When Was The Gregorian Chant “veni Sancte Spiritus” Written

Veni Creator Spiritus – Wikipedia

Veni Creator Spiritus
Hymn
First verse
English Come, Creator Spirit
Occasion Pentecost
Written 9th century
Text attributed toRabanus Maurus
Language Latin
Meter 8 8 8 8
Melody Gregorian chant

It is thought that Rabanus Maurus, a ninth-century German monk, teacher, and archbishop, wrote the ancient Christian hymn ” Veni Creator Spiritus ” (Come, Creator Spirit), which means “Come, Creator Spirit.” It is customary to sing the originalLatintext inGregorian Chant when the originalLatintext is employed. It has been translated and paraphrased into various languages, and it has been modified into a variety of musical styles, most frequently as a Pentecostal hymn or for other events that center on the Holy Spirit, among other things.

Liturgical use

Veni Creator Spiritus is sung in the Catholic Church on the Feast of Pentecost as an invocation of the Holy Spirit throughout liturgical ceremonies (at bothTerceandVespers). Among other occasions, it is sung at the entrance of Cardinals to the Sistine Chapel when they elect a new Pope, the consecration of bishops, the ordination of priests, the celebration of the sacrament of Confirmation, the dedication of churches, the celebration of synods or councils, the coronation of monarchs, the profession of members of religious institutes, and other similar solemn occasions.

  • The hymn is also sung on New Year’s Day in several Catholic communities as a symbol of plenaryindulgence, according to tradition.
  • This chant is also commonly used in the Anglican Communion, and may be found in the Ordering of Priests and the Consecration of Bishops in the Book of Common Prayer (1662), as well as in the Novena to The Holy Ghost in Saint Augustine’s Prayer Book (1662).
  • Come, Holy Ghost, inspire our souls,” was written by Bishop John Cosin in 1625 and has been used for all successive British coronations since then.
  • (1872, n.

Text

There are several varieties. The Vatican just produced the following Latin and English translations of the Bible, which are as follows:

Latin text English version
Veni, creator Spiritus, mentes tuorum visita, imple superna gratia, quae tu creasti, pectora. Come, Holy Ghost, Creator, comefrom thy bright heav’nly throne;come, take possession of our souls,and make them all thine own.
Qui diceris Paraclitus, donum Dei altissimi, fons vivus, ignis, caritas, et spiritalis unctio. Thou who art called theParaclete,best gift of God above,the living spring, the living fire,sweet unction and true love.
Tu septiformis munere, dextrae Dei tu digitus, tu rite promissum Patris, sermone ditans guttura. Thou who art sevenfold in thy grace,finger of God’s right hand;his promise, teaching little onesto speak and understand.
Accende lumen sensibus, infunde amorem cordibus, infirma nostri corporis virtute firmans perpeti. O guide our minds with thy blest light,with love our hearts inflame;and with thy strength, which ne’er decays,confirm our mortal frame.
Hostem repellas longius pacemque dones protinus; ductore sic te praevio vitemus omne noxium. Far from us drive our deadly foe;true peace unto us bring;and through all perils lead us safebeneath thy sacred wing.
Per te sciamus da Patrem noscamus atque Filium, te utriusque Spiritum credamus omni tempore. Through thee may we the Father know,through thee th’eternal Son,and thee the Spirit of them both,thrice-blessed three in One.
In some instances, adoxologyfollows:
Deo Patri sit gloria, et Filio qui a mortuis surrexit, ac Paraclito, in saeculorum saecula. All glory to the Father be,with his coequal Son;the same to thee, great Paraclete,while endless ages run.
Amen. Amen.

Notable English translations

It is possible to have several different versions. Recent publications by the Vatican include the following Latin and English versions:

German paraphrases

” Komm, Gott Schöpfer, Heiliger Geist ” (literally: “Come, God Creator, Holy Ghost”) was written by Martin Luther as a Lutheran hymn for Pentecost, and it was originally published in 1524, using a tune drawn from the chant of the Latin hymn. It occurs in the Protestant hymnal Evangelisches Gesangbuchas EG 126, which is a collection of hymns. In 1845, Heinrich Bone wrote his own German paraphrase, ” Komm, Schöpfer Geist, kehr bei uns ein ” (literally: “Come, Creator Spirit, visit us”), which included an adaption of the plainchant tune as well as his own words.

“Komm, Heiliger Geist, der Leben schafft,” a rhymed German translation or paraphrase, was composed by Friedrich Dörr to a tune that was close to the Gregorian melody and published in 1972 under the title “Komm, Heiliger Geist, der Leben schafft.” It was included in the first edition of the common German Catholic hymnal Gotteslobin in 1975, and in its second edition in 2013, as GL 342 in the section “Pfingsten – Heiliger Geist” (Pentecost – Holy Spirit).

It was also included in the third edition of the common German Catholic hymnal Gotteslobin in 2013.

Musical settings

Veni Creator Spiritus has influenced the following works by renowned composers over the ages, which are listed in approximate chronological order:

  • Jean Titelouze, Veni creator (1623)
  • Guillaume-Gabriel Nivers, “L’hymne de la Pentecôt” in his second Livre d’Orgue (1667)
  • Marc-Antoine Charpentier, five settings:
  • Among the works by Veni creator Spiritus are Veni creator Spiritus, H.54 for 3 voices (or chorus), 2 violins, and continuo (1670s)
  • Veni creator Spiritus, H.66 for soloists, chorus, flutes, bassoons, strings, and continuo (1680s)
  • Veni creator Spiritus, H.69 for 1 voice and continuo (1680s)
  • Veni creator Spiritus, H.70 for 1 voice and continuo (late 1680
  • Among the works by Veni creator Spiritus are Veni creator Spiritus, H.54 for 3 voices (or chorus), 2 violins, and continuo (1670s)
  • Veni creator Spiritus, H.66 for soloists, chorus, flutes, bassons, strings, and continuo (1680s)
  • Veni creator Spiritus, H.69 for 1 voice and continuo (1680s)
  • Veni creator Spiritus, H.70 for 1 voice and continuo (late 1680s

References

  1. Saint Augustine’s Prayer Book, published in 1967. (Revised ed.) 316
  2. Ab”Mass and Rite of Canonization” (PDF).vatican.va. pp. 32–35
  3. Ab”Mass and Rite of Canonization” (PDF).vatican.va. “Come, Holy Ghost, Creator, Come / Veni Creator Spiritus” (Come, Holy Ghost, Creator, Come) was retrieved on October 18, 2015. Hymns for the Breviary. The 7th of January, 2013. Charles S. Nutter and Wilbur F. Tillett, eds., retrieved on June 4, 2017. The Hymns and Hymn Writers of the Church (SmithLamar, 1911), p. 108
  4. The Hymns and Hymn Writers of the Church (SmithLamar, 1911), p. 108
  5. 204 and 229 in Beth Quitslund’s The Reformation in Rhyme: Sternhold, Hopkins, and the English Metrical Psalter (Ashgate, 2008)
  6. The Eucharistic Understanding of John Cosin and His Contribution to the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, by Ivan D. Aquilina (University of Leeds, 2002), p. 6
  7. “Guide to the Coronation Service,” by Ivan D. Aquilina (University of Leeds, 2002). Westminster Abbey is a historic building in London. Archives of the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II from Oremus.org, which was accessed on October 14, 2020
  8. “Creator Spirit, by Whose Aid?” from Hymnary.org, which was accessed on October 14, 2020
  9. And “Creator Spirit, By Whose Aid” (PDF) from the Oregon Catholic Press. 9th of May, 2017
  10. Retrieved

External links

  • Pope John Paul II’s Pastoral Commentary on the Gregorian Chant is available for free download.
  • Whitsun
  • Whit Monday
  • Whit Tuesday
  • Trinity Sunday
  • Corpus Christi
  • Ordinary Time
  • Time after Pentecost
  • Time after Trinity
  • Whitsun
  • Whit
  • Baby leaping, Ducasse de Mons, Green Week, Morris Dance, Pinkster, Rosalia, Wakes Week, Whit Ale, and Whit Friday are all things to look forward to.
  • Ducasse de Mons
  • Green week
  • Morris dancers
  • Pinkster
  • Rosalia
  • Wakes week
  • Whit ale
  • Whit Friday
  • Baby leaping
  • Ducasse de Mons
  • Let God’s Breath rest on me
  • Let the Divine Love descend upon me. The Spirit of the Lord fills the entire universe (The Spirit of the Lord fills the entire universe)
  • Come, God the Creator, Holy Spirit (Come, God the Creator, Holy Spirit)
  • Komm, Heilger Geist, der Leben schafft(Come, Holy Spirit, who brings life into being)
  • Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott(Come, Holy Spirit, God and Lord)
  • (Come, Creator Spirit, make a stop by and see us.) Nun bitten wir den Heiligen Geist(Now we beseech the Holy Ghost)
  • Nunc sancte nobis spiritus(Come, Holy Ghost, Whoever You Are)
  • Nunc sancte nobis spiritus(Come, Holy Ghost, Whoever You Are). O komm, du Geist der Wahrheit (Come, you spirit of truth)
  • O komm, du Geist der Wahrheit Veni Creator Spiritus (Come, Creator Spirit)
  • Veni Sancte Spiritus (Come, Holy Spirit)
  • Veni Creator Spiritus (Come, Creator Spirit).

Veni Sancte Spiritus: Summon The Holy Spirit With The Ancient “Golden Sequence” Prayer

TheVeni Sancte Spiritus, often known as the “Golden Sequence,” is a beautiful and powerful prayer to the Holy Spirit that goes back to the thirteenth century and is being performed today. Cardinal Stephen Langton, the Archbishop of Canterbury, is credited with the phrase. From Pentecost until the following Saturday, this “sequence” (which is still sung and chanted after the first reading, the Epistle, and the Alleluia, but before the Gospel reading) was formalized into the liturgical calendar.

This prayer, in other words, has been firmly rooted in the solemn remembrance of Pentecost and the transition from Eastertide to Ordinary Time for over 450 years now.

Veni Sancte Spiritus

Make use of your senses to participate in this prayer. Look for a tranquil location. Take a look at it. Make a prayer for it. Take a listen to the chant videos provided below. Follow the chant notation video and try your hand at chanting your own prayer in the style of the video. Invite Him into your heart and soul with a childlike faith, inviting His brilliance, His gifts, His comfort, His refreshment, His light, His healing, His quenching waters, His purification, His life, and His delights into your heart and soul.

Veni Sancte Spiritusin Gregorian Chant

It’s also available in square notes, so you can learn how to sing it (as well as how to read square note chant, which I highly encourage!) Even if you have no prior knowledge or experience with Latin, I implore you to try reading out loud the Latin version above – it is totally phonetic (the words sound exactly as they look to the eye), and it trills off the tongue with beautiful elegance. You may begin to comprehend why Latin is such a good language for chanting. It has a natural lyrical quality about it.

See also:  Why Chant The Epistle

Veni Sancte Spiritus (Gregorian chant)

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It’s also available in square notes, so you can practice singing along with it (as well as learning how to read square note chant, which I highly suggest!) It doesn’t matter if you have no prior knowledge or experience with Latin; please, I implore you, try reading out loud the Latin version above – it’s totally phonetic (the words sound exactly as they look to the eye) and it trills off the tongue with beautiful elegance — You can see why Latin is such a good language for chanting if you grasp what Latin is.

It has a lyrical quality to it by nature, as well. (Please keep in mind that the English translation provided above is not a literal translation, but is rather a poetic interpretation of the original Japanese text).

And here it is in square notes so that you can learn to sing it (as well as how to read square note chant, which I highly suggest!). You may read the Latin version above out loud even if you have no prior expertise or comfort with the language; it is totally phonetic (the words sound exactly as they look to the eye) and it trills off the tongue with beautiful elegance. You may begin to see why Latin is such a good language for chanting. It has a lyrical quality to it by nature. (Please keep in mind that the English translation provided above is not a literal translation, but rather a poetic interpretation.)

General Information

Veni Sancte Spiritus is the title of this piece. Anonymous is credited as the composer (Gregorian chant) Lyricist: 1v is the number of voices in the song. Voicing:Unison Genre:Sacred, Hymns for the Feast of Pentecost in sequence Language:Latin A cappella or keyboard are used as instruments. Firstpublished: Tonus Primus in the Dorian manner, according to the description. This is the schedule for Whitsunday. It has been attributed to Pope Innocent III (1160 or 1161 -1216) or Stephen Langton, Archbishop of Canterbury (c.

  1. In Blume, C., Bannister, H.
  2. Saint Victor, Notker, B., and the Catholic Church, there is a lengthy debate about authorship and sources (1915).
  3. Thesaurus hymnologici prosarium.
  4. Reisland & Co., Leipzig.
  5. 54, pages 234-9 of the AHMA (Analecta Hymnica Medii Aevi).

External websites:

  • Gregorien.info is a website that contains information on Gregobase, the Cantus index, and the Cantus. A version in Ab may be found at Hymnary.org
  • Hymnary.org
  • The Catholic Encyclopedia contains an entry for “Veni Sancte Spiritus.” Giovanni Getto is a fictional character created by the author of the novel Getto. Despite the will of the anima: Meditazioni sullo Spirito Santo: Il Veni Sancte Spiritus e Il Gloria Patri: Il Veni Sancte Spiritus e Il Gloria Patri. Già E Non Ancora, a 198-page novel. Jaca Book (Milan, Italy), 1991

Original text and translations

Veni Sancte Spiritus is a website where you may read the original text as well as translations.

Veni Sancte Spiritus Et Emitte Coelitus

Please consider making a donation to New Advent in order to receive the complete contents of this website as an immediate download. A single purchase of $19.99 provides access to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Church Fathers, Summa Theologica, Bible, and other resources. Pentecost is celebrated in a certain order (the “Golden Sequence”). A version of this hymn, which is performed at Mass fromWhitsundayuntil the next Saturday inclusively, consists of ten stanzas in the following form: Veni, Sancte Spiritus; Et emitte coelitus; Lucis Tuae radium.

  • The “Veni Sancte Spiritus” is distinguished by the persistence throughout the hymn of the same rhythmic closure in “ium,” which is a unique element of the hymn.
  • Neale’s translation incorporates this element across all of the stanzas (given in the Baltimore Manual of Prayers”).
  • Dean Trench and others have followed Durandus’ lead in claiming that Robert II, who ruled in France from 997 to 1031, was the originator of the sequence.
  • The sequence has actually been discovered in manuscripts from the eleventh and twelfth centuries, but it was written by a later hand, leading to the conclusion that it was written sometime after the middle of the twelfth century, according to the evidence.
  • ), which was made by a writer whom Cardinal Pitra believes was an English Cistercian who lived around the year 1210 and wrote in the 12th century.
  • Notkeri,” which was published in 1220, is considered to be more credible.
  • Gall, claims that his abbot, Ulrich, was dispatched to Rome by Frederick II, where he consulted with the Pope on a variety of subjects and was present at the Mass of the Holy Spirit, which was celebrated in front of the Holy Father in the presence of the Pope.
  • Ekkehard then notes (which he most likely received from Abbot Ulrich himself upon his return to St.
  • The older sequence was progressively supplanted by its challenger, which was nearly uniformly allocated to one or more days within the octave as a result of the competition.
  • It remained unchanged after the modification (1634) under Urban VIII.

Daniel expresses his gratitude for this acknowledgment. Gihr devotes a significant amount of room in his work on the Mass to praising the hymn, and Julian pays it a thoughtful and grateful homage to the piece.

Sources

Contributions to the Study and Interpretation of the Old Church Hymns, II (Paderborn, 1886), 61-76, which includes a good commentary; JULIAN, Dict. of Hymnol. (2nd ed., London, 1907), 1212, 1721 (which includes discussion of authorship, first lines of trs., etc.); to his list should be added: BAGSHAWE, Breviary Hymns and Missal Sequ “Among the hymns are “Come, O Holy Spirit, down” from DONAHOE’s Early Christian Hymns (New York, 1908), 149, “Holy Spirit, come and shine” from Irish Monthly (Nov., 1887), “O Holy Spirit, come!” from Missal for the Use of the Laity (London, 1903), 410, “O Holy Spirit, come possess us,” a four-lined stanza, and others.

  1. When it comes to Catholic sodalities, the version most commonly heard is a modification of the one written by AUSTIN (1668): “Come Holy Spirit, bring down those lights which softly trickle in quiet streams,” and so on.
  2. Text and annotations are found on pages 198-9 of TRENCH’s Sacred Latin Poetry (3rd edition, London, 1874), as well as on page 197 of the same book for a historical sketch of Robert II; Trench considers the sequence “the sweetest…
  3. 199: Veni sancte Spiritus, Katharin coelitus Invitatus meritor; Consolator optime, Doctor disert “etc.; see also X., 32, 122, 253; XXXVIII, 166; XXI, 56; XXXIX, 30; XL, 52; XLI, 195; XLII, 69 for additional examples.
  4. Hymns Ancient and Modern (history ed., London, 1909), 263-6.
  5. The Vatican Graduale (Rome, 1908) Annus Sanctus (London, 1874), trs.
  6. 164, 166, 169, 173: also, in Appendix, pp.
  7. WINKWORTH, The Seven Great Hymns of the Medieval Church (7th ed., New York, 1868), 126-33, text and translation of WINKWORTH.
  8. A note about accented syllables is given in JOHNER’s An New School of Gregorian Chant (New York, 1906), page 115: “Do not prolong the emphasized syllables, since else a disagreeable 6-8 time is unavoidably produced.”

About this page

Citation in the APA style (1912). Come, Holy Spirit, and send out the Coelitus. It may be found in the Catholic Encyclopedia. The Robert Appleton Company is based in New York. Citation in the MLA style. Hugh Henry is a fictional character created by author Hugh Henry. “Veni Sancte Spiritus Et Emitte Coelitus.” “Veni Sancte Spiritus Et Emitte Coelitus.” ‘The Catholic Encyclopedia,’ Volume 15, New York, Robert Appleton Company, 1912. Transcription. Originally published in New Advent, this piece was transcribed for the publication by Wm Stuart French, Jr.

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Pentecost Sequence: Veni Sancte Spiritus

Citation in the APA style (1912). Come, Holy Spirit, and let us pray for you. The Catholic Encyclopedia has a definition for this term. The Robert Appleton Company is based in New York, and the publisher is Robert Appleton. Citation in the MLA style is required. Hugh Henry is a fictional character created by author Charles Dickens in the novel A Christmas Carol (1997). Come, O Holy Spirit, and let us pray for you. “Veni Sancte Spiritus Et Emitte Coelitus” (Come, Holy Spirit, and let us pray for you.) ‘The Catholic Encyclopedia,’ Volume 15, New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912.

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Latin text English text Pastoral commentary
Veni, Sancte Spiritus,et emitte caelituslucis tuae radium. Come, O Holy Spirit, come!From your bright and blissful HomeRays of healing light impart. This hymn is not only an invocation. It is a prayer requesting that this divine Person dwell within us with his radiant fruit.
Veni, pater pauperum,veni, dator munerum,veni, lumen cordium. Come, Father of the poor,Source of gifts that will endureLight of ev’ry human heart. One of the proper names of the Holy Ghost, after that of Love, is gift. Love is the first gift and the Divine Giver brings life to souls.
Consolator optime,dulcis hospes animae,dulce refrigerium. You, of all consolers best,Of the soul, most kindly Guest,Quick’ning courage do bestow. “ Do you not know that you are the temple of the Holy Ghost.” “ He dwells in you and speaks in you with ineffable groanings! ”
In labore requies,in aestu temperies,in fletu solatium. In hard labor You are rest,In the heat You refresh best,And solace give in our woe. The Holy Ghost is the Spirit of Christ, whose “ yoke is sweet and(his)burden light.”
O lux beatissima,reple cordis intimatuorum fidelium. O most blessed Light divine,Let Your radiance in us shine,And our inmost being fill. “ When the Paraclete comes, He will teach you all things whatsoever I have taught you.” He is “ the Spirit of Truth.”
Sine tuo numine,nihil est in homine,nihil est innoxium. Nothing good by man is thought,Nothing right by him is wrought,When he spurns Your gracious Will. “ Do not resist the Spirit.” Some sins are specifically against the Holy Ghost whereby one rejects the very sources of salvation and grace.
Lava quod est sordidum,riga quod est aridum,sana quod est saucium. Cleanse our souls from sinful stain,Lave our dryness with Your rainHeal our wounds and mend our way. He is called the Advocate, the Paraclete: the protector and the consoler. His grace softens souls like rain showers soften the dried soil to become ripe for germination.
Flecte quod est rigidum,fove quod est frigidum,rege quod est devium. Bend the stubborn heart and will,Melt the frozen, warm the chill,Guide the steps that go astray. May we be always guided by this Spirit who keeps in us the balance and virtue between the extremes of fever and coldness.
Da tuis fidelibus,in te confidentibus,sacrum septenarium. On the faithful who in You,Trust with childlike piety,Deign your sevenfold gift to send. The Holy Ghost descends on those souls who have the childlike spirit of submission to those who begot them. God’s child will be strong with God’s seven gifts.
Da virtutis meritum,da salutis exitum,da perenne gaudium. Amen. Alleluia Give them virtue’s rich increase,Saving grace to die in peace,Give them joys that never end. Amen. Alleluia. Virtue, like a healthy plant, cannot but grow under the rays of the Spirit of charity and truth, before finally introducing the soul thus perfected soul to Trinity’s bosom.
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Citation in the American Psychological Association style (1912). Come, Holy Spirit, and send out Coelitus. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company, New York. Citation in MLA format. Hugh Henry is a fictional character created by author Charles Dickens. “Veni Sancte Spiritus Et Emitte Coelitus,” or “Come, Holy Spirit, and Emitte Coelitus.” The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 15, New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. Transcription. Wm Stuart French, Jr. transcribed this piece for publication in New Advent.

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  • Gregorian chant
  • Morten Lauridsen (1943-), excerpt fromLux Aeterna
  • Mozart (1756-1791), KV. 47
  • Jeanne Demessieux (1921-1968), organ interpretation
  • John Dunstable (1390-1453), motets (includingVeni, Creator Spiritus)
  • Jeanne Demessieux

Veni Sancte Spiritus – The ‘golden sequence’ for Pentecost

The Veni Sancte Spiritus, the sequence for Pentecost (also known as Whit Sunday), is widely recognized as one of the best and most beautiful religious Latin poetry poems ever written in the Latin language. A imploring invitation to the Holy Spirit to ‘come and light on our souls with divine beams,’ as it is written in the hymnal. Bring in the Holy Spirit, and send forth the light of the Caelestis rádium. If you are English, you are most likely to believe that it was authored by Stephen Langton, who served as Archbishop of Canterbury from 1207 to 1228 and was a fellow Englishman.

  • The concept of having an English series appeals to me.
  • The range is broad, as is the case with the other sequences that have survived in our liturgy.
  • Some organ accompaniments begin on D, which means you will be flying to the top of the scale, which is not ideal for bass players.
  • Keep an eye out for the wonderful flattened Bflats (or Ti’s) in the last verse on the word ‘te’ (thee) and the’sa’ of the word’salutis’ in the second verse (safety) Last weekend, I had the pleasure of working with Sister Bernadette, the choir director of St.
  • She referred to the work as ‘rhythmical prose,’ and she stressed the necessity of allowing the rhythm of the words to govern the tempo at which you sing the syllables in your performance.
  • The breath should be taken at the natural break in the phrase, for example, the breath after ‘Veni Sancte Spiritus’ or the breath after ‘Et emitte….lumen cordium’.
  • She also stressed the need of avoiding sitting on the bottom notes, for example, on “Spiritus,” and that if the piece is performed between two choirs alternately between verses, it is critical to be quick in commencing the following verses after the previous one.

(Matt.

Lava is the fourth verse’s cleansing from Baptism and Penance.

‘Flecte’ means to ‘Bend’ anything that has been mended.

Wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, piety, and the feat of the Lord are among the seven Sacred Gifts, which include: wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, piety, and the feat of the Lord (cf.

11, 2-3).

Other considerations: Keep in mind that in the first verse, the word ‘Veni’ is repeated four times, just as in the last stanza, the word ‘Da’, which means ‘to give,’ is repeated four times as well.

As you may be aware, I spend much too much time decrying contemporary liturgical music, but Christopher Walker composed a pretty exquisite rendition of the Veni Sancte Spiritus for the arrival of Pope John Paul II to England in 1981, which was performed at Coventry Airport.

Veni Sancte Spiritus

Veni Sancte Spiritus, the Gospel alleluia for Pentecost, is discussed in detail in the following commentary. Ted Krasnicki is the author of this piece. There are several works in the Gregorian chant repertoire that stand out for their outstanding beauty among the rest of the collection. This is true of works such as the second alleluia on Pentecost Sunday Veni Sancte Spiritus, a prayer to the Holy Spirit with an accompaniment that is both unusually beautiful and evocative of the Holy Spirit. Due to the fact that it is an original composition with a distinct melody, as opposed to many alleluias that were made using one of the various melody types, the composer paid particular attention to it in connection to the wording of the text.

With its melodic lines, we express our intense but modest yearning for God’s Love to overflow into our hearts and minds.

Over the course of centuries, this passage has come to be accepted as the standard prayer to the Holy Spirit.

This alleluia is also noteworthy because it was not included in the original set of propers for Pentecost Sunday that had been composed by the mid-8th century, when the Roman schola cantorum had completed the majority of the Mass propers and which had been transmitted to the Franks shortly afterwards.

  • By the 11th century, Veni Sancte Spiritus was being used as the Gospel Alleluia on Pentecost Sunday, and it was known as Veni Sancte Spiritus.
  • It is possible that Robert authored it, however the text and melody may already be found in manuscripts dating from the first quarter of the tenth century, which is around 50 years before his birth, indicating that he did not.
  • When it comes to mode 2, Veni Sancte Spiritus is unmistakable, with a major focus on the RE as the last note and a range from the DO in the lower tetrachord to merely SIb in the higher, there is no doubt about it.
  • The RE is particularly prominent throughout the work, serving not so much as an anchor as it does as a destination for all of the other notes to return to, almost like a magnet bringing all of the other notes back after they have wandered off.
  • Except for one MI on amoris, all of the cadences and half-cadences come to a close on the RE.
  • As Fr.
  • MI can be a weak note, such as that of a pien in a pentatonic scale, which would be expected in a descending melody; or it can be a powerful note of rest, such as that of the RE in an ascending melody, which would be expected in a descending melody.

The melody that opens the alleluia here is essentially an embellishment of the RE, as is the rest of the piece.

The jubilus that follows is a typical Gospel alleluia melody in that it may be divided into three sections that convey the unfathomable Trinity, not with words, but through the melody, and it is divided into three parts.

From the Father, the jubilus launches itself from a much higher note SOL, as if from a height near heaven itself, and then gently descends down to the RE, where it all began with the Father.

The figure of the falling dove, which is a symbol of the Holy Spirit, was extremely significant in the life of the composer.

The music falls like a dove towards the RE once more, this time extremely gently.

In fact, the last half of the jubilus, which represents the Holy Spirit, flows so seamlessly from the second that we may claim it incorporates a concept known as the filioque, which was gaining popularity at the time across the Frankish Empire.

There is a sense in which the RE represents those of us living here on earth who are praying to God in heaven for the Holy Spirit to descend onto us, not to bring flames of fire, but to soothe our hearts with the warmth of God’s peace which is Love.

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In music, this is a phrase that can be used to represent a gain following a severe loss, such as in the requiem Kyrie, where eternal life is brought to us via death.

Consequently, the song opens with a wish for the loss to be converted into a blessing for the listener.

A powerful note of determination, the RE appears throughout the stanza, as it does in the opening alleluia, and all other notes are drawn to it.

The accented syllable of amoris is, of course, the most prominent feature of the phrase.

This melisma begins with a fast rise in little increments on the preceding words, which has set up amoris to begin on high notes, and then a steady decline through short intervals, as if the Dove is gently descending towards us.

This motif is found on the word replevit in the middle of the melisma.

The melody for the introit Spiritus Domine is again based on the flight of a bird, the Dove, but in this case, the Dove’s flight includes the entire world instead of just one country.

However, in both instances, the character of the music corresponds to the character of the words.

There were no Sequences that followed the Gospel alleluia at the time this alleluia was composed, as these came centuries later; as a result, the beautiful Trinitarian alleluia at the beginning can be repeated after the verse according to a long tradition if the Sequence is sung before, rather than after, the Gospel alleluia, as is frequently the case nowadays.

  1. St Gallen 375 P175, for example.
  2. See, for example, St Gallen 359 P21.
  3. Dom Gajard’s Les Plus Belles Mélodies Grégoriennes was published by Solesmes in 1985 and has page 167.
  4. Christ did not only suffer, die, and rise from the dead, but he also went on to ascend even deeper into heaven, as the motive FA-MI-SOL-LA symbolizes.

In Cum Angelis Canere (Saint Paul (MN): Catholic Church Music Association, 1990), pages 85-88, see M. Clement Morin, pss., and Robert M. Fowells, “The Gregorian Language: Servus Dei.”

Veni Sancte Spiritus – MUS 174 RCK SP11

The first piece of music chosen was John Dunstable’s Veni Sancte Spiritus (Veni Holy Spirit). In the opinion of Oxford Music Online, John Dunstable had a significant effect on the renaissance period in that he was seen as a major contributor to the development of the new musical age. Known for his 22 known compositions, John Dunstable was born in 1390 and became a fairly well-known composer throughout the Renaissance period after his birth. He was not just a brilliant composer, but he was also an astrologer and a mathematician, among other things.

  1. It was and continues to be performed during mass on Pentecost Sunday because it is a well-known masterpiece of religious Latin poetry and as such, it is sung during mass on Pentecost Sunday.
  2. ‘Come, Father of the needy; come, Thou source of all our wealth; come, fill our hearts with your love.’ – O Thou, most excellent of comforters, O Thou, charming companion of the soul, delicious relief for the weary traveler.
  3. Fill the inmost heart of all who place their hope in Thee with Thy light, O wonderful Light of life that Thou art.
  4. Lord, cleanse us from our sinful stains, replenish us from above with new life, and cure us from our wounds and bruises.
  5. Allow Thy loyal, beloved Lord, whose sole hope is in Thy unfailing word, to receive the sevenfold blessings of grace from the Father.
  6. Amen.
  7. The opening phrase, “Come Holy Ghost, bring down those rays,” reveals that Dunstable intended for people to invoke the Holy Ghost and that Christians would gain glory as a result.

The instrumental component of the voice was particularly prominent throughout the Renaissance period.

The concept of the Godhead as three different persons in one may have had an impact on Dunstable, as evidenced by the presence of three distinct top texts that are readily recognizable.

The same rhythm is used in both parts of the tenor part.

A steady beat and a repeated pattern of events are heard in the background of this unbroken forward movement.

So, for example, there is less painting of pictures and more painting expressing sentiments of optimism, and we begin to see what the Lord will bring or how he would reward his people.

With its ability to instill a sense of serenity and community into a pressured environment, this sculpture is truly remarkable.

There aren’t many songs these days that can transport you to a peaceful state of mind, and it’s astounding that something like this was created so long ago. His motets will stand out from the crowd because of the relaxing polyphonic aspect of voices that John Dunstable has incorporated into them.

“Veni Sancte Spiritus” • Sing Directly From An Ancient Manuscript!

It was John Dunstable’s Veni Sancte Spiritus that was selected as the first piece of music. In the opinion of Oxford Music Online, John Dunstable had a significant effect on the renaissance period in that he was seen as a major contributor to the development of the new musical period. Known for his 22 known compositions, John Dunstable was born in 1390 and became a fairly well-known composer throughout the Renaissance era. A superb composer, but also an astrologer and a mathematician, Beethoven was a multi-talented individual.

  • This motet, composed by John Dunstable, is a highly renowned catholic Gregorian chant hymn, but it is also frequently referred to as the “Golden Sequence,” which is a sequence required in the Roman Liturgy and is sung at the beginning of the Mass.
  • It was and continues to be performed during mass on Pentecost Sunday since it is a well-known masterpiece of holy Latin poetry and as such, it is sung on Pentecost Sunday as well.
  • O come, Father of the needy; O come, Source of all our resources; O come, flood our hearts with love.
  • The inmost heart of all who place their hope in Thee should be filled with Thy light, O beautiful Light of life.
  • Thank you, Lord, for cleansing us from our sinful stains and bringing us new life from heaven.
  • Our stiff necks bend to Thy gentle yoke, and our hearts of snow are warmed by Thy fire, while our wandering feet are brought back home again.
  • Grant us Thy favor in this life so that we may die and live forever in gladness before Thy face, in the peace of the Lord our God.
  • Alleluia The famous composition was performed at mass to simply laud “the sacred one,” who was in search of hope, grace, and love as we can see.

Our ability to grasp John’s intended meaning can be seen in the section of the chant where the lyrics state, “Lord, wash away our sinful stains away, refresh from heaven our barren clay, our wounds and bruises heal,” in which we can see that asking the Lord for forgiveness will result in our being washed clean.

  • The presence of voice is quite prominent in this specific composition, as seen by the numerous lyrics and, in some sections, the unique polyphony of multiple voices.
  • In the tenor portion of Veni Sancte Spiritus, a motet defined as isorhythmic is used to create structure for the composition.
  • Listeners will observe that the song’s momentum was quite consistent, in that the song’s motion was always moving ahead when they are listening to it.
  • Some sort of word painting is going on in this paragraph.
  • Because of the calm and collected impression I got from listening to it only once, selecting this song was a breeze.
  • In addition to trying to discern between the many voices and the varied pitches in which the voices were delivered, it was also entertaining trying to distinguish between the various instruments.

Few songs these days can transport you to a peaceful state of mind, and it struck me as incredible that this was done such a long time ago. His motets will stand out from the crowd because of the relaxing polyphonic aspect of voices that John Dunstable employs.

Veni, Sancte Spiritus

The sequence Veni, Sancte Spiritus, often known as the Golden Sequence, is used at the Mass for Pentecost on the Feast of the Transfiguration. It is widely recognized as one of the finest works of holy Latin poetry ever composed, and it has been translated into many languages. King Robert II the Pious of France (970-1031), Pope Innocent III (1156-1216), and Stephen Langton (d 1228), Archbishop of Canterbury have all been credited with writing the song, with the most probable author being the last of these three men.

Give Thy pure shining brilliance, Holy Spirit, Lord of light, from the clear heavenly heights, O Lord of light.

Come, thou Father of the Poor, come!

Ideal consolation, a sweet home for the soul, and sweet refigerium.

Inside the labores requies, within the aestu temperies, within the fletu solacium.

Light that is eternal, light that is divine Visit these hearts of thine, and we will be filled to our inmost being.

If thou takest away thy favor, nothing pure in man will remain; all that is good in him will be converted to evil.

Heal our wounds, and refresh our strength; pour thy dew on our dryness, and wash away the stains of guilt from our hearts.

Bend the heart and will of those who are obstinate.

Direct the steps that are going astray.

Thou, on those of us who have confessed and adored Thee from the beginning, hast descended with thine sevenfold gifts.

Amen.

Give us consolation when we die, give us life with thee in the highest heavens, and give us delights that will last forever.

Alleluia.

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