When Was Puer Natus In Bethlehem Chant Written

Puer natus in Bethlehem (Gregorian chant)

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Catu Côrte-Real Suarez is the editor of this publication (submitted2021-11-23). Information about the score: A4, 2 pages, 33 kB Copyright courtesy of CPDL Edition notes:Em Font size has been increased. The entire thing is contained inside two pages. Catu Côrte-Real Suarez is the editor of this publication (submitted2021-11-23). Information about the score: A4, 1 page, 30 kB Original copyright is owned by CPDL. Edition notes: Same as below, one step higher in Em. Catu Côrte-Real Suarez is the editor of this publication (submitted2021-07-28).

Edition notes:TTB hurt.

Copyright:CPDL St.

Information about the score: Letter, 1 page, 62 kB Notes about the edition: monophonic stemless notes (copyright:CPDL).

Marco Gallo is the editor of this publication (submitted2002-10-10).

General Information

Puer natus is the Latin phrase for “first born.” Anonymous is credited as the composer (Gregorian chant) 1v is the number of voices in the song. Voicing:Unison Genre:Sacred,Chant Language:Latin A cappella is used as the primary instrument. Firstpublished: Description:

External websites:

At the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem, you may see the original text as well as translations.

Puer Natus in Béthlehem

“Puer natus in Bethlehem” (A child is born in Bethlehem) is a medieval Latin Christmas song written by an unnamed author and dedicated to the Virgin Mary (or authors). That this hymn is so simple is a testament to its beauty, as it absorbs so much theology in its poetry, and in its limited compass, so readily and organically. In the name of Jesus, born in Bethlehem, under the aegis of Jerusalem, alleluia. Refrain: In cordis jubilo, Christum natum adoremus (in joyous celebration). It’s time for a new song.

  1. Alleluia, the Virgin Mary gave birth to a son under the guidance of Gabriel.
  2. Thank you for your prayers.
  3. The bos and the asinus knew what was going on, and it was Dominus who knew what was going on.
  4. And the Angelus pastoribus proclaims, “Reveal what the Lord has revealed,” Alleluia.
  5. Alleluia, Intrantes domum invicem, Novum salutant Principem, Intrantes domum invicem, Novum salutant Principem Alleluia, de Matre natus Virgine, sint virili semine, de Matre natus Virgine.
  6. Alleluia, in carne nobis similis,Peccato sed dissimilis,Peccato sed dissimilis,Peccato sed dissimilis God and his sibi similes have redderet our homines, Alleluia.
  7. God’s blessings be upon you, Alleluia.

Hamilton M.

Restatement (literal translation): Let us worship the new-born Christ with an exultant heart and a new hymn of praise.

Allelujah.

Allelujah.

Allelujah.

Allelujah.

And the angel said to the shepherds, “The Lord reveals that He has risen from the dead,” which means, “He has appeared to us.” Allelujah.

And they come in with their sacrifices, to proclaim the birth of the newborn King of Kings.

He comes as the Son of a virgin mother, yet He has no earthly father; praise be to God.

Our frail body and His are one and the same, and He became our sinless kinsman, Hallelujah.

That we, having been set free from fatal tyranny, should be like Him, and so like God. Allelujah. On that day, rejoice in the presence of the Lord and pray for him. Allelujah. To the holy One in Three, and to the holy One in Three. Give gratitude and praise to the Lord forever and ever. Allelujah.

Ein Kind Geborn zu Bethlehem (Puer natus in Bethlehem)

Chorale Melodies used in Bach’s Vocal WorksEin Kind geborn zu Bethlehem (Puer natus in Bethlehem)
MelodyText|Variant of the CM|Use of the CM by Bach|Use of the CM by other composers
MelodyText:Zahn: 192b |EKG
Wilhelm Thomas and Konrad Amerln report, in their book � Das Weihnachtslied � (Bärenreiter, 1932), that it was customary to sing a trope at the end of the Benedicamus where the key words � Puer natus � appear in the 3 rdmass in the service on the 1 stday of Christmas. This tradition can be traced back into the 13 thcentury. The trope introducing the addition of � Puer natus in Bethlehem � is seen by musicologists as an attempt to modernize and make more �folksy� the chanting of the mass. This trope is included in a group of similar tropes such as � Puer nobis nascitur �, � In dulci jubilo � and � Resonet in laudibus �, more commonly known in German as � Joseph, lieber Joseph mein �.The first German versified version appeared in 1439 as given by Heinrich von Laufenberg. An early record of the melody with the Latin text is by an unknown master as used in a 5-pt setting (including another chorale as well in a quasi-quodlibet form) from 1542:
The earliest combination of German text and the already existing melody is from 1545.Some other early instances of the melody appear in settings by:
Michael Praetorius: 4-pt. setting (1609):
Samuel Scheidt: 4-pt. setting (Görlitz, 1650):
(see:further settings by Scheidt below)
Bach may have been acquainted with the Gotha hymnal from 1715 where the melody appears thus.
Variant of the CM:Zahn:192a
A variant form of Zahn 192b given above is:Zahn192aThe chorale text here is a paraphrased-verse chorale text byMartin Lutherand is based upon Luke 2. The two chorale texts, � Vom Himmel hoch da komm ich her � and � Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schar �, are quite similar in content just as the melody for � Puer natus in Bethlehem � has much in common with the melody for � Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schar �.A version of the chorale melody which Bach may have consulted and used (with some minor changes) is that found in theGothahymnal from 1715:
Use of the Chorale Melody by Bach:
Text:Ein Kind geborn zu Bethlehem| EKG:Author:Anon (1543)
Ver Work Mvt. Year Br RE KE Di BC Score Music Examples
4 BWV 65 Mvt. 2 1724 12 302 12 F169A27:5 PDF Mvt. 2 (MG)|Mvt. 2 (Leusink)
BWV 65/2: Breitkopf 12 (Title:Puer natus in Bethlehem).
Untexted:
Ver Work Mvt. Year Br RE KE Di BC Score Music Examples
BWV 603 1713/15 K32
BWV 603:Puer natus in Bethlehem,Orgelbüchlein No. 5.
Variant of the CM:
Untexted:
Ver Work Mvt. Year Br RE KE Di BC Score Music Examples
BWV 607 1713/15 K39
BWV 603:Puer natus in Bethlehem,Orgelbüchlein No. 5.
Use of the Chorale Melody by other composers:
Johannes Stomius, vulgo Mulinus(1502-1562)Puer natus in Bethlehem, 3-pt. vocal setting
Andreas Raselius(c1563-1602):Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schar, Chorale Motet for 5 voices
David Palladius(Active years: 1572-1599):Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schar, Chorale Motet for 5 voices
Johann Hermann Schein(1586-1630):Ein Kind geborn zu Bethlehemfor 6 voices
Paul Siefert(1586-1666):Chorale Variations for Instruments onPuer natus in Bethlehem
Samuel Scheidt(1587-1654):Puer natus in Bethlehemfor 8 voicesEin Kind geborn zu Bethlehemfor 6 voices and bc
Georg Victorinus(active years: 1591-1626):Puer natus in Bethlehem, 4-pt. setting
Matthias Spiegler(1595 – after 1631):Puer natus in Bethlehem, 4-pt. Chorale Motet for 2 Sopranos, 1 Tenor and 1 �Baritono�
Pater S. J. Jakob Gippenbusch(1612-1664):Psalteriolum harmonicumpublished in Köln in 1642 containsPuer natus in Bethlehem, 4-pt. setting with bc (organ) accompaniment.
Anon (1625):The collectionCento Davidicusfrom 1625 contains an anonymous 4-pt. setting ofPuer natus in Bethlehemin both Latin and German.
Dietrich Buxtehude(c1637-1707):Puer natus in Bethlehem, Chorale Prelude for Organ, BuxWV 217
Johann Schelle(1648-1701)Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schar, Cantata for 2 Clarini, Timpani, 2 Violini, 2 Violette, 2 Cornetti, 2 Tromboni, 5 Voices and Organo.While theMartin Luthertext is generally associated with Puer natus in Bethlehem, and one might assume that Schelle based his cantata using that text on that tune, he actually used the tune,Vom Himmel hoch, which shares a meter with the previous tune. Thus, the text fits both tunes. For further reference, seethe Concordia Publishing House modern edition of the work, edited by Dale F. Voelker and published in 1990 (Concoredia 97-6001).Contributed by Mark Alan Filbert, MM, MSM, Cantor – Saint Paul Lutheran Church, Denver, Colorado, USA (December 20, 2008)
Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow(1663-1712):Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schar, Cantata for S, A., T., B., 4 voices. in ripieno, 4 Clarini, Tamburi, 2 Violini, 3 Violette, Bassoon, bc. (at the latest by 1697)
Georg Friedrich Kauffmann(1679-1735):Puer natus in Bethlehem, Chorale Prelude for Organ (Leipzig, 1733)
Gregor Joseph Werner(1693-1766):Puer natus in Bethlehemfor 4pt. Chorus, Violin and Viola da Gamba
Sources: NBA, vols. III/2.12.2 in particularand the BWV (” Bach Werke Verzeichnis “) The PDF files of the Chorales were contributed by Margaret GreentreeJ.S. Bach ChoralesSoftware: Capella 2004 Software, version 5.1.Prepared byThomas BraatzAryeh Oron(January 2006)
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Meditation on the Nativity: Puer natus in Bethlehem

Puer natus in Bethlehem” (Purified in Bethlehem) is a medieval Latin Christmas song written by an unnamed author in the fourth century AD (or authors). With its wonderful simplicity, this hymn absorbs so much theology in its poetry and in its limited span, and it does so effortlessly and organically. In the name of Jesus, born in Bethlehem, under the watchful eye of Jerusalem, alleluia Refrain: Jesus Christ was born in the year of our Lord’s birth, and we celebrate his birth with joy and adoration.

  1. Alleluia, assumpsit carnem Filius, Dei Patris altissimus.
  2. Processsit Matris Utero,alleluia Tamquam sponsus de thalamo,Tamquam sponsus de thalamo,alleluia It is in praesepio that I am, and it is in qui regnat sine termino that I am, and it is all thanks to you.
  3. alleluia.
  4. Thank you, Reges de Saba, Aurum thus myrrham offerunt, Alleluia Alleluia, Intrantes domum invicem, Novum salutant Principem, Intrantes domum invicem, Novum salutant Principem.
  5. It is in the flesh that we are alike, not in the flesh that we are different.
  6. God and his sibi similes have redderet our homines, praise be to God!
  7. Laudetur sancta Trinitas.

MacGill has provided the English translation (1876) In Bethlehem, a child is born, and Jerusalem rejoices in great gladness.

Christ, the Son of God the Father, has put on flesh at the highest place.

The virgin gave birth to the Son, as announced by the angel Gabriel.

He emerges from the mother’s womb as if he were a bridegroom on his wedding day.

So there, in a manger of all places, rests He who rules over all the world.

The ox and ass in the next-door stall, and the Lord of all in that kid.

Likewise, the angel to the shepherds said, “The Lord discloses to us that He has risen,” which means, “The Lord has revealed to us that He has risen.” Allelujah.

To welcome the newborn King of Kings with their sacrifices, and to proclaim him to be the new King of Kings Allelujah.

With the venom of the snake removed, He claimed our blood and lineage, praise be to God!

As if being freed from death enslavement meant being like Him and hence like God. Allelujah. Come, then, and on his birthday, rejoice before the Lord and pray for him. Allelujah. To the holy One in Three, and to the holy One in One. Give gratitude and praise to the Lord forever and ever! Allelujah.

Puer natus in Bethlehem, Alleluia.Unde gaudet Jerusalem. Alleluia.Hic jacet in præsepio, Alleluia.Qui regnat sine termino. Alleluia.Cognovit bos et asinus, Alleluia.Quod puer erat Dominus. Alleluia.Reges de Sabâ veniunt, Alleluia.Aurum, thus, myrrham offerunt. Alleluia.Intrantes domum invicem, Alleluia.Novum salutant principem. Alleluia.De matre natus virgine, Alleluia.Sine virili semine; Alleluia.Sine serpentis vulnere, Alleluia.De nostro venit sanguine; Alleluia.In carne nobis similis, Alleluia.Peccato sed dissimilis; Alleluia.Ut redderet nos homines, Alleluia.Deo et sibi similes. Alleluia.In hoc natali gaudio, Alleluia.Benedicamus Domino: Alleluia.Laudetur sancta Trinitas, Alleluia.Deo dicamus gratias. Alleluia. A Child is born in Bethlehem; Alleluia.Exult for joy, Jerusalem! Alleluia.There in a manger lowly lies, Alleluia.He who reigns above the skies. Alleluia.The ox and ass in neighbouring stall. Alleluia.See in that Child the Lord of all. Alleluia.And kingly pilgrims, long foretold, Alleluia.From East bring incense, myrrh, and gold, Alleluia.And enter with their offerings. Alleluia.To hail the new-born King of Kings. Alleluia.He comes, a maiden mother’s Son. Alleluia.Yet earthly father hath He none; Alleluia.And, from the serpent’s poison free. Alleluia.He owned our blood and pedigree. Alleluia.Our feeble flesh and His same. Alleluia.Our sinless kinsman He became, Alleluia.That we, from deadly thrall set free. Alleluia.Like Him, and so like God, should be. Alleluia.Come then, and on this natal day, Alleluia.Rejoice before the Lord and pray. Alleluia.And to the Holy One in Three, Alleluia.Give praise and thanks eternally. Alleluia.Translated by Hamilton Montgomerie MacGill, 1876
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Puer Natus in Bethlehem

This polyphonic setting of the refrain of Puer Natus in Bethlehem is the latest installment in the ongoing effort of music dedicated to the Baby Jesus. I finished this piece in late June of this year. The sheet music for this piece is available for free download at the bottom of this article. UnlikeVox Clara, which commemorates Jesus throughout the Advent season, Puer Natus in Bethlehem is an old Christmas carol that glorifies Jesus during the Christmas season. It is a simple elaboration of the refrain “In cordis jubilo” from the well-known chanted tune, which is the subject of this brief work.

Discussion

My favorite aspects of the text ofPuer Natus in Bethlehem are the numerous contrasts and inherent impossibilities that it contains. A virgin conceives and gives birth to a son. He is the product of a woman who did not bear the seed of a male. Despite the fact that his dominion would last forever, he is laid in a manger. With the exception of sin, he resembles us in every way. He takes on our body in order for us to be transformed by Him. No, Deo with his sibi similes, you will not redden our souls.

Consider what it would be like to be able to convert the falsehood of your sworn adversary into truth.

We ask that you please download the free sheet music and utilize it for the glory and honor of the Infant Jesus.

Whether you are singing this or another work of mine, I would want to hear from you.

About the Featured Image

The featured image is from theNativity by Noel-Niclas Coyel III, and it is a detail from the painting. It is available to the general public.

Puer Natus in Bethlehem

In Bethlehem, there is a statue of the Virgin Mary. I hope you are doing well with the weird and disturbing events that have occurred over the past several days. It means that, in addition to dealing with the pandemic and other issues, we all have a lot on our plates right now. I believe there are some rays of hope, but I believe it will take some time for them to manifest themselves. In the meanwhile, please look after yourself since we require your assistance now more than ever. Partly as a diversion, and partly because it’s excellent material, I’d like to share with you today a fairly basic melody that has been transformed into a pair of fantastic concoctions by none other than the legendary Michael Praetorius (1571-1621).

A few centuries later, the melody was introduced, and it was eventually paired with the text—first in English, then in German—from the mid-16th century onward.

It moves from G to B-flat, then back to G, before returning to G.

Isn’t it simple to understand?

Despite this, this melody has served as the foundation for a plethora of complicated and even momentous situations, as I will demonstrate to you.

A score for the first of them, as well as a recording of it, are included in the zip folder.

It’s like being in musical paradise!

The term “prolific” does not even begin to describe it.

(It seems like it was a hundred years ago today.) I realize there is a lot going on, but please try to spend a few minutes listening to these lovely compositions, and perhaps even singing along with them.

It will be beneficial to you! (Not in the sense of medicine, but rather as a welcome respite into a realm of comity and delight.) Sending my warmest greetings and best wishes for world peace, justice, and harmony (and counterpoint).

Puer natus in Bethlehem

8.4.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8. Latin Chant from the 14th century as a source. A Child is Born in the City of Bethlehem (proper text) (Puer natus in Bethlehem;Ein Kind geborn zu Bethlehem) Zahn 192 is the number of the item. Recordings that are currently available It follows that you will find links that will take you to businesses with which I have an affiliate connection, meaning that I will get a commission if you make a purchase after clicking through. As an Apple Services Performance Partner and as an Amazon Associate, I receive money when people make purchases through my links.

  • 8.4.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8.8 Latin Chant from the fourteenth century as source. Correct Text: In Bethlehem, a child is born (Puer natus in Bethlehem
  • Ein Kind geborn zu Bethlehem) Zahn 192 is the number. Pre-recorded material that is available I have an affiliate agreement with the businesses listed below, which means that I get a compensation if you make a purchase after clicking on one of the links in the following section. Apple Services Performance Partner and Amazon Associate, I receive commissions on purchases made through my links and advertisements. Listed below are a few of the greatest recordings currently available of this tune:
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The tune “Puer natus in Bethelem,” which has its beginnings in a fourteenth-century chant, is most commonly connected with the Christmas hymn of the same name. As a descant for a more traditional five-part melody, what is now called the tune proper was originally intended to be used as the tenor line in subsequent four-part versions. As the melody in Joseph Klug’s Geistliche Lieder, as well as in the Leipzig edition of Valentin Babst’s Geistliche Lieder, 1545, it is this tenor line that stands out.

Who is the author of the melody of “Puer Natus in Betlehem Alleluia”?

The tune “Puer natus in Bethelem,” which has its beginnings in a fourteenth-century chant, is related with the Christmas hymn of the same name, which has the same name as the chant. As a descant for a more traditional five-part melody, what is today considered the song proper began life as the tenor line in later four-part arrangements, where it remained quite intact. Joseph Klug’s Geistliche Lieder, Leipzig, 1545, and Valentin Babst’s Geistliche Lieder, Leipzig, 1545, both use this tenor line as the basis for their melodies.

Replies

  • By the way, as far as I can recall, the refrain appears to be from the CD “Nova cantica,” which was released by Dominique Vellard and Emmanuel Bonnardot. Todd M. McComb’s description (from the Early Music FAQ) is as follows: Unfortunately, I don’t have the CD with me at the moment. As a result, I am unable to confirm, but I believe it was the monophonic conductus «Natus est» (track 11). The tune that I recall, which was presumably adapted to this text (thank goodness for the flexibility of human memory): re fa-fa sol-sol-la la-sol la-re sol-fa-mi-re sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la sol-sol-la Thank you very much. Oliver Gerlach expressed himself as follows: Although the text and monodic melody are believed to have been written in the 14th century, the following is what the author of this page believes (possibly copied and pasted from wikipedia, which you should not treat as trustworthy, but this does not imply that other encyclopedias are
  • ): I’m providing you with the link because it has some specific and relevant references. There are numerous choral versions of it (Buxtehude, and even Schein in German!) that are available. So much so that even Bach wrote about the German version (here it is stated that the earliest German version was written in 1439 by Heinrich von Laufenberg): I’m not sure about the melody, but the refrain “Cum novo cantico” with this protus plagalis tune was already used by Aquitanian composers, particularly the longer refrain (in which the ambitus stayed within the protus pentachord, rather than outside it, as it is here): “In cordis jubilo Christum natum adoremus cum novo cantico.” I’m not sure about the melody, but the refrain ” Several old Christmas clichés from the 12th century, I believe, were incorporated into the later melody. You can look into the following sources: Unfortunately, I was unable to locate the song that I recalled at first glance. Is there a name for the composer of the music of “Puer Natus in Betlehem Alleluia?” Specifically, I’m looking for the creator and / or originator of the melody for the canticumPuer natus in the Betlehem Alleluia hymn. I’m looking for a site where I can obtain…
  • Although the text and monodic melody are believed to have been written in the 14th century, the following is what the author of this page believes (possibly copied and pasted from wikipedia, which you should not treat as trustworthy, but this does not imply that other encyclopedias are
  • ): I’m providing you with the link because it has some specific and relevant references. There are numerous choral versions of it (Buxtehude, and even Schein in German!) that are available. So much so that even Bach wrote about the German version (here it is stated that the earliest German version was written in 1439 by Heinrich von Laufenberg): I’m not sure about the melody, but the refrain “Cum novo cantico” with this protus plagalis tune was already used by Aquitanian composers, particularly the longer refrain (in which the ambitus stayed within the protus pentachord, rather than outside it, as it is here): “In cordis jubilo Christum natum adoremus cum novo cantico.” I’m not sure about the melody, but the refrain ” Several old Christmas clichés from the 12th century, I believe, were incorporated into the later melody. You can look into the following sources: Unfortunately, I was unable to locate the song that I recalled at first glance
  • Merci. I haven’t been able to track down the source of the music yet. Louis-Marie Salaün stated, “I am not aware of the identity of the composer, but it is generally accepted that this song is included in the famous mediéval finlandais-suédois “Piae Cantiones” published in 1582.” I am not aware of the identity of the composer, but it is generally accepted that this song is included in the famous mediéval finlandais-suédois “Piae Cantiones” published in 1582.

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