Where Did The Rock Chalk Chant Come From

Rock Chalk, Jayhawk – Wikipedia

“Rock Chalk, Jayhawk” (also known as the “Rock Chalk” cry) is a chant that is used at athletic events involving the University of Kansas Jayhawks. In the chant, the words “Rock chalk, Jayhawk, KU” are repeated over and over.

History

The science club of the university was the first to use the chant, which was first used in 1886. A group of chemistry professors were returning by rail to Lawrence after attending a symposium in Chicago. During their journey, they talked about the importance of a rousing cry. They came up with the phrase “Rah, Rah, Jayhawk, Go KU,” which they chanted three times and then changed to “Rock Chalk Jayhawk, Go KU.” As of 1889, “Rock Chalk,” a transposition of chalk rock, a type of limestone found in the Cretaceous-age bedrocks of central and western parts of the state and which is similar to the coccolith-bearing chalk of the White Cliffs of Dover, had supplanted the two “rahs.” By 1889, the two “rahs” had been replaced by “Rock Chalk.” In addition, the University is situated on the ridge of flintyCarboniferous limestone known as Mount Oread, which is employed in the construction of several structures.

The individuals responsible for the transformation are uncertain; Bailey himself attributes it to the geology department, while others attribute it to an English professor.

The 1911 Border Warfootball game drew more than 1,000 spectators who gathered in downtown Lawrence to see a telegraph “broadcast” of the game and partake in shouts such as the Rock Chalk.

The Rock Chalk chant, according to former United States President Theodore Roosevelt, is the finest college cry he has ever heard.

Usage

Fans have interpreted the word “Rock Chalk” in a variety of ways, including the creation of Rock “Chocolate” Jayhawk ice cream. It is most well-known for being yelled at basketball games at Allen Fieldhouse and football games at University of Kansas Memorial Stadium, where it can be heard well. Before each game, the chant “Rock chalk. Jay-Hawk. KU” is sung twice slowly and then three times fast, beginning with the first. In most cases, it is preceded by the Kansas alma mater, “Crimson & Blue,” and followed by the battle song, “I’m a Jayhawk.” KU fans have been known to do the steady repeat of “Rock chalk.

KU” since the early 1990s, when the Jayhawks are considered to be comfortably ahead and a victory is certain.

References

For as long as I can remember, I’ve been a supporter of the Kansas basketball team (well, okay since high school anyway). And I’ve been hearing the chorus for a long time. I used to believe it was “Rock, Jock, Jayhawk” because, after all, what the hell is “Rock Chalk” meant to signify, anyway? I found out today, as it turns out. It’s actually a pretty interesting story to hear. Oh. Whoops. It’s possible that you have no idea what I’m talking about.

“Rock, Chalk, Jayhawk KU” is the world-famous cry heard at Kansas University’s college games, and it is sung by thousands of people every year. The silence is terrible. It is quite plain and defined here: Jayhawk is a rock and chalk artist. And here’s what I learned about it while researching it:

  • A chemistry instructor called E.H.S. Bailey created it in 1886 for the scientific club
  • It was initially titled “Rah, Rah Jayhawk, KU”
  • It was later changed to “Rock Chalk” because….drumroll please…chalk rock is the name of the limestone that surrounds the KU campus! (Yeah, I know, it’s a little strange. Rock Jock is a much more logical choice. (However, keep in mind that this was for a science club at the time.) Teddy Roosevelt proclaimed it to be the finest college chant he had ever heard (the only question is whether he thought it was called Rock Jock or Rock Chalk? And, more importantly, was he a scientific club nerd who genuinely understood what it meant?)
  • According to rumor, the chant was really utilized during battle in the Philippines in 1899, the Boxer Rebellion in China, and World War II. In the 1920 Olympics, the King of Belgium requested a typical American college scream, and KU’s Rock Chalk was picked. I’m curious whether the Jayhawk mascot traveled from another country for this…

Despite this, I still believe Rock Jock makes more sense! *All material was located on theKU: Traditions of the Universitywebsite.

How was KU’s ‘Rock chalk, Jayhawk’ cheer born?

It has the ability to send shivers down the spines of players on rival teams. WATCH: The cry “Rock Chalk, Jayhawk, KU” begins quietly and then builds in volume and intensity until it reaches a near-frenzy. Theodore Roosevelt (a Harvard graduate) is claimed to have regarded it as “the best college cheer that has ever been conceived,” according to a Kansas University history. There are a number of different origin legends for the chant, all of which have some common features. Wikipedia The university’s scientific club adopted the song in 1886, and it has been used ever since.

Bailey, a chemistry professor, and his colleagues came up with the phrase “Rah, Rah, Jayhawk, Go KU,” which they chanted three times and then changed to “Rock Chalk Jayhawk, KU.” ‘Rock Chalk’, a transposition of chalk rock, a form of limestone that exists on Mount Oread (where the University is located), was later used to replace the two ‘rahs,’ which were removed in 1889.

  1. Dictionary of the Urban “Back in the day, KU science teachers came up with this catchphrase.
  2. In addition, chalk is about the only thing that rhymes with jayhawk in this context.
  3. Bailey invented a shout for the Kansas Institution scientific club that became known as the Rock Chalk Chant.
  4. Bailey’s rendition consisted of the words ‘Rah, Rah, Jayhawk, KU’ repeated three times in a row.
  5. An essay concerning the origins of the cry “Rock chalk, Jayhawk, KU” was shared to us by a university spokesman.
  6. Hersey of the University of Kansas Department of History, examines the Bailey and chalk rock topics.
  7. “It was believed that the yells came from the clicking of a train’s wheels as heard from the’swaying railway car’ across the plains, to alleged chalk rock outcroppings atop Mt.
  8. (In 1956, the geology department pointed out that, while such outcroppings did not occur on the hill, they can be found in western Kansas, despite the fact that they did not exist on the hill).” Watch this video to hear the story from Prof.
See also:  What Do The Pacer Fans Chant At George

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“Rock Chalk, Jayhawk” (also known as the “Rock Chalk” cry) is a chant that is used at sporting events involving the University of Kansas Jayhawks. In the chant, the words “Rock chalk, Jayhawk, KU” are repeated over and over. The science club of the university was the first to use the chant, which was first used in 1886. Faculty members from the Department of Chemistry were returning to Lawrence by train after attending a symposium in Chicago. During their journey, they talked about the importance of a rousing cry.

Later, in 1889, the term “Rock Chalk” was used to refer to a transposition of chalk rock, a type of limestone, that exists in the Cretaceous-age bedrocks of the central and western parts of the state, as well as on Mount Oread, where the University is located, and is similar to the coccolith-bearing chalk of the white cliffs of Dover.

  1. It was used by Kansas troops in the Philippine-American War in 1899, the Boxer Rebellion, and World War II, among other conflicts.
  2. Albert I of Belgium requested a traditional American college cry during the 1920 Summer Olympics, and the gathered athletes responded by chanting it in response to his request.
  3. During the pregame, the chant “Rock chalk…
  4. KU” is sung twice slowly, then three times fast, before the game begins.

Jay-Hawk… KU” since the early 1980s, especially when the Jayhawks are perceived to be comfortably ahead and a victory is assured. Report

Traditions

The Jayhawk has a rich history. Mascots, particularly those of sporting teams, are thought to bring good fortune. Almost every college and institution has a mascot that they are proud of. The Jayhawk, a legendary bird with a rich history, may be seen on the campus of the University of Kansas. The Jayhawk’s origins may be traced back to the historic struggles of Kansas settlers in the 1800s. The word “Jayhawk” is believed to have been originated about 1848. In that year, accounts of its use surfaced from Illinois to Texas, and a group of pioneers traversing what is now Nebraska dubbed themselves “The Jayhawkers of ’49” for their efforts.

  • Takeaway message: Do not turn your back on this bird.
  • The area served as a battleground between those who desired a state in which slavery would be lawful and abolitionists who want a state free of the institution of slavery.
  • Jayhawkers were a term used to refer to thugs on both sides for a period of time.
  • Over the course of the American Civil War, the jay-wild hawk’s and woolly look gave way to a patriotic emblem.
  • By the end of the war, the term “Jayhawk” had become associated with the zealous individuals who had helped to establish Kansas as a Free State.
  • And when Kansas football players came to the field for the first time in 1890, it seemed only natural to refer to them as Jayhawkers.
  • For many years, fans were perplexed by this question.

He handed it a pair of shoes.

Of course, this is for kicking opponents.

Jimmy O’Bryon and George Hollingbery created a Jayhawk that looked like a duck in 1923.

Calvin created a grim-faced bird with talons that were capable of maiming people in 1929.

That of a smiling Jayhawk, created by Harold D.

In 1947, the design was protected by a copyright.

When the University of Kansas Alumni Association donated a mascot suit in the 1960s, the Jayhawk became a three-dimensional character.

An enormous egg was dragged out to the 50-yard line at half-time of the 1971 Homecoming game, and the hatching of Big Jay’s buddy, Baby Jay, was observed by the audience.

A piece of birdlike iconography on the exterior of Dyche Hall, which was built in 1901, has been compared to a Jayhawk.

The statue was a gift from the Class of 1956.

Colors of the School The colors of the University of Kansas, crimson and blue, have been in use since the early 1890s, but they were not the colors initially chosen by the Board of Regents of the university in the 1860s.

Early oratorical competitions employed the colors maize and blue, and it is possible that they were also used when Kansas participated in rowing in the middle of the 1880s.

McCook, who happened to be a Harvard alumnus who had donated money to build a stadium at KU.

Until then, Kansas football games were held at Central Park, which is located on Massachusetts Street in the heart of downtown Lawrence.

The supporters came out in force to support the crimson and blue on their squad.

At long last, in May 1896, the Kansas Athletic Board chose the colors red and blue as the official team colors of the University of Kansas.

Since then, only minor adjustments have been made to the lyrics, which now feature rival schools from the Big Eight Conference.

Future modifications to the conference schedule will not automatically need additional adjustments to the lyrics.

The song is about the Sooners, the Cowboys, and the seven other rivals who have stayed in the evolving Big 12 Conference.

His lyrics change the first verse and one line of the chorus, which are as follows: “I’m a Jayhawk,” written by Matt Schoenfeld in October 2010.

Talk about the Wildcats and the Cyclone lads, and you’ll get the picture.

Chorus: ‘Cause I’m a Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay, Jayhawk,’ I’m a Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay, Jayhawk,’ I’m a Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay, Jayhawk,’ I’m a Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay, Jayhawk,’ I’m a Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay, Jayhawk,’ I’m a Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay, Jayhawk,’ I’m Up in Lawrence on the Kaw, there’s a lot going on.

Rope in some ‘Horns and pay attention.

Pay attention to the battle music!

Let’s talk about the Tiger and his tail, shall we?

‘Cause I’m a Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay Jayhawk,’ says the chorus.

Because I’m a Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay Jayhawk (Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay).

I’ve got a bill that’s huge enough to twist the Tiger’s tail, so go ahead and husk some corn and listen to the Cornhusker’s howl, because I’m a Jay, Jay, Jay, Jay Jayhawk, and I’ve got a bill that’s big enough to twist the Tiger’s tail.

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Rock Chalk Chant is a popular song in the United States.

This weird, traditional chant, which is among the most well-known of all college cheers, was created by E.H.S.

Bailey was looking for a cheerleader for his Science Club.

Bailey’s club received the shout on May 21, 1886, after he submitted it.

The scientific club adopted this cry the next year, and there were several mentions to “The Science Club Yell” in the student publications throughout the school year.

This particular chant was selected as the college cry during the state oratorical competition in Topeka in 1886, since the students who supported the victors were passionate yet uncoordinated.

There is very little yelling among the students at the University of Kansas, and it is only in the middle of a tremendous triumph that the chant “Rock chalk Jay Hawk, K U U U glides through the nighttime air, reminding one of a band of Apache Indians” is heard.

Pay attention to the chant!

Far above the beautiful valley, there is a view of the mountains.

Our venerable Alma Mater, with its towering presence toward the blue.

Hallelujah for you, our Alma Mater All hail to the venerable KU.

The distant hum of a bustling city can be heard far away. She stands proudly against the dome of heaven and looks down on the world. After that, we greet our foster mother. We will always remember her as a noble friend who is always true to her word. Salute to the venerable KU

Legend of the Jayhawk University of Kansas

Mascots are believed to bring good luck, especially to athletic teams.KU is home of the Jayhawk, a mythical bird with a fascinating history.Its origin is rooted in the historic struggles of Kansas settlers.The term “Jayhawk” was probably coined about 1848.Accounts of its use appeared from Illinois to Texas.The name combines two birds-the blue jay, a noisy, quarrelsome thing known to rob nests, and the sparrow hawk, a stealthy hunter.The message here: Do not turn your back on this bird.During the 1850’s, the Kansas Territory was filled with such Jayhawks.The area was a battleground between those wanting a state where slavery would be legal and those committed to a Free State.The factions looted, sacked, rustled cattle, and otherwise attacked each other’s settlements.For a time, ruffians on both sides were called Jayhawkers.But the name stuck to the free staters.Lawrence, where KU would be founded, was a Free State stronghold.During the Civil War, the Jayhawk’s ruffian image gave way to patriotic symbol.Kansas Governor Charles Robinson raised a regiment called the Independent Mounted Kansas Jayhawkers.By war’s end, Jayhawks were synonymous with the impassioned people who made Kansas a Free State.In 1886, the bird appeared in a cheer-the Rock Chalk Chant.When KU football players first took the field in 1890, it seemed natural to call them Jayhawkers.How do you draw a Jayhawk?For years, that question stumped fans.Henry Maloy, a cartoonist for the student newspaper, drew a memorable version of the Jayhawk (top left) in 1912.He gave it shoes.Why?For kicking opponents, of course.In 1920, a more somber bird (top right), perched on a KU monogram, came into use. In 1923, Jimmy O’Bryon and George Hollingbery designed a duck-like Jayhawk (second image on left).About 1929, Forrest O. Calvin drew a grim-faced bird (near right) sporting talons that could maim.In 1941, Gene “Yogi” Williams opened the Jayhawk’s eyes and beak (left), giving it a contentious look.It is student Harold D. Sandy’s 1946 design of a smiling Jayhawk (left) that survives.The design purchased from Sandy and was copyrighted in 1947 by the KU Bookstores.The University of Kansas later registered the design as its official service-mark and it is still one of the most recognizable and unique collegiate mascots in the country.


Information is from “Traditions”, published by the KU Office of University Relations.

Kansas Jayhawkers – Terror in the Civil War – Legends of America

The “Jayhawk” is the official mascot of the University of Kansas, which was founded in 1869. Today, the name “Jayhawk” is most commonly used to refer to a legendary bird native to the state of Kansas. It is used as the mascot for the University of Kansas and is frequently used to refer to anyone from the state of Kansas. A distinct sort of Jayhawker, on the other hand, was very much a part of the Kansas-Missouri Border War and the Civil War that followed thereafter. There is evidence that the phrase was originally used in 1849 by a party of California-bound migrants travelling through Kansas who went by the name of Jayhawkers.

  • By the 1850s, the name had become commonly recognized in the region as referring to someone who was originally from Kansas.
  • Tensions arose immediately between the opposing groups, which culminated in the Kansas-Missouri Border War, often known as “Bleeding Kansas” in the years leading up to the American Civil War, which took place in 1861.
  • The anti-slavery activists were known to as Jayhawkers, while the pro-slavery advocates were referred to as Bushwhackers or Border Ruffians.
  • Despite the fact that Kansas had been designated a “Free-State,” the fights between the Jayhawkers and the Bushwhackers persisted throughout the Civil War.
  • When it came to guerrilla warfare, the actual Jayhawkers may be described as undisciplined, unprincipled, thieving, and murdering.
  • Kansas troops continued to refer to themselves as Jayhawkers because they liked the rough image the title represented.
  • Jennison, were commonly known as Jayhawkers.

Lane, who headed what was known as “Lane’s Brigade,” and Daniel R.

Anthony, both of whom were members of the Jayhawker fraternity.

As part of their campaign against Missouri during the Civil War, Jayhawker bands invaded the state, often carrying out some of the most infamous atrocities committed during the conflict, such as the Sacking of Osceolaon September 23, 1861 (led by James H.

“Remember Osceola!” Confederate guerillas could be heard chanting two years later, in August 1863, when William QuantrillattackedLawrence, Kansas in what has become known as theLawrence Massacre, during which Confederate guerillas were killed.

Harper’s Weekly published this illustration of the Lawrence, Kansas Raid in September 1863.

As the Civil War progressed and the frequency of Jayhawk attacks decreased, the ruffian image was replaced by a patriotic one, and Kansas Governor Charles Robinson established a unit known as the Independent Mounted Kansas Jayhawks.

When the University of Kansas’ Rock Chalk chant was introduced in 1886, the mythological bird “appeared” as part of a crowd shout during a sporting event.

Today, the name is still used to refer to Kansasnatives, and it also serves as the mascot for the University of Kansas.

See also: Abolitionists in the State of Kansas Free-State Kansas Missouri Bushwhackers (also known as Missouri Bushwhackers) The Red Legs of Kansas Pro-Slavery Movement in Kansas were a group of people who advocated for slavery.

Evolution of Jayhawk – Icon Artworks

Mascots, particularly those of sporting teams, are thought to bring good fortune. Almost every college and institution has a mascot that they are proud of. The Jayhawk, a legendary bird with a rich history, may be seen on the campus of the University of Kansas. The Jayhawk’s origins may be traced back to the historic struggles of Kansas settlers in the 1800s. The word “Jayhawk” is believed to have been originated about 1848. In that year, accounts of its use surfaced from Illinois to Texas, and a group of pioneers traversing what is now Nebraska dubbed themselves “The Jayhawkers of ’49” for their efforts.

  • Takeaway message: Do not turn your back on this bird.
  • The area served as a battleground between those who desired a state in which slavery would be lawful and abolitionists who want a state free of the institution of slavery.
  • Jayhawkers were a term used to refer to thugs on both sides for a period of time.
  • Over the course of the American Civil War, the jay-wild hawk’s and woolly look gave way to a patriotic emblem.
  • By the end of the war, the term “Jayhawk” had become associated with the zealous individuals who had helped to establish Kansas as a Free State.
  • And when Kansas football players came to the field for the first time in 1890, it seemed only natural to refer to them as Jayhawkers.
  • For many years, fans were perplexed by this question.

He handed it a pair of shoes.

Of course, this is for kicking opponents.

Jimmy O’Bryon and George Hollingbery created a Jayhawk that looked like a duck in 1923.

Calvin created a grim-faced bird with talons that were capable of maiming people in 1929.

That of a smiling Jayhawk, created by Harold D.

In 1947, the design was protected by a copyright.

A number of Jayhawks are now stationed on the Lawrence campus.

A massive Jayhawk monument, with sleek, contemporary lines, stands in front of Strong Hall. The statue was a gift from the Class of 1956. Visitors to the Adams Alumni Center are greeted with another bronze bird, this one striding and feathered.

Kansas Jayhawks News and Notes: 11.11.15

Today, thank a veteran for their service and commemorate our fallen heroes.

– Kansas Sports –

Kansas defeats Fort Hays State 95-59 in the Big 12 Conference. While sophomore guard Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk ended with 15 points, the Allen Fieldhouse public-address speakers chanted “Svi for three!” five times as the sophomore guard finished with all of his points coming from 3-point field goals. Notebook: Self ditches the tie; Greene has a hip ailment | KUsports.com On “Salute to Service Night,” KU’s players donned what coach Carlton Bragg referred to as “camo socks” to pay tribute to America’s veterans.

  • The Jayhawks played their final exhibition game against FortHays State before opening the season against Northern Colorado on Friday, and the crowd erupted in a rousing “Free Diallo” chant.
  • “We have representation that is fighting hard for him,” Self continued of Diallo, “but now they’ll have double representation as well.” It has the potential to be quite intriguing.” Men’s basketball players are huge fans of the University of Kansas volleyball team |
  • KU volleyball is looking forward to another opportunity against UT – KUsports.com The Kansas coach said that his team was dissatisfied with their performance in Austin, but that the Longhorns pushed the Jayhawks’ mistakes.
  • “I think that’s going to be a major part of (tonight), is how we defend against them, since they outplayed us both offensively and defensively the previous time we played them.” The Jayhawks Talk About the Difficult Task Ahead Against No.
  • 8 Texas Christian University.
  • 14, to take on the 8-1 Horned Frogs.
  • • Willis might get his first career start for the Jayhawks against TCU |
  • The Kansas Jayhawks’ road to victory versus TCU appears to be taking an unpleasant turn again |
  • 12 Oklahoma State, which ended their school-record 16-game winning run, the TCU Frogs return home this weekend as a more than six-touchdown favorite over Kansas (0-9, 0-6).

Kansas Montell Cozart, the Kansas quarterback, will have season-ending surgery. Kansas quarterback Montell Cozart will undergo shoulder surgery after suffering an injury last month, while his substitute, Ryan Willis, is still dealing with a strained groin.

– College Sports –

There are three ongoing and incredible collegiate basketball streaks. Other colleges and universities, at all levels of college basketball, continue to wow us with their accomplishments year after year. Everyone continues to direct their attention at them, yet they continue to prosper. The list of ongoing college basketball streaks that merit our greatest respect and appreciation may be extended indefinitely. Three of them, on the other hand, rise to a very high level of distinction, and it is these that we will discuss more below.

  • This week, additional credit will be awarded to Ohio State and Iowa, while Stanford will be given a break due to a 9 a.m.
  • Bottom 10 – Despite their devotion to Miami supporters, the Georgia Bulldogs are far from being the best of the Dawgs.
  • 2.
  • The problem is that UCF continued to do what it does all the time.

– In The News –

Daily fantasy sports services are unlawful, according to the New York Attorney General – CBS News DraftKings and FanDuel, two daily fantasy sports firms, have been ordered to cease accepting bets in the state of New York.

– Video of the Day –

VIDEO – Mets outfielder is a big Kansas Jayhawks basketball fan | KMBC Home | Local News – KMBC Although he has no personal links to Lawrence or the University of Kansas, New York Mets outfielder Curtis Granderson is a great fan of the Kansas Jayhawks basketball team, according to the school’s website.

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