When Pange Lingua Chant Written

Pange lingua gloriosi corporis mysterium – Wikipedia

On the Adventure Time blog, there is a discussion over the final credits. a full (slightly different) version of the song can be found on Ashley Eriksson’s Myspace page. Ericsson’s band LAKE has a website. This song is included on the official Adventure Time Soundcloud account:

Text

There are several English versions available, each with a different rhyme scheme and meter. The first column of the following has the Latin text, which includes an adoxology, and the second column contains an English translation by Edward Caswall. The third column is a more literal reproduction of the first two columns. Gloriósi, Pange, language, Pange This page contains the following links: Córporis mysterium; Sanguinisque pretiósi; Quem in mundi prédium; Fructus ventris generósi; and Rex effedit géntium.

It is with great pleasure that I announce the following: Salus, honor, and virtue quoqueSit et beneficio: Procedénti ab utróqueCompare sit laudátio, procedénti ab utróque Amen.

  1. Song, my tongue, the Saviour’s majesty; Of His Flesh, the mystery sing; Of the Blood, all price exceeding;Shed by our Immortal King; Dedicated to the salvation of the world From a lovely womb until the beginning of spring.
  2. The bread of nature is formed from the Word-made-Flesh.
  3. Only the heart in earnestness, Faith, and she will swiftly understand her lesson.
  4. Thank you to the Eternal Father, to the Son who comes from on high, and to the Holy Spirit who proceeds forth from each forever, Assume the roles of redemption, honor, blessing, might, and limitless grandeur Amen.
  5. Give voice to the mystery of the beautiful Body and the priceless Blood that the King of the Nations poured forth for the price of the world, the fruit of a noble Womb, and the price of the world.
  6. His presence brought about a lovely sense of order to the stalemate.
  7. True bread is transformed into flesh by the Word as Flesh, and wine is transformed into the Blood of Christ by the same word.
  8. As a result, let us venerate and prostrate before the great Sacrament, and let the old Covenant be replaced by a new ceremony.

As a compensation for the imperfection of the senses, let faith be manifested. Praise and gladness be given to the Begetter and the Begotten, as well as greetings, honor, power, and blessing. The One who proceeds from Bothbe deserves equal acclaim. Amen, Alleluia, thank you.

Music history

The hymn Pange lingua is available in two different plainchant arrangements. Two of the most well-known are from the Roman liturgy and are in Phrygian style (Mode III), while the other is from the Mozarabic liturgy, which is found in Spain. The Gallican Rite included the use of the Roman melody, which was originally composed for it. The Roman version of the Pange lingua hymn served as the inspiration for theMissa Pange language, a classic piece by RenaissancecomposerJosquin des Prez, which is still performed today.

  • It has been likened to the late works of Beethoven for its simplicity, motivic coherence, and attentive attention to the text, and many experts believe it to be one of the pinnacles of Renaissance polyphony.
  • One of his versions for four voices is considered to be one of the most popular pieces of the sixteenth century, and it served as the inspiration for hundreds of keyboard works in addition to masses, many of which were written by composers from Spain.
  • The verses and plainchant melody of Pange lingua, as well asVexilla regisinHymn of Jesus, were incorporated by Gustav Holst in his Hymn of Jesus (1917).
  • They signal the conclusion of the monstrance procession during the Holy Thursday service.
  • The “Night Procession” from Franz Liszt’sTwo Episodes from Lenau’s Faustis primarily a fantasy on the Pange lingua melody, which is a fantasy on the Pange lingua melody.
  • Pange lingua has been translated into a plethora of various languages for use in religious ceremonies all around the world.

The Latin version, on the other hand, continues to be the most popular. Until the 1970s, the Syrian version of “Pange lingua” was employed as part of the benediction liturgy in the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church of Kerala, India, which is located in the state of Kerala.

References

  1. Plainchant arrangements of the Pange lingua hymn are available in two variations. Two of the most well-known are from the Roman liturgy and are in Phrygian style (Mode III), while the other is from the Mozarabic liturgy, which is based on the Arabic language. The Gallican Rite included a piece of music with a Roman theme. Josquin des Prez’s famousMissa Pange language, which is based on the Roman version of the Pange Lingua hymn, was inspired by the Roman version of the hymn. Theyassis, a complex fantasy on the hymn, is one of the composer’s final works, and it has been dated to the time between 1515 and 1521, because it was not included byPetrucciin his 1514 collection of Josquin’s masses, and it was only published after his death in 1521. It has been likened to the late works of Beethoven because of its simplicity, motivic coherence, and attentive attention to the text, and many observers believe it to be one of the pinnacles of Renaissance polyphonic composition. Many different versions of the Pange language were written by Juan de Urrede, a Flemish composer who lived and worked in Spain during the late fifteenth century. The majority of his works were based on the original Mozarabic melody. One of his versions for four voices is considered to be one of the most popular pieces of the sixteenth century, and it served as the inspiration for hundreds of keyboard works in addition to masses, many of which were written by composers from the Spanish-speaking countries. The ” do–re–fa–mi–re–do “- theme (C–D–F–E–D–C) was developed from Josquin’s treatment of the hymn’s third line in the Kyrie of theMissa Pange Lingua, and it has since been used in a variety of non-religious works by composers such as Simon Lohet, Michelangelo Rossi, François Roberday, Johann Caspar Ferdinand Fischer, Johann A setting of the first strophe of the hymn Pange Lingua, WAB 31, was Anton Bruckner’s very first work. Along withVexilla regisinHymn of Jesus, Gustav Holst included both the text and plainchant tune from Pange lingua (1917). The last two verses of Pange lingua (Tantum ergo) are frequently omitted from the final version of the poem. At the conclusion of the Holy Thursday service, they signal the completion of the procession of the monstrance. In addition to one by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, one by Franz Schubert, eight byAnton Bruckner, one by Maurice Duruflé, and one by Charles-Marie Widor, several other musical arrangements have been composed for this. Two episodes from Lenau’s Faust are based on the Pange lingua tune, while the “Night Procession” from Franz Liszt’s Two Episodes from Lenau’s Faust is based on that melody. On the Solas’ 1995 albumSolas An Domhain, they perform a setting of Pange Lingua penned by Ciaran McLoughlin. In order to be used in worship across the world, Pange lingua has been translated into a variety of languages. The Latin translation, on the other hand, continues to be the most often used today. Until the 1970s, the Syrian version of “Pange lingua” was included in the benediction ceremony of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church in Kerala, India.

Sources

  • Margot Fassler is a writer who lives in New York City (2014). Walter Frisch is a writer who lives in New York City (ed.). Music in the Western Medieval period. Western Music in Its Context: A Norton History of Western Music (1st ed.). W. W. Norton and Company, New York, ISBN 978-0-393-92915-7

External links

  • Margot Fassler is a writer who lives in the United States of America (2014). Walter Frisch is a writer who lives in the United States of America (ed.). Aspects of Western music throughout the Middle Ages Music in Context: Western Music in Its Historical Context (New York: Norton, 2001). (1st ed.). ISBN 978-0-393-92915-7 (New York: W. W. Norton & Company)

Gregorian Chant Lyrics – Pange Lingua Gloriosi – traditional benediction hymn adoration feast Corpus Christi

Pange Lingua is a language of the Philippines. This hymn, Pange lingua gloriosi, is available as a MIDI file. Corporis mysterium, Sanguinisque pretiosi, Corporis mysterium, Sanguinisque pretiosi, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corporis mysterium, Corpori In the name of the universe, fructus ventris generosi, and Rex effudit gentium.

  • Nobis datus, nobis natus (no more days, no more nights) From virginal purity to the world’s conversatus, sparso verbi semine, and sui moras incolatus, miro clausit ordine, ex intacta Virgine.
  • In supremae nocte coenaeRecumbens cum fratribus,Observata lege pleneCibis in legalibus,Cibum turbae duodenaeSe dat suis manibus,Observata lege pleneCibis in legalibus,Cibum turbae duodenaeSe dat suis manibus 4.
  • 5.
  • Amen.
  • Panem de caelo praestitisti eis praestitisti eis.
  • Oremus: Deus, who has placed us in the midst of a miraculous sacrament, has resurrected the passions of our forefathers: tribue, quaesumus, ita nos corporis et sanguinis tui sacra mysteria venerari, ut redemptionis tuae fructum in nobis iugiter sentiamus.
  • In the name of God, Amen.

This song is extraordinarily exquisite in its declaration of trust in Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament, and it should be heard by everyone.

It is customary to sing the last two stanzas of the Tantum Ergo at the beginning of the last section of Benediction, after any time of quiet and before the priest blesses the congregation with Our Lord Himself.

It is one of the most well-known chants in the history of mankind.

See also:  "when The Chant Comes" Pdf

Thomas Aquinas, was the author of this work.

Due to his celestial purity and sanctity, he was able to come extremely close to God.

This feat was performed at the same time by a fellow priest and close friend of mine.

Thomas was done, he presented it to the priest, who was taken aback by the sublime beauty and expressiveness of the work.

The hymn is both beautiful and lyrical in its expression of Catholic teaching as it is exact in its expression of it.

Verse 4 in particular has a clever play on words, which has been expertly organized by a Latin master.

St.

Consider the heights a man may reach via God’s favor and the development of virtue – rather than aiming downward toward the level of the lower animals (through sensuality, rage, and unbridled passions), he instead aspires upward toward the level of the angels through the cultivation of virtue (by purity, humility, charity).

To return to theGregorian Chant Lyrics page, click here.

Hauntingly Beautiful Gregorian Chant “Pange Lingua” written by St. Thomas Aquinas for Corpus Christi

Aquinas’ hymn, “Pange language gloriosi corporis mysterium,” was written for the Feast of Corpus Christi and is also performed on Holy Thursday. It was composed in 1225 and was dedicated to the Virgin Mary. Tantum ergo is the final two verses of the hymn that are sung during the celebration of the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. Lyrics in Latin with English translation are provided. Pange, language, gloriósiCórporis mystérium,Sanguinisque pretiósi,Quem in mundi prétium,Fructus ventris generósi,Rex effedit géntium,Sanguinisque pretiósi,Sanguinisque pretiósi,Quem in mundi prétium Nobis datus, nobis natus, et cetera Vrgine’s intact, and the rest of the world conversátus, Sparso verbi sémine, Sui moras incolátus, Miro clausit órdine’s clausit In suprema nocte coenRecmbens cum frátribusObserváta lege pleneCibis in legálibus, Cibum turbum duodénSe dat suis mánibus in suprema nocte coenRecmbens cum frátribus Panem verum, verbum caro, panem verum Deficiency of the verbo carnem: Ad firmándum cor sincérum,Sola fides sfficit, Fitque sanguis Christi merum, Et si sensus déficit, Fitque sanguis Christi merum, Et si sensus déficit, Fitque sanguis Christi merum As a result of this, sacraméntum Venerémur cérnui: Venerémur cérnui is a kind of venerémur.

  • In addition to the antequum documéntumNovo cedat rui: Prstet fides suppleméntumSénsuum deféctui suppleméntumSénsuum deféctui suppleméntumSénsuum deféctui suppleméntumSénsuum deféctui suppleméntumSénsuum deféctui Genitóri, GenitóqueLaus, and jubilátio, to name a few.
  • Alleluja.
  • A pure and immaculate VirginBorn for us on this world below,He as Man talking with man stayed to sow the seeds of truth; Then He finished in solemn orderWonderfully His Life of sorrow.
  • The bread of nature is formed from the Word-made-Flesh.
  • Only the heart in earnestness, Faith, and she will swiftly understand her lesson.

Thank you to the Eternal Father, to the Son who comes from on high, and to the Holy Spirit who proceeds forth from each forever, Assume the roles of redemption, honor, blessing, might, and limitless grandeur Amen. Alleluia.

Pange Lingua Gloriosi

The first words of two liturgical hymns are presented here. Pange language gloriosi lauream certaminis by Venantius fortunatus, a hymn of the holy cross written for the acceptance of a relic of the cross given by Emperor Justin II to Queen Radegunda at Poitiers in 569, is one of the best-known of these works. It is one of the most well-known Passiontide hymns of all time, and it has been used in the Good Friday liturgy of adoration of the cross since the ninth century, when it was first composed.

The original text is divided into 10 stanzas, each of which has three lines of trochaic tetrameter, a form that was previously popular among Roman soldiers’ marching songs.

Many works were inspired by this holy cross song, including the not less renowned Eucharistic hymn, (2)Pange language gloriosi corporis mysterium, which was customarily performed during Vespers and during the procession on Corpus Christiand holy thursday (Corpus Christiand).

This gem of medieval poetry was most likely penned by St.

It was written by the Goliardic poet Hugh Primas of Orléans to a preexisting melody (that of the holy cross sequenceLaudes crucis attollamus), and it contains many echoes and reminiscences from earlier hymns; however, it is an original piece of work, with highly poetic inspiration and doctrinal exactitude.

  1. J.
  2. Analecta hymnica (50:71, 585–586) contains the Holy Cross and other hymns.
  3. j.
  4. raby,A History of Christian-Latin Poetry from the Beginnings to the End of the Middle Ages(Berlin 1964–65) 1:129–135; 2:251–252; j.
  5. fischer, Lexikon für Theologie und Kirche, ed.
  6. hofer and k.
  7. h.
  8. b.
  9. j.
  10. rahner (Frei

Pange Lingua

Written by St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) for the Solemnity of Corpus Christi, this hymn is considered the most beautiful of Aquinas’ hymns and one of the great seven hymns of the Church. The rhythm of the Pange Lingua is said to have come down from a marching song of Caesar’s Legions: “Ecce, Caesar nunc triumphat qui subegit Gallias.” Besides the Solemnity of Corpus Christi, this hymn is also used on Holy Thursday. The last two stanzas make up the Tantum Ergo (Down in Adoration Falling) that is used at Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament.
PANGE, lingua, gloriosiCorporis mysterium,Sanguinisque pretiosi,quem in mundi pretiumfructus ventris generosiRex effudit Gentium. SING, my tongue, the Savior’s glory,of His flesh the mystery sing;of the Blood, all price exceeding,shed by our immortal King,destined, for the world’s redemption,from a noble womb to spring.
Nobis datus, nobis natusex intacta Virgine,et in mundo conversatus,sparso verbi semine,sui moras incolatusmiro clausit ordine. Of a pure and spotless Virginborn for us on earth below,He, as Man, with man conversing,stayed, the seeds of truth to sow;then He closed in solemn orderwondrously His life of woe.
In supremae nocte cenaerecumbens cum fratribusobservata lege plenecibis in legalibus,cibum turbae duodenaese dat suis manibus. On the night of that Last Supper,seated with His chosen band,He the Pascal victim eating,first fulfills the Law’s command;then as Food to His Apostlesgives Himself with His own hand.
Verbum caro, panem verumverbo carnem efficit:fitque sanguis Christi merum,et si sensus deficit,ad firmandum cor sincerumsola fides sufficit. Word-made-Flesh, the bread of natureby His word to Flesh He turns;wine into His Blood He changes;-what though sense no change discerns?Only be the heart in earnest,faith her lesson quickly learns.
Tantum ergo Sacramentumveneremur cernui:et antiquum documentumnovo cedat ritui:praestet fides supplementumsensuum defectui. Down in adoration falling,Lo! the sacred Host we hail;Lo! o’er ancient forms departing,newer rites of grace prevail;faith for all defects supplying,where the feeble sense fail.
Genitori, Genitoquelaus et iubilatio,salus, honor, virtus quoquesit et benedictio:procedenti ab utroquecompar sit laudatio.Amen. Alleluia. To the everlasting Father,and the Son who reigns on high,with the Holy Ghost proceedingforth from Each eternally,be salvation, honor, blessing,might and endless majesty.Amen. Alleluia.

From Liturgia Horarum. Tr. Fr. Edward Caswall (1814-1878).

Pange Lingua (Tell Tongue) – a Gregorian Plainchant, used by several classical composers

This old Gregorian Chant or Plainchant, which dates back to the 13th Century, is the source of this tune. While singing a hymn written by St. Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274), the melody is utilized to depict how bread and wine are transformed into the body and blood of Christ during the Roman Catholic Mass. According to the Latin text, the opening line of the hymn starts, “Pange Lingua Gloriosi Corporis Mysterium,” which translates as “Tell, tongue, of the secret of the magnificent Body.” Pange Lingua” (Missa Pange Lingua), which is a whole Mass based on the hymn and its tune, was written by Josquin des Prez (about 1450–1521) during the Renaissance Period, and it is considered to be one of the most important works in the history of classical music.

Bach, Mozart, Schubert, Franz Liszt, and Anton Bruckner are among the composers who have utilized the hymn’s tune or produced different arrangements for it in later works.

Although the melody has been harmonised in a variety of ways, the version we have included here is a straightforward one that pays homage to the original plainchant and is played on an organ with both hands in unison (an octave apart) by the same player.

It is common for slurs in musical notation to group together notes that are used to represent the same syllable of text. In addition to PDF Sheet Music, MIDI and MP3 files are available for download. TheDies Iraeor (“Day of Wrath”) is another Gregorian Chant that may be found on mfiles.

Music History Resource Center

Introduction Mozart may not have realized that his Symphony No. 41 would be his final composition; he was stricken by a severe sickness and died within two weeks of the commencement of the disease. What about Beethoven and Mahler, for example? Did they realize that their ninth symphonies would be their final ones; apparently not for they each began a tenth shortly after. This suggests that Josquin des Prez (c1450-1521) did not see the Missa Pange language as his solemn farewell concert, although this turned out to be the case as well.

  • And it was a fitting culmination to his illustrious career as a composer of liturgical music.
  • The Dominican philosopher Thomas Aquinas is credited with writing the hymnPange lingua gloriosi corporis mysterium, saguinisque pretiosi (Speak my tongue of the magnificent mystery of the priceless body and blood), which may be found in the thirteenth-century manuscript.
  • In this way, the polyphonic Mass of Josquin might be liturgically suitable not just on the feast of Corpus Christi but also at any Mass in which Christological devotion was the primary intention.
  • Pange lingua, like other hymns, is written in a straightforward form, consisting of only six short verses.
  • However, the most significant aspect of this song is that it is in the Phrygian mode, which is the mournful half step wailing mood that had a unique appeal for Josquin (see his motetMiserere mei, Deus,Anthology, No.
  • Josquin transformed Aquinas’ tune into the structural backbone of the whole Mass by incorporating it into his own composition.
  • In doing so, he developed aparaphrase Mass, which is regarded by musicologists as the archetypal paraphrase Mass.
  • At the same time, as a quick scan of the Kyriewill demonstrate, it is also a superb example of Josquin’s late compositional style at its absolute finest.
  • After that, the Christe continues with the paraphrase, which is now engaging phrases three and four of the chant, with the dueting organized bass-alto, tenor-soprano, and the chant itself.
  • However, it is in this passage that we first notice the distinctive nature of Josquin’s writing.
  • It is only when the soprano has achieved its destination (the last e’) that the bass will impart a sense of release and closure to the movement by dropping down in a sequence of thirds-another characteristic “Josquinian” creative gesture.

This is really fantastic music. The Kyrie described below should be used largely as a hook to entice you to listen to the entire Mass, which is accessible on the Internet in a variety of recordings, including the one listed below.

Pange Lingua Gloriosi: a Eucharistic Hymn by St. Thomas Aquinas

St. Thomas Aquinas authored the office (the official prayers of the Church) for the feast of Corpus Christi at the request of Pope Urban IV, who expanded the celebration of the feast to the entire church by extending it to the entire world. This office is the source of the well-known Eucharistic hymnsPange Lingua Gloriosi andTantum Ergo Sacramentum, which are both sung during the celebration of the Mass. (the final two verses of thePange Lingua). Pange Lingua is most known to modern Catholics for its usage during the procession during Mass of the Lord’s Supper on Holy Thursdayevening, when the Body of Christ is withdrawn from the tabernacle and carried to another location to be stored overnight, while the altar is stripped naked of its decorations.

Pange Lingua

Let my speech proclaim the Savior’s grandeur; let the mystery of His flesh be sung; let the priceless Blood of our everlasting King be spilt for the salvation of all mankind, from a noble womb to spring. Following the birth of a pure and spotless Virgin for us on earth below, He remained as Man, with man talking, to plant the seeds of truth; then He brought His life of suffering to an end in solemn order wondrously. During that Last Supper, He the Pascal victim eating, sitting with His chosen band, first fulfills the Law’s demand; secondly, as Food for His Apostles, He delivers Himself with His own hand to those who are seated with Him.

All that is required is a sincere heart, and trust in her ability to rapidly absorb her lesson.

Salvation, honor, blessing, might, and unending grandeur be given to the everlasting Father, the Son who reigns on high, and the Holy Ghost who proceeds out from each forever.

Pange lingua – Tantum ergo (Gregorian chant)

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Andrew Sims is the editor (submitted2021-02-13). Information about the score: A4, 1 page, 34 kB Copyright: CPDL Edition notes: The hymn with underlaid words in the version published in Hymns AncientModern New Standard, starting “Now, my tongue,” is the version with underlaid words in the version published in Hymns AncientModern New Standard, beginning “Now, my tongue.” Andrew Sims is the editor (submitted2021-02-13). Information about the score: A4, 2 pages, 113 kB Description: The hymn in the form published in Hymns AncientModern New Standard, melody with words not underlaid, beginning “Now, my tongue” and ending with “Now, my tongue” is copyrighted by CPDL.

John’s College Freshman Chorus is the editor of this publication (submitted2019-03-04).

Andrew Sims is the editor (submitted2019-01-12).

Andrew Sims is the editor (submitted2017-11-19).

Information about the score: A4, 1 page, 21 kB CC BY NC (Creative Commons) Notes on the editions: There are two editions, one in C-dur and one in Bb-dur.

Abel Di Marco is the editor of this publication (submitted2001-03-29). The score is a letter with one page and 4.93 MB in size. The copyright is a Personal Edition. Abel Di Marco was in charge of the arrangements. Verse 1 is underlaid with verse 56, which is alphabetized under Tantum.

General Information

Tantum ergo propter language – Pange lingua Anonymous is credited as the composer (Gregorian chant) 1v is the number of voices in the song. Voicing:Unison Sacred music includes hymns, chants, and eucharistic songs. Meter readings: 87, 87, 87 Language:Latin A cappella is used as the primary instrument. First published in 1982; second published in 1983 No. 252 in Hymns Ancient and Modern, New Standard Edition. Description: Primus modus operandi (primus operandi) (Dorian). According to Walters and colleagues (2006), Thomas Aquinas’s initial Phrygian mode setting of this passage was eventually altered to this Dorian mode setting, which is more accurate.

References

  • Graduale Romanum, Vatican, 1908, p. 124
  • Liber Usualis, p. 950
  • Graduale Triplex, Moines de Solesmes, 1979, p.851
  • Walters, Barbara R, Vincent Corrigan, and Peter T Ricketts. Graduale Romanum, Vatican, 1908, p. 124
  • Graduale Triplex, Moines de Solesmes, 1979, The celebration of the Feast of Corpus Christi. The Pennsylvania State University Press published a chapter titled “Diffusion of the Feast via Social Networks” in 2006, which can be found on pages 39-40 of the book.

External websites:

  • Among the many entries for “Pange lingua” are those in Gregobase, the Cantus Database of Gregorian Chant, Global Chant, the Digital Image Archive of Medieval Music, and the Académie de Chant grégorien. “Pange lingua” entries are also found at the Academy of Gregorian Chant and the Global Chant databases, as well as at the Digital Image Archive of Medieval Music.

Original text and translations

Pange language is a website where you may read the original text and translations.

Pange Lingua Gloriosi Catholic Hymns

At Pange lingua, you may read the original text as well as translations.

Pange Lingua Gloriosi Hymn:

  1. Pange lingua is a website where you may read the original content as well as translations.
  1. Sing, my tongue, the Saviour’s majesty, and the secret of His Flesh will be revealed
  2. Of the Blood, which is worth more than any price, shed by our eternal King, From a magnificent womb to spring, I was destined to bring about the salvation of the earth. He, as Man, with other men speaking, remained to plant the seeds of truth in the womb of a clean and spotless Virgin born for us on this planet below
  3. Then, in solemn order, He brought His life of adversity to a stop
  4. On the night of that Last Supper, seated with His chosen band, He, the Paschal victim eating, is the first to fulfill the Law’s mandate
  5. Second, He, the Paschal victim eating, is the first to fulfill the Law’s command. Then, as a source of nourishment for all of his brothers, He gives Himself with His own hand
  6. The bread of nature is formed from the Word become flesh. He turns in response to His message to Flesh. He is transformed by the infusion of wine into his blood. What if there is no discernible difference? Faith rapidly learns that all that matters is that one’s heart is in it. As we bow our heads in devotion, see, the Sacred Host is revealed
  7. Behold, as archaic forms fade away, other rituals of grace take their place
  8. In places where the feeble senses fail, faith is there to fill in the gaps. To the everlasting Father, and to the Son who reigns on high, and to the Holy Ghost who proceeds forth from each eternally, be salvation, honor, blessing, might, and unending majesty forever and ever.

It is my tongue that proclaims the Saviour’s splendor, and it is the mystery of His flesh that I sing. Our eternal King shed his blood at an unimaginable cost, and we are the beneficiaries. From a magnificent womb to rise, destined for the salvation of the world He, as Man, with other men chatting, remained to plant the seeds of truth in the womb of a clean and spotless Virgin born for us on earth below; Then He brought His life of misery to a conclusion in solemn order; His first and most important act is to eat the Paschal victim on the night of that Last Supper, seated with His chosen band.

  1. He, the Paschal victim eating, thereby meets the mandate of the Law; and second, He, the Paschal victim eating, fulfills His own command.
  2. He turns because He has spoken to Flesh.
  3. What if there is no discernible difference in the perception of time?
  4. We acclaim the Sacred Host as we fall to our knees in worship; when traditional forms fade away, other rites of grace take their place.
  5. To the everlasting Father, and to the Son who reigns on high, and to the Holy Ghost who proceeds out from each eternally, be salvation, honor, blessing, might, and unending majesty forever and ever;

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Sing, my tongue, the Saviour’s splendor, and the secret of His Flesh will be revealed. Of the Blood, all of which was worth more than its price, shed by our eternal King, From a magnificent womb to rise, destined for the salvation of the world; A clean and immaculate Virgin was born for us on the surface of the earth; He, in the form of a man, chatting with another man, remained to plant the seeds of truth; Then, in solemn order, He brought His life of misery to a stop; On the night of that Last Supper, seated with His chosen band, He, the Paschal victim eating, first fulfills the Law’s mandate; second, He, the Paschal victim eating, satisfies the Law’s command.

  • Then, as a source of nourishment for all of his brothers, He gives Himself with His own hand.
  • He turns in response to His message to Flesh; He transforms when he drinks wine.
  • Faith rapidly learns that all that is required is a sincere heart.
  • To the everlasting Father, and to the Son who reigns on high, and to the Holy Ghost who proceeds out from each forever, be salvation, honor, blessing, power, and unending majesty;

Josquin: Missa Pange Lingua

Sing, my tongue, the glory of the Saviour, the mystery of His Flesh sing; Our eternal King shed blood at an unimaginable cost, and we are the beneficiaries. From a magnificent womb to spring, I was destined for the salvation of the world. Of a clean and immaculate Virgin Born for us on earth below, He, as Man, with man speaking, remained, the seeds of truth to be sown; Then, in somber order, He brought His life of adversity to a stop. On the night of that Last Supper, seated with His chosen band, He, the Paschal victim eating, is the first to fulfill the Law’s demand.

He turns because of His word to Flesh.

What if there is no discernible shift?

We proclaim the Sacred Host as we fall to our knees in worship; when traditional forms fade away, other rites of grace take their place; Where the weak senses fail, faith fills in the gaps.

Analysis

Sing, my tongue, the Saviour’s majesty, and the secret of His Flesh will be revealed; Of the Blood, which is worth more than any price, shed by our eternal King, From a magnificent womb to spring, I was destined to bring about the salvation of the earth. He, as Man, with other men speaking, remained to plant the seeds of truth in the womb of a clean and spotless Virgin born for us on this planet below; Then, in solemn order, He brought His life of adversity to a stop; On the night of that Last Supper, seated with His chosen band, He, the Paschal victim eating, is the first to fulfill the Law’s mandate; second, He, the Paschal victim eating, is the first to fulfill the Law’s command.

  1. Then, as a source of nourishment for all of his brothers, He gives Himself with His own hand; The bread of nature is formed from the Word become flesh.
  2. He is transformed by the infusion of wine into his blood.
  3. Faith rapidly learns that all that matters is that one’s heart is in it.
  4. To the everlasting Father, and to the Son who reigns on high, and to the Holy Ghost who proceeds forth from each eternally, be salvation, honor, blessing, might, and unending majesty forever and ever.

Comparison

The motetAve Maria, composed by Josquin des Prez, is another well-known composition by the composer. Serena is a Virgo. A lot of the elements of this motet are similar to those of M issa Pange Lingua. Additionally, it has comprehensive imitative polyphony, point of imitatation, and voice coupling capabilities. The motet, on the other hand, is not based on a plainsong that already exists. It also makes use of voice pairs in a much more direct manner. When it comes to syllabic structure, the voices frequently duet with one another, and the motet is largely homophonic.

Additionally, the motet contains obvious portions of four-voice homophony for a number of “measures.” This approach is not nearly as popular as it should be among the general public.

Observations

This work has piqued my interest ever since I first started learning about the history of music some years ago. The mastery of imitative polyphony, as well as the utilization of such a beautiful tune, impressed me greatly. Because each movement incorporates this chant, the music has the potential to become stale and monotonous; nonetheless, Josquin’s creativity shines through in the inventive ways he employs the same material. In addition to being visually pleasing, the object is also functional.

Works Cited

“Josquin: Missa Pange Lingua (Tallis Scholars)” is a piece written by Josquin. YouTube video, 29:22 minutes. “Edward Murray” posted this on June 15th, 2011, and it was last updated on June 15th, 2011. Patrick Macey and colleagues “Josquin des Prez,” or “Josquin the Prez.” Grove Music is available online. Oxford Music Online is a website dedicated to promoting the music of Oxford University. On February 11, 2014, I was able to visit the Oxford University Press website. Leeman Perkins is credited with inventing the term “perkins.” (Josquin des Prez, “Mode and Structure in the Masses of Josquin,” Journal of the American Musicological Society, volume 2, number 2, 1876, pp.

To view the complete score, click here.

Pange Lingua – Academic Kids

TALLIS SCHOLARSHIP: “Josquin: Missa Pange Lingua.” You may watch the video at 29:22 on YouTube here. “Edward Murray” posted this on June 15th, 2011, and it was first uploaded there. Those named Patrick Macey and others Josequin des Prez” means “Josquin of the Prez” in French. Grove Music Online is a website that provides access to Grove Music’s catalog of recordings. Oxford Music Online is a website that provides access to a wide range of music from Oxford University Press. On February 11, 2014, I was able to access Oxford University Press.

Leeman Perkins is a well-known author and illustrator.

2, no.

“Mode and Structure in the Masses of Josquin.” Score in its entirety may be found at this link: Missa Pange Lingua is a linguist who specializes in the Spanish language.

Latin text and English version

Pange, language, and gloriosi are three words that come to mind. I will sing, with my tongue, the Savior’s splendour, Corporis mysterium, the mystery of His flesh will be sung. Rex effudit Gentium, Sanguinisque pretiosi of the Blood, beyond all price, quem in mundi pretiumshed by our immortal King, fructus ventris generosi intended for the redemption of the world, from a lovely womb until the beginning of spring Nobis datus, nobis natus, et cetera He, as Man, conversed with men sparso verbi semine, lingered, and sowed the seeds of truth in the soil of the earth; sui moras incolatus, and then He closed in solemn order miro clausit ordine.

  1. His calamity-filled life was amazing.
  2. Giving Himself with His own hand is a beautiful thing.
  3. adhering to the letter of the law and being sincere All that is required is that the heart be sincere; sola fides suffice.
  4. In adoration, we descend to our knees and venerate our Lord: “Lo, the holy Host we hail; and ancient documentum” (Lo, the sacred Host we greet).
  5. o’er old forms departing, novo cedat ritui:newer rituals of grace take precedence; praestet fides supplementum faith for all flaws providing, sensuum defectui; o’er ancient forms departing, novo cedat ritui:newer rites of grace take precedence; when the poor faculties of reasoning collapse.

Genitori, Genitoque Amen. Alleluia. Amen. Alleluia.

Pange lingua in music history

The hymn Pange Lingua is available in two different plainchant arrangements. Among the more well-known of them is aPhrygian modetune from the Roman liturgy, while the other comes from the Mozarabic liturgy of Spain. The Gallican Rite included the use of the Roman melody, which was originally composed for it. In the Renaissance, composerJosquin Desprez created a renowned piece based on the Pange Language hymn, known as the Missa pange lingua, which was inspired by the Roman version of the hymn.

It has been likened to Beethoven’s late works for its simplicity, motivic coherence, and attentive attention to the text, and many experts believe it to be one of the pinnacles of Renaissance polyphony.

The four-voice version of one of his compositions became one of the most popular pieces of the sixteenth century, and it served as the inspiration for hundreds of keyboard works in addition to masses, many of which were written by Spanish composers.

External link

  • For the hymn Pange Lingua, there are two different plainchant arrangements available. Among the more well-known of them is aPhrygian modetune from the Roman liturgy, while the other is from the Mozarabic liturgy of Spain. The Gallican Rite included a piece of music with a Roman theme. In the Renaissance, composerJosquin Desprez created a renowned piece based on the Pange Language hymn, known as the Missa pange lingua, which was inspired by the Roman version. As one of the composer’s final compositions, it has been tentatively dated to the time between 1515 and 1521, owing to the fact that it was not included byPetrucci in his 1515 collection of Josquin’s masses and was only published after his death. This piece has been likened to the late works of Beethoven in terms of simplicity, motivic coherence, and meticulous attention paid to the text, and many critics believe it to be one of the pinnacles of Renaissance polyphony. During the late 15th century, Johannes Urreda, a Flemishcomposer who lived in Spain, produced various settings of the Pange Lingua, the majority of which were based on the Mozarabic melody. One of his versions for four voices became one of the most popular compositions of the 16th century, and it served as the inspiration for dozens of keyboard works, as well as masses, many of which were written by Spanish composers, as well as for dozens of keyboard works by others.

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