Who Ate All The Pies Chant

Who Ate All the Pies? – Wikipedia

” Who Ate All the Pies? ” is a football cry chanted by fans in the United Kingdom during matches. ” Knees Up Mother Brown ” is a popular song that is intended at overweight footballers, officials, and other fans.

Background and origin

Sheffield United fans sang the song for the first time in 1894. It was addressed at the club’s goalkeeperWilliam “Fatty” Foulke, who weighed more than 300 lbs at the time (140 kg). In his early career, he played for Blackwell Colliery before moving on to play for Sheffield United and then Chelsea FC in the Premier League. Knees up Mother Brown is the music that was utilized in the chant, therefore it’s extremely unlikely that the chant originated with Foulke, who resigned in 1907 and died in 1916; Knees up Mother Brown was first recorded in 1918.

The lyrics

The chant’s words are as follows: “Who ate all the pies?” Who was it who devoured all of the pies? You ate all the pies, you fat bastard, you fat bastard! You ate all the pies, you fat bastard! “The burgers and the fries,” says one variant, in place of “The burgers and the fries.”

Adoption and inspiration

Its lyrics are as follows: “Who ate all the pies?” says the chorus. Was it you or someone else that devoured the entire pie collection? All the pies were devoured by you, you fat bastard! You fat bastard, you fat bastard, you ate them all! “The burgers and the fries,” says one variant, in place of “The burgers.”

Wayne Shaw controversy

When Wayne Shaw, a 23-stone Sutton goalkeeper, ate a pie during a match in February 2017, he was fined and suspended by the Football Association for violating gambling laws. He later admitted that he had seen odds of 8/1 on him doing so and told his friends about it, which led to the incident being dubbed “piegate.”

References

  1. Rebecca Evans is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom (2007-09-11). “A pie chant inspired by a football legend.” The Daily Mirror is a British tabloid newspaper. Cresswell, Julia (2008-05-21)
  2. Retrieved on 2008-05-21
  3. (2007). The cat’s pyjamas: the Penguin book of clichés is a collection of stories about cats. James Hilton (1941)Random Harvest
  4. James Hilton (1941)Random Harvest
  5. ” ‘Fatty’ Foulke: The Sheffield United and Chelsea goalkeeper who became a legend.” 2019-08-30. Phythian, Graham (2019-09-04)
  6. Phythian, Graham (2005). The true story of William Foulke is told in Colossus: The True Story of William Foulke. Isbn0-7524-3274-5
  7. White, Jim (Tempus, p. 26
  8. Isbn0-7524-3274-5)
  9. (26 November 1993). As described by the New York Times, “Brown goes to town on the pin-striped suit: Britain’s crudest comic does his filthy routine in front of a hand-picked City crowd.” independent.co.uk is the website of the Independent newspaper. The original version of this article was published on 2014-11-15
  10. Roy Chubby Brown is a fictional character created by author Roy Chubby Brown (2 August 2012). Chubby Brown’s autobiography, Common as Muck!, is available online. Little, Brown Book Group, p. 9.ISBN 978-1-4055-2047-8
  11. Brown, Roy “Chubby”.” “Who Ate All the Pies” video. Little, Brown Book Group, p. 9.ISBN 978-1-4055-2047-8
  12. Brown, Roy “Chubby”.” “Who Ate All the Pies” video. Brown, Jonathan (2014-03-19)
  13. Retrieved on 2014-03-19
  14. (28 July 2014). “Carter the Unstoppable Sex Machine pays respect to Jon ‘Fat’ Beast, who passed away at the age of 51.” The Independent is a newspaper published in the United Kingdom. “Hitting the Headlines,” which was retrieved on May 10, 2015. The Vegetarian Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting vegetarianism. Obtainable on 2008-05-21 from Mick, Quinn, and Oliver Harvey (2004). Who was it who devoured all of the pies? Mick Quinn’s life and times are chronicled in this book. Virgin Books (ISBN0-7535-0803-6)
  15. Virgin Books (ISBN0-7535-0803-6)
  16. Virgin Books (ISBN The Barmy Army is now attempting to keep Warney as well, as if the trophy wasn’t enough incentive before… The Sydney Morning Herald published an article on September 14, 2005, stating that “Sutton’s roly poly goalkeeper might find himself in hot water following a pitch-side prank,” says the newspaper. The 21st of February, 2017

Who Ate All the Pies?

Fan participation in the singing of amusing songs during football and rugby matches is a vital component of the game in the United Kingdom, and one that is enthusiastically pursued by supporters. The players, the referee and ground crew, the opposition, and other spectators can all be the subjects of the songs, as well as other people. Among the most well-known of these chants shouted by fans in the United Kingdom is “Who Ate All the Pies?” Although it is not required to be done so, it is frequently chanted to the tune of ” Knees Up Mother Brown ” and is directed towards allegedly overweight footballers, referees, or rival supporters.

The first chant

It is claimed that the song was first sung in the direction of the massive goalkeeperWilliam Henry Foulkes (also known as Fatty Foulkes), who was 6 ft 2 inches (188 cm) tall and weighed approximately 12 stones (170 lbs, or 80 kg) when he joinedSheffield United in1894, but had increased to approximately 24 stones (330 lbs, or 150 kg) by1902, despite remaining “agile as a cat” despite his weight despite his Sheffield United’s home ground of Bramall Lane, Sheffield, hosted a League Division 1 match against Bury on Saturday, September 6, 1902.

The pioneering film makersMitchell and Kenyonrecorded him in one of the first movies of a football match when they filmed the game at Bramall Lane, Sheffield, on the 6th September, 1902.

Sheffield triumphed 1-0, yet the next day, the Sheffield Daily Telegraph headed their article with the words “Cupholders Win A Poor Game.” A scene from the game appeared in the BBC television series “The Lost World of MitchellKenyon.”

Later chants

During the 1980s and 1990s, the chant was connected with strikerMick Quinn, who played for six different football teams during that time period. Quinn is memorialized with the ” Mick Quinn award for the footballer who best resembles a tub of lard() “.

Alternative Theories

It has been reported that this slogan started as a crowd chant at an English football match, where the fans can be quite innovative with their vocabulary, with the majority of it being scatalogical. The habit of eating meat pies at half-time has been around for a long time, with thousands of pies being devoured at various games throughout the years. Every now and again, there aren’t enough pies to go around, and any player who appears to be getting a bit overweight, for example, Paul Gascoigne, or ‘Gazza,’ gets catcalled with the fitting “who ate all the pies?”

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The lyrics

The chant’s words are as follows: “Who ate all the pies?” Who was it who devoured all of the pies? “You fat bastard, you fat bastard, you fat bastard, you ate all the pies!” There is a picture that is missing. Fbcard.jpg Thumb One common variant substitutes “The burgers and the fries” for the second line of the original. R. Chubby Brown has taken part of the song (the third line, “You fat bastard”) as his anthem, and the audience members eagerly shout it before to his stage performances.

The vegetarian pie-less version

The Vegetarian Society has adopted a variation of this phrase, “Who ate all the peas?” as its campaign slogan. Their “Men and Meat Campaign,” which included displaying it on promotional hoardings at football stadiums, was designed to counter the notion that vegetarianism is “just for women.” This version, on the other hand, misses some of the innovative elements of the original!

Sources

There is a picture that is missing. PiesQuinn.jpg ‘Who ate all the pies?’ asks Mick Quinn in his memoirs. Mick Quinn’s life and times are chronicled here (ISBN 0753508036).

External links

  • ” Hitting the Headlines() ” – an article from the Vegetarian Society’s website that was used as a reference
  • ” bfi Video-The Lost World of MitchellKenyon() ” – a video from the British Film Institute’s website that was used as a reference
  • At the opening of episode 2, Fatty Foulkes is at Sheffield United, and there is a link to the All the Pies website().

Where did the phrase who ate all the Pies come from? – Firstlawcomic.com

In honor of William “Fatty” Foulke, it is possible that the chant was created in his honor. ” Who ate all the pies?” is a football chant popular among football supporters in the United Kingdom. ” Knees Up Mother Brown ” is a popular song that is intended at overweight footballers, officials, and other fans.

Who was the first person to win the world pie eating championship?

Winners in the year 1992 With a time of three minutes and forty seconds, Dave Smyth, a painter from Hindley, won the first ever pie eating competition in 1992. 1995

Who was the person who jumped out of a pie?

Jeffery Hudson, the most famous of these small pie popper people, popped out of a pie that was being presented to King Charles I and Queen Henrietta Maria of England in 1660. As if he were a knight, the 18-inch young man started dancing on the table while dressed in knight attire.

Who was the goalkeeper who ate a steak pie?

After devouring a steak pie on national television, a veteran non-league goalkeeper from South London was pushed into the spotlight. It’s been 1095 days since that incident.

Without a doubt, the tale has a lot of supporting documentation. In honor of William “Fatty” Foulke, it is possible that the chant was created in his honor. Throughout the United Kingdom, football supporters chant “Who Ate All the Pies?” as part of their celebrations.

What is the Chant who ate all the pies?

Throughout the United Kingdom, football supporters chant “Who Ate All the Pies?” as part of their celebrations.

What kind of pie was used in the help?

As a result, the gluten-free pie’s crust was painted to match the pure chocolate pie’s, a process that Ubick describes as “a little cinematic magic.” The following is the recipe that Flemming used for every pie in the film, with the exception of the one that Howard ate: Combine all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl and well combine with a mixer.

Who is the Fat Bastard in who ate all the pies?

During his stage appearances, Roy “Chubby” Brown has taken a portion of the song (the third line – “You big bastard”) as his anthem, and the audience responds enthusiastically by chanting it. In addition, Brown and the crowd sang the complete chant towards the conclusion of his 2013 DVD release “Who Ate All the Pies?” Brown and the audience sang the entire chorus.

Who Ate All the Pies? is a football chant sung by fans in the United Kingdom. It is usually sung to the tune of Knees Up Mother Brown and is aimed at overweight

Who Ate All the Pies? is a football cry that is sung by fans in the United Kingdom during matches. To the tune of “Knees Up, Mother Brown,” the song is frequently directed towards overweight football players, officials, or other fans.

1. Background and origin

In the United Kingdom, football supporters occasionally consume meat pies before kickoff or at halftime during games. The players who appear to be slightly overweight are heckled with the query “Who ate all the pies?” when there aren’t enough pies to go around on occasion. It was originally heard in 1894 by Sheffield United supporters, who aimed it towards the club’s goalkeeper, William “Fatty” Foulke, who weighed more than 300 lb (140 kg), according to The Cats Pyjamas: The Penguin Book of Cliches.

If the melody used was Knees up Mother Brown, it is very implausible that the chant originated with Foulke, who resigned in 1907 and died in 1916; Knees up Mother Brown was first used in 1918, as noted in a BBC Sport report on Foulke published in September of the same year.

2. The lyrics

The chant’s words are as follows: “Who ate all the pies?” Who was it who devoured all of the pies? “You fat bastard, you fat bastard, you fat bastard, you ate all the pies!” “The burgers and the fries,” says one variant, in place of “The burgers and the fries.”

3. Adoption and inspiration

During Roy “Chubby” Brown’s theatrical appearances, the third line of the song, “You fat bastard,” has been adopted as his anthem, with the audience enthusiastically chanting the phrase during his performance on stage. In addition, Brown and the crowd sang the complete chant towards the conclusion of his 2013 DVD release “Who Ate All the Pies?” Brown and the audience sang the entire chorus. In addition, Carter The Unstoppable Sex Machine, a 90s indie band, shouted this slogan during their live performances, and it was featured as the beginning to their album 30 Something.

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A variation of this, “Who ate all the peas?,” has been adopted as a slogan by the Vegetarian Society of America.

During the 1980s and 1990s, the cry was connected with the striker Micky Quinn, who played for six different football clubs during that time period.

According to Quinns, the chant served as the inspiration for his autobiography, which was released in 2003. Known to have been aimed towards players such as Shane Warne by members of the Barmy Army during cricket matches, the slogan has been heard at a number of occasions.

4. Wayne Shaw controversy

In a February 2017 event nicknamed “piegate,” Sutton goalkeeper Wayne Shaw, who weighs 23 stone, was fined and suspended by the Football Association for eating a pie while watching football on television in violation of gambling regulations.

  • Pukka Pies is a pie maker headquartered in Syston, Leicestershire, United Kingdom, that produces a variety of pies. Single-serve and sharing pies sausage are among the company’s offerings, which represent the pinnacle of his professional career. Chris Wright is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom. You’ll Need This From the Early 1980s A Tribute to Karl – Heinz Rummenigge Song in Your Life Who Ate All the Pies Who Ate All
  • Pork Pie In Your Life Pot pie is a type of pie that is baked in a pot. Rabbit pie is a traditional dish in the United Kingdom. Rapure Scotch pie is a type of pie from Scotland. a pie made of the sea Shepherd’s pie is a traditional dish in the United Kingdom. Steak and kidney pie is a traditional dish. Steak pie is a dish that is popular in the United States. Tourtiere Pies and puddings from the olden days What is the Pies’ History
  • What are the Top Six Football Podcasts – Who Ate All the Pies? The Mystery of Who Ate All the Pies Barry Glendenning is the author of this work. 27th of March, 2016. They are all talk, but it appears that everyone enjoys contests, as shown by the fact that 73 single – layer moon pies were consumed in eight minutes at the Bass Pro Shops store in Memphis, Tennessee. The Moon Pie Festival was hosted for the first time in Newport, Tennessee. Echo. Retrieved on the 23rd of February, 2017. Who was it who devoured all of the pies? Retrieved on February 23, 2017 from ITV. Jack Rathborn is the author of this work. Goalkeeper Wayne Shaw’s colorful Sutton s pie-eating antics were captured on camera on December 20, 2016. Paul Lewis on the 16th of December, 2005 I devoured all of the pies. The Guardian newspaper is based in London. Pie eaters are being targeted by a health campaign. The BBC reported on November 23, 2006, that Armstrong’s printing of the Book of the Week The Independent is a newspaper published in the United Kingdom. NewsBank. Retrieved on the 5th of February, 2010. Quinn and Micky are two of the most talented musicians in the world. Harvey, Oliver (2003, 2003). The Mystery of Who Ate All the Pies The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: The Friendly Video Who Ate All the Pies Obtainable on June 27, 2019. Himno Nacional de El Salvador is the national flag of El Salvador. The National Anthems of Every Country in the World. Songs of Praise from Around the World
  • Classic Moments In 1978, Manchester United won 3 – 5 against West Brom, and the question was, “Who ate all the pies?” The Mystery of Who Ate All the Pies Manchester United vs. West Bromwich Albion is the video of the day.

Fatty Foulke, man who ate all the Pies

The long-awaited answer to the question “Who ate all the pies?” has now been disclosed. In its original form, the song was directed towards a late Victorian goalkeeper by the name of William “Fatty” Foulke. At 24 stone, he is the heaviest professional player in the history of the Guinness Book of Records. The answer to this question, as well as many others, may be found in a new book that explains the roots of some of Britain’s most popular clichés. Julia Cresswell, author of The Cat’s Pyjamas: The Penguin Book of Cliches, scoured the archives of Oxford University’s Bodleian Library for inspiration for her new book.

  • “It was aimed jokingly at their goalie Foulke,” said the referee.
  • Many of them have their roots in sports banter, with the new dictionary revealing hundreds of examples.
  • An upper-class clique known as The Souls invented its own language in order to exclude others, and they adapted the phrase “over the moon” from the nursery rhyme “the cow leaped over the moon” to mean “joyful” in order to exclude outsiders.
  • The cricketing expressions “off your own bat” and “in a safe set of hands” are both derived from the sport.
  • The results of her investigation revealed that it is not only athletes and fans who are repurposing old catchphrases.
  • Other shocks revealed by the book include the word “crazy for it,” which is connected with Manchester and, in particular, with the Oasis brothers Noel and Liam Gallagher, who are featured in the book.
  • ‘It appears to have been used in much the same way as it is now, to express being really enthusiastic about something,’ Julia continued.
  • The practice of getting out of bed on the “wrong side of the bed” may be traced back to the Romans.
  • Historically, men who like “sowing their wild oats” may be traced back to a remark from 1576.
  • “Did you feel the earth move for yourself?” is an adaptation of the phrase “did thee feel the earth move?” The contemporary version appeared in a sex scene in Ernest Hemingway’s 1940 novel about the Spanish Civil War, For Whom the Bell Tolls, which was set during the Spanish Civil War.

In addition, Shakespeare is credited for coining several of today’s common idioms. “It defies belief,” “the unkindest cut,” “salad days,” “to the manner born,” “murder most nasty,” and “cruel to be nice” were among the phrases thrown about.

Who Ate All the Pies?

“Who Ate All the Pies?” is a football cry chanted by supporters in the United Kingdom. ” Knees Up Mother Brown ” is a song that is commonly performed to the tune of ” Knees Up Mother Brown ” and is directed towards overweight football players, officials, or rival fans. Origin In the book “The Cat’s Pyjamas: The Penguin Book of Cliches” (ISBN 9780141025162), it is stated that Sheffield United supporters sang the “Who ate all the pies?” chant for the first time in 1894, directing it at the club’s goalkeeperWilliam “Fatty” Foulke, who weighed more than300 lbs (1 kg) on matchdays.

  1. It was also after the First World War when football songs that were parodies of popular songs began to gain in popularity.
  2. Chants that come later The cry has been connected with striker Micky Quinn, who played for six different football clubs throughout the 1980s and 1990s.
  3. Background Fans in the United Kingdom have long had a practice of eating meat pies at half-time during football games.
  4. R.
  5. In addition, the 90s indie band Carter The Unstoppable Sex Machine yelled this sentence during their live performances, and it was incorporated as the beginning to their album ” 30 Something “.
  6. The vegetarian version of the pie does not have pie crust.
  7. When they put it up on promotional hoardings at football stadiums as part of their “Men and Meat Campaign,” they were attempting to dispel the myth that vegetarianism is “only for women.” ources Mick Quinn is the final name on the book’s reference list.
  8. coauthors= Oliver Harvey and others 2004 is the year in question.
  9. Who ate all of the pies, you could wonder.

This book is a biography of Mick Quinn (ISBN = 0-7535-0803-6*) and it has the following online link: title=Hitting the Headlines. Vegetarian Society is the publisher. last=2008-05-21 accessdate=2008-05-21 last= The first is the Wikimedia Foundation, which was founded in 2010.

Revealed: Chubby Victorian footballer who inspired ‘who ate all the pies’ chant

‘Fatty’ Foulke was the name of a fairly huge Victorian goalie who was the inspiration for the derisory football terrace shout, ‘who ate all the pies?’ The roots of the mocking football shout, as well as the origins of many other colorful chants, clichés, and catchphrases in the English language, were found by researchers. Continue reading for more information. The discoveries have been included into a new dictionary, with Foulke being the most intriguing and interesting of the entries. Between 1894 and 1907, Foulke played in goal for Sheffield United, Chelsea, and Bradford City, among other teams.

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Those with less than Twiggy-like figures have been targeted with the term from the terraces, as has ex-Newcastle United striker Mickey Quinn, who adopted the phrase as the title of his autobiography: “Who ate all the pies?” The fans, however, are not the only ones who are repurposing old catchphrases.

  • Continue reading for more information.
  • For her book The Cat’s Pyjamas: The Penguin Book of Clichés, author Julia Cresswell combed through archives and records at Oxford University’s Bodleian Library in an attempt to discover the earliest known usage of a variety of idioms.
  • In addition, the phrase “taking a rain check” has roots dating back to 1884, when a “rain check” was a complimentary ticket to another baseball game for spectators who had purchased tickets to a game that had been cancelled due to severe weather.
  • Continue reading for more information.
  • “How did clichés come to be?” Ms Cresswell wondered aloud.

“There are others who are news.” Fashion, as well as changes in society, have a part in their utilization.” There are a few other shocks revealed by the book, like the fact that the phrase’mad for it,’ which has become synonymous with Manchester and in particular with the Oasis brothers Noel and Liam Gallagher, really dates back to writings published in 1670.

  1. Continue reading for more information.
  2. The expression “to get out of bed on the wrong side of the bed” dates back to the Romans, who believed that sleeping on the left side of the bed was unfortunate, while the phrase “to strike while the iron is hot” was coined by Chaucer.
  3. The phrase “lay back and think of England” was first recorded in a Lady’s journal in the late nineteenth century.
  4. Continue reading for more information.

Also attributed to Shakespeare are several common idioms such as “beggars’ believe,” “the unkindest cut,” salad days, “to the way bred,” “murder most heinous,” “cruel to be kind,” and “cruel to be cruel.” Julia Cresswell’s The Cat’s Pyjamas: The Penguin Book of Cliches will be released on November 15th by Penguin and will cost £8.99.

THAT’S WHO ATE ALL THE PIES

The first occurrence of the terrace chant was in 1894, in response to the 24th Sheffield United goalkeeper. It’s become a well-known terrace insult for fat soccer players throughout the years. However, experts have uncovered how far back in time the cry “Who ate all the pies?” can be traced – all the way back to 1894. It was initially directed at the 24th-ranked Sheffield United goalkeeper William “Fatty” Foulke, who was gathered up by his own fans in a fun manner. Foulke has the world record for being the heaviest footballer ever, and he went on to play for England.

According to a recent publication titled The Cat’s Pyjamas: The Penguin Book of Cliches, even more catchphrases in sports and other areas of life may be traced back to historical events.

Take a rain check dates back to 1884, when it was a free ticket given to baseball spectators after a game was postponed due to inclement weather.

Others are even older than that.

Julia Cresswell, the author of the book, stated: “Where do clichés originate from, and why do they exist?

When it comes to their utilization, fashion has a part “IMPORTANT FACT William “The Fridge” Perry, a former American Football defensive lineman, likewise weighed in at 24 stone and a half.

DID THE EARTH MOVE AS A RESULT OF YOUR ACTIONS?

Prepare to Get Out of Bed The concept of the “wrong side” dates back to the Romans, who believed that the left was unfortunate.

Take A Deep Breath And Consider England A passage from a lady’s journal written in the late 1800s.

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