Who Had The We Are Chant Firat

The True Origin Of ‘We Are Penn State’

Dennis Shea contributed to this article. Onward State published a “Penn State History Lesson” earlier this month, claiming that the actions of the 1947-48 football team, who bravely stood up to racial prejudice, were the inspiration for the iconic “We Are Penn State” phrase and cheer. The narrative is both lovely and uplifting in its own right. A number of media outlets, including Onward State, the Daily Collegian, the Penn Stater alumni magazine, the Centre Daily Times, and others, have covered the topic extensively.

It’s also not true in this case.

In the annals of Penn State history, this is a moment we should all be proud of and celebrate.

The true origin of the term and cheer was revealed for the first time in 1999 by prominent Penn State historian, Lou Prato, in the magazine Town and Gown, which was published in 1999.

Now, it has evolved into an iconic statement for students, alumni, and others, uniting them all in their love of Penn State University.

Prato’s version of events is correct?

  1. In the period 1947-48 to the late 1970s/early 1980s, there is no reference of the slogan “We Are Penn State” or its relation to the events surrounding the Cotton Bowl in either The Collegian archives or any other university source, including the institution’s own publications. How come, if the events of 1947-48 were the inspiration, there was no reference of the phrase in Penn State sources for more than 30 years? It is noted in Lou Prato’s 1999 Town and Gown article that he investigated the source and discovered a connection to the cheerleaders of the late 1970s and early 1980s, but that none of the cheerleaders involved made any reference to a connection to the Cotton Bowl or the 1947-48 football squad. In a lengthy and thorough history of how they developed the chant over the course of several seasons, they emphasize that they were inspired mostly by observing successful cries in other football stadiums, such as Ohio State and USC. Following the late 1970s/early 1980s, the phrase appears in a number of Collegians articles and other University materials. There is no mention of the 1947-48 football team activities in any of those papers
  2. The first time a connection is drawn between the 1947-48 football team events and “We Are Penn State” is in the Penn State Football Story film released by Penn State sports marketing in 2008-09: This connection has never been made previously. This is the primary source for all subsequent news pieces regarding the connection, including this one. This is the source that Onward State and all other Penn State media outlets use
  3. In reality, Mr. Triplett produced another film for Penn State In Motion in 2006, which was released two years before that video. There is absolutely no mention of the slogan “We Are Penn State” in the film (which is actually two videos).:

In the period 1947-48 to the late 1970s/early 1980s, there is no reference of the slogan “We Are Penn State” or its relation to the events surrounding the Cotton Bowl in either the Collegian archives or any other university source, including the institution’s own publications. How come, if the events of 1947-48 were the inspiration, there was no reference of the phrase in Penn State sources for more than 30 years; It is noted in Lou Prato’s 1999 Town and Gown article that he investigated the source and discovered a connection to the cheerleaders of the late 1970s and early 1980s, but that none of the cheerleaders involved made any reference to a connection to the Cotton Bowl or the 1947-48 football squad.

They provide a thorough and extensive history of how they developed the chant over the course of several seasons, based mostly on their observations of effective cries at other stadiums, like as Ohio State and USC, to inspire their efforts.

There is no mention of the events of 1947-48 in any of those records; the first time a connection is established between the events of the 1947-48 football team and “We Are Penn State” is in the Penn State Football Story film released by Penn State sports marketing in 2008-09, which states: A previous mention of this link did not include the phrase Thereafter, all articles concerning the link will be based on this first report.

According to Onward State and all other Penn State media sources, Mr. Triplett produced a film for Penn State In Motion in 2006 that was released two years prior to the one used in the above video. There is no mention of the slogan “We Are Penn State” in the film (which is actually two videos).:;

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r/CFB – History Question: ‘We Are ND’ – ‘We Are Penn State’ – which came first?

Level 1I believe it is more fundamental to the PSU cheer repertory than the other levels. According to my observations during this year’s bowl game, the phrase “essential to” is a bit of an understatement. 1st grade I had no idea that Notre Dame employed this chant until recently. level 2 was reached 7 years ago. Portal de transfere de technologie de l’Université de Georgia When I hear the phrase “We are Notre Dame,” this is what comes to mind. a second-grade education Each corner of the stadium is marked with yellow signage.

  1. 7 years ago today Penn State is a university in Pennsylvania.
  2. Ours is said to have been founded in 1948.
  3. In the late 1980s, the song “We Are Marshall” became very famous.
  4. There were discussions about whether or not northern clubs would refrain from fielding their black players during bowl games against southern teams.
  5. ‘We are Penn State,’ wrote the inscriptions on Penn State t-shirts.
  6. a second-grade education Yeah, I thought the cry was ridiculous until I realized that it was actually essential in the advancement of racial equality in the United States.
  7. Old cheerleaders, perhaps?

It’s the same rabbit hole as “Play like a champion today,” which is level 2.

level 2Op was created 7 years ago.

Northwestern Wow, that’s hilarious.

Yes, that would be an excellent example of a different school.

1st grade In my opinion, it’s more of a PSU issue than anything else.

1st grade I’ve always thought that was a ridiculous chant, nearly as ridiculous as the “we think that we will win” shout.

Thank you for informing me; I would have never guessed.

1st grade I’m quite sure that happened yesterday, and now that everyone has duplicated it, it’s virtually in the public domain.

The same may be said with the phrase “Go !” 1st grade We had that dang sign before they showed up, and I have no understanding what that means. Rudy completely destroyed the situation for us. 1st grade I’d never heard of “We are ND” before, so that’s my answer to your question.

Origin of the “We Are…” chant?

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Next up: UConn

Curious when this started. Read some articles this AM that suggested either DePaul or Penn State started it in the 70s. Can anyone remember when this started for us?LoggedMaigh Eo for Sam


Curious when this started. Read some articles this AM that suggested either DePaul or Penn State started it in the 70s. Can anyone remember when this started for us?I remember it when I got there in the 80’sLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


I remember it when I got there in the 80’sThey were doing in 79 when I got there, but I have the DVD of the 1977 Championship game and you could here MU fans doing in the background then, so it goes at least that far back.LoggedCalvin:I’m a genius.But I’m a misunderstood genius.Hobbes:What’s misunderstood about you? Calvin:Nobody thinks I’m a genius.


I think at MU it may go back as far as the early 70’s.I remember a poster saying he began the chant.Penn State claims to have originated the chant around 1976.As a kid I somewhat remember the crowd chanting “We Are (clap clap), SC (clap clap)” at USC in the OJ days (68-69)Logged


They were chanting “WE ARE.(clap,clap) MARQUETTE at the first game in the fall of 1971. I had assumed that this was an original MU thing, and had been a long time tradition.Logged


I ALWAYS remember it and I’ve been going to games for 50 years or pretty close.(It’s the one thing I knew how to do when I was 7 or 8!)Logged


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.LoggedLudum habemus.


Somewhat related to this thread: I was at church with my wife and 3-year old son last month and he started chanting “We Are Marquette” during the service. I did very little to stop him resulting in absolute daggers from my better half.Logged


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.Winner!Logged


I recall Gary Brell saying how he thought it was a lame cheer.that puts it in the mid ’70’sLogged


I recall Gary Brell saying how he thought it was a lame cheer.that puts it in the mid ’70’sBrell played 1969-71, so it might put it early 70`s.Logged


They were doing in 79 when I got there, but I have the DVD of the 1977 Championship game and you could here MU fans doing in the background then, so it goes at least that far back.I do remember the “Warriors Warriors” chant from the 70’s.Logged


I was a freshman in the fall of 1970 and attended every home game of that glorious season. We chanted it.Logged


As long as I can remember it has been chanted at MU games. I go back to ’68 and it has been there the whole time.Logged


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.This is great.LoggedDown 1 w 5 seconds left. Doable.


I recall chanting it in the original Latin.Nos Marquette SumisI think I’m close been a long timeLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


Logged


I was a freshman in the fall of 1971.We were doing it then. DePaul stole it from us.They weren’t doing it until later in the 70’s at a minimum, certainly not at the games I attended there when MU played there while I was a student.They certainly didn’t start it.Logged


Cavemen.PleeeeaaaaaseHumanus IncavoLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


showed great proficiency in learning the local languages, especially Huron, but he would always introduce himself with “je suis Marquette,” a phrase that over the years would become ubiquitous in the region.”Je suis Marquette,” obviously, translates to “I am Marquette.”Those who returned in Father Jacques stead would then introduce themselves with “nous sommes Marquette” (we are Marquette).LoggedWow, I’m very concerned for Benny.Being able to mimic Myron Medcalf’s writing so closely implies an oncoming case of dementia.


I was only able to make it to one game last season, but we chanted it then.Logged


suis Marquette,” obviously, translates to “I am Marquette.”Those who returned in Father Jacques stead would then introduce themselves with “nous sommes Marquette” (we are Marquette).Let’s see I got the Spelling AND word order wrong, I guess it hasn’t been that long, I think that was the case back then alsoLoggedPeace, Love, and Rye Whiskey.May your life and your glass always be full


Let’s see I got the Spelling AND word order wrong, I guess it hasn’t been that long, I think that was the case back then alsoBenny is translating to French.Latin would be “Marquette Sumus” according to my Google translator.Logged


Is there a Banner involvedLogged” Love is Space and Time measured by the Heart. “M Proust


Logged


See also:  Where Did The Gregorian Chant Come From

April/ The true story of the birth of the Seminole Warchant

The true story of the birth of the Seminole Warchant By Charlie Barnes, Executive Director – Seminole Boosters April/May 2008 Thirty years ago in Palm Beach County, young men who lived west of Military Trail were called �cowboys.� Chief among the cowboys for the purpose of our story was one Rob Hill. It�s been said each of us will be famous for fifteen minutes. Well, Rob Hill�s exposure to fame only lasted about fifteen seconds but it was a doozy. On a forgotten football weekend long ago, a camera crew from ABC in search of local color descended on the Theta Chi fraternity house at Florida State University and asked to meet or see evidence of Rob Hill. Little Theta Chi pledges went scurrying through the hallways, camera in tow until they stopped in front of a framed display with small photographs of each Fraternity member. Out of breath, bursting with pride, the boys pointed to one picture and the cameras focused in. �That�s him!� they said. �That�s Rob Hill, the man who invented the Seminole Warchant!� Whether Rob Hill was in fact the singularity at the point of the Big Bang is open to speculation, but there�s no question that the three significant players in creating the Seminole Warchant were: the Scalphunters, the Theta Chi Fraternity and the Marching Chiefs. Since there seems to be such a strong interest in the subject among so many Seminole fans, let�s explore the Warchant story from the perspective of four people who were closely involved in its origin. Rob Hill entered FSU as a freshman and followed his fellow Palm Beach cowboys to the Theta Chi Fraternity. Prominent Orlando attorney and developerTodd Southwas also a Theta Chi cowboy who continued to remain active in his fraternity and in Scalphunters all the way through the FSU Law School, graduating in 1985. South is now a Director on the Seminole Boosters National Board and has a freshman son at FSU. �Those Palm Beach guys included Bobby Kreusler along with Glenn and Ed Criser, sons of University of Florida President Marshal Criser. They loved to send their dad garnetgold balloons,� says South. �The thing started in 1983 or 1984. Late in the game with the game in-hand, our guys would make a moaning Indian sound and the arm motion. It became a late game tradition, sort of like lighting cigars in the 4th quarter. People would turn around and say, �What the hell are they doing?� The physical motion is different today. To duplicate the original arm motion, raise your right arm pointed to the right, then place the palm of your hand behind your head. Your arm goes straight out to the right, as if pointing to the goal, before returning to the back of your head. It wasn�t a �tomahawk chop� or a chop of any kind. The original motion repeatedly pointed to the right. It soon morphed into the motion we see today where the arm moves directly forward in front of the body. Peggy Bazzellbegan with the Boosters in 1981 and retired in 2007. Peggy was in charge of Donor Records and knew everyone; she did a great deal of fundraising simply by talking to donors. �That spirit group (the Scalphunters) and the Theta Chis were the first components in the development of the Warchant,� she said. �Seating the spirit group close to the Chiefs made it all come together because some chant-like noise developed�Once the Chiefs got involved the noise became an actual war chant�This was the beginning of everything.� Peggy does not believe there was a single instant that made the Warchant come to life, but that over the course of a year-and-a-half it developed into a substantial phenomenon that every fan in the stadium embraced, not just the students. Butch Rahmanis Senior Vice President of Colonial Bank in Lakeland. Before his graduation in 1986 he was a distinguished student Senator, Vice President of Gold Key and a leader in Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity. Rahman recalls, �Some friends and I were walking by the Seminole Booster office (then located on Wildwood Drive) when a Theta Chi namedBobby Kreuslercame out of his fraternity house on his way to the Scalphunters meeting.� Kruesler was on his way to teach the Theta Chi �chant� to the Scalphunters. �I asked him what it sounded like,� says Rahman. �I�d heard it before. Our two fraternities were friendly and used to sit next to each other at the games. This guy named Rob Hill would just stand up and do it by himself. People used to turn around and say �What in the world is he doing?�� Rahman offered Kreusler an alternative. Butch Rahman had graduated from Natick High School in Massachusetts where they�d used a rhythmic, repetitive chant to support their teams. �It wasn�t organized at all, and there was no arm motion,� he says, �But it was catchy.� Kreusler was enthusiastic. �It�s perfect!� Rahman said, �He loved it, so I coached him and told him to teach that to the Scalphunters. Later, it was during that Auburn game on October 13, 1984, that the Marching Chiefs heard it and started playing around with the tune. After the game, band members turned to us and asked us to do it again so they could get the music right.� Tom Desjardin is the official Historian for the State of Maine. Tom was an FSU student from 1982 through 1988, earning both his B.S. and M.S. He took his Ph.D. in History from the University of Maine. His interest in history motivated him to record the Warchant�s origin in a letter fifteen years ago. We reached him recently at his home in Maine and he was kind enough to share his recollections. Desjardin was a member of Phi Gamma Delta and was named Greek Man of the Year. As President of the Interfraternity Council, he says that he and �Fred the Seminole Head� Miller first introduced the Chant at a student pep rally in 1984. Miller was a star running back for the Seminoles in the early 1970s, and was elected Homecoming Chief by the student body in 1976. As an alumnus, Fred remained a superfan, painting the Seminole image on his own bald head for every game. In October of 1984, the Scalphunters staged a pep rally. Desjardin remembers, �The week of the FSU vs. Auburn game a Theta Chi named Bobby Kreusler came to us with what sounded to us like a goofy cheer where we waved our hands behind our heads.� On Friday night (October 12) before the game, the Scalphunters held their pep rally in the parking lot behind the south endzone where the University Center Club stands now. Thousands of enthusiastic students crowded around the bonfire. Desjardin was emcee at the pep rally and Glen Criser, Vice President of the Student Body, suggested to him that they bring all the Scalphunters up on stage to demonstrate the new cheer and teach it to the students. �We introduced it and got about forty of us up on stage.� Desjardin smiles and says, �In front of a crowd the thing didn�t appear as goofy as we had thought. But it still needed a lot of work.� Desjardin says their efforts to initiate the new cheer at remaining 1984 home games met with mixed success. But events were to take a dramatic turn exactly one year later, on October 12, 1985. The Seminoles played at Auburn and nearly 20,000 Seminole fans made the trek through the gorgeous autumn countryside to Jordan-Hare Stadium. Thousands of Seminoles drove to Auburn without tickets, just to be near the game and enjoy the atmosphere.�For some reason, our tickets were all together in one section in the endzone, and we were almost right down on the field,� said Desjardin. He and the other Scalphunters settled in and began to lead the Warchant. The magic of a single moment overtook everyone by surprise. It happened in the second quarter of play as the Seminoles were driving for a touchdown. �Our �Noles were moving right toward us in the endzone,� recalls Desjardin. �We got as loud as we could, trying to make the team hear us and get everyone fired up.� Then it happened. �As we were doing the cheer, we realized something that none of us had known before. At some point during the season, the Marching Chiefs had developed a drum beat and trumpet flourishes for the Chant!� It seems astonishing but, Desjardin says, �Prior to that game at Auburn, we never heard the band play during the Chant. At Auburn, the Chiefs were on about the ten yard line facing at an angle toward us. When we all did the Warchant together, the effect was electrifying!� The rhythmic music helped orchestrate fans� arm motions in unison. Thousands of voices all rang loud, together as one, coupled with the driving beat of the Marching Chiefs. �It was incredible,� says Desjardin. �I remember the look on some of the Auburn players� faces when the cheer reached its peak. You could tell it affected the players on both sides and the Chant helped to inspire a huge goal-line stand by our defense.�This was originally printed in the April/May 2008Florida State Timesmagazine. The author has given his permission to reprint this article.

The Real Story of How The Seminole War Chant Was Started

After reading Bud’s piece about the War Chant and the Braves, I thought I’d give my personal insights into the origins of this Great Seminole tradition that he mentioned. These are the facts that I am aware of since I was present when it all began in the stands at Doak Campbell Stadium, not in Atlanta, Kansas City, or for any other sports club in the country. While on a plane, I penned this after being exposed to another article on the Internet that provided a little skewed and second-hand description of the circumstances.

  • A lovely Saturday afternoon in 1983 found us doing what many college students like doing the most: attending to a football game with our friends.
  • We used to go to a lot of night games at Florida State University back then, so that was one thing that quickly distinguished it from the others.
  • As is customary, we were also stocking up on our take-in bags, which were essential in keeping the drinks flowing throughout the game.
  • Rob “Sweat” Hill was one of the most colorful characters on the show.
  • Everyone who knew Rob knew he enjoyed singing, but no one could have predicted that he would go on to make music that would be so infectious that it would spread like wildfire.
  • As a fraternity, we purchased our student tickets in bulk so that we could all sit in one section.
  • I honestly don’t recall who my opponent was, but the game became noteworthy because of something Rob did throughout the game that I did not remember.

Bum…

Bum.

Bum.

Bum.

Bum.

I’m not sure if it was the booze kicking in or Rob’s desire to sing, but he began to sing a more traditional version of an Indian war chant, oh.ohh…ohh….oh…oh….ohhhhh., with some hya.

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tossed in for authenticity: oh.ohh…ohh….oh…oh….ohhhhh.

We, of course, thought it was hilarious, and some of the other guys in his row got into the spirit by singing along with us.

Our tone wasn’t quite as nice as Rob’s because we didn’t have the same melodic talents or perhaps because we had a bit too much to drink.

Although the game was over, we were able to find something enjoyable to do to support our team, and the chop allowed us to continue to enjoy our drinks while we were doing it.

By the conclusion of the season, our whole Fraternity was participating, and despite the odd stares and even ridicule from other fraternities, we were enjoying our newly discovered chant during the games, and we even managed to recruit a few non-Theta Chi members to join in.

Many of the Theta Chi members had joined Scalphunters, a Florida State University student booster club comprised of a diverse collection of students dedicated to promoting the Seminoles’ spirit on campus.

Throughout a meeting, it was suggested that we do the Theta Chi War Chant during the game in order to display our Seminole pride.

It goes without saying that the Theta Chi block was still in full effect.

We had no idea how quickly the War Chant was spreading.

They approached us and asked if we could teach them the War Chant, which we gladly did.

They departed happy, and we couldn’t stop laughing about it.

It should be noted, however, that it was altered from the original War Chant performed by the Theta Chi’s, which has not changed in any way from the first day we began performing it, with the exception of music being added to the complete chant.

Within a few weeks after the season’s conclusion, the whole student population had embraced the “War Chant,” and the Seminoles had developed an identity that bothered rival teams and even Coach Bowden for a short period of time.

We complied because we knew that whatever Coach Bowden desired, we would most certainly fulfill him his wish.

And all of a sudden, I heard the “War Chant,” and it was extremely loud, far louder than I had ever heard it before.

I consider myself fortunate to have been one of the first to perform the “War Chant,” but I consider myself even more fortunate to have been seated next to Rob “Sweat” Hill, who established a Seminole Tradition that will outlive all of us for generations to come.

And there you have it, my friends, the rest of the tale. Fanposts are an area dedicated to Tomahawk Nation fans and do not represent the opinions of the organization.

Kansas Fans Chanted ‘S-E-C’ At Texas During Upset Win Over Longhorns

After reading Bud’s essay on the War Chant and the Braves, I thought I’d give my personal insights into the origins of this Great Seminole tradition that dates back centuries. Those are the facts that I am aware of since I was present in the stands of Doak Campbell Stadium when it all began – not in Atlanta or Kansas City nor for any other professional sports team. While on a plane, I composed this after being exposed to another narrative on the Internet that presented the facts in a little skewed and secondhand manner.

  1. A lovely Saturday afternoon in 1983 found us doing what most college students like doing the most: attending a football game.
  2. We used to go to a lot of night games at Florida State University back then, so that was one thing that stood out right away.
  3. Every year, we stockpile our take-in bags, which serve as a convenient way to keep the drinks flowing during football season.
  4. Rob “Sweat” Hill was one of the more colorful personalities.
  5. All of Rob’s friends and family knew he enjoyed singing, but no one could have predicted that he would go on to make music that became so infectious that it spread like wildfire.
  6. The student tickets for our fraternity were purchased in bulk so that we could sit together as a group.
  7. I honestly don’t recall who my opponent was, but the game became noteworthy because of something Rob did throughout the game that I did not see coming in the first place.

A bum…

Bum.

Bum.

Bum.

Bum.

I’m not sure if it was the booze kicking in or Rob’s desire to sing, but he began to sing a more traditional version of an Indian war chant, oh.ohh…ohh….oh…oh….ohhhhh., with some hya.

tossed in for authenticity: oh.ohh…ohh….oh…oh…oh….ohhhhh., Other fans surrounding us gave him odd looks as he continued to do this for quite some time.

Eventually, I and a couple of the other guys in my row decided to join in the fun as well.

The result was more of a droning effect than a pleasant tone.

We proceeded to use this new War Chant that Rob had composed for the following several games.

After that, the season was ready to resume in earnest the following season.

I used to be a Scalphunter, as you may have figured out.

When we started chanting the War Chant on the Scalphunter block during the very first game, everyone was excited.

The “Wave” started to catch on when two groups of fans did it in slightly different parts of the stadium at the same time.

Within minutes, the War Chant had grown in popularity among the troops.

They approached us and asked if we would teach them the War Chant, which we gladly did.

After they had finished their meal, we continued to chuckle.

It should be noted, however, that it was altered from the original War Chant performed by the Theta Chi’s, which has not changed in any way from the first day we began performing it, with the exception of music being added to the whole chant.

Within a few weeks after the season’s conclusion, the whole student population had adopted the “War Chant,” and the Seminoles had developed an identity that irritated rival teams and even Coach Bowden for a short period of time.

We were happy to comply because we were confident that anything Coach Bowden asked for would be granted.

It was loud, far louder than I’d ever heard it before, and I couldn’t believe it was the “War Chant.” The “War Chant” is being performed in front of me on television, and it was incredible to witness.

The Seminoles should pay Rob an honorary homage during one of their home games to recognize and praise him for his accomplishment, no matter how ridiculous the concept was that came up with by some naive college kids.

What follows is THE REST OF THE STORY, my dear friends. Fanposts are a section dedicated to Tomahawk Nation’s fans and do not represent the opinions of Tomahawk Nation in any kind.

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Written by Michael Shapiro

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Nick Selbe contributed to this article.

Kendricks Ejected After Helmet-to-Helmet Hit on Fields

Written by Michael Shapiro In overtime, after the Longhorns scored the first touchdown, Kansas answered with a touchdown and a go-ahead conversion, setting up Kansas quarterback Jalen Daniels’ winning toss to Casey. Daniels completed 21 of 30 throw attempts for a total of three touchdowns, in addition to scoring a running touchdown. “It really speaks a lot about the young guys we have in our locker room,” first-year Kansas coach Lance Leipold said after the game, according to the Associated Press.

It’s a one-sided victory.

More College Football coverage may be found at:

  • Kansas It Was Jared, Wasn’t It?’ said the shocked parents of FB after witnessing the OT catch. South Dakota pulls off a thrilling walk-off victory on a must-see Hail Mary
  • According to reports, UW’s Lake shoved a player into the locker room in 2019. Baylor defeats Oklahoma for the first time in a crucial Big 12 matchup.

Stolen Sports Traditions

  1. Associated Press photographer JOE RAYMOND There are some fantastic sporting traditions out there, but it doesn’t make taking them acceptable in any circumstance. If a sports team or its followers follow a specific sporting tradition and there is credible proof that no one linked with that team originated that practice, we may be dealing with probable theft on the part of the team or its fans. The Boston Red Sox did not originate postseason beards, and neither did the New York Yankees. The Atlanta Braves have admitted that they got their “Tomahawk Chop” from the Florida State Seminoles in a roundabout way. Did you know that Notre Dame wasn’t the first college football team to have a sign that read “Play Like A Champion Today” on the side of the field? Let’s take a look at a few sporting traditions that have been stolen, whether intentionally or not, and whether they have been confessed or not. How much, if at all, were the authors of the traditions outraged by this? The theft is considered to be more serious the more severe the act
  1. In terms of athletics, the football team from Hawaii is most frequently connected with the performance of the Haka dance, which is a traditional Hawaiian dance. In truth, the All Blacks rugby team in New Zealand is credited with establishing this sporting tradition in the country. A battle cry of the Mori people from New Zealand, the Haka is performed during rugby games as a way to both honor and terrify opponents. The rugby team originally began playing the Haka at games in order to both honor and intimidate opponents.
  1. Associated Press photographer Wilfredo Lee Who was it that sparked the whole color-out craze in sports? According to Jared Diamond of the Wall Street Journal, the Winnipeg Jets were the team in question in the 1980s. According to Diamond, a former Jets executive stated that the club opted to conduct white-outs because white shirts are the most effective at concealing other colors. Teams are already organizing color-outs all over the place, as if it were their job. The Miami Heat, for example, has been staging white-outs since 2006, and is a famous example.
  1. Associated Press photographer Elsa Garrison From 1999 until his retirement in 2013, Mariano Rivera, the legendary New York Yankees closer, sprinted out of the bullpen to Metallica’s “Enter Sandman” as his theme song. Metallica performed the song live at one of Rivera’s final home games since his entrance had become such a famous scene, and the song had become such a significant part of that event. In 2000, the Virginia Tech football team became the first to take the field while playing “Enter Sandman.” Because of the near proximity of the events, it is possible that this is a coincidence, although it is difficult to say. Perhaps someone in the University of Vermont athletic department was a fan of the New York Yankees.
  1. Associated Press photographer Matt Slocum So, since the 1980 New York Islanders, playoff beards have been a thing in the sport of ice hockey. Other sports teams or individual individuals have participated in the ritual from time to time, but the Boston Red Sox were the ones who entirely took over the tradition in 2013. The Boston Red Sox players let their beards to grow all the way up to and through their World Series triumph, frequently plucking at each other’s whiskers in joy of their accomplishment (OK). It turns out, though, that hockey players may not be bothered by the heist. According to Kevin McGran of the Toronto Star, Toronto Maple Leafs forward David Clarkson said, “It just goes to show that everyone understands what time of year it is when everyone begins sporting beards.” It doesn’t matter if it’s hockey or baseball. Fans are well aware that it is postseason time.”
  1. According to L.V. Anderson of Slatemagazine, the battle chant used by Florida State Seminoles supporters was most likely started by the Seminoles themselves. Later, Deion Sanders brought the cry with him to the Atlanta Braves of Major League Baseball, where it is known as the “Tomahawk Chop.” Sanders, on the other hand, attended Florida State, so this isn’t really deliberate theft. The Braves and the Kansas City Chiefs both acknowledge that this practice originated with the Seminoles.
  1. Sports coverage on USA TODAY Since 1954, the Masked Rider has served as the official mascot of Texas Tech University. For every home football game, he enters the field on a black horse, which he rides out onto the field on stage. When a professor at Oklahoma State University was tasked with devising a new mascot for the school in 1984, he came up with the concept of Spirit Rider, who is also a dude riding a black horse.
  1. Auburn, Alabama’s Tigers take a trek from their athletic facility to the stadium on game days when they play football. Thousands of supporters line the street to cheer on the players as they make their way down the street. The Tiger Walk is located here. Auburn athletics’ website states that this long-standing custom began in the 1960s when children would approach players on their way to the stadium and ask them to sign autographs. Many other colleges and universities, including Tennessee, Georgia, and Virginia Tech, now do their own versions of this walk.
  1. Photo courtesy of Don Wright/Associated Press The Pittsburgh Steelers were the first to use the Terrible Towel in 1975, when commentator Myron Cope came up with the notion to get the fans pumped up during the playoffs that year. It worked, as seen by the Steelers’ victory in Super Bowl X, and it stayed. Many NFL and other sports teams now use Terrible Towels, despite the fact that they are not authorized to refer to them as such. As a result, they are referred to as rally towels.
  1. According to Brent Woronoff of the Daytona Beach News-Journal, a guy named Monty Musgrave came up with the idea for the University of Florida’s “Gator Chomp” cry in 1981, according to the newspaper. In the marching band, Musgrave performed the famous melody from Jawson on his tuba as cheerleaders “chomped” on their arms, as if they were eating the song. Obviously, no one has definitively stolen Musgrave’s masterpiece, but the University of Iowa’s fourth-down chant certainly has the appearance of a gator clamping his jaws together in frustration.
  1. Ronald Martinez is a photographer for Getty Images. It is not enough to rename a tradition to prove that you did not take it. It is a long-standing tradition at Baylor University that a number of students dressed in yellow t-shirts run onto the field before each home game to greet the players as they enter the stadium before each game. Although it is true that the Rowdy Rush was inspired by the Baylor Line, the University of Texas at San Antonio established it in 2013. Freshmen at UTSA are given the opportunity to rush onto the field before to kickoff and contribute to the formation of the team’s entry tunnel, similar to the Baylor Line. The Baylor faithful have expressed a variety of opinions
  1. Images courtesy of Ronald Martinez/Getty Images A tradition is not invalidated simply because it has been given a new name. In honor of the Baylor Line, which runs onto the field before to each home game and welcomes the players onto the field, Baylor University has established a long-standing tradition. Although it is true that the Rowdy Rush was inspired by the Baylor Line, the University of Texas at San Antonio introduced it in 2013. Freshmen at UTSA are given the opportunity to rush onto the field before to kickoff and contribute to the formation of the team’s entry tunnel, much like the Baylor Line does. The Baylor faithful have expressed a range of opinions
  2. Nonetheless, some have expressed concern.
  1. Associated Press photographer David J. Phillip The “12th Man” has become well-known thanks to the Seattle Seahawks’ Super Bowl victory. They sell his shirts, make reference to him in broadcasts, and have even named a burger after him that can be seen at concession stand snack stands. However, Texas A M was the first institution to establish the practice in 1922. In response to Seattle’s usage of the slogan, the Aggies launched legal action against the team. In 2006, the university launched a lawsuit to assert ownership rights to the phrase “12th Man.” The complaint was eventually dismissed. As a consequence of the lawsuit, it was agreed that the trademark belonged to the Aggies, although Texas A&M would still enable the Seahawks to use the term under a license arrangement. So there’s a happy ending to this story
  1. Associated Press photographer JOE RAYMOND The “Play Like A Champion Today” sign on the Notre Dame campus is one of the most instantly known icons in all of athletics. But did you know that the Oklahoma Sooners had the exact same sign, and that they were the ones who put it there first? According to Berry Tramel of The Oklahoman, former Oklahoma head coach Bud Wilkinson posted a banner above his team’s locker room exit somewhere between 1947 and 1951 that said “Play Like A Champion Today.” Notre Dame’s sign didn’t emerge until 1986, according to all indications of its existence. “They blatantly stole our ‘Play Like A Champion Today’ sign and have claimed it as their own,” one OU fan commented to Tramel. When I think about it, I’m always puzzled as to why Lou Holtz did not also rename the “Oklahoma Drill.”
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Q&A: ‘We Are Marshall’ movie fact vs. fiction

HUNTINGTON, N.C. – The Herald-discussion Dispatch’s boards have been buzzing with activity, and a flood of e-mails has been flooding in with questions about what actually happened in the genuine story of “We Are Marshall.” The film, produced by Warner Bros. Pictures, chronicles the narrative of the Marshall University football team after an aircraft accident in 1970 claimed the lives of all 75 persons on board, including the majority of the team’s players, coaches, and supporters. Here’s a case of fact against fantasy.

  • Q.
  • A: Yes, according to Jack Lengyel, a former Marshall head football coach.
  • The fact that it was viewed as a hindrance was something we never considered.” The situation was simply viewed by Lengyel as a chance to construct.” “We had a significant number of guys go.
  • Nevertheless, there were a large number of players who accepted our invitation.” When it came to recruiting, the coaching staff did use some ingenuity, as shown by Matthew McConaughey in the film, using many basketball players and at least one soccer player to round out the roster.
  • A: Ernie Salvatore and Jack Hardin remember how they discovered it was the Marshall jet that had crashed in a manner that differs from that depicted in the film.
  • He was a senior reporter for The Herald-Dispatch at the time of the collision and arrived on the site immediately afterward.
  • “At that point, I realized what it was and who it was.

” “And I responded with a ‘yes.'” It was just a few weeks ago that he scored on a touchdown throw,” Salvatore explained of the sophomore end.

A: No, not at all.

Screenwriter Jamie Linden explained that the rationale for creating two (primary) composite characters was due to the large number of individuals that attended the screening.

Griffen worked in a steel plant and had a son who was a member of the 1970 football squad that perished in the accident.

According to Linden, “all of those tales need to be heard.” The thought of looking them in the eyes and saying, ‘We are going to take over you,’ was too terrifying.

A moving sequence with Matthew McConaughey takes place in the Spring Hill Cemetery, where the graves of six players who were unable to be recognized following the disaster are commemorated.

“The newcomers weren’t familiar with the story.

“This was done to assist them in comprehending the severity of this tragedy and the role they would need to play in the future in order to create the groundwork for future generations of Marshall football players.” He described it as a “secret time” for the squad, which takes place at 6 a.m.

Despite the fact that McConaughey used the words “The funerals have come to an end today,” Lengyel explained that he felt compelled to inform not just his players, but also the schools against which they competed.

Q: Did they actually shout “We Are.

A: While the cry “We are.

“The cry ‘We are Marshall’ was never used during our game,” Lengyel explained.

It is the glue that holds the entire community together.” In the Marshall University game versus Xavier University, how accurate was the team’s performance?

The final result was 15-13 in favor of the home team.

When Marshall defeated Xavier University in 1971, Dave Wellman, director of communications at the university recalled his attendance.

People were sobbing in the stands during the game.

“People stayed in the stands the entire time.” In the last scene of the movie, is Nate Ruffin actually buried at the memorial alongside the unnamed players as shown?

Ruffin was a football player at Marshall University from 1968 to 1971, when he was named captain of the Young Thundering Herd in 1971.

QUESTION: Was Fairfield Stadium used for the filming of the Marshall v.

Fairfield Stadium was the site of Marshall’s final home game, which took place in November 1990.

Up to the merger of Huntington High School and Huntington East High School in the autumn of 1996, Fairfield was utilized as a football practice facility by both schools.

The stadium was demolished in November 2004 to make room for Marshall University’s Clinical Education and Outreach Center, and it was completely demolished by the time the filming of the movie began.

Productions.

‘Ah, Jim’s,’ wrote screenwriter Jamie Linden.

However, because they were our composite parts, the personalities of Paul Griffen and Annie Cantrell were a little more fluid than usual.

But I didn’t want to imply that Jim Tweel was ever opposed to Marshall football returning, so we renamed the restaurant ‘Paul’s’ instead of ‘Paul’s.’ In the weeks leading up to production, McG returned to Huntington and visited the steel factory, which he fell in love with, so we decided to make Paul the president of the steel company.

As a result, the owner role was given to Lloyd Boone, who had previously worked as a booster, and the restaurant was renamed Boone’s, for better or worse.

We just ran out of time in terms of logistics.

“It’ll always be Jim’s place in my heart.” Q: Did Marshall’s squad truly go through the season without the assistance of an athletic director?

Joe McMullen was named as the new athletic director in February 1971, a month before Jack Lengyel was chosen as the team’s head coach.

McMullen was acquainted with Lengyel as a result of their shared affiliation at the University of Akron.

A: No, not at all. In the process of replacing Georgia Tech head coach Rick Tolley, assistant coach Dick Bestwick was the first to be hired. However, after two days, he changed his mind and decided to return to Georgia Tech.

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