Where Did The Motherwell Bois Come Up With War Chant

The origin of Iceland’s incredible ‘Viking’ war chant? Motherwell…

Players and supporters from Iceland’s 330,000-strong crowd celebrated their last-16 triumph over England on Monday night, erupting in applause throughout the continent with a collective “Huh.” Iceland’s thunderclap may resemble an ancient Viking war cry, but it is in reality a celebration with Scottish origins that has been popular in recent years. Fans of Motherwell were the inspiration for this piece. Similar to the oars of a Gokstad ship building up to battlelike velocity, Iceland is inspired and the opponent is frozen as the synchronised clap and ‘Huh’ climb to a spine-tingling crescendo, and the opposition is frozen.

‘Huh’ – Iceland via Motherwell

Icelandic newspaper Morgunblai claims that the cry has absolutely no connection to Iceland’s Viking heritage, and that it was invented by a sports team at the newspaper. Instead, the Scottish Premier League is played. It was told to The Irish Times that Icelandic team Stjarnan embarked on a fantastic Europa League qualification campaign in 2014, which culminated in a heartbreaking playoff loss to Inter Milan. They came across Motherwell on their journey and defeated them 5-4 on aggregate. And it was during the first 2-2 draw in Fir Park that the Icelanders were first exposed to the chant, which is equal parts horrifying and fascinating.

Since then, Iceland has faced the Netherlands, Turkey, the Czech Republic, Portugal, and England in their quest to advance to the last eight of the Euro 2016 tournament in France.

They’re undoubtedly making their presence known in the community.

The odd origins of Iceland’s primal, heart-stopping Viking war chant

Icelandic newspaper Morgunblai claims that the cry has absolutely no connection to Iceland’s Viking heritage, and that it was created by a sports team at the newspaper. Scottish Premier League, to be specific. It was told to The Irish Times that Icelandic team Stjarnan embarked on a fantastic Europa League qualification campaign in 2014, which culminated in a heartbreaking playoff defeat to Inter Milan. They came up against Motherwell on the way and defeated them 5-4 on aggregate in the process.

From here, their mesmerized fan group – the Silver Spoons (yes, they’re from the affluent side of Garabr, apparently) – carried the chant back home and then taught it to the national team’s supporter club for the Euro 2016 qualification season.

The smallest country to ever compete in a major tournament was the Republic of the Philippines (RP). Certainly, they’re making their presence known. Iceland jerseys were completely sold out in Ireland by Tuesday noon!

Iceland’s ‘Viking war chant’ originated in Scotland

According to the sports staff of Icelandic daily Morgunblai, however, the cry has absolutely no connection to the country’s Viking heritage. Instead, the Scottish Premier League is being played. They stated to The Irish Times that in 2014, Icelandic team Stjarnan embarked on a Cinderella Europa League qualification campaign, which culminated in a playoff defeat to Inter Milan. They came upon Motherwell along the route and defeated them 5-4 on aggregate. And it was during the original 2-2 tie in Fir Park that the Icelanders were first exposed to the chant, which is equal parts horrifying and fascinating.

As a result, Iceland has faced a number of difficult opponents like the Netherlands, Turkey, the Czech Republic, Portugal, and England in their quest to reach the final eight of Euro 2016.

Certainly, they are making their presence known.

Iceland’s ‘Viking War Cry’ Is Cool, But Where It Came From Will Surprise You

According to the sports staff of Icelandic daily Morgunblai, however, the cry has absolutely no connection to the country’s Viking origins. Instead, the Scottish Premier League will be played. They stated to The Irish Times that in 2014, Icelandic team Stjarnan embarked on a fantastic Europa League qualification campaign that culminated in a heartbreaking playoff defeat to Inter Milan. They came across Motherwell on the road and defeated them 5-4 on aggregate. And it was during the original 2-2 tie at Fir Park that the Icelanders were first exposed to the chant, which is equal parts horrifying and fascinating.

Since then, Iceland has played the Netherlands, Turkey, the Czech Republic, Portugal, and England in their quest to reach the last eight of Euro 2016.

They’re certainly making their presence known.

Iceland’s Viking War Clap: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Iceland’s notorious war clap is captured on film by Getty Images. Iceland’s viking war clap has become a renowned battle cry, and it was made famous by Icelandic supporters during the Euro 2016 tournament. The horrifying scream immediately became a worldwide hit, eventually finding its way to the United States, where the Minnesota Vikings adopted it as their own battle cry. Being in the audience while the chant is carried out by tens of thousands of Icelandic soccer supporters is truly a sight to witness, with thousands of arms clapping in unison and spectators shouting a thundering “HUH” into the sky.

The victory celebration has become a standard habit for winning teams at Euro 2016, but where did the song come from in the first place? You should be familiar with Iceland’s Viking War Chant, which is as follows:

1. The Clap Became Famously Popular After Iceland Beat England in the 2016 European Championship

  • Iconic war clap by Icelandic soldiers. Image courtesy of Getty Images After becoming a renowned battle cry during the Euro 2016 tournament, Icelandic supporters adopted the viking war clap as their rallying cry. As the horrifying scream spread throughout the world, it got it to the United States, where the Minnesota Vikings adopted it as their own battle cry. Being in the audience while the chant is carried out by tens of thousands of Icelandic soccer supporters is truly a sight to witness, with thousands of arms clapping in unison and spectators shouting a thundering “HUH” into the air. What started as a custom for winning teams at Euro 2016 has now become standard practice, but where did the song originate? You should be familiar with Iceland’s Viking War Chant, which includes the following information:

2. The Chant Originated in Scotland During a Europa League Game Between Iceland’s ReykjavikScotland’s Motherwell

  • Getty Following their defeat to France in the Euro 2016 quarter-final football match between France and Iceland the day before, the Iceland national football team celebrated during a welcoming ceremony in Reykjavik on July 4, 2016. The match took place the day before. Karl Petersson / AFP / Stockholm (The photo credit should be changed to read Image courtesy of KARL PETERSSON/AFP/Getty Images However, according to Icelandic journal Morgunbladid, “the song was adopted by Icelandic club Stjarnan on a trip to Scottish side, Motherwell” despite the fact that Iceland’s copy of the chant gained international fame during the Euros. In an article published by The Telegraph, it is stated that fans of the Reykjavik-based team were “first exposed to the horrifying terrace song during a Europa League match against Scottish Premier League side, Motherwell.” After a while, Motherwell’s slow-cap develops into the club’s signature song, ‘Since I Was Young.’ In spite of the fact that they were finally eliminated from the Europa League by Inter Milan, Icelandic supporters introduced the clap to their national team, which adopted it after their victory over England in 2016. The following is the original video of the Scottish version: Since I Was a Child, I’ve been a fan of Motherwell Bois. Motherwell has been singing since I was a child, but after the section clapped twice after the drum beat and sped up, I was surprised. Motherwell defeated league leaders Celtic 2-1 in a thrilling match that included outstanding performances from both the squad and the spectators. 2013-03-07T01:11:30.000Z
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3. The Minnesota Vikings Eventually Adopted the ChantMade it Their Own, Replacing the Traditional “HUH” with a Thunderous “SKOL”

  • Following its passage through Europe, the war chant finally found its way to America, where it was adopted as the official anthem of the Minnesota Vikings NFL football club. Following the viral video of the Icelandic national team and its supporters performing the shout together, Vikings fans contacted the team to inquire about the possibility of the team adopting the slogan. According to Iceland Magazine, the squad solicited the help of Iceland soccer team captain Aron Gunnarsson as well as strongman and actor Hafór “Thor” Björnsson, who portrays “The Mountain” in the HBO series Game of Thrones, to get the chant going. The Minnesota Vikings played the Green Bay Packers in their first game at their new U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis. The game was the team’s home opener. The Vikings made several slight modifications to the chant in order to make it their own, such as substituting the conventional “HUH” with a loud “SKOL” (skál is Icelandic for “cheers” or “a toast”). According to Wikipedia, this is a reference to the words of the Vikings’ fight song, “Skol, Vikings,” which has been associated with the team from about the time of its founding in 1961. The following video shows Vikings supporters chanting their own version of the war cry when General Jon Jensen of the Minnesota National Guard blows the Gjallarhorn before to kickoff: Gjallarhorn, Skol Chant Fire Up Fans Pregame Preparations for Sunday’s game began with the sounding of the Gjallarhorn by Major General Jon Jensen of the Minnesota National Guard, followed by Jensen and Jared Allen leading spectators in the Skol Chant before kickoff. More Vikings videos may be found at vikings.com/videos. 2017-11-21T13:47:22.000Z

4. New Zealand’s HakaTonga’s Sipi Tau Are Both Popular War Chants Often Performed Before Rugby Games

  • Getty New Zealand All Blacks captain Sam Whitelock leads the haka during their International Test match against France on June 16, 2018 at Westpac Stadium in Wellington, New Zealand. (Image courtesy of Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images) ) In sports across the world, war cries and chants have long been popular, and rugby is perhaps the most well-known application of this tradition. It is said in theLad Bible that these dances and screams “come from traditional tribes and cultures in each individual country and have a true tale behind them, with traditional tribes and cultures in the Pacific Nations adopting these dances and cries the most.” The Sipi Tau of Tonga and the famed Haka of New Zealand are the most well-known of these dances. The Samoans also have their own national anthem, the Siva Tau, which is also used by the national Australian football team. TheHakaoriginated as a traditional battle cry of the Mori people, who are descended from aboriginal peoples from the country of New Zealand. a posture dance done by a group, with forceful motions and stomping of the feet to rhythmically chanted accompaniment, that is employed as a technique to scare adversaries prior to combat Is this the greatest haka in history? The French squad formed an arrow before of the Rugby World Cup 2011 final in New Zealand, as the All Blacks conducted their pre-match custom – the haka – before the contest. To keep up with World Rugby on social media, follow the following accounts: TWITTER.COM/RUGBYWORLDCUP FACEBOOK.COM/RUGBYWORLDCUP WWW.TWITTER.COM/WORLDRUGBY FACEBOOK.COM/WORLDUGBY INSTAGRAM.COM/WORLDRUGBY 2015-06-18T16:07:09.000Z
  • The Sipi Tau, also known as theKailko, performs a similar function in Tongan culture, serving as an expression of a war cry that dates back to the 1800s, when there were no obstacles before the start of World War I. When Tongan rugby teams initially adopted the war cry is unknown, however it has become increasingly common for teams to perform before significant games in recent years. In 2017, Tonga Sipi Tau – Mate Ma’a Tonga will be held. WHAT DO YOU RECOMMEND I DO NEXT? THANK YOU FOR YOUR LIKE AND SUBSCRIBE 2017-10-09T04:15:39.000Z

5. The Icelandic Chant Was So Popular that Other European Teams Started Adopting the Chant as Well

  • Ingolfstorg plaza in the center of Reykjavik is packed with Iceland’s national team football players and coaching staff following the FIFA World Cup 2018 qualifying football match against Kosovo on October 9, 2017. The match was played in Reykjavik on the island of Iceland’s capital. Defeating Kosovo in Reykjavik by a score of 2-0, Iceland qualified for the FIFA World Cup 2018 as the world’s smallest country in history. Halldor KOLBEINS is shown in this AFP photo. (The photo credit should read HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP/Getty Images rather than HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP/Getty Images.) ) Since the 2016 European Championships, several teams around Europe have adopted Iceland’s version of the battle chant. As reported by the Telegraph, Wales celebrated their quarter-final victory over Belgium with an impromptu version of the Icelandic celebration, while France similarly celebrated their semi-final victory over Germany with their own copy of the Icelandic celebration. According to the Daily Mail, despite the fact that Iceland borrowed the war cry from Scotland, there is some suggestion that the war cry may also have Polish origins. A number of people have drawn parallels between the chant and the extremely successful and artistically stunning film “300,” saying that it is similar to the war cry of the Spartan army featured in the film. Check out the following videos for additional examples of the Icelandic chant: Iceland holds a spectacular homecoming party for their Euro 2016 squad, in which they execute the ultimate “Viking war chant.” After being ousted from the Euro 2016 competition, the Icelandic national football team comes home to a rousing reception from the home crowd. CREDIT: Icelandic Football Association (FAI). FOR LICENSING INQUIRIES, PLEASE CONTACT ruptly.tv. COURTESY: RT’s RUPTLY video agency
  • NO RE-UPLOADING OR RE-USE ALLOWED. RT LIVE is available at rt.com/on-air. Join Russia Today on YouTube at youtube.com/subscription center?add user=RussiaToday. Subscribe to RT News on Facebook at facebook.com/RTnews. Keep up with us on Twitter… 2016-07-04T20:53:36.000Z
  • Video The following video is connected to Iceland’s viking war clap: 5 quick things you should be aware of 2018-06-16T11:09:40-04:00
  • Iceland’s epic Viking war cry is heard by 10,000 supporters as the squad prepares to depart for Euro 2016. The image is from of siminn.is Epic Viking war cry: 10,000 supporters pay respect to Iceland’s squad as they leave the Euro 2016 tournament, stealing the hearts of soccer fans all over the world with their shout. RT Rt.com/on-air is broadcasting in real time. Join Russia Today on YouTube at youtube.com/subscription center?add user=RussiaToday. Like us on Facebook if you want to keep up with us. facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter for the latest updates. twitter.com/RT com Follow us on Instagram to stay up to date. instagram.com/rt Please follow us on Google+ (plus.google.com/+RT) and Twitter. Listen to what we have to say on… 2016-07-04T18:26:08.000Z
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The Viking war chant that originated in… Scotland! Iceland’s mighty clap celebration and chants of ‘huh’ performed after Euro 2016 wins was inspired by Motherwell fans

Iceland players and fans’ frightening claps and ominous cries of ‘huh’ following victory in Euro 2016 have been compared to a Viking war cry, according to some. However, it has since been found that the unique celebration was in fact inspired by supporters of Scottish team Motherwell, which is a highly improbable source of inspiration. Iceland’s national team performed a slow clap after Arnor Ingvi Traustason’s last-minute winner at Stade de France secured qualification from Group F with a 2-1 victory against Austria.

  1. When Iceland defeated England in the European Championship final, it was considered to be one of the biggest upsets in European Championship history.
  2. The claps themselves get more rapid before the celebration reaches its climax, at which point both fans and players begin to applaud enthusiastically.
  3. After hearing the song during a match against Motherwell in 2014, fans of Stjarnan, a Reykjavik-based team that competes in Iceland’s top division, became fans of the cry.
  4. It is believed that the tremendous song, which is not of Viking origin, has been recited on the terraces of Fir Park, in North Lanarkshire, for many years.
  5. The claps get more rapid before the celebration reaches its zenith and supporters and players begin to applaud.
  6. Despite the fact that Stjarnan were eventually eliminated from the competition by Italian giants Inter Milan, its fans elected to take the chant home with them as a keepsake.
  7. In recent years, the celebration has become synonymous with the country’s success in the competition, especially after they recently performed it after defeating England in the final 16 of the tournament.

It was a Motherwell supporter’s rendition of the song ‘Since I Was Young’ that inspired the thunderous clap that has become iconic with Iceland’s Euro 2016 triumph. Iceland will face France in the quarterfinals of Euro 2016 on Sunday, July 3, after defeating England in the previous round.

The Real Story of How The Seminole War Chant Was Started

Iceland players and fans’ frightening claps and ominous cries of ‘huh’ following victory in Euro 2016 have been compared to a Viking war cry, according to a recent report. It has since been found that the unique celebration was in fact inspired by supporters of Scottish side Motherwell, which is an incredibly improbable origin. Iceland’s national squad performed a slow clap after Arnor Ingvi Traustason’s last-minute winner at Stade de France secured qualification from Group F with a 2-1 win against Austria.

  • When Iceland defeated England in the European Championship final, it was considered to be one of the greatest upsets in the tournament’s history.
  • Prior to reaching its peak, the claps themselves accelerate in pace, and both fans and players begin to scream in delight.
  • A trip to Motherwell in 2014 resulted in a cry being adopted by the supporters of Stjarnan, a Reykjavik-based team that compete in Iceland’s top division.
  • It is believed that the tremendous song, which is not of Viking origin, has been recited on the terraces of Fir Park, in North Lanarkshire, for several decades.
  • Moreover, while it is done by a lot of teams, Motherwell are unusual in that its supporters, known as the Bois, initiate the slow clap to kick off the performance.
  • The seismic clap was later presented to national team fans, who adopted it for the squad’s Euro 2016 qualifying campaign in the following season.
  • Iceland will now face France in the Euro 2016 Quarter Finals on Sunday, July 3, in the country’s stadium.
  • On Sunday, July 3, Iceland will face France in the quarterfinals of Euro 2016, following their victory against England.

Icelandic “thunder clap” … smallest football team of Euro 2016 creates the biggest legacy

Iceland’s incredible run to the quarter-finals of Euro 2016 has surely been one of the most remarkable tales of the competition. Because of the Scandinavians’ lion-slaying feats and exuberant commentators, the rest of Europe has adopted the country as their second team, despite its small population of 330,000 people. Iceland scored a stunning loss on England on their route to an unexpected quarterfinal game against France. However, despite the harm they have done to the psyche of English football, Iceland has captured the hearts of the entire continent.

Lars Lagerback’s side eventually lost to hosts France in the quarter-finals, but thousands of people gathered in the Reykjavik fanzone to show their support with a final “Viking” war chant that, along with the team’s achievements, has garnered widespread public attention throughout the world in recent weeks.

  1. In the aftermath of Iceland’s dramatic last-gasp goal against Austria, which ensured their qualification for the last 16, the menacing slow chant, followed by an unified single clap, initially attracted notice.
  2. The celebration has proven to be so popular that it has been adopted by other European countries participating in the competition.
  3. The cry was used by the hosts France to commemorate their semi-final triumph against Germany in the World Cup.
  4. Icelandic journal Morgunbladid reports that Icelandic team Stjarnan adopted the song during a match against Scottish side Motherwell in 2012.
  5. Motherwell’s slow-cap then grows into the club’s signature song, ‘Since I Was Young,’ which has become a club classic.

Despite being eliminated from the Europa League by Inter Milan, Icelandic supporters were instrumental in bringing the clap to the attention of their national team. Below you will find the original version in all of its splendor: More content from the blog

Iceland at the 2018 World Cup: What to know about that awesome viking chant, including its origins

Iceland, with a population of 330,000 people, may be the smallest country to ever qualify for the FIFA World Cup, but its supporters are more vocal than those of virtually any other side. It’s always fascinating to see teams make their World Cup debuts, but there’s a special mystique surrounding Iceland this year because of the customary chants that will be released throughout the tournament. We’re especially talking to the viking clap, which is an epic cry that occurs after games in which the players unite with the crowd by clapping their hands over their shoulders.

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The Minnesota Vikings are the most well-known American football team that have adopted the phrase.

Where did the Icelandic viking chant come from?

A common myth, according to The Telegraph, is that the song represents the adoption of a pre-battle war cry by the troops. In actuality, the chant has considerably more humble origins and has only been around for four years, according to its creators. Icelandic soccer club Stjarnan competed in a match against Motherwell in Scotland in 2014, and the squad was first exposed to the song thanks to the support of Motherwell’s supporters. The composition developed into Motherwell’s song, “Since I Was Young,” which is now available on iTunes.

It looked somewhat like this:

So, what does the thunderclap chant look like?

Now, it appears as follows:This was the homecoming party for Iceland’s incredible run through the Euro 2016 tournament. The most important part of the chant is to keep the tempo. The procedure for performing the chant is, on the whole, uncomplicated.

  • The drummer strikes the drum twice, and the audience answers with a “HUH” and a clap. Drummer waits many beats before pounding twice again to get the same reaction
  • Drummer continues to pound twice, gradually increasing the speed of his strokes when he goes again. Every second beat, the crowd responds
  • The drummer shortens the spacing between drum beats until it becomes incessant clapping, ending in one loud “HUH.”

Simple? Yes, if you can maintain your beat. Terrifying? Rhythm be damned, this is unquestionably true. A sight to behold in such a large group of people.

Have other teams adopted the chant?

The Minnesota Vikings, who have a “SKOL” shout that follows a similar rhythm, are the most renowned team to have its own take on the chant. It’s one of the few chants that has the ability to successfully captivate a whole stadium audience. American supporters aren’t exactly known for keeping up with their teams, yet Vikings fans manage to do so. Then you’ll be cursed to lose in the NFC playoffs because you made fun of it, because football’s gods are unkind to those who ridicule them. Unless, of course, you’re a member of the Philadelphia Eagles (it took me several videos to find one without cursing, shout-out to Philly).

Nevertheless, it is something to look forward to throughout this World Cup.

When they get to the worldwide stage, they’ll be eager to show the rest of the world what they’ve learned.

Viking chant me arse

It was the so-called ‘Viking battle cry’ that captivated Europe when Iceland upset England in one of the biggest shocks in the history of international football. It was the first time the chant had been heard outside of Scandinavia. Players and tens of thousands of supporters joined together in a thunderous clapping performance that appeared to be based on some sort of medieval ceremony. However, its origins are really a little closer to England than most people realize. In the town of Motherwell.

  1. Motherwell Bois, the supporters’ organisation of the Scottish Premiership team, has been doing this for some years.
  2. So, how did it make the transition from relative obscurity in the stands at Fir Park to international acclaim at the Cannes Film Festival?
  3. Since since, it has brought nothing but good fortune to both Stjarnan and Iceland, whose supporters adopted the mascot from the club team.
  4. Iceland went on to qualify for their first major international event with the assistance of a double victory over Holland in the qualifiers, before navigating their way into the last 16 and a match with England in the main competition.

The rest, as they say, is history. Meanwhile, back in Motherwell, supporters no likely took pleasure in the Icelandic festivities for a variety of reasons…

Revealed: the origin of Iceland’s ‘Viking Thunder-Clap’ celebration

Iceland’s incredible run to the quarter-finals of Euro 2016 has surely been one of the most remarkable tales of the competition. Because of the Scandinavians’ lion-slaying feats and exuberant commentators, the rest of Europe has adopted the country as their second team, despite its small population of 330,000 people. During their journey to an unexpected quarterfinal match against France, Iceland delivered one of the most devastating losses in the history of English football on Roy Hodgson’s team, ultimately losing him his job as manager.

In addition, the – now legendary – “Thunderclap” celebration, which is sure to make an appearance in the Premier League next season, will be their most lasting legacy.

The victory celebration has become a standard habit for winning teams at Euro 2016, but where did the song come from in the first place?

The claps and chants get increasingly rapid until culminating in a final clap followed by a yell of ‘huh!’ at the conclusion of the performance.

Immediately following their quarter-final victory over Belgium, Wales performed an improvised rendition of the Icelandic celebration.

It has been described as a “Viking war chant,” and the majority of people believe that the song is derived from an old pre-battle rite.

The horrifying terrace cry was first heard by fans of the Reykjavik-based team during a Europa League match against Motherwell of the Scottish Premier League.

Despite being eliminated from the Europa League by Inter Milan, Icelandic supporters were instrumental in bringing the clap to the attention of their national team.

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