most prominent monastic landlord and institution in Tuscany as a result of its imperial ties and contributions from pilgrims on the adjacent Via Francigena, a pilgrims’ road to Rome that passed through the region.
  • The inside of the church of Sant’Antimo After the monastery was compelled to sign a contract relinquishing a fourth of its land in Siena, the wonderful years came to an end on June 12, 1212, when Montalcino was captured by the Siennese and captured by them.

The abbey was entrusted to the Guglelmiti by Pope Nicholas IV (1288-1292) in a deed dated 23rd August 1291, and it experienced a brief resurgence between 1397 and 1404 before being suppressed in 1462 by Pope Pius II “Piccolomini” (1458-1464), who transferred ownership to the bishop of the newly established diocese of Montalcino and Pienza, which was established on the 13th August of the The Italian government issued a decree in 1866 that effectively ended religious orders throughout the country.

  • The monastic community was relocated to the town of Pescia, where it stayed until its dissolution in 1949.
  • After the abbey was transferred to the control of the new Italian state in 1867, a lengthy process of physical repair commenced, which finally resulted in the preservation of the whole structure.
  • The entrance of the Regular Canons Premonstratensi in 1992 marked the beginning of the resumption of religious activities.
  • The facade, which is still completed, contains a gateway, which is likely one of a pair that was originally planned, and is crowned by a lintel that dates to the first half of the 12th century, as well as capitals, friezes, and ferrules.
  • During the early morning hours, the sun catches the ambulatory stonework, which is the most valuable of all the stones used in the construction of the church: alabaster and travertine, from which the capitals and columns are carved.
  • When measured in length, the church measures 44 meters.
  • Others in the ambulatory have a Lombard appearance, which suggests that Sant’Antimo was the work of two masters or a Lombard who had worked in Auvergne, as has been suggested.
  • Immediately in front of you on your left is an enormous bell tower that rises to around 30 meters in height and is split into four orders.

It is adorned in Lombard style, with a trace of Pisan flair in its columns at the angles of its base. The bell tower is home to two bells, one of which is etched with Abbot Ugo’s name (1216-1222) and the year 1219 on the inside of the ringing bell.

Private and shared minibus tours (up to 8 persons)to Montalcino and Sant’Antimowith Angela SaltafuoriWrite down this phone number!Tel: (+39)333 318 5705
Full day private and shared wine toursfrom Florence and nearby toBrunello di Montalcino wineries. This tourincludes a visit to Sant’Antimoand if timing can be coordinated there is an opportunity to hear the Gregorian Chant practised by the monks. Fixed prices offered.Full day sight-seeing toursfrom Florence and nearby to the Crete Senesi – Montalcino, Montepulciano, Pienza, Colle di Val d’Elsa, Abbey of Monte Oliveto Maggiore.Fixed prices offered.More about Angie’s minibus tours

Sant Antimo..Gregorian chants in Tuscany?

Even though it’s all in Italian, here’s a list of the feast days that will be celebrated in early January (the time followed by a name indicates that the service will be conducted in Gregorian chant, with the exception of the ones that state that there will also be polyphonic hymns): MARIA MADRE DI DIO was born on the first of February in the year 2006. 7.30 Tentative schedule: Lodi 9:00 Terza 11:00 Messa with Greek and Poliphonic Choirs Twelve minutes and forty-five seconds, fourteen minutes and forty-five seconds, eighteen minutes and thirty seconds, Vespro with Benedizione Eucaristica Compieta2-5 gennaio 2006 at 20.30 hrs.

  1. At 24.00, Vigilia7.30, Lodi9.00, Terza11.00, Messa with Gregorian and Polifonic singers is scheduled.
  2. Sabbath, the 7th of June, 2006 5.45 Mattutino7.00 Lodi9.00 Terza – Messa19.00 Vespro20.30 CompietaDomenica 8 gennaio 2006: BATTESIMO DI CRISTO BATTESIMO DI CRISTO 7.30 p.m.
  3. Terza11.00 p.m.
  4. Twelve minutes and forty-five seconds, fourteen minutes and forty-five seconds, eighteen minutes and thirty seconds, Vespro with Benedizione Eucaristica Compieta is scheduled at 20.30.
  5. Lodi 7.00 p.m.
  6. Messa 9.15 p.m.
  7. to 12.30 p.m.
  8. Compieta a las 20.30 horas Sundays and religious holidays: Vigilie 0.00 Lodi 7.30 Terza 9.00 Vigilante 0.00 Visitation schedule for the church 9.15 a.m.
  9. Messa 11.00 a.m.
  10. Nona 14.45 p.m.
  11. Compieta a las 20.30 horas The “orario di visita” refers to the hours during which you are permitted to stroll around the church.

Sant’ Antimo Monastery; For A Taste Of Gregorian Chant

Even though it’s all in Italian, here’s a list of the feast days that will be celebrated in early January (the time followed by a name indicates that the service will be conducted in Gregorian chant, with the exception of the ones that state that there will also be polyphonic hymns): Saints Nicholas and John the Baptist MARIANA MADRE DI DIO was born on the first of February in the year 2006. 7.30 9:00 a.m.; 11:00 a.m.; Messa with Greek and Polifonic musicians – 12.45 Sesta14.45 Nona18.30 Vespro with Benedizione Eucaristica (Eucaristic benediction) 2.30 p.m.

  • 5.45 Sat, 7.00 a.m.
  • Vespro, and Compieta, 20.30 EPIFANIA will be held on Saturday, June 6, 2006.
  • – 12.45 Sesta14.45 Nona18.30 Vespro with Benedizione Eucaristica (Eucaristic benediction) Compieta begins at 20.30.
  • Lodi: 9:00 p.m.
  • Messa with Greek and Poliphonic Choirs – 12.45 Sesta14.45 Nona18.30 Vespro with Benedizione Eucaristica (Eucaristic benediction) Compieta begins at 20.30.
  • Days of the week: Mattutino 5.45 Lodi 7.00 Terza 9.00 Messa 9.15 Mattutino 5.45 Lodi 7.00 Terza 9.00 Messa 9.15 the church’s schedule of visits Between the hours of 10.15 and 12.30 p.m.
  • The hours are 15.00 – 18.00 19.00 (Vespro) At 20.30, the clock strikes midnight.
  • 11.00 a.m.

The eucaristic blessing will take place at 18.30 on Vespro. At 20.30, the clock strikes midnight. You can freely go around the cathedral during the “orario di visita,” which are designated hours. Please refrain from walking about or taking photographs during services.

As you approached the monastery amid vineyards bursting with Brunello grapes, the monastery appeared to be very stunning. The monastery was erected on the site of an ancient Roman villa, but it was the great Charlemagne who established Sant’Antimo as a major pilgrimage destination. During his journey return to France from Rome in 781, Charlemagne is said to have passed through here via the Via Francigena, according to legend. Members of his entourage had been afflicted by the plague and had come to this location to rest.

  • He did this and mixed the elixir with some wine, and his warriors were able to recuperate!
  • As for the angel who gave herbal medicine advice (it was more likely a village wise woman), I’m not sure what to make of it, but whatever the case, Charlemagne pledged that an abbey would be erected here, and by the year 814, Sant’ Antimo was completed.
  • A large portion of the monastery that you see now dates back to the 12th century, but its apse is still the original structure.
  • It is believed that the influence of the abbey waned together with the sovereignty of Montalcino after it was ceded to the Florentines in the 13th century.
  • The Gregorian chant was the monks’ preferred method of prayer, and the Latin mass is sung multiple times a day, allowing anybody who wishes to participate to come within the monastery.
  • BE AWARE THAT THERE ARE NO LONGER MASSES WITH GREGORIAN CHANT AS OF NOVEMBER 2015.
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If you are interested in hearing Gregorian Chant, you must head to the Abbey of Monte Oliveto Maggiore, halfway between Montalcino and Sienna.For more information and the prayer schedule head toAbbazia di Monte Oliveto.

Upon our arrival to the monastery of Sant’ Antimo, there was plenty of parking available just in front of the church, which was ideal because we were running behind schedule for the mass, which was sung in Gregorian chant. As I walked inside the coolness of the Abbey, the scent of the lavender sachets that the monks were selling in front of the Monastery filled the entire church with the pleasant perfume of the countryside. I was in heaven. The lavender, the candlelight, and the hauntingly beautiful singing all worked together to create an ambiance that gave us the impression that we had traveled back in time.

  • When we were seated in the seats for the mass, I realized that he had taken my hand and was holding it extremely strongly, which I thought was strange.
  • As Liam and I got closer to the life-sized 13th century carved wooden cross, he released a sigh of relief and I couldn’t stop smiling.
  • He had the impression that he had been afraid.
  • Never once did it cross my mind that I should explain to Liam what would take place during our visit to the Abbey.
  • Wander through the church’s interior, which is decorated with alabaster and travertine marble, to get a sense of its history.
  • A second surprise that Liam was unprepared for was the crypts that may be found in antique churches.
  • In 303, the Christian priest Saint Anthimus of Rome was killed in Rome.
  • Sant’Antimo was already revered in Rome, and many travelers visited his grave to pay their respects.
  • Liam and I had a talk that was summarized as follows: After seeing that the crucifix was simply a sculpture, he expressed relief that there were no dead people in the church.

The question arises, “What type of people go to church with dead guys?!?” After responding in a terrified tone, Liam bolted from the scene in a flash! Again, I had no idea what to anticipate while visiting historic cathedrals in Italy, so I didn’t inform Liam in advance.

Following our exploration of the crypt, we returned to the sunshine for a slew of shots and a lunch in the olive orchards nearby. In addition to our wine from Montalcino, we had bread, salami, Pecorino frescocheese (a soft sheep milk cheese) and honey from Montalcino. Nevertheless, we had forgotten to bring the wine bottle opener! NOOOOOOOO! When visiting Tuscany, bring a wine bottle opener in your handbag or car at all times because WINE HAPPENS. A great deal.

Abbey of Sant’Antimo near Montalcino where you can hear Gregorian chant

A visit to the Abbey of Sant’Antimo near Montalcino, Tuscany, is one of the most attractive and atmospheric destinations in the region. The abbey,abbaziain Italian, is located in a picturesque valley, close to the town of Montalcino in the Val d’Orcia, and is easily accessible. This is also one of the few churches in Tuscany where you may hear Gregorian chant on a regular basis, with the Basilica of San Miniato al Monte serving as the exception. IMPORTANT UPDATE: The French monks will be departing the Abbey in November 2015, and with them, the possibility to hear Gregorian chant will be lost.

  • Beyond the fact that it is a functioning monastic community, the Abbey is a work of art from an architectural standpoint and deserves to be studied carefully, notably the carved capitals of the interior columns of the nave.
  • It may have been built on the site of a former Roman villa.
  • This stunning chapel should not be missed if you are planning a trip to the Val d’Orcia and, more specifically, if you are visiting Montalcino.
  • My preferred holiday accommodations in Tuscany, compiled in one place.

AboutElena Spolaor

Elena is a historian who lives in Tuscany with her family. She is a regular contributor to web articles on life in Tuscany and Umbria, despite the fact that she was born in Venice. Her areas of expertise include local history and folklore in Tuscany and Umbria. Commenting and pinging are temporarily closed for this post.

Abbey of Sant’Antimo near Montalcino

The Romanesque Monastery of Sant’Antimo is a lovely and evocative abbey established in the 12th century, and it may be reached after seeing Montalcino. When you are driving along the winding rural road that leads to the monastery, the scenery is breathtaking: vineyards, olive orchards, rolling green hills, and solitary farmhouses sprinkled throughout the landscape. The Abbey, which was constructed of travertine stone, is situated in ideal solitude on a plain surrounded by ancient olive orchards and picturesque wheat fields.

While returning from Rome, the king and his army made a pit stop here because the men were plagued by an unidentified sickness.

The treatment was successful, and the army was rescued, leading the king to decide to construct a chapel as a gesture of thanks.

There are rumors that you may uncover relics from this time period on the right side of the cathedral, where you will locate the “Carolingian chapel,” which is believed to be the first abbey church in existence.

Now, lege et labora

The monks who reside at the Abbey conduct their lives by a motto that is evocative of the Rules of St. Benedict: “Now, lege et labora,” which means “Now, learn and work.” Now is a time for prayer, both as a group and in private prayer, andlegemeans to study the law, both divine and human-made, in order to better understand the world. After that, labora is an abbreviation that stands for: (the) core component of every man’s day, whether manual or intellectual, lived in the form of community service or activities to support themselves.

Liturgy and Prayer

With a motto that is evocative of the Rules of St. Benedict, the monks who reside at the Abbey go about their daily lives with the motto “Now, lege et labora.” Now is a time for prayer, both as a group and in private prayer, andlegemeans to study the law, both divine and human-made, in order to better understand one’s own situation. Finally, labora is an abbreviation that means (the) basic component of every man’s day, whether manual or intellectual, lived as communal service or as activities to support for themselves.

SANT’ANTIMO ABBEY – TUSCANY’S ROMANESQUE TREASURE

Anyone, regardless of religious affiliation, can be mesmerized by the everlasting beauty of the Sant’Antimo abbey’s ruins. The Tuscan church and monastery have the ability to transform even the most tenacious skeptic into a reborn spiritual. At the very least, throughout the duration of the stay. It was one of the most powerful monasteries in the area around Siena during the Middle Ages, and it is considered one of the most exquisite specimens of Romanesque architecture in all of Tuscany. The construction of the initially benedictine monastery began in 1118 and was completed in 1260.

  1. It’s unlikely that life in the abbey was very difficult.
  2. Things continued to deteriorate from that point on.
  3. He was transforming his hometown of Corsignano into the town of Pienza, and he wanted to make room for his nephew, who would become the bishop of the new town!
  4. In the 1980s, attempts were undertaken to rehabilitate the church and bring Sant’Antimo back to the spiritual life of the community.
  5. It is possible to attend vespers and mess (as long as you don’t cause any disruption) because they are accompanied by Gregorian chants.

One lone cypress tree, planted exactly next to the monastery’s bell tower by an industrious monk (or farmer?) gives witness to the kindness of a thinking monk (or farmer?) The man was well aware of what he was doing.

Vespers and mass, both of which feature Gregorian chanting, are held seven times a day. For information on the times of vespers and mass at Sant’Antimo, please refer to the monastery’s website. If you have the opportunity, park your car at Castelnuovo dell’Abate and take a short stroll down to the monastery. Because the abbey’s position in the valley contributes to its overall attractiveness, taking a walk towards and around it helps to put everything into perspective. You may park your car immediately after passing the turnoff towards Castelnuovo dell’Abate.

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It’s a short walk, and because parking in Sant’Antimo is pricey, leaving your car in town can save you a few dollars.

A traditional ‘Alimentari’ (food store) can be found in the upper part of town, where you may obtain a traditional Tuscan sandwich.

While the quality of the food at the two restaurants in Castelnuovo isn’t particularly high, Osteria Bassomondo (located at the crossroads on via Bassomondo) does provide a taste of Tuscany, as long as you stick to the basics, such as a few slices of Pecorino cheese and Tuscan Prosciutto, all of which should be accompanied by a glass of the region’s red wine.

  1. For those who wish to include a vineyard tour, I recommend L’UCCELLIERA, which is a short walk from the monastery and is one of my favorite estates in Montalcino (check location on ourMontalcino winery map).
  2. Other possibilities are Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona (a larger estate a little farther down the dirt road towards Sant’Angelo in Colle) and Ciacci Piccolomini d’Aragona (a smaller estate a little further along the dirt road towards Sant’Angelo in Colle).
  3. Those who want to hike will like the well-marked path that runs from Montalcino (partially through the forests) to Sant’Antimo.
  4. In the tourist information center in Montalcino, you may obtain a map and further information.

Art and history enthusiasts will discover a well-researched overview of the abbey’s history, as well as extensive photographs of the abbey’s architectural arrangement, on this website.

Five Abbeys in Tuscany

When traveling through Italy, it is hard to miss the religious symbols that dot the landscape and adorn the buildings of the cities and villages. It is suggested for travelers to enter basilicas, monasteries, and churches in Tuscany to behold the divine imagery and architecture that may be found there. The abbeys, on the other hand, are some of the most beautiful spots to visit if you happen to be in the vicinity. An abbey is a Catholic structure that can be used as a monastery or convent for a community of at least twelve monks or nuns, depending on the denomination.

  1. Even when abbeys are no longer in use or practice, they often keep their names for decades thereafter — as in the case of the abbeys on our list this week!
  2. Saint Antimo Abbey is located in the town of Sant’Antimo.
  3. Many soldiers in Charlemagne’s army died as a result of the disease when they were camped near the battlefield.
  4. He was instructed by the angel to pick a bit of grass and infuse it with wine.
  5. Despite the fact that historians think the abbey’s origins date back much further than Charlemagne’s reign, the narrative has persisted to this day.
  6. Make an effort to time your visit to coincide with the prayer schedule of the monks who dwell there in order to hear their Gregorian Chant.
  7. The Abbey of Monte Oliveto Maggiore is located in the town of Monte Oliveto Maggiore.

The chant was called after Pope Gregory the Great, who was responsible for the streamlining and categorization of music in the Catholic Church.

In particular, the chanting monks are devout to the Virgin Mary, who is depicted in their white habits to represent purity and innocence.

The fascinating drawbridge, which is still in place at the entryway, and a pharmacy filled with antique spice jars make this one abbey well worth the effort of traveling to and exploring.

Visitors now may stop by the abbey to get a glimpse of the distinctive architectural elements that have been preserved and rebuilt by the numerous monks who have resided there throughout the years.

St.

Paul’s statues are located on the grounds.

The Abbey of San Galgano is located in the town of San Galgano, Italy.

A little distance outside of Siena, this monument contains the ruins of the earliest Tuscan Cistercian Gothic monastery, which dates back to the 12th century.

It is surrounded by fields of green, making it the ideal setting for a picnic lunch, and it is only a ten-minute walk away from the Hermitage of Montesiepi, if you happen to be in the neighborhood at the time.

This story, which is similar to the legend of King Arthur, centres around Saint Galgano, who, after getting a vision from the Archangel Michael, decides to give up his past as a knight and drive his sword into a stone to save others.

Torri is a tiny village located less than 15 miles from Siena, and it is most known for the Abbey of Santa Mustiola, which is located there.

The cloister, which is now in the possession of the Biocchi family, is open for visits on a limited number of days each week.

If you are in the region, you should take the time to see this gorgeous abbey, which is located in a charming hamlet and makes for an excellent day trip.

Explore and discover your own favorites, then report back to us on what you discovered.

Tell us about one of your favorite abbeys, whether they are in Tuscany or elsewhere in Italy. Kelly Gallucci is the author of this piece. jdbradley/rishon-lezion/Tim Brown/Tim Brown/wyzik/ianloic are the photographers that captured this image.

Abbazia di Sant’Antimo – Abbey of Sant’Antimo, Tuscany, Italy

When traveling through Italy, it is hard to miss the religious symbols that dot the landscape and adorn the buildings of cities and villages. The hills of Tuscany are littered with a variety of basilicas, monasteries, and churches that commemorate the Roman Catholic religion, and travelers are invited to enter inside to take in the divine imagery and architecture that can be found within them. The abbeys, on the other hand, are some of the most gorgeous sites to visit in the area if you’re in the mood for it.

  1. In many communities, an Abbot or Abbess will act as the spiritual father or mother, respectively.
  2. If you are interested in the history of Italy, these five abbeys are strongly suggested as must-see destinations.
  3. The abbey, which is located near Montalcino, is said to have been founded by Charlemagne, according to mythology.
  4. He had a dream that night in which an angel appeared to him.
  5. Charlemagne swore to fund the construction of the abbey after the soldiers who drank the combination were claimed to have been healed.
  6. You can visit the church whenever you want if you chance to be in the neighborhood.
  7. Make an effort to time your visit to coincide with the prayer schedule of the monks who live there in order to hear their Gregorian Chant.

The Abbey of Monte Oliveto Maggiore is located in the town of Monte Oliveto Maggiore, Italy.

In honor of Pope Gregory the Great, who ordered the streamlining and categorization of church music, the chant was named after him.

In particular, the chanting monks are devout to the Virgin Mary, who is depicted in their white habits to represent purity and purity alone.

Taking the effort to visit this abbey is definitely worth it because of the fascinating drawbridge, which still exists at the entrance, and a pharmacy filled with antique spice jars.

It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

An archaeological collection, including Roman graves, Etruscan urns and some Roman sculptures, is housed at a museum next to the hotel.

Peter and St.

It’s a great area to pull over and take in a little bit of history because it’s quiet and calm.

Touring this monastery is a must-do during your summer vacation in Tuscany.

The park is open to visitors throughout the day and into the early evening, however most prefer arriving before or after the tour buses to get a more private view of this magnificent location.

The sword in the stone, which is kept in the Hermitage, is one of the most remarkable artifacts of the area of Tuscany.

The Abbey of Santa Mustiola is located in the town of Santa Mustiola, Italy.

Most visitors to this monastery come to see the Romanesque cloister, which is a rectangular open area encircled by covered walkways or open galleries.

Each of the three levels of the cloister is beautifully designed with black and white marble, bricks, and wooden columns, with the lowest level being the most impressive.

All of these abbeys are just a small sample of what Tuscany (and the rest of Italy) has to offer.

We’d love to hear about one of your favorite abbeys, whether they’re located in Tuscany or elsewhere in Italy! Kelly Gallucci is the author of this work. jdbradley/rishon-lezion/Tim Brown/Tim Brown/wyzik/ianloic are the photographers that captured these images.

The access and parking at the Sant’Antimo Abbey

We began by touring the town of Montalcino, and then continued on to the abbey. It is around 10 kilometers distant from Montalcino, and the journey took no more than 15 minutes.. We drove down the Strada Provinciale della Badia di Sant’Antimo/SP 55 until we reached the crossroads, where we turned right (A; GPS 42.994840, 11.519637). The paid parking lot was accessible through a very nice asphalt road (P; GPS: 43.000660, 11.517329).

The abbey buildings

The abbey is around 100 meters from the parking lot, and it is accessible by a rather broad road. The structures are situated in the heart of Tuscany’s rural countryside. When we were walking to the abbey, we saw that agricultural work was being done on the right side of the road – the soil was being plowed. A tractor was employed for this purpose, however it was a special tractor that looked more like a bulldozer than a regular tractor:) In addition, the furrows were immense. But, let us return to the abbey, which comprises of a church (B; GPS coordinates: 42.999634, 11.515382) and additional structures (C; GPS coordinates: 42.999219, 11.515390) in which the monks reside and do their duties.

  • The church itself is exceedingly old; it is believed to have been built during the reign of Charlemagne in the ninth century.
  • The inside is fairly minimalist, yet mysterious, and as a result, it creates a one-of-a-kind image.
  • The walls are made of alabaster.
  • However, some of the church’s elements are only available from 10:30 to 12:30 and from 15:30 to 18:30.
  • When the monks in residence take part in the services, it is difficult to access the church, but you may listen in on Gregorian chants and engage in the prayers at various times of the day and night.
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See also:
  • Monteriggioni, Siena, Pienza, San Gimignano, and Cortona are just a few of the places to visit in Tuscany.

Abbey of Sant’Antimo

Among the places visited are Monteriggioni, Siena, Pienza, San Gimignano, Cortona and other towns in Tuscany.

Travel Tip: Sant’Antimo Abbey near Montalcino

Brought to you by:BrowsingItalyon Tuscany, Italy, on November 6, 2013 Comments Offon Travel Tip: Visit the Abbey of Sant’Antimo near Montalcino 7,599 people have looked at this page. 8 Visit Sant’Antimo Abbey if you are heading to Montalcino or driving through the Val d’Orcia. It is a 12th-century Romanesque church that sits serenely against a magnificent landscape. Environment in a picturesque setting Anyone may admire the gorgeous architecture and captivating Gregorian chant during the religious services at the Montalcino Abbey, which is located around 10 kilometers south of the town on Montalcino’s outskirts.

Opening Hours

Abbey of Sant’Antimo It is open for prayers from 5.30 a.m. to 9.00 p.m. Monday through Saturday, with the exception of Sundays, when they open at 7 a.m. Please remember that this is a place of prayer, and that you should be attentive and respectful of the request for silence throughout your stay. During the religious service, it is also not permitted to take photographs or recordings.

This schedule shows when prayer services will be held and when you can listen to the chants. Hours of operation are as follows: weekdays: 10.30am to 12.30pm / 3.00pm to 6.30pm; weekends: 9.15am to 10.45am / 3.00-6.00pm The church’s interior has been described as follows:

How to get there

While driving is the most convenient mode of transportation, information on their official website in Italian indicates that you might take a train to Buonconvento, the nearest railway station, to reach the location. To go to Sant’Antimo, you would take a bus to Montalcino, where you would then take another bus to Castelnuovo dell’Abate, which is the town where the monastery is located. You may check out the bus timetable from Montalcino by clicking on this link.

Other contact details

Phone: +39 0577 835659, address: I-53020 Castelnuovo dell’Abate (SI). +39 0577 835603 Fax: +39 0577 835603 Email:[email protected] Website:

Additional resources

Telephone: +39 0577 835659, address: I-53020 Castelnuovo dell’Abate (SI). +39 0577 835603 Fax: +39 0577 835602 Email:[email protected] Website:

The Abbey of Sant’Antimo near Siena

The Benedictine Abbey of Sant’Antimo is regarded to be one of the most important Romanesque monuments in Tuscany, and it was built in the 12th century. Saint Antimo Abbey is located in the town of Sant’Antimo.

The history of the abbey

Legend has it that the Abbey’s beginnings date back thousands of years. According to mythology, it was founded by Charlemagne in the year 781 AD. That it has been documented since the beginning of the 9th century, and that one of his most important patrons has been identified as Louis the pious, son of Charlemagne, is unquestionable. The Abbot of Sant’Antimo is a monk who lives in the town of Sant’Antimo. It was one of the most important landowners in the region, and he exercised his control over a huge territory stretching from Grosseto to Pistoia, according to legend.

During the XIII century, the monastery began to lose authority over parts of his properties, as well as influence over the abbey itself.

It was abandoned to such an extent in the 15th century that its stones were repurposed in the construction of the settlement of Castelnuovo dell’Abate, which was built on the site of the Abbey.

During this time period, work on the first restoration of the Church was initiated..

The church

Histological legends surround the founding of the Abbey. Selon the tradition, it was founded by Charlemagne in the year 781 That it has been documented since the beginning of the 9th century, and that one of his most important patrons has been identified as Louis the pious, Charlemagne’s son, is unquestionable. The Abbot of Sant’Antimo is a monk who lives in the town of Sant’Antimo in Italy. A wide expanse stretching from Grosseto to Pistoia was under the control of one of the area’s most important landowners, who exerted his influence over the whole region.

When the abbey began to lose authority and control over parts of its properties in the XIII century, it was a sign of the times.

It was abandoned to such an extent in the 15th century that its stones were repurposed in the construction of the settlement of Castelnuovo dell’Abate, which is located nearby.

During this time period, work on the first restoration of the Church was initiated. It was only after much deliberation and debate that the Archbishop of Siena agreed to reestablish a monastic community at Sant’Antimo.

The exterior of the Church

Despite the fact that the facade is unfinished, there are evidence of four arches and a porch encircling the beautiful entryway, which is embellished with elegant sculptures. An inscription on the architrave of the gateway, which is adorned on the exterior with a vine plant representation, commemorates the monk Azzone dei Porcari, who was one of the Church’s architects and was also one of its architects. The impressive bell tower may be seen at the bottom of the left side of the church (27 meters tall).

The apse and the bell tower

The interior

The church of Sant’Antimo is a three-nave structure made of travertine masonry. A series of arches supporting columns alternates with cruciform pillars above which are the women’s galleries, dividing the naves in two. The capitals of the columns, particularly the one representing Daniel in the pit of the Lions, which is credited to the Master of Cabestany, deserve special attention. Daniel, the Master of Cabestany, in the pit of lions (Photo courtesy of Sailko/CC BY). The region around the apse, which is capped by an ambulatory with three radial chapels, is particularly noteworthy.

Gregorian chants

Sant’Antimo is well-known for its long-standing tradition of Gregorian chanting. It is customary for the Abbey to host both holy and classical music events on a regular basis. It also provided classes for anyone who wanted to study gregorian chant as well as the skill of miniature painting.

Opening hours

From November through March, every day from 10 a.m. to 17 p.m. From April to October, the hours are 10 a.m. to 19 p.m., seven days a week.

Guide tours

Tours may be divided into two categories: the first time you use the video-guide: 3 euros The cost of a video-guide including the path known as ” La Via della Luce ” (the way of light) is six euros. You may find further information about the abbey, including information about visiting and gregorian chanting, on their official website.

How to get to the Abbey of Sant’Antimo

For those traveling by car: from Florence, take the Firenze-Siena motorway connection to Siena, and then continue on the Strada Regionale 2 Cassia to Buonconvento, where you will turn left onto the SP14 Strada Provinciale del Brunello and follow the signs for Montalcino. You must continue on SP55 in the direction of Sant’Antimo and Castelnuovo dell’Abate once you have arrived at the town. Coming from the south, take the A1 to the Chiusi / Chianciano exit, then continue on the SP146 towards Chianciano Terme, then follow the signs for Campiglia d’Orcia, Castiglione d’Orcia, and finally Sant’Antimo until you reach the town.

You can reach to Castelnuovo dell’Abate, which is only one kilometer away from the abbey, using public transportation. The Siena Mobilità 0P1 line connects Castelnuovo and Montalcino, and it is operated by the city.

Tuscany – Sant’Antimo Abbey

Pauline Kenny, originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, is an American expat who currently resides in Dorset, on the English coast, with her husband Steve Cohen. Pauline founded the SlowTrav/SlowTalk websites in 2000, and she sold them to Internet Brands the following year. After that, Slow Europe began to emerge a few years later. Reports from Travelers in Italy Sicily, April of this year Visiting Orvieto and the Tuscan countryside in June 2014 April 2015 in Apulia and Basilicata, Italy September 2015: Lazio, Le Marche, and Umbria, Italy Naples and Positano, Italy, in May of 2016.

Positano in the month of November 2017.

Trip Reports from the country of France Antibes, on the Cote d’Azur, in October 2016 (and more to come) more to come Switzerland Travel Reports & Experiences The Swiss Alps, Lenk, September 2014- Two weeks in Lenk and a week in Samoens, Switzerland (France).

To have a look at the wildflowers.

Switzerland and Italy are two of the most prosperous countries in the world.

Lenk and Kandersteg, Switzerland (August 2017).

A week in Hasliberg and two weeks in Lenk, Switzerland, during the month of August 2018.

In 2019, spend three weeks in Lenk and one week in the Luberon region of Switzerland (France).

previous ones will be included My Romantic Relationship with Israel Our first journey to Israel was in March of this year, for two weeks.

Israeli cities visited in November 2018 include Jerusalem, Ein Gedi, the Negev, Eilat, Mitzpe Ramon, and Tel Aviv.

Visiting Israel for four weeks in November 2019: Jerusalem, Ein Gedi, Eilat, Mitzpe Ramon, and Zikhron Yaakov.

We visited Tel Aviv and Haifa before being forced to return home due to COVID limitations.

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